The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry
A compelling emotional and spiritual case against hurry and in favor of a slower, simpler way of life "As someone all too familiar with 'hurry sickness, ' I desperately needed this book."--Scott Harrison, New York Times best-selling author of Thirst"Who am I becoming?" That was the question nagging pastor and author John Mark Comer. Outwardly, he appeared successful. But inwardly, things weren't pretty. So he turned to a trusted mentor for guidance and heard these words:"Ruthlessly eliminate hurry from your life. Hurry is the great enemy of the spiritual life." It wasn't the response he expected, but it was--and continues to be--the answer he needs. Too often we treat the symptoms of toxicity in our modern world instead of trying to pinpoint the cause. A growing number of voices are pointing at hurry, or busyness, as a root of much evil.Within the pages of this book, you'll find a fascinating roadmap to staying emotionally healthy and spiritually alive in the chaos of the modern world.

The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry Details

TitleThe Ruthless Elimination of Hurry
Author
ReleaseOct 29th, 2019
PublisherWaterbrook Press
ISBN-139780525653097
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Christian, Religion, Faith, Spirituality

The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry Review

  • Catherine A.
    January 1, 1970
    The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry is a guide to discovering how to live a life like Jesus lived. The author' voice is engaging, his anecdotes filled with wisdom. I appreciated the interesting history of our present concept of time and how modern society has mangled the Sabbath. Society boasts of busyness. This book exposes the wisdom, grace, and power of patience, rest, and reflection. I will definitely read this again and again. Those looking to live a powerful life will enjoy this book. An add The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry is a guide to discovering how to live a life like Jesus lived. The author' voice is engaging, his anecdotes filled with wisdom. I appreciated the interesting history of our present concept of time and how modern society has mangled the Sabbath. Society boasts of busyness. This book exposes the wisdom, grace, and power of patience, rest, and reflection. I will definitely read this again and again. Those looking to live a powerful life will enjoy this book. An added note: the index of referenced material is a treasure trove of additional reading on the subject.
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  • Natalyn Houk
    January 1, 1970
    Ever feel tired, lost, and just plain burnt out? Same. In "The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry," by John Mark Comer, we begin to see this problem is more common than we think. Are we replacing Jesus with striving to keep up with everyone and everything? Comer helps us refocus and retrain our minds to think differently and ditch the hurry mentality.Honestly, I loved this book. Sometimes Christian books tend to get overly preachy, or just feel cheesy. This book brought enough preaching a Ever feel tired, lost, and just plain burnt out? Same. In "The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry," by John Mark Comer, we begin to see this problem is more common than we think. Are we replacing Jesus with striving to keep up with everyone and everything? Comer helps us refocus and retrain our minds to think differently and ditch the hurry mentality.Honestly, I loved this book. Sometimes Christian books tend to get overly preachy, or just feel cheesy. This book brought enough preaching and truth mixed with helpful tips to make the book feel more like a resource I would use practically. There wasn't any gimmick or fluff. Just helpful, practical material.
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  • Jordan
    January 1, 1970
    Deeply needed stuff.
  • Erin Young
    January 1, 1970
    Revolutionary? No. Approachable, practical, and engaging, yes.
  • Hilary F
    January 1, 1970
    I have loved John Mark Comer's books and teachings for a few years now. He has beautifully mastered the art of using his own unique voice when writing, making deep or hard topics seem easy to read. This book is no exception and, honestly, may be one of his best works. I felt convicted yet encouraged, exposed yet freed. We live in a world that highly values productivity and hurry, celebrating the people who can "do it all". The church, sadly, often shares this same value. Yet this way of living h I have loved John Mark Comer's books and teachings for a few years now. He has beautifully mastered the art of using his own unique voice when writing, making deep or hard topics seem easy to read. This book is no exception and, honestly, may be one of his best works. I felt convicted yet encouraged, exposed yet freed. We live in a world that highly values productivity and hurry, celebrating the people who can "do it all". The church, sadly, often shares this same value. Yet this way of living has left nearly all of us, myself included, feeling empty, burned out, and weary. In this book, John Mark weaves teaching and insight with his own story of the struggle between the desire to prove his worth/do it all and the desire to actually enjoy his life, his ministry, his family, and, mostly, being a disciple Jesus.This book has showed me a better way, and it's been like a breath of fresh air to my soul. There are definitely sections that felt heavy because they hit so close, exposing parts of me that I've hid for a long time behind the mask of busy-ness. Yet every thread he pulled unraveled things in me, giving me words for things I didn't quite understand yet and methods to finding rest and slow again. I honestly believe that every person needs to read this book to find a new way!
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  • Angela Payne
    January 1, 1970
    I cannot say enough good about this book! It was such an easy read with so much truth and practical application for living a life based on the practices and habits of Jesus. I found this book to be inspiring, perspective shaping and I loved the authors style of writing. He adds wit and humour to every page but it doesn’t take away from the very important truths expressed. I would recommend this book to everyone I know because “being busy” is an epidemic that needs some healthy perspective.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    This book contains truth and practices of crucial need in our modern lives. The author begins by sharing his own story of burn out which I found of great encouragement and help. The book then goes on to speak on the dangers of hurry and technology alongside the importance of being emotionally and spiritually healthy.Technology has helped us and yet also challenged us with constant notifications that make us reachable 24/7. Hurry, busyness and productivity have become near gods in our This book contains truth and practices of crucial need in our modern lives. The author begins by sharing his own story of burn out which I found of great encouragement and help. The book then goes on to speak on the dangers of hurry and technology alongside the importance of being emotionally and spiritually healthy.Technology has helped us and yet also challenged us with constant notifications that make us reachable 24/7. Hurry, busyness and productivity have become near gods in our lives, controlling us in ways that can quickly lead to burn out. One could even say they have begun to control many of us.I believe this book is a critical message for our general. Hurry is presented as the enemy of our spiritual lives, and rightfully so. Hurry is uncovered as an issue affecting even the depths of our souls. Addiction to technology is shown as the controlling idol it has become. The question is, will we let this knowledge spur us to action or not?This book explains how certain spiritual disciplines and life-altering practices can help alleviate the toxicity of hurry in our lives. These practices include silence and solitude, sabbath-keeping and rest, simplicity and slowing down. By employing these spiritual practices in our lives, we will find hurry and distraction no longer keeping us from living life as we should live it. We can begin to find ourselves truly present in every moment.* A review copy of this book was provided to me by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. *
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  • Rachel Moss
    January 1, 1970
    “What’s hard isn’t following Jesus. What’s hard is following myself, doing my life my way; therein lies the path to exhaustion. With Jesus there’s still a yoke, a weight to life, but it’s an easy yoke, and we never carry it alone.”Quote from The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry by John Mark Comer We live in a time where we see people going through life in a hurry. In a hurry to get a job promotion. In a hurry to get the latest technology. In a hurry to binge watch the latest Netflix show or g “What’s hard isn’t following Jesus. What’s hard is following myself, doing my life my way; therein lies the path to exhaustion. With Jesus there’s still a yoke, a weight to life, but it’s an easy yoke, and we never carry it alone.”Quote from The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry by John Mark Comer We live in a time where we see people going through life in a hurry. In a hurry to get a job promotion. In a hurry to get the latest technology. In a hurry to binge watch the latest Netflix show or get the newest, most stylist clothes. What if you don’t have to live life in a hurry? What if living a simple, minimalist life is truly better for you? John Mark Comer invites you to look at the deeper meaning of living a life of slowing down. He shares four practices that have helped him live a simple life and shares how they can help us as well.1) Silence and Solitude2) Sabbath3)Simplicity4)SlowingI received a complimentary e-copy from Netgalley for a review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    I've recently discovered Jon Mark's teachings the Bridgetown church podcasts and have very much enjoyed listening to them. So I was excited to dive into this book.I loved the writing, it reads like a conversation. This book is full of food for thought but also a lot of practical advice on how to eliminate hurry from our lives.I can't recommend this enough.Thank you to Netgalley and WaterBrook & Multnomah for the eARC
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  • Karren Hodgkins
    January 1, 1970
    Definitely on trend and yet a refreshing read on the topic. I just loved it; both the content and the conversational prose. The author leverages his story as a pastor of a Megachurch to communicate why hurrying just cannot be a sustainable lifestyle, if one is looking to have a spiritual life, if one is looking to develop and grow a relationship with God one needs to spend time with Him, we need to allow Him to talk to us, to guide us. In describing his lowest point and the journey he has taken Definitely on trend and yet a refreshing read on the topic. I just loved it; both the content and the conversational prose. The author leverages his story as a pastor of a Megachurch to communicate why hurrying just cannot be a sustainable lifestyle, if one is looking to have a spiritual life, if one is looking to develop and grow a relationship with God one needs to spend time with Him, we need to allow Him to talk to us, to guide us. In describing his lowest point and the journey he has taken since then, the reader is encouraged to make important changes in one’s life. It resonated when the author indicated that Hurry kills relationships, gratitude and joy. Having already embarked on the journey of slowing down, I concur. He invites us to savour and enjoy the now, to slow down and simplify our life. He quotes Anne Lamott,” No, is a complete sentence.” How many of us need to learn how to say no, kindly but firmly in order to achieve the life we really want?Rather than being disciples, he describes the followers of Jesus as apprentices! He reminds us to live into both our potential and limitations. He asks how many of us are prepared to adopt the life of Jesus? While we aspire to His leadership style (He is about love, joy and peace. He is about example and invitation), while we admire who He is, the lifestyle He practised is not one that we naturally look to emulate. There is just too much pressure to give in to worldly pressures, to pursue worldly goods. I enjoyed this thread that ran throughout the book. It is both challenging and reassuring to consider that a balanced lifestyle is based on biblical truth. However, the author is not shy of leveraging other sources to build his arguments. He also quotes studies and research that dovetail with these spiritual teachings.I have read that boredom is a catalyst to creativity and here the author describes moments of boredom as opportunities for prayer. It’s so contrarian to how I was raised (ie: The devil makes work for idle hands) The value of the Sabbath was espoused and it becomes quite clear that this is so much more than just taking a day off. The busier we get, the more effort we need to make to ensure we have enough quiet times for prayer and to stoke our spirits. We need the time to breathe.There is a chapter full of rules/suggestions on how we can make changes that will help us to slow down. While helpful, the gentle and humorous writing style ensured that I digested them in the way they were intended, with a couple of chuckles along the way. Oh, how I wish checking email once a week was a possibility! Not in my chosen profession, but I can schedule times to pay attention to mail and use the time in between to work on projects and not be distracted!I highly recommend this book and am sure I will revisit its contents.With thanks to NetGalley, WaterBrook & Multnomah and the author for my free copy to review in exchange for an honest opinion.
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  • Tom Marshall
    January 1, 1970
    The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry by John Mark Comer is a combination of a book on slowing down and a book on the spiritual disciplines. Comer calls them spiritual practices. “Discipline” is an offensive word today. Of course, the spiritual disciplines force us to slow down, so the combination works well. Western culture in particular loves the idea that the secret to life is ambition, assertiveness, busyness, multitasking, and constant hustling. There’s no time to sleep or rest. However, the tr The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry by John Mark Comer is a combination of a book on slowing down and a book on the spiritual disciplines. Comer calls them spiritual practices. “Discipline” is an offensive word today. Of course, the spiritual disciplines force us to slow down, so the combination works well. Western culture in particular loves the idea that the secret to life is ambition, assertiveness, busyness, multitasking, and constant hustling. There’s no time to sleep or rest. However, the truth is we live in a culture of low-grade exhaustion and anxiety. Something is missing, and no matter how hard we hustle, we can’t quite grasp that elusive happiness hustling and grinding promises. That’s where the spiritual practices come in. Comer calls them “the way of Jesus.”Comer bases his premise on Jesus’ words in Matthew 11:28-30. “Come to me, all of you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take up my yoke and learn from me, because I am lowly and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.” Jesus calls the weary and burdened and promises them rest. How do they get it? Take up His yoke and learn from Him. Comer writes:What if the secret to a happy life—and it is a secret, an open one but a secret nonetheless; how else do so few people know it?—what is the secret isn’t “out there” but much closer to home? What if all you had to do was slow down long enough for the merry-go-round blur of life to come into focus? What if the secret to the life we crave is actually easy?I’ll admit as I read The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry I thought to myself, “This is all great stuff, but I’m really not that busy. Life is pretty relaxed.” Funny how God works. Almost immediately after finishing the book I was asked to teach two classes, coach my son’s team which practices 4 days a week, and take care of the lines on the team’s field, all in addition to my full time job. My schedule is now full. There are moments where I have this impending sense of not having enough time to get it all done. I keep coming back to Comer’s book and the spiritual practices he lays out for our hyper world.The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry clearly lays out our modern problem using a variety of sources. The quotes alone are brilliant and pointed me to great sources for additional reading. The book lays the groundwork for the solution based on the way of Jesus, and then offers four practices to help unhurry your life. Comer’s writing is smart and engaging. He says he wants you to feel like you’re having a conversation with him over coffee. I think he succeeds. I highly recommend this one. John Mark Comer also cohosts the This Cultural Moment podcast, which is very smart and helpful. Check it out.
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  • Caitlin
    January 1, 1970
    Do you ever feel, feel so paper thinLike a house of cardsOne blow from caving in? - Katy PerryWe’re all tired. Worked to the bone. Too busy for friends but not too busy for binging a season of our favorite show. Addicted to the technology we can’t take our eyes away from and irritated by the distractions that threatened to take our gaze away. We all get it. We feel somehow that it’s not quite right. That something, a better life, is out there. If we could only find the ri Do you ever feel, feel so paper thinLike a house of cardsOne blow from caving in? - Katy PerryWe’re all tired. Worked to the bone. Too busy for friends but not too busy for binging a season of our favorite show. Addicted to the technology we can’t take our eyes away from and irritated by the distractions that threatened to take our gaze away. We all get it. We feel somehow that it’s not quite right. That something, a better life, is out there. If we could only find the right article, podcast, or hack to get us there. And we’re in a hurry to find it.John Mark’s book is not a quick fix, a jolt of inspiration, that will fade with time. It’s not an esoteric or gnostic call to learn an ancient secret. Nor is it a Luddite scree against technology.It’s something different. It’s a reminder, a manual, an primer if you will, of ways to live the lifestyle of Jesus and experience the joy of Jesus. JMC uncovers the practices that have been recently erased from most church traditions (simplicity, slowing down, sabbath, and silence) inviting us to relearn the rhythms of grace. These practices aren’t just for the desert fathers or the ultra spiritual. They are each invitations to a deeper, fuller life. This book has the potential to ruin you. It’s already given me language and framework for what I’ve been feeling for a long time (as my reading history will attest to). There’s a better way, friends.
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  • Ian
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so relevant for these modern times as many of us in the church have allowed the ways of the world to seduce us to believe they will satisfy. Comer brings a tremendously insightful perspective to the "easy yoke of Jesus" and provides both the rationale and practical know-how in adopting it as one's mantra for life.The first half of the book addresses the problems associated with the modern hurried life. The second half introduces us to the 4 "S's" of doing life adopting t This book is so relevant for these modern times as many of us in the church have allowed the ways of the world to seduce us to believe they will satisfy. Comer brings a tremendously insightful perspective to the "easy yoke of Jesus" and provides both the rationale and practical know-how in adopting it as one's mantra for life.The first half of the book addresses the problems associated with the modern hurried life. The second half introduces us to the 4 "S's" of doing life adopting the "easy yoke": Silence & Solitude, Sabbath, Simplicity and Slowing. Comer is a voracious reader and I love that he embellishes his own thoughts with those of many who've both gone before him or doing life presently. We share many of the same 'literary' heroes but he's also introduced me to a number of his that I was less familiar with.I expect I'll be buying copies to distribute to friends and I hope the impact of Comer's words is felt far and wide to help influence a revival in the lives of the church community to discover this 'easy yoke' that Jesus invites us to adopt.This should become compulsory reading for all students studying some form of spiritual formation, theology and so on.I received an early "Uncorrected Proof" e-book from Waterbrook/NetGalley, however, this has had no influence over my opinions expressed in this review.
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  • Seth
    January 1, 1970
    I’m a fiction guy, so this review is not a common thing for me. I read this book in three sittings & it’s going to take some time for me to figure out exactly what I’m taking away from it, but it’s one of the most thought-provoking books I’ve ever read. I’m a huge fan of Comer from hearing him speak at a leadership conventions a few years ago. I’ve been an avid listener to his podcasts & i just love the way he puts thoughts together. I’ve been praying & searching for the reasons behi I’m a fiction guy, so this review is not a common thing for me. I read this book in three sittings & it’s going to take some time for me to figure out exactly what I’m taking away from it, but it’s one of the most thought-provoking books I’ve ever read. I’m a huge fan of Comer from hearing him speak at a leadership conventions a few years ago. I’ve been an avid listener to his podcasts & i just love the way he puts thoughts together. I’ve been praying & searching for the reasons behind my unrest. Upon reading this book, God has really opened up my eyes to the fact that I’ve been in my own ways. Through biblical references, stories from his life, & helpful tips on habit-changing choices, Comer points us on a great direction to getting our souls back to being able to rest, which, if done correctly, can get us back to the One that created us in the first place. As he said, it’s not a book of answers, but of means to an end. And that end is Jesus & a content soul.
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  • Trevor Winsor
    January 1, 1970
    The list of books that have impacted me to the center of my soul has grown after reading this incredibly generous, convicting, and superbly-insightful book. Two things are obvious after reading this book: (1) I would love to spend more time with John Mark (seeing as I live in Portland), and (2) John Mark spoke prophetically to my soul with this writing.It would take me pages and pages to write out all the quotes, insights, and encouragements that impacted me from this book. So, all I The list of books that have impacted me to the center of my soul has grown after reading this incredibly generous, convicting, and superbly-insightful book. Two things are obvious after reading this book: (1) I would love to spend more time with John Mark (seeing as I live in Portland), and (2) John Mark spoke prophetically to my soul with this writing.It would take me pages and pages to write out all the quotes, insights, and encouragements that impacted me from this book. So, all I'll say is this–an unhurried life, centered on Jesus, is what I've yearned for (without knowing it) for as long as I can remember. And now, for the first time, I see that it's possible. Jesus wants it for me and has given me the tools (including this book) to practice the unhurried way of Jesus in my daily life.Read this book. And then thank Jesus and John Mark Comer for the impact it will have in your life.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I may have accidentally read this book about not hurrying in a single day. What can I say, I’m a fast reader and it was just that good. This newest book from JMC is so, so important. Busyness and hurry are our cultural default and it is incredibly damaging to our souls. I've seen in my own life how "ruthlessly eliminating hurry" is essential to my health, physically and spiritually. Embracing slow and rest and Sabbath has been a huge catalyst for my spiritual growth. Comer outlines a few discipl I may have accidentally read this book about not hurrying in a single day. What can I say, I’m a fast reader and it was just that good. This newest book from JMC is so, so important. Busyness and hurry are our cultural default and it is incredibly damaging to our souls. I've seen in my own life how "ruthlessly eliminating hurry" is essential to my health, physically and spiritually. Embracing slow and rest and Sabbath has been a huge catalyst for my spiritual growth. Comer outlines a few disciplines to help eliminate hurry that are based off of the example of Jesus; silence and solitude, Sabbath, simplicity, and slowing. And he offers tons of practical and relevant insights for how to actually put those things into practice. To live in communion with God and love people well, we must take things slow. These insights aren't new or super different, but they are concise and especially well-worded. I loved this book and would highly recommend it!
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  • David
    January 1, 1970
    The cultural tide towards hurry is relentless.So thankful for this timely, humble, precise book on one of the greatest challenges of our time. John Mark is someone who has not only identified the problem, but has been willing to walk the road ahead and do the strenuous, costly work to find a more genuine way of to live.In a world where church leaders hold on to influence and position until they break, he shows a different way — a value for spiritual integrity above position and The cultural tide towards hurry is relentless.So thankful for this timely, humble, precise book on one of the greatest challenges of our time. John Mark is someone who has not only identified the problem, but has been willing to walk the road ahead and do the strenuous, costly work to find a more genuine way of to live.In a world where church leaders hold on to influence and position until they break, he shows a different way — a value for spiritual integrity above position and influence and the upward journey we often call success.My favorite thing about this book is that it drives you back to the story of the gospels, to the inner workings of the lifestyle of Jesus and to the quiet place of prayer.This is essential reading. May we too live a life ordered after the way of Jesus, over and above everything else.
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  • Luke Wright
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this read. Short paragraphs, relatable, readable reflections on the spiritual disciplines of Sabbath, Slowing, and Simplicity. Particularly relateable to those longing for freedom from this digital age in which we live. Draws from other great modern spiritual growth writers such as Dallas Willard, Richard Foster, Henri Nouwen, and John Ortberg, offering an onramp to a well-ordered life in the way of Jesus. Found this book super refreshing, and the irony was not lost on me that I 'hurried' Loved this read. Short paragraphs, relatable, readable reflections on the spiritual disciplines of Sabbath, Slowing, and Simplicity. Particularly relateable to those longing for freedom from this digital age in which we live. Draws from other great modern spiritual growth writers such as Dallas Willard, Richard Foster, Henri Nouwen, and John Ortberg, offering an onramp to a well-ordered life in the way of Jesus. Found this book super refreshing, and the irony was not lost on me that I 'hurried' my way through it. Will be revisiting and recommending this read to anyone hungry for a sustainable rhythm of life with God in an age of distraction. :)
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  • Justin Sainton
    January 1, 1970
    Simple, but profoundly good!Written from a an ingeniously pastoral, yet genuinely pastoral perspective - The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry invites us all into a life that, in our depths, we already know we were made for. John Mark has a great gift for gathering beautiful quotes across disciplines and centuries, bringing them together to make a poignant point, carefully objecting relevant objections just before they pop into your mind, and finally bringing the seemingly ethereal and abstract Simple, but profoundly good!Written from a an ingeniously pastoral, yet genuinely pastoral perspective - The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry invites us all into a life that, in our depths, we already know we were made for. John Mark has a great gift for gathering beautiful quotes across disciplines and centuries, bringing them together to make a poignant point, carefully objecting relevant objections just before they pop into your mind, and finally bringing the seemingly ethereal and abstract into concrete practical application. Really truly enjoyed this.
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  • Mhughessc
    January 1, 1970
    In this book, John Mark Comer offers proof and personal anecdotes describing the benefits of living a less hurried life. I was personally convicted by his assertion that you can only live a peaceful life when your schedule reflects your values. This was a very helpful book, and I highly recommend it.Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC. All opinions are my own.
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  • Chris Wermeskerch
    January 1, 1970
    But because it’s conversational, I felt much more inclined to listen to Comer and accept some of the advice that he had for me. Starting with a personal appeal/story rather than hard data helped, too. I would say that this book is worth checking out, but the current $22 price tag feels a bit high for the amount of content.(see more of my review at chriswerms .wordpress .com)
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  • Amy T. - Book lover!
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t think there’s a person living in this modern age who couldn’t benefit from this book. Living a more simple, intentional life, slowing down, focusing on God, focusing on the present are all things that get pushed aside as we rush through the busyness of our lives. I am definitely going to implement as many of this practices as possible.
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  • Marcus Archibald
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn’t put it down. My take: if you were grabbed even a little by the title, this is probably the book for you. Very interesting points, very practical ways to improve. Only will work if you do the practices he suggests, however. I’m going to give it a week and read it again to really internalize it.
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  • Coralyn Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    Jon Mark brings to us once again a carefully constructed and authentic message about the reality of our world and in doing so calls us into a way of life with Jesus that enriches and strengths our minds and patterns of behavior. The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry is a quick ( but not hurried ) read with a generous amount of practical application. I was blessed by this book. You will be too.
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  • Jenny Seagren
    January 1, 1970
    I have been listening to John Mark Comer’s teaching and reading his books for 10 years now. His deep desire to become a person of love through apprenticeship to Jesus and his passion to help others do the same is evident in all of his teaching. “The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry” is his best work yet. As I read each page I am drawn to greater awareness of my deepest desire to live the life of love for which God created me. This beautiful book offers clear, tangible steps I can take to position m I have been listening to John Mark Comer’s teaching and reading his books for 10 years now. His deep desire to become a person of love through apprenticeship to Jesus and his passion to help others do the same is evident in all of his teaching. “The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry” is his best work yet. As I read each page I am drawn to greater awareness of my deepest desire to live the life of love for which God created me. This beautiful book offers clear, tangible steps I can take to position myself to experience God’s love in such a way that I will be transformed by that love into a better lover of those around me. Thank you, John Mark, for a message that could not be more relevant in this cultural moment in which we all find ourselves.
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  • Daniel Mendoza
    January 1, 1970
    Read it slowlyThe problem with John Mark is the level of wit and insight he offers. I inadvertently end up highlighting everything. As someone who works in a church setting, I wish I could prescribe this book for all my bosses and even those I supervise. Do less, be more.
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  • Lizzie Lowrie
    January 1, 1970
    This book is excellent. So well written with warmth, wisdom and deep encouragement. There's a lot to process and I tried to read it slowly but its such a good book, it was hard to do! Do read this book, but more importantly, do take time to put it into practice.
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  • Russell Matherly
    January 1, 1970
    Clear, practical, down to earth. Philosophically challenging, theologically convicting, and comforting to the soul.
  • Tyler Pieper
    January 1, 1970
    Refreshing and important.
  • Maureen Russell
    January 1, 1970
    Still processing through the implications of this book and what I need to take from it and make my own. I love the way this author made me think. Highly recommend.
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