This Is Your Brain on Birth Control
An eye-opening book that reveals crucial information every woman taking hormonal birth control should know This groundbreaking book sheds light on how hormonal birth control affects women--and the world around them--in ways we are just now beginning to understand. By allowing women to control their fertility, the birth control pill has revolutionized women's lives. Women are going to college, graduating, and entering the workforce in greater numbers than ever before, and there's good reason to believe that the birth control pill has a lot to do with this. But there's a lot more to the pill than meets the eye.Although women go on the pill for a small handful of targeted effects (pregnancy prevention and clearer skin, yay!), sex hormones can't work that way. Sex hormones impact the activities of billions of cells in the body at once, many of which are in the brain. There, they play a role in influencing attraction, sexual motivation, stress, hunger, eating patterns, emotion regulation, friendships, aggression, mood, learning, and more. This means that being on the birth control pill makes women a different version of themselves than when they are off of it. And this is a big deal. For instance, women on the pill have a dampened cortisol spike in response to stress. While this might sound great (no stress!), it can have negative implications for learning, memory, and mood. Additionally, because the pill influences who women are attracted to, being on the pill may inadvertently influence who women choose as partners, which can have important implications for their relationships once they go off it. Sometimes these changes are for the better . . . but other times, they're for the worse. By changing what women's brains do, the pill also has the ability to have cascading effects on everything and everyone that a woman encounters. This means that the reach of the pill extends far beyond women's own bodies, having a major impact on society and the world.This paradigm-shattering book provides an even-handed, science-based understanding of who women are, both on and off the pill. It will change the way that women think about their hormones and how they view themselves. It also serves as a rallying cry for women to demand more information from science about how their bodies and brains work and to advocate for better research. This book will help women make more informed decisions about their health, whether they're on the pill or off of it.

This Is Your Brain on Birth Control Details

TitleThis Is Your Brain on Birth Control
Author
ReleaseOct 1st, 2019
PublisherAvery Publishing Group
ISBN-139780525536031
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Feminism, Science, Health, Psychology, Womens, Biology

This Is Your Brain on Birth Control Review

  • Valerie Fazio
    January 1, 1970
    A fantastic, must-read for all women on and off birth control. Not only is this book chock full of information about the pull, birth control in general, and the effects of it; it is also PACKED with information and facts about sex, hormones and women in general. I won this book on a goodreads giveaway and it is my favorite won book thus far. Non-fiction books are not typically my style of reading, but a book like this practically begs to be read. I ate up every word, soaked up the information A fantastic, must-read for all women on and off birth control. Not only is this book chock full of information about the pull, birth control in general, and the effects of it; it is also PACKED with information and facts about sex, hormones and women in general. I won this book on a goodreads giveaway and it is my favorite won book thus far. Non-fiction books are not typically my style of reading, but a book like this practically begs to be read. I ate up every word, soaked up the information that seems to be kept from women, and more than doubled my knowledge on the science behind us women. I highly recommend this book, not just to women on birth control, but to all of us women out there. Not only do you better understand your body, but you can glimpse into your own psyche, mind, actions and every day life. Thanks Avery Books for this fantastic read, I look forward to reading more!
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  • Tilly
    January 1, 1970
    4 starsI was both excited and nervous to read this book as being someone that suffers from endometriosis and is on a combined pill for treatment (and which massively helps me cope), I didn't want to be completely put off taking it! But I am a scientist at heart and so I wanted the information anyway, as we all should.Dr Sarah Hill is a brilliant writer and the book is split up nicely for different areas the pill can and does affect. I like to think myself well read within everything 4 starsI was both excited and nervous to read this book as being someone that suffers from endometriosis and is on a combined pill for treatment (and which massively helps me cope), I didn't want to be completely put off taking it! But I am a scientist at heart and so I wanted the information anyway, as we all should.Dr Sarah Hill is a brilliant writer and the book is split up nicely for different areas the pill can and does affect. I like to think myself well read within everything gyaecological but I learnt a great deal which made the book thoroughly interesting. There is some vital information and advice for women both on the pill and thinking of taking the pill, so it is a must read. Dr Hill was also very careful not to give advice on what you as a reader should do, but gave you the necessary information to make up your own mind.What I found was missing was information about the many illnesses and conditions that the pill may be used to treat of manage. It fully focused on the not getting pregnant aspect and handling PMS when in fact many women take it for other medical reasons. I also found that there was quite a bit of repetition which I could have done without. Overall, the science and explanations were great but there were a few things missing for me. However a very good and incredibly important read for women.Please note that I received this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jillian Doherty
    January 1, 1970
    This book should be in every counseling center - chocked full of factual affirmations, opening one's eyes with paradigm-shattering data. This book provides an even-handed, science-based understanding of who women are, both on and off the pill. It will change the way that women think about their hormones and how they view themselves.The truth about how the pill can affect women is hidden but crucial and only starting to be known. No researcher wants to be on record as the person who took down This book should be in every counseling center - chocked full of factual affirmations, opening one's eyes with paradigm-shattering data. This book provides an even-handed, science-based understanding of who women are, both on and off the pill. It will change the way that women think about their hormones and how they view themselves.The truth about how the pill can affect women is hidden but crucial and only starting to be known. No researcher wants to be on record as the person who took down hormonal birth control, but every woman who is using it needs to know. The consequences can range from casual (mild mood swings) to devastating (suicide).Galley borrowed from the publisher.
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  • Jaimie Krems
    January 1, 1970
    As an evolutionary social scientist---I'm professor of experimental psychology at a large research-focused university---I had very high expectations for this book. It exceeded those expectations. Dr. Hill is an incredible author and her work is not only readable, but it's also plainly fun to read. I will be assigning this book to students and recommending it to those interested in women's psychology and behavior, evolutionary medicine, hormones---and simply to all who are interested in better As an evolutionary social scientist---I'm professor of experimental psychology at a large research-focused university---I had very high expectations for this book. It exceeded those expectations. Dr. Hill is an incredible author and her work is not only readable, but it's also plainly fun to read. I will be assigning this book to students and recommending it to those interested in women's psychology and behavior, evolutionary medicine, hormones---and simply to all who are interested in better understanding the mysteries that still wait to be discovered about women's bodies and minds. (For the record, given what this book reveals about the impact of birth control on women, everyone should be interested in better understanding its effects on women.)
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  • Hope
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so freaking interesting. It should be required reading for anyone on birth control - not to scare anyone - but because better information leads to better decision making. I learned a lot from this book that can explain some of my experiences on hormonal birth control, and that information will likely help me make good decisions if I ever decide to go back on it. My one complaint about this book is that I thought the author generalized a little bit too much about women’s experiences This book was so freaking interesting. It should be required reading for anyone on birth control - not to scare anyone - but because better information leads to better decision making. I learned a lot from this book that can explain some of my experiences on hormonal birth control, and that information will likely help me make good decisions if I ever decide to go back on it. My one complaint about this book is that I thought the author generalized a little bit too much about women’s experiences of birth control. Access to birth control is not, and has never been, evenly spread across all populations of women, and I wish the author had considered that a little more. I also find it hard to believe that the current male-female achievement gap can be explained by the rise of birth control and men’s sexual motivations... but that’s maybe just me expecting too much from men!
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  • Elly
    January 1, 1970
    I expected an easy read but it was harder than I expected—not because Hill was in the science weeds (she was, but it was fascinating so I wasn't mad) but because the science challenged many of my understandings of sex and gender. It turned out to make room for a much more nuanced, informed view that wasn't transphobic--but at first, the book didn't seem that way. Hormones inform behavior. Sex at birth informs hormones. Those are facts, they're real, but at first blush I BALKED at this book. I I expected an easy read but it was harder than I expected—not because Hill was in the science weeds (she was, but it was fascinating so I wasn't mad) but because the science challenged many of my understandings of sex and gender. It turned out to make room for a much more nuanced, informed view that wasn't transphobic--but at first, the book didn't seem that way. Hormones inform behavior. Sex at birth informs hormones. Those are facts, they're real, but at first blush I BALKED at this book. I mean, I don't like to think I'm some sort of walking uterine flesh bag with a brain full o' Estrogen and a heart full o' babies. But I got over her emphasizing the role of hormones in behavior when she pointed out men's hormone levels are far more variable in many ways than women's, it's just only women's hormonal changeability has been politicized and used against them in ways men's' changing hormone levels never have, and hormone levels aren't DESTINY but they can influence how medicines work on world view and self-determination so it's good to know about them. These facts are hard to talk about, but the conversation is critical even if it is screechingly uncomfortable. The Right uses biology as destiny all the time, and some of Hill's quotes, taken out of context, could be twisted (like any science) to slap me in the face with the imperative of the heterosexual nuclear family. I don't appreciate this. But the information in the context of the book absolutely pushes no agenda aside from "hey we should study female hormones sometimes so we don't accidentally kill people with uteruses with alheimer's drugs and depression." She mostly talked about relationships and the pill from heterosexual points of view (Statistically this makes sense, as far as who's likely reading) but the focus on heterosexuality only enforced to me that we desperately need more attention on trans health and queer relationships. Hill discusses how few women (even female RATS) are used in scientific study and it's positively terrifying how much we don't know about hormones and biology of non-males. I really hope that people read this book and don't shout her down as being anti-feminist because she's not--and I know many people probably will just because she's a woman and a scientist and she's trying to break down some real, potentially deadly problems about the pill. And that information is critical to everyone, people with uteruses especially.
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  • Avigail
    January 1, 1970
    A MUST READ for everyone—regardless of whether you have the biological equipment to get pregnant. Here is why: Sarah Hill explains how we ALL are affected when people change their hormones to prevent pregnancy. Hormones ARE us, not a part of us, and make us who we are. As a result, when we change them we change ourselves, and the effects of many individual people changing their hormones cascade throughout society and affect people of all/any/no genders. If you are a partner to someone who takes A MUST READ for everyone—regardless of whether you have the biological equipment to get pregnant. Here is why: Sarah Hill explains how we ALL are affected when people change their hormones to prevent pregnancy. Hormones ARE us, not a part of us, and make us who we are. As a result, when we change them we change ourselves, and the effects of many individual people changing their hormones cascade throughout society and affect people of all/any/no genders. If you are a partner to someone who takes birth control, or a parent (or hopeful parent-to-be), or a teacher, or a clinician, this book will help you understand what it means to make the decision to take hormonal birth control—and how the lack of research on cis-women and their bodies (and just gender bias generally) has left contraceptive-seekers with inadequate information to make good personal decisions about what path is best and right for their bodies. Please note that this book does NOT discourage people from using hormonal birth control! Nor does it reduce women to a puddle of hormones (or at least no more so than any other bodies). I have some quibbles about the writing, which is overall very accessible but often feels like it’s trying too hard to be cool (the footnotes esp). And there are some points where I felt the examples/analogies were glib and possibly offensive. But the power of this book and its arguments is not diminished by these flaws.
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  • Sophia
    January 1, 1970
    This kind of book is a must read for women on or planning to use birth control. It tells you all the changes that are not on that enormous information sheet that comes with the box but instead are far more likely: psychological side effects. It opens your eyes to all the things that may have changed in your life that you attributed to anything but the pill. Having said that, there were a few things I didn’t like about the author’s communication style. For one, she treats numbers as if they were This kind of book is a must read for women on or planning to use birth control. It tells you all the changes that are not on that enormous information sheet that comes with the box but instead are far more likely: psychological side effects. It opens your eyes to all the things that may have changed in your life that you attributed to anything but the pill. Having said that, there were a few things I didn’t like about the author’s communication style. For one, she treats numbers as if they were toxic. There are some nice plots, but otherwise the reader has no way of knowing how large effect sizes are or how likely something is in the population. So when she says the pill decreases libido, by how much? How many women are actually on the pill? How many of those have ill effects? By not providing these numbers, she makes the phenomenon seem enormous, because when you say “women on the pill have a harder time discriminating odors” you imagine scent-blindness, not a 5-10% difference. I honestly don’t know what numbers are behind any of the studies she cites, but because of her writing style, I was ready to stop birth control right then and there, and a decision like that should not happen without numbers.The other thing I didn’t like was her way of presenting still uncertain research with a lot of optimism and promoting theories in a similar way. She’ll make a strong statement, then walk back a little saying “not all research agrees” then undoes that by adding “but it’s something to keep an eye on!” If you’re a scientist talking to other scientists, the moment you declare you like a theory but it’s not universally accepted, the listeners will appreciate being informed of this new idea and evaluate it for themselves. When you do this with the general public, they look to you as an authority and would most likely just trust your expert opinion (unless they already have a reason to not agree with you). I think she should have held back on ideas that aren’t so solid.Then she has a few ideas that I just think aren’t correct or at least not as big a factor as she thinks. Two examples of this: the idea that the introduction of the pill is the main driver for women’s increased college education; and the possibility that it is the reason for men’s decreased college education. In general, the author has a bit too much of a “nature” interpretation of behavior, attributing almost everything to evolution, hormones and genes, viewing all social phenomenon as a consequence of these. In reality, society can change arbitrarily, and if you only look at western research on western people, you really don’t have the data to affirm whether large scale changes are really due to a single factor like the use of birth control. In the case of explaining the increase in percentage of women in college, just like you can say the introduction of the pill increased women’s chances of higher education, obtaining higher education increased women’s awareness of the need for birth control. In developing countries, it’s not enough to just provide the pill, you need to also provide the education that allows women to want and benefit from the pill. I’m not denying that the pill was a social game changer, and I really think there’s something to the idea of a lot of these changes being unintentional and unanticipated, but such statements require a lot more caution and a harder look at other societies.A similarly bold idea is that men actually have decreased their interest in higher education because they no longer need to compete too hard for sex like in the bad old days where women had to be picky because they were essentially always choosing the father of their children. For one thing, from one of the few graphs she provides, she states that there is this decrease; I don’t see it. I see both genders increasing in the 60s and 70s, women exponentially and men logarithmically. The very fact that the percent of men obtaining college degrees increases makes it almost impossible to say that anything specific had a negative impact on their overall desire to study; you don’t have some clear “baseline” time period where all the men that wanted to study could study, until basically the present day! There are no grounds for saying men want to study less than before rather than they just want to study less than women. So all in all, I think it’s a super relevant topic, the author is clearly an authority in the field, I just think the book promotes the effects of the pill being worse and larger than they may be.
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  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    As Dr. Hill says in this book, there is still much research that needs to be done on how the pill affects women psychologically. She is not saying that the pill should be banned, but she does want women to have a fuller picture of how the pill may effect women. Sex hormones do more than we give them credit for, and they change what it feels like to be ourselves (and who that “self” is). That’s a pretty big deal, and I’m glad that Dr. Hill was brave enough to do the work involved in writing and As Dr. Hill says in this book, there is still much research that needs to be done on how the pill affects women psychologically. She is not saying that the pill should be banned, but she does want women to have a fuller picture of how the pill may effect women. Sex hormones do more than we give them credit for, and they change what it feels like to be ourselves (and who that “self” is). That’s a pretty big deal, and I’m glad that Dr. Hill was brave enough to do the work involved in writing and publishing this book. Despite the fact that her research may come across as threatening to women (the pill could be credited for giving women greater educational and career opportunities), she still took the risk so that women can make more informed decisions about contraception. Now, I didn’t love the book, as I felt her tone came across as a bit unprofessional (she curses—though it is covered up my asterisks) at times, as if that was necessary to make it palatable and less intimidating (I suppose I’m not her typical audience as a 29 year old married woman). And I also got a bit tired of her evolutionary approach that links every behavior to sex ad nauseam. It makes sense because that’s her area of expertise in the university, but it reached the point of trivializing sex and who we have sex with at times. But, as with any book, you take what is helpful and lay aside the rest. I still found the information interesting and helpful for my own decisions concerning contraception and some insight into how the pill has shaped our culture and women’s’ experiences.
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  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    It's about time that this book came out! It's about a Texas PhD's research on the psychological changes that occur on birth control, BC's affects on attraction, and the challenges that gender research face today! This book has been my favorite read of the year, and it should be a mandatory read for you too! I hope that Hill's research becomes a huge topic of discussion in the medical community and around the world. After reading this book, I feel obligated to change how I prescribe birth control It's about time that this book came out! It's about a Texas PhD's research on the psychological changes that occur on birth control, BC's affects on attraction, and the challenges that gender research face today! This book has been my favorite read of the year, and it should be a mandatory read for you too! I hope that Hill's research becomes a huge topic of discussion in the medical community and around the world. After reading this book, I feel obligated to change how I prescribe birth control to my patients!
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  • Katie Bruell
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. This was eye-opening, to say the least. It made me mad about past doctors and past choices, for sure. I hope every woman will read this book to at least be more informed about the decisions she's making.Of course, a lot of the science in here is somewhat speculative, though research-based, but based on my own experiences, I believe it.One quibble--she talks a lot about how there are now more women than men in college, but never considers that mass incarceration and the war on drugs are huge Wow. This was eye-opening, to say the least. It made me mad about past doctors and past choices, for sure. I hope every woman will read this book to at least be more informed about the decisions she's making.Of course, a lot of the science in here is somewhat speculative, though research-based, but based on my own experiences, I believe it.One quibble--she talks a lot about how there are now more women than men in college, but never considers that mass incarceration and the war on drugs are huge contributors to this issue.
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  • Alexandra Chupanovkaya
    January 1, 1970
    Educational and eye opening. It is truly scary how little we know about all the side effects of something that, it seems, the majority of the population is using.
  • Aphrodite
    January 1, 1970
    Very informative with scientific research based on human studies and data. However, expensive since half the book was cited sources.
  • Khan Ashraf Alif
    January 1, 1970
    Brillian! Recommending to everyone
  • Melissa Mock
    January 1, 1970
    Super interesting read, at very least gets you thinking about the list of possible effects birth control has on your body. To me, it highlighted the failings of doctors to educate patients and actually explain how birth control works and the positive and negative associated with it. If I had known I likely wouldn’t have used it to regularize my period since I was a teenager.
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  • Yvonne
    January 1, 1970
    Conflicting feelings about this book. I am happy to know more about the workings of hormones now ... but I still do not believe that - as the book repeatedly underlines - we ARE our hormones (we are also our socialisation, our community, our learned experiences etc. ...). A little bit too deterministic to my liking. Still, an interesting read.
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  • saranimals
    January 1, 1970
    Excessive use of footnotes significantly impeded the flow (pun intended) of reading
  • Dolly
    January 1, 1970
    Basic:Birth control pill works by changing a woman's hormones (estrogen and progestin), which stop ovulation. No ovulation means there's no egg hanging around for sperm to fertilize, so pregnancy can't happen.- Your hormones influence whom you are attracted to, your senses, desire and personality. - Estrogen increases serotonin level and modifies the production of endorphins. Progesterone prepares endometrium to receive a fertilized egg. If implantation does not occur, estrogen and progesterone Basic:Birth control pill works by changing a woman's hormones (estrogen and progestin), which stop ovulation. No ovulation means there's no egg hanging around for sperm to fertilize, so pregnancy can't happen.- Your hormones influence whom you are attracted to, your senses, desire and personality. - Estrogen increases serotonin level and modifies the production of endorphins. Progesterone prepares endometrium to receive a fertilized egg. If implantation does not occur, estrogen and progesterone levels drop, the endometrium breaks down and menstruation occurs. Progesterone also encourages the growth of milk-producing glands in the breast during pregnancy. Progesterone is the secret source of maternal instincts.- Tl;dr, higher levels of estrogen increases sexual and progesterone reduces sexual desire. - When a naturally cycling woman (not on birth control pills) is ovulating, she is likely to act more flirtatiously and more down to have casual sex with sexy men. Biologically speaking, sexiness indicates good genes, manifested in masculine facial features, facial symmetry, etc. Men also find ovulating women more attractive than non-ovulating women. Wives are less reluctant to let an ovulating woman to interact with their partners at social functions. These all happen below the conscious level.- When women look for partners while on pill (low estrogen level), they are optimizing for loyalty, the ability to provide and niceness. Naturally cycling women take attractiveness into account for mating choice.The implications for the marriage are as follows:1. If a woman was on pill when she met her partner and went off pill during the marriage, she might suddenly find her partner to be so unattractive and be so dissatisfied with her sex life that she initiates a divorce coz now she's finding other men attractive. The flip side is that, if the said woman happened to marry an attractive man (while not optimizing for it), then going off pill could make her see for the first time how sexy her partner is and increases sexual satisfaction and relationship quality. Estrogen heightens perception of attractiveness. 2. There are many interesting facts but I have a lot of Jira tickets and tech debt to crunch. I recommend the audio book.
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  • Kaylee Hartwig
    January 1, 1970
    Today I finished reading This is Your Brain on Birth Control: The Surprising Science of Women, Hormones, and the Law of Unintended Consequences.My recommendation may come across as biased as it is written by my very own cousin Sarah E. Hill, PhD, but this has been a very eye opening read for me. I would encourage anyone who is or has been on the pill, is thinking about starting or going off it, anyone who has a partner on the pill, or in general any health care professionals to take the time to Today I finished reading This is Your Brain on Birth Control: The Surprising Science of Women, Hormones, and the Law of Unintended Consequences.My recommendation may come across as biased as it is written by my very own cousin Sarah E. Hill, PhD, but this has been a very eye opening read for me. I would encourage anyone who is or has been on the pill, is thinking about starting or going off it, anyone who has a partner on the pill, or in general any health care professionals to take the time to read and learn from it. In my opinion, despite being all science-y, it was just easy and, quite often, funny enough for the average person to make it through without struggle.Birth control pills have been known to allow women to plan their families and careers out. Some people also forget that they aren't just used to prevent pregnancy, but can also treat irregular periods, cramps, acne, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, endometriosis, etc... But because these hormones cannot target ovulation alone, (quoting from the book jacket) "they play a role in influencing attraction, sexual motivation, stress, hunger, eating patterns, emotion regulation, friendships, aggression, mood, learning, and more." This can be good or bad for each individual and could change how you feel about your decisions and relationships when you decide go off the pill.This book wasn't written to sway anyone from going on or off birth control, but to allow women to make more informed decisions on what we are putting in our bodies and the version of ourselves that we want to be. It reminds us that side effects aren't all just in our heads as women are so often told. And in a world where women's bodies are politicized, it reminds us that our knowledge is power.Great job, Cousin Sarah!
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  • Natalie Wisz
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. This book was eye-opening and frankly kind of shocking. It's a must-read for anyone who is using/has used/is considering hormonal birth control. The author did a great job of shedding light on some of the aspects of the pharmaceutical industry that I hadn't even considered, to be honest--I mean who would have though that the vast majority of medicines (especially ones intended for females) haven't even been sufficiently road-tested on females?! YIKES. I'm also sort of embarrassed to admit Wow. This book was eye-opening and frankly kind of shocking. It's a must-read for anyone who is using/has used/is considering hormonal birth control. The author did a great job of shedding light on some of the aspects of the pharmaceutical industry that I hadn't even considered, to be honest--I mean who would have though that the vast majority of medicines (especially ones intended for females) haven't even been sufficiently road-tested on females?! YIKES. I'm also sort of embarrassed to admit that some of the information presented I had never really even thought about. I feel like I should have known that HBC (as with any medication, really) could not possibly be targeted to one specific part of the body (sex organs), but it's such a duh, obvious thing to realize. Of course hormones affect every organ, so of course there will be whole-body implications as a result. The fact that HBC changes one's brain shape is of particular concern, especially considering there's not yet confirmation whether this is reversible(!!!).Despite the negatives from the scientific perspective, I did also appreciate that the book was not so completely one-sided. It offers lots of information on how the birth control movement has done a lot of collective good for our society. For the first time ever, females have become empowered to have control over their fertility (e.g., they can avoid being sidelined by an unplanned pregnancy in favor of educational or career advancement, for example). Overall, this was a super informative read and I'll definitely be recommending it!
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so, so important. For a long time, I've been wishing for a resource that would describe the possible side effects of the pill and back them up with studies and facts, and finally it exists. This book helped confirm a lot of what I often suspected was going on with my own body but couldn't confirm because there just isn't much "hard" research out there. It's easy to think YOU are the problem, and Dr Hill actually even talks about why this is. I could write an essay about this book, This book is so, so important. For a long time, I've been wishing for a resource that would describe the possible side effects of the pill and back them up with studies and facts, and finally it exists. This book helped confirm a lot of what I often suspected was going on with my own body but couldn't confirm because there just isn't much "hard" research out there. It's easy to think YOU are the problem, and Dr Hill actually even talks about why this is. I could write an essay about this book, but basically, every person with ovaries considering taking hormonal birth control (and everyone who cares about people who may take hormonal b/c) should read this book, whether they think they "need" it or not. Just do it. I learned so much and feel so much more informed and reassured. It's huge.4 out of 5 just because it felt a little uneven in some ways, tons of footnotes sometimes got in the way rather than added to the reading experience, and some of the studies described and/or her conclusions based on them left me with a skeptically raised eyebrow. Regardless, READ IT.
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  • Heidi Mueller
    January 1, 1970
    This is a must read for every woman. I wasn’t aware of the long term effects of birth control. After being on the Pill, and then having an IUD (20 years of birth control), I was astounded by how many of my health issues have been brought on by the Pill. I had my IUD removed four days after starting this book, and my 2.5 year struggle with chronic intractable migraines ended immediately. I have been off my medication for 3 weeks now and have had no reoccurrence of pain. I have also noticed that This is a must read for every woman. I wasn’t aware of the long term effects of birth control. After being on the Pill, and then having an IUD (20 years of birth control), I was astounded by how many of my health issues have been brought on by the Pill. I had my IUD removed four days after starting this book, and my 2.5 year struggle with chronic intractable migraines ended immediately. I have been off my medication for 3 weeks now and have had no reoccurrence of pain. I have also noticed that my anxiety has been almost completely eliminated, I no longer have issues with excessive sweating, and my general feeling of depression and anxiousness is gone. I feel like a completely different person.
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  • Cassie
    January 1, 1970
    This is a well written, clever, very neutral and as unbiased as can be, enlightening book that every woman should read - whether they are on the pill or not. She brings up very critical points, backing it up with research and science, on how important our hormones are to our bodies. She is very clear about how new this research is and how it continues to grow and develop. Hill makes a point to identify the gaps in the studies while also addressing important issues. I learned a lot and I've This is a well written, clever, very neutral and as unbiased as can be, enlightening book that every woman should read - whether they are on the pill or not. She brings up very critical points, backing it up with research and science, on how important our hormones are to our bodies. She is very clear about how new this research is and how it continues to grow and develop. Hill makes a point to identify the gaps in the studies while also addressing important issues. I learned a lot and I've studied this stuff for a decade now. Usually when I pick a book up like this, I don't learn a ton of new stuff because I've already read the research. Hill's book had me dropping my jaw after each turn of page. Really good (and important) stuff.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I went in skeptical and was never turned away by the research or message. Big takeaways: our hormones influence who we’re attracted to and the things we’re drawn to while also influencing our mood and preference for a partner. There was also a thoughtful discussion on limitations to research that takes women’s hormonal cycles into consideration and a justification for why this type of research is so new. Important question from the book: How is initial mate selection influenced by birth control I went in skeptical and was never turned away by the research or message. Big takeaways: our hormones influence who we’re attracted to and the things we’re drawn to while also influencing our mood and preference for a partner. There was also a thoughtful discussion on limitations to research that takes women’s hormonal cycles into consideration and a justification for why this type of research is so new. Important question from the book: How is initial mate selection influenced by birth control use and what impact does that have on women’s attraction and marital satisfaction when she’s not on birth control?
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  • Eve Pendle
    January 1, 1970
    Read this book, then make your doctor read this book. "Whoa" moments on every page. This is a very balanced and non judgmental book about the effects (there's only effects, side effects are just a con to make it sound better) of the pill. It's very readable, and the footnotes are often hilarious. This essential reading for all sexually active women - because no doctor I've ever been to has any clue about this, and neither does the internet. Read it. You'll enjoy it. Also, there's sexy lemurs. Read this book, then make your doctor read this book. "Whoa" moments on every page. This is a very balanced and non judgmental book about the effects (there's only effects, side effects are just a con to make it sound better) of the pill. It's very readable, and the footnotes are often hilarious. This essential reading for all sexually active women - because no doctor I've ever been to has any clue about this, and neither does the internet. Read it. You'll enjoy it. Also, there's sexy lemurs. No, really there is.
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  • Lily
    January 1, 1970
    This book is amazing. The more I read books about the effects of birth control, the happier I am about deciding to go off of it. A lot of people aren’t aware of what happens to our bodies while taking it-I was that person too-and I think it should be required reading for doctors and women. But I also love birth control and all the benefits it gives us as well. It’s a double edged sword. All I know is this was an interesting and eye opening read.
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  • eilasoles
    January 1, 1970
    Hugely important (why did we have to wait till 2019 for something like this to be written!!) and accessibly written (at time trying a little too hard maybe). I have quibbles with the evolutionary stuff, none of which seemed super-convincing to me and also didn't seem strictly necessary for a discussion of the effects of the pill.
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  • Shaunessy mairead
    January 1, 1970
    I would give this book 10 stars if I could, it was well thought out, balanced and cautious, but remained incredibly powerful. I’m not sure what I expected from this book but it surpassed my expectations.
  • Cait Cole
    January 1, 1970
    A must read. It will have you scratching your head, wondering—how is it possible that I didn’t know these things already? It also might make you weep a little. I know I did. An excellent resource for any woman seeking guidance when making choices about their reproductive health.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    "You are a different person on the birth control pill than you are when you're off the pill. And there's no bigger deal than this."Through reading this book, I have answered so many questions about myself.
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