Parable of the Sower
The follow-up to Kindred, the #1 bestseller, comes Octavia E. Butler’s groundbreaking dystopian novel In this graphic novel adaptation of Octavia E. Butler’s Parable of the Sower, by Damian Duffy and John Jennings, the award-winning team behind the #1 bestseller Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation, the author portrays a searing vision of America’s future. In the year 2024, the country is marred by unattended environmental and economic crises that lead to social chaos. Lauren Olamina, a preacher’s daughter living in Los Angeles, is protected from danger by the walls of her gated community. However, in a night of fire and death, what begins as a fight for survival soon leads to something much more: a startling vision of human destiny . . . and the birth of a new faith.

Parable of the Sower Details

TitleParable of the Sower
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 28th, 2020
PublisherHarry N. Abrams
ISBN-139781419731334
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Fiction, Science Fiction, Dystopia, Adult, Graphic Novels Comics, Classics, Young Adult, Teen, Fantasy, Paranormal

Parable of the Sower Review

  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley and ABRAMS FOR an ARC in exchange for an honest review In this graphic novel adaptation of science fiction writer, Octavia Butler's 1993 novel, Damian Duffy and illustrator John Jennings brings us to the 2020s where society has largely collapsed due to climate change, inequality and corporate greed. Lauren Oya Olamina is a teenage protagonist who lives in a gated community near Los Angeles. As we travel through the outside of the gated community, Lauren and the other Thanks to NetGalley and ABRAMS FOR an ARC in exchange for an honest review In this graphic novel adaptation of science fiction writer, Octavia Butler's 1993 novel, Damian Duffy and illustrator John Jennings brings us to the 2020s where society has largely collapsed due to climate change, inequality and corporate greed. Lauren Oya Olamina is a teenage protagonist who lives in a gated community near Los Angeles. As we travel through the outside of the gated community, Lauren and the other characters witness massive poverty and violence daily. In response to her father's ever-constant faith as a Baptist, Lauren explores her belief system through her journals, called Earthseed. Although I cannot comment upon the illustrations of the graphic novel, as they were incomplete and still in the sketch stage, I can state that I was very interested in what would happen to Lauren as the story progressed. As there is a sequel Parable of the Talents, I would imagine that there will be a future graphic novel somewhere down the road.Goodreads review 24/12/19Publication Date 28/01/20
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  • Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    It's the year 2024 and Lauren Olamina is a preacher's daughter living with her family in a gated L.A. community. The gate is there to protect their community from outsiders fighting for food and water. America is a shell of its former self thanks to environmental and economic crises mishandled by leaders.Outside the gates is chaos where people travel toward safety they're not sure exists and spend exorbitant amounts of their savings on clean water.As the safety of their community begins to It's the year 2024 and Lauren Olamina is a preacher's daughter living with her family in a gated L.A. community.  The gate is there to protect their community from outsiders fighting for food and water.  America is a shell of its former self thanks to environmental and economic crises mishandled by leaders.Outside the gates is chaos where people travel toward safety they're not sure exists and spend exorbitant amounts of their savings on clean water.As the safety of their community begins to crumble, Lauren begins to prepare for the worst and teaches herself survival skills she knows she'll need.  Her neighbors cling to their religion during these terrible times but what no one knows is that Lauren has found her own faith.  Writing her thoughts down daily, she creates a revolutionary idea she calls Earthseed.Lauren finds fellow refugees outside the walls in which she was raised and shares the concept of Earthseed with them.  Together they travel North in search of shelter and safety where they can create a new community.Butler's Earthseed duology (published in the 1990s) is a stunning sci-fi dystopia set in America's near future focusing on actual current events that are frighteningly magnified, making the possibility of this setting far too realistic for comfort.  The ARC I received has very limited panel detail, just rough sketches currently, so I'm curious to see the final illustrations.  The story has translated well to the graphic novel format thanks to Duffy's efforts.Thanks to Abrams and NetGalley for providing me with a digital ARC in exchange for my honest review. Parable of the Sower: A Graphic Novel Adaptation is scheduled for release on January 28, 2020.For more reviews, visit www.rootsandreads.wordpress.com
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  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    Why read a graphic novel adaptation of a novel? For the same reason, one watches a movie adaptation of a novel. It adds a different aspect to the story. Often, if successful, such an adaptation can breathe new life to a story and flesh out things that were not as significant. This graphic novel tells the story of Butler's apocalyptic vision of the future in plain inked drawings, sometimes leaving characters in shadows and not fully illustrated. The story is broken down piece by piece in comic Why read a graphic novel adaptation of a novel? For the same reason, one watches a movie adaptation of a novel. It adds a different aspect to the story. Often, if successful, such an adaptation can breathe new life to a story and flesh out things that were not as significant. This graphic novel tells the story of Butler's apocalyptic vision of the future in plain inked drawings, sometimes leaving characters in shadows and not fully illustrated. The story is broken down piece by piece in comic strip panels which highlight the pain and despair of Butler's novel which portrays a civilization which caved in on itself, with looters everywhere, and people wandering desperately up and down freeways looking for something anything cause it's all they have. The God Is change philosophy is offered in notebook-like tidbits that feels like a natural pet of the story. Overall, quite a worthwhile introduction to Butler's work.
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  • Obsidian
    January 1, 1970
    Please note that I received this book via NetGalley. This did not affect my rating or review.So the thing is this is my least favorite of Butler's works. The story had a lot of plot holes that the graphic novel of course cannot and does not fix. Taking place in 2025, we follow the character of Lauren Olamina and her family that are living in what remains of areas around Los Angeles. Told in the first person, we get Lauren's "insights" into her family, friends, community, and what the world is Please note that I received this book via NetGalley. This did not affect my rating or review.So the thing is this is my least favorite of Butler's works. The story had a lot of plot holes that the graphic novel of course cannot and does not fix. Taking place in 2025, we follow the character of Lauren Olamina and her family that are living in what remains of areas around Los Angeles. Told in the first person, we get Lauren's "insights" into her family, friends, community, and what the world is turning into. The whole Earthseed concept never really works though at least in graphic novel format it's okay to have stilted sentences like "God is Change." I think graphic novels in the right hands can really rock. I love re-reading The Gunslinger series via graphic novel format and the novel "Speak" recently as heart-wrenching to read via that format. Duffy though doesn't really grab me with his art. Everything is shadowy and dark. A few times I wondered if the ARC I got had finished art or what. Here is a link to my review of the novel where I still had some of the same issues while reading this graphic novel: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    This was my first introduction to Butler's work, but I'll definitely be back for more. Her unique take on a dystopian America still feels futuristic, even though it's set in 2024 and was written in 1993. I decided to give this graphic novel adaptation a try since I thought the story would lend itself well to this form - there's so much intense imagery described. The story was incredible - both tragic and hopeful - as a young woman does all she can to survive during intensely threatening times. This was my first introduction to Butler's work, but I'll definitely be back for more. Her unique take on a dystopian America still feels futuristic, even though it's set in 2024 and was written in 1993. I decided to give this graphic novel adaptation a try since I thought the story would lend itself well to this form - there's so much intense imagery described. The story was incredible - both tragic and hopeful - as a young woman does all she can to survive during intensely threatening times. She decides to form her own religion called Earthseed, which she uses to propel her towards a safer future where God is trusted and relied upon fully. Despite some truly brutal descriptions of violence and death, there is still an inspiring purity to this text. Full disclosure: the ARC I was provided with by the publisher didn't have the final artwork included, so I don't feel like I can truly judge what the art will look like once the project is complete. However, overall, I felt this book was a great alternative to classic dystopian novels. The grit and heart of Butler's writing won me over completely.
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  • Nicole| Booklover.zzz | Zamudio-Roman
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Netgalley and Publishers for the opportunity to read an ARC of this graphic novel!3.5 starsI liked the art style they chose for the graphic novel. I just read the novel for class so, having the story fresh in my mind. I was excited to read graphic novel but found that too much information was skipped over/missing or not translated though the artwork that the graphic novel could not be a stand alone work. If someone were to pick it up without having read the book, there were times Thank you Netgalley and Publishers for the opportunity to read an ARC of this graphic novel!3.5 starsI liked the art style they chose for the graphic novel. I just read the novel for class so, having the story fresh in my mind. I was excited to read graphic novel but found that too much information was skipped over/missing or not translated though the artwork that the graphic novel could not be a stand alone work. If someone were to pick it up without having read the book, there were times especially at the beginning (that captures ch 1-2) needed more explanation and/or detail. I like the interesting direction the graphic novel attempts to take though.
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  • Etienne
    January 1, 1970
    Not sure about this one. I got it as an ARC and some panel really seem unfinished, was it part of the style, all of the art look a bit sketchy, which I enjoy I'm not saying that negatively, but some of it really look unfinished... anyway! I wasn't a big fan of the story, never read the original source material so I can't compare... but I find the rhythm to slow for me in a graphic novel format, maybe the novel would be a better choice for me. I never really engage in it...
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  • Elyse
    January 1, 1970
    NetGalley ARC.I have not read the novel Parable of the Sower. In fact, I've never read an Octavia Butler book. Yet. She is definitely an author I want to read, I just haven't been in the situation to pick one up. That being said, this graphic novel was okay. I like color to my illustrations and there was none. The illustrations in this graphic novel look like sketches and I didn't really like that. I liked the gist of the story and it definitely made me more interested in the novel series.
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  • GONZA
    January 1, 1970
    My problem with this graphic novel was mostly due to the great expectations. I had read the adaptation of Kindred almost six months ago and I liked it a lot, so I was ready to repeat the experience, but this time the story was claustrophobic and sad (your usually post scarcity stuff) , and I also get the style of the author (sketchy tables, unfinished drawing, etc.) but all together they were too much for me and I didn't really appreciate that.Il mio problema con questa graphic novel é da My problem with this graphic novel was mostly due to the great expectations. I had read the adaptation of Kindred almost six months ago and I liked it a lot, so I was ready to repeat the experience, but this time the story was claustrophobic and sad (your usually post scarcity stuff) , and I also get the style of the author (sketchy tables, unfinished drawing, etc.) but all together they were too much for me and I didn't really appreciate that.Il mio problema con questa graphic novel é da imputarsi soprattutto al fatto che avevo delle grosse aspettative in quanto avevo letto l'adattamento di Kindred circa sei mesi fa, mi era piaciuto tanto e mi aspettavo qualcosa di simile, ma stavolta la storia era claustrofobica e cupa (la classica storia post scarcity) e lo stile dell'autore (tavole solo abbozzate per esempio), per quanto avessero un senso nel descrivere questo tipo di storia, hanno formato un insieme di cose troppo pesanti perché il risultato poi mi piacesse.THANKS NETGALLEY FOR THE PREVIEW!
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  • Crystal
    January 1, 1970
    Even though this ARC is far from finished - the preface is missing and some art is just sketches - this graphic novel has the potential to be a huge up and coming seller next year. I just very recently finished reading the novel version of Parable of the Sower and loved the world building. This graphic novel version does it just as well as Butler's prose. The themes in the novel and this adaptation speak so poignantly to our experiences in 2019 and I hope this graphic novel will have more people Even though this ARC is far from finished - the preface is missing and some art is just sketches - this graphic novel has the potential to be a huge up and coming seller next year. I just very recently finished reading the novel version of Parable of the Sower and loved the world building. This graphic novel version does it just as well as Butler's prose. The themes in the novel and this adaptation speak so poignantly to our experiences in 2019 and I hope this graphic novel will have more people exposed to Butler's genius.
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  • Veronica
    January 1, 1970
    The graphics aren't finished in the advance copy so I'm looking forward to holding a finished copy in my hands. The novel is set in our all too near future you can feel it. I also read too fast & write reviews to slow. More in the future. Bottomline - get this book.
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  • Annette Jordan
    January 1, 1970
    This is a difficult review to write because it is virtually impossible and certainly unfair to review a graphic novel where the artwork is as incomplete as it is here. The illustrations are key to the success of any graphic novel , and they are what really make a difference when you adapt such a beloved classic as the wonderful Parable of the Sower. From what I could see in several of the more finished panels, the illustrations have promise and certainly seem in keeping with the story, but there This is a difficult review to write because it is virtually impossible and certainly unfair to review a graphic novel where the artwork is as incomplete as it is here. The illustrations are key to the success of any graphic novel , and they are what really make a difference when you adapt such a beloved classic as the wonderful Parable of the Sower. From what I could see in several of the more finished panels, the illustrations have promise and certainly seem in keeping with the story, but there are not enough of them which have been completed to say that for sure. The storytelling is very true to the original book, and I really loved the decision to have Lauren's diary entries be written on lined paper, like they were written in a school exercise book. It works to both clearly delineate those sections from the rest of the story, and as the perfect way to illustrate her inner thoughts. It is a good thing that I was familiar with the story as otherwise I think it would have been a struggle to follow what was happening , quite often there is not enough distinction between the characters to determine who is involved in the conversation. I am sure that this is something that will be more resolved in the finished product, but right now it does make things difficult. As far as I can tell, the book will not gloss over the more difficult and disturbing scenes from the book, though I wish that I could see how the finished product will illustrate them. I like the concept of a graphic version of the story, and this shows definite promise.I read and reviewed an unfinished ARC courtesy of NetGalley and the publisher, all opinions are my own.
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  • Chessa
    January 1, 1970
    I...am confused and frustrated. Or maybe this is just a good lesson for me: beware requesting ARCs of graphic novels?I am a huge fan of the novel Parable of the Sower - it truly changed my life when I read it years ago. So no question, a 5-star story for me.But the artwork here is so unfinished, I just have to wonder why the publisher even bothered to release an ARC of it? Because as it stands right now, it is so painful, confusing, and so obviously in flux that I would never ever recommend it. I...am confused and frustrated. Or maybe this is just a good lesson for me: beware requesting ARCs of graphic novels?I am a huge fan of the novel Parable of the Sower - it truly changed my life when I read it years ago. So no question, a 5-star story for me.But the artwork here is so unfinished, I just have to wonder why the publisher even bothered to release an ARC of it? Because as it stands right now, it is so painful, confusing, and so obviously in flux that I would never ever recommend it. I hate to judge an unfinished work, but at the same time, this is what you provided for me to review?! I’m so torn. I truly hope the artwork is made more vibrant and if nothing else, more clear in the final rendering. This gave me a frustration headache trying to read it, which makes me sad. It’s a terrifying and wonderful story, and I hope the final artwork will do it justice.5 stars for the story/2 stars for the artwork
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  • Ms. Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Although this ARC has inconsistent art (still having some sketches, some outlines, some almost complete art) it is still as riveting as the original.The distillation of the text into graphic novel sized bites and images is excellent. The art that is there, even the sketches, are full of movement and life.This story has not only stood the test of time, but become more relevant with time. With a Netflix series on the horizon for this world, I anticipate the novel AND this graphic novel having a Although this ARC has inconsistent art (still having some sketches, some outlines, some almost complete art) it is still as riveting as the original.The distillation of the text into graphic novel sized bites and images is excellent. The art that is there, even the sketches, are full of movement and life.This story has not only stood the test of time, but become more relevant with time. With a Netflix series on the horizon for this world, I anticipate the novel AND this graphic novel having a resurgence. Well worth adding to a GN collection in a middle school, high school, university, or public library.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Octavia E. Butler (author), Damian Duffy (illustrator), ABRAMS, AbramsComicsArt, and NetGalley for allowing me the extreme pleasure of access to an advanced reader copy of “Parable of the Sower: A Graphic Novel Adaptation: A Graphic Novel Adaptation” for an honest review. This graphic novel adaptation of Parable of the Sower was quite a surprise when I opened it. I've never recieved an ARC that was in such a rough draft format as this one arrived, so I'm going to do my best to cover Thank you to Octavia E. Butler (author), Damian Duffy (illustrator), ABRAMS, AbramsComicsArt, and NetGalley for allowing me the extreme pleasure of access to an advanced reader copy of “Parable of the Sower: A Graphic Novel Adaptation: A Graphic Novel Adaptation” for an honest review. This graphic novel adaptation of Parable of the Sower was quite a surprise when I opened it. I've never recieved an ARC that was in such a rough draft format as this one arrived, so I'm going to do my best to cover this as openly and honestly as I can (while adding some notes of supposition given that there are five months to publication and it will be shored up by then, likely).I deeply love that Lauren's narrative of this story remains her journal entries and that the journal entries are on every page, and every piece of narration is backgrounded my the image of it being written on lined paper (though I'm deeply questioning the few sheets that were three-hole punched?), as it kept you in the frame of mine it was written down and being told in that writing no matter what you saw in the comic boxes and dialogue bubbles format. The art on the front cover, which stormed into my heart and demanded I request this adaption, is the only piece of art in the whole graphic novel that is complete. Everything between that gorgeous front cover and the end is serious of very rough sketches, all of which are in black and white. Several faces all still bear the lines of their symmetry, and most things don't have much background. This made it very hard to distinguish characters from each other and if I hadn't read Parable of the Sower in print two weeks earlier, I don't think I would have been able to even guess who they were. I was very moved by getting to see the big groups together. It's easy to blend the idea of that many into a lump in your head, but seeing just how many people the group collected, and how many were settling at the end brought that even more home to me than reading the novel did. Star rating for current art, but very likely to become a 4/5 once completed. No complaints aside from not knowing how to judge the art scale yet.
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  • Liz (Quirky Cat)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of Parable of the Sower through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. To be clear: Parable of the Sower is a graphic novel adaptation of a novel by Octavia E. Butler (of the same name, in case that wasn’t clear). The novel originally published back in the ‘90s, and it seemed right to try and do something more with it now. Damian Duffy handled the writing for the adaptation, and John Jenning lent his artwork. Together they brought Butler’s tale to all-new I received a copy of Parable of the Sower through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. To be clear: Parable of the Sower is a graphic novel adaptation of a novel by Octavia E. Butler (of the same name, in case that wasn’t clear). The novel originally published back in the ‘90s, and it seemed right to try and do something more with it now. Damian Duffy handled the writing for the adaptation, and John Jenning lent his artwork. Together they brought Butler’s tale to all-new heights. Set in the year 2024, this novel if full of heavy dystopian plot. Butler didn’t write a happy futuristic world, but instead something dark and disturbing. Here is a world without regulations; a world created by the consequences of our actions. In a world where we destroyed the environment. This is the world that Lauren Olamina was born into. Her life had been protected; she lived in a world more similar to a bubble than she would have ever liked to admit. That it, up until everything changed for her. And then it was her turn to change the lives of others. I can’t emphasize enough that this is an adaptation. Now, I personally love adaptations. And I think many others do as well (how many times have we hoped to see a book make it into the theaters?). So I was incredibly excited when I saw that this one was getting turned into a graphic novel. Butler’s tale translated perfectly onto the pages here. I know that Duffy had to edit some things to make it all fit with Jenning’s artwork, but I think the end result was something that still felt true to the original works. Actually, I think they built upon it, but that’s just a personal opinion. This graphic novel is perfect for any dystopian fan, or any fan of Octavia Butler, for that matter. And if you’re a fan of both, then you’re in luck. Because this adaptation has everything I could have hoped for, and then some. For more reviews check out Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks
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  • Jim
    January 1, 1970
    Parable of the Sower: Graphic Novelby Octavia E. Butler, adaptation by Damian Duffy and John JenningsThis is a tricky one to review. On the one hand, there is the stellar story behind this adaption. Butler was a master of the field, weaving powerful prose with profound ideas to create something transcendent, at times. The Parable of the Sower novel is deep, and compelling, and important. It is a story of humanity in danger, of faith and creed and hope. It is about race and love and humanity. It Parable of the Sower: Graphic Novelby Octavia E. Butler, adaptation by Damian Duffy and John JenningsThis is a tricky one to review. On the one hand, there is the stellar story behind this adaption. Butler was a master of the field, weaving powerful prose with profound ideas to create something transcendent, at times. The Parable of the Sower novel is deep, and compelling, and important. It is a story of humanity in danger, of faith and creed and hope. It is about race and love and humanity. It is a story worth reading, for anyone.The idea of a graphic novel adaptation is a good one. I like graphic novels. It can be tricky, though, to adapt books to visual form (just like to movies) because you can't do everything. You have to balance the words and the pictures, so some words get left out. Obviously, it can work, as the comics creators behind this one created a wonderful award-winning adaptation of Kindred. But judging that success is wholly dependent upon the art, and the art in this eARC is not finished. I assume so, anyway, because these are sketches, The faces aren't drawn at all in some panels, with the guidelines there to show where eyes, mouth etc. go. Some characters are fully drawn in, but many are barely ghosts. There is no coloring at all.So I can't judge the art. I'm sure it will be fine when it's done, but it's not done, so I can only judge the verbal adaptation: the cuts and changes made to fit a novel to a graphic format.And that is all pretty smooth. It works to focus on the dialog, mostly. It can be hard in some scenes, without the accompanying art, to know who is talking to whom. The action can be hard to follow as well. But the characters come through. The narrative beats hit, and the story works, which is to be expected, since this is Octavia Butler's story.I just wish I could see how it works as a graphic novel.
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  • Jennie
    January 1, 1970
    I will start this by saying that I have never read anything by Octavia E Butler and only became aware of her in the last couple of years. So when I say this graphic novel version of her story Parable of the Sower I thought this would be a nice way to be introduced to her. Now obviously this isn't the original but instead a graphic depiction of her original story. Just like a movie adaptation can help you fall in love with a book so can a graphic novel. This a story set less than ten years from I will start this by saying that I have never read anything by Octavia E Butler and only became aware of her in the last couple of years. So when I say this graphic novel version of her story Parable of the Sower I thought this would be a nice way to be introduced to her. Now obviously this isn't the original but instead a graphic depiction of her original story. Just like a movie adaptation can help you fall in love with a book so can a graphic novel. This a story set less than ten years from now where our environment has been destroyed to the point where the poor scavenge to survive and fires are dangerous because everything is so dry. Parts of society have fallen apart, the cops and fireman have to be paid to come out and then don't really do anything. The rich have gated themselves off from everyone else in order to give them a sense of safety. And "debt slavery" has been come common place and acceptable. The main character, Lauren, has what is called hyper-empathy where she can feel other peoples pain and pleasure. Through her life experiences in her short 16-18 years she has developed a new "religion" called Earthseed, where god is change and we need to live for each other.This graphic novel made me much more interested in reading Butler's work. The drawing style is very interesting. Most graphic novels you see are versions of Manga so the art is very precise but this art, at times, gets down to almost base draft drawing with no defining figures. This worked really well with the story and at times was very appropriate due to the violent nature of parts of the story. Definitely pick this one up if you are at all curious about Butler or even if you love her work. It just might enhance your love of her stories.
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  • Vivienne
    January 1, 1970
    My thanks to Abrams/Abrams ComicArts for a temporary digital edition via NetGalley of the graphic novel adaptation of Olivia E. Butler’s ‘Parable of the Sower’ in exchange for an honest review.It was adapted by Damian Duffy with art by John Jennings, the team that had previously adapted Butler’s ‘The Kindred’ as a graphic novel.I had read ‘Parable of the Sower’ last year for the first time and found it a deeply moving novel. Therefore, I welcomed the opportunity to read and review this My thanks to Abrams/Abrams ComicArts for a temporary digital edition via NetGalley of the graphic novel adaptation of Olivia E. Butler’s ‘Parable of the Sower’ in exchange for an honest review.It was adapted by Damian Duffy with art by John Jennings, the team that had previously adapted Butler’s ‘The Kindred’ as a graphic novel.I had read ‘Parable of the Sower’ last year for the first time and found it a deeply moving novel. Therefore, I welcomed the opportunity to read and review this adaptation expecting that it would be an excellent way to introduce the work to a new generation.However, I consider the most important aspect of a graphic novel is the art. In this case NetGalley members were presented with a very rough and unfinished work, no coloration and many panels were just very minimal sketches. Even though there was a disclaimer that it was unfinished I am perplexed as to why the publishers didn’t either wait to closer the publication date or update the NetGalley files when a more polished version was available.As a result I could initially only review what I saw rather than imagining the finished product. As much as I consider ‘Parable’ to be a dystopian classic and was somewhat familiar with the story having recently read, it was very hard to understand what was going on. Now was that because the source material doesn’t work as a graphic novel or was I overly distracted by the incomplete art? It was hard to judge.I was also looking forward to reading Nalo Hopkinson’s Introduction but this also was missing from the eARC. Edit 28 January 2020: While I could only give 2 stars after reading the unfinished ARC, I did download the Kindle sample on the day of publication. This gave me both the opportunity to read Nalo’s moving Introduction and to view 17 pages of the finished artwork, which was excellent. Thus, my amended rating is 4 stars and I hope in the future to purchase my own copy of this important graphic novel adaptation.
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  • Dawn Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    1.27.2020DNF @50 pagesI had tried to read the novel "Kindred" and just couldn't get into the whole concept [I have learned that I love sci-fi to WATCH. To read, not so much]. Then a friend told me about the graphic novel and I tried it and absolutely loved it. So I was really excited that Parable was coming up as a graphic novel ARC. I have not read the novel Parable of the Sower. I actually didn't really know what this was even about. And once I read a synopsis, I was really excited to dive in. 1.27.2020DNF @50 pagesI had tried to read the novel "Kindred" and just couldn't get into the whole concept [I have learned that I love sci-fi to WATCH. To read, not so much]. Then a friend told me about the graphic novel and I tried it and absolutely loved it. So I was really excited that Parable was coming up as a graphic novel ARC. I have not read the novel Parable of the Sower. I actually didn't really know what this was even about. And once I read a synopsis, I was really excited to dive in. That said, this graphic novel was very disappointing. I like color to my illustrations and there was none. Nada [according to the letter at the beginning of the book, this graphic novel WILL be in color when its published, but that doesn't help the reader right now]. Actually, there were squares that were done in blue ink instead of the black and white and that was even more disconcerting than the black and white sketches. Oh yeah, the illustrations in this graphic novel are mostly sketches and that didn't really translate well. And I found that I am not a fan. At all. It was very difficult to read and the teeny print made it even more difficult. Even when blowing up the screen, the print was minuscule. After 50 pages, I was getting a headache and was done. I liked the idea of the story and once done, it might really be a great read and I might be tempted to pick up the book again once its published, but if the print is still that tiny, I will have to pass again. Thank you to NetGalley and ABRAMS/Abrams ComicArts for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    I won an ARC of this graphic novel adaption of Parable of the Sower by Octavia E. Butler (adapted by Damian Duffy) from Goodreads. Unfortunately, I did not know I would be receiving an ARC with unfinished black and white artwork, many panels of which were extremely rough sketches that were difficult to make out. I recently finished the original text and enjoyed it overall despite not connecting much with the overarching religious theme. I was really interested to see if the illustrations helped I won an ARC of this graphic novel adaption of Parable of the Sower by Octavia E. Butler (adapted by Damian Duffy) from Goodreads. Unfortunately, I did not know I would be receiving an ARC with unfinished black and white artwork, many panels of which were extremely rough sketches that were difficult to make out. I recently finished the original text and enjoyed it overall despite not connecting much with the overarching religious theme. I was really interested to see if the illustrations helped me connect with it more. But all I could do with these rough panels was assess whether Duffy did a good job adapting the original through the dialogue bubbles and text boxes. I'd say he did, and I think the final artwork examples are gorgeous. I absolutely love the way the characters are illustrated. However, I really don't know if all the illustrations work with the descriptions because I don't know what the panels look like.It's also hard to judge the pacing and descriptions for an unfinished graphic novel. So much relies on the visuals that I can't fault the moments when I felt more context would have been nice, especially for anyone who hasn't read the source material. Perhaps the context is in the final illustration. I think overall the adaptation is done well, but I can't judge how the artwork contributes to that. I'll be sticking to my rating for the original novel for now. If I'm able to get my hands on a complete version, I'll reassess based on the finished artwork.I highly recommend publishers reconsider sending such rough versions of graphic novels to reviewers.
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  • Midnight Voss
    January 1, 1970
    I have been a fan of Octavia Butler for years, and I am so excited that her work is being adapted for new audiences to pick up. Her dystopian series was particularly prescient, predicting a lot of the scarcity and callous behavior towards the poor as the ravages of climate change and unchecked excesses of capitalism change our way of life beyond recognition. Like always, Butler looks at the future with biological and intersectional lenses, leading the way with Olamina, a neurodivergent young I have been a fan of Octavia Butler for years, and I am so excited that her work is being adapted for new audiences to pick up. Her dystopian series was particularly prescient, predicting a lot of the scarcity and callous behavior towards the poor as the ravages of climate change and unchecked excesses of capitalism change our way of life beyond recognition. Like always, Butler looks at the future with biological and intersectional lenses, leading the way with Olamina, a neurodivergent young girl with biologically enforced empathy who begins to write her own religion from what she observes to be true.The story is powerful and painful. I forgot how much I loved it. I may come back to edit my review when I have the chance to see the finished artwork. As is, there are some sections where the notebook format, or visualizing the sci fi elements of hyperempathy syndrome does quite help. Large other portions are still so rough that it is impossible to tell what is going on. I have hopes for that and will edit my review when I have a chance to see it. As is, I’m not as happy with this aspect.My other criticism is that the opening misses some context, so it may be difficult for new readers to get into the graphic novel.Overall? Forget The Road. Have students read The Parable if the Sower and The Parable of the Talents.
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  • Siobhán
    January 1, 1970
    *I received an ARC via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Thanks for the free graphic novel.*Octavia E. Butler is a force to be reckoned with if you are into sci-fi. "Parable of the Sower", originally a novel published in 1993, takes place in a post-climate-change U.S. where poverty and violence reign. This dystopia was adapted into a graphic novel, which makes absolute sense. The story is well done. Our protagonist Lauren Oya Olamina is a black girl who can sense other people's *I received an ARC via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Thanks for the free graphic novel.*Octavia E. Butler is a force to be reckoned with if you are into sci-fi. "Parable of the Sower", originally a novel published in 1993, takes place in a post-climate-change U.S. where poverty and violence reign. This dystopia was adapted into a graphic novel, which makes absolute sense. The story is well done. Our protagonist Lauren Oya Olamina is a black girl who can sense other people's emotions. She leaves the village she grew up in after losing her entire family, travelling north, looking for water, shelter and a new life. She believes that the only thing that can save humankind might be space travel and she founds a new religion, called Earthseed. It is a very touching tale of a resilient young woman giving hope to others in an utterly hopeless world. The graphic novel has a very rough black-and-white style which is both impressive and confusing. I found it hard to differentiate between different characters or really understand what the panels were showing besides terrifying faces. I also had trouble reading the text, but that might have been an issue with both my PC and my eyes. If you are into dystopias and would like to experience a classic as a graphic novel, pick this one up. Four Stars because I the graphic novel style was too much for me.
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  • April Gray
    January 1, 1970
    So, I didn't really get to see much of the artwork for this, so I can't comment much on that. The e-ARC I was provided had storyboard art, not the finished work, but I was able to get a sample peek online, and what I saw looked great. The story had what I love from Octavia E. Butler- dystopia with a hint of hope for humankind, but there will be a lot of work getting to the brighter future. I haven't read the original book yet, so I can't say how good the adaption is, but it seems good. I like So, I didn't really get to see much of the artwork for this, so I can't comment much on that. The e-ARC I was provided had storyboard art, not the finished work, but I was able to get a sample peek online, and what I saw looked great. The story had what I love from Octavia E. Butler- dystopia with a hint of hope for humankind, but there will be a lot of work getting to the brighter future. I haven't read the original book yet, so I can't say how good the adaption is, but it seems good. I like the way this version is formatted, as if you're reading Lauren's notebooks, with verses from the Earthseed book throughout. I definitely want to read the original sooner rather than later, to get more detail about the story, but this didn't feel like chunks were missing- there's no explanation of what happened, what led the world to become like this, though, and I'd like to know. Of course, there might not be an explanation, and that's okay too, leaves room to imagine what might've gone wrong. Butler's book was written in 1993, and is set just a few years from now, 2024 if I remember correctly. I could see things getting to this point- maybe not as soon as 2024, but not so far away. #ParableOfTheSower #NetGalley
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  • Diane Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    In Parable of the Sower, Lauren is a preacher’s daughter living in the broken world of the Los Angeles’ suburbs in 2024. Climate change has left the world short of water. The class battle has been fought—and won by the rich. Hope for the future is non-existent. But Lauren has a vision for a new God—a God of change. She feels all mankind is Earthseed, destined to move off the ruined Earth to other planets.It is amazing that Parable of the Sower feels like it was written yesterday because it is so In Parable of the Sower, Lauren is a preacher’s daughter living in the broken world of the Los Angeles’ suburbs in 2024. Climate change has left the world short of water. The class battle has been fought—and won by the rich. Hope for the future is non-existent. But Lauren has a vision for a new God—a God of change. She feels all mankind is Earthseed, destined to move off the ruined Earth to other planets.It is amazing that Parable of the Sower feels like it was written yesterday because it is so topical. However, it was originally published more than twenty-five years ago in 1993.When I started reading, I thought this was a sequel to Kindred, which I loved in graphic novel format by the same author and artist. However, it is a completely different tale of how a religion gets started in a startlingly prescient world of the future. Unfortunately, the art was only done in a rough outline in my advanced review copy so I can’t review it here. But the art in Kindred was beautiful and evocative. Overall, this a good warning about what the future may hold for our planet. 4 stars!Thanks to Abrams ComicArts and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Susie Wang
    January 1, 1970
    Very solid read. The adaptation from novel to graphic novel seems very smooth. There are more long passages in it than most graphic novels, but I suppose they already tried their best to not include too many.I haven't read the novels yet, but I'm assuming this adaptation stops where the first novel stops. (I just checked the last few pages of the novel, the adaptation indeed ends where the first novel ends. I also noted that the adaptation is quite faithful to the original materials.)I read the Very solid read. The adaptation from novel to graphic novel seems very smooth. There are more long passages in it than most graphic novels, but I suppose they already tried their best to not include too many.I haven't read the novels yet, but I'm assuming this adaptation stops where the first novel stops. (I just checked the last few pages of the novel, the adaptation indeed ends where the first novel ends. I also noted that the adaptation is quite faithful to the original materials.)I read the black and white line work, so I'm not able to comment on the art style or anything like that. But from what the cover offers, it looks a bit too saturated and just... red. I hope the final work would be less saturated, or it would hurt people's eyes, honestly.Like I said, I understand the dialogues and occasional narration wouldn't be enough to tell a story this epic. And the result shows the weakness in attempting to do so. The graphic novel reads more like a coming of age story set in apocalyptic environment than the beginning of an epic story. I actually think it would be better if they wait till the second volumn is ready and publish them together.Overall, nice adaptation, great source materials, but still left something to be desired.
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  • Paisley Green
    January 1, 1970
    This ARC is hard to review. I love Octavia Butler's Earthseed books, of which Parable of the Sower is the first. People have praised Butler time and time again for her prescient depiction of 2020s America and her hopeful Afrofuturist science fiction philosophy. Seriously, read those books. This graphic novel is a faithful adaptation, and some artistic choices, like the voiceover boxes being the lined paper of Lauren Olamina's journal, already capture the protagonist's inner life well. BUT, it's This ARC is hard to review. I love Octavia Butler's Earthseed books, of which Parable of the Sower is the first. People have praised Butler time and time again for her prescient depiction of 2020s America and her hopeful Afrofuturist science fiction philosophy. Seriously, read those books. This graphic novel is a faithful adaptation, and some artistic choices, like the voiceover boxes being the lined paper of Lauren Olamina's journal, already capture the protagonist's inner life well. BUT, it's hard to judge this ARC well because the art isn't anywhere close to done. There are a few panels here and there where Lauren's face is fully lined and shaded, but most of this advance copy is rough sketches. And I mean rough--it was hard to tell what most of the characters looked like besides Lauren, or even what was happening in some action scenes. That being said, what I DID see of the art was lovely, and the paneling choices themselves were pleasing. Once the book is released in January, I can see this rating going up to 5 stars. But for now, it's hard to extrapolate the end product from what I have.
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  • Angie
    January 1, 1970
    First off: I received an ARC of this graphic novel through Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own for better or worse, etc. On to my thoughts:This book is GORGEOUS. I can't wait for it to come out in January 2020, because I am absolutely going to buy it. I hoard graphic novels and comics, as well as science fiction and fantasy literature, so this will fit right in with what I've got going. Plus, I have an abiding love for the work of Octavia Butler. Soooo... yeah, First off: I received an ARC of this graphic novel through Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own for better or worse, etc. On to my thoughts:This book is GORGEOUS. I can't wait for it to come out in January 2020, because I am absolutely going to buy it. I hoard graphic novels and comics, as well as science fiction and fantasy literature, so this will fit right in with what I've got going. Plus, I have an abiding love for the work of Octavia Butler. Soooo... yeah, it's going to be mine.The art, which was done by John Jennings is beautifully done. Although in this ARC it is incomplete, it still rocked my world. The completed pictures are lovely, but even the sketches show the promise of beautiful panels to come. And I have to say, the decision to show the journal entries as handwriting on bits of notebook paper was an artistically wonderful decision.As for story, well, it's Parable of the Sower. This adaptation doesn't veer away from the source material.4.5 out of 5 arbitrary items of rating.
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  • Lucy Goodfellow
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent way to introduce a classic science fiction story to new readers.The illustrator is able to show the dystopian horrors of this world superbly with drawings that take the intense imagery that Octavia E. Butler crafted and amplify it tenfold. The artwork helps the fragmented nature of the story- that can cause an issue for readers of the original, to flow seamlessly from scene to scene, making the passage of time easy to follow.The story itself is adapted faithfully from the original An excellent way to introduce a classic science fiction story to new readers.The illustrator is able to show the dystopian horrors of this world superbly with drawings that take the intense imagery that Octavia E. Butler crafted and amplify it tenfold. The artwork helps the fragmented nature of the story- that can cause an issue for readers of the original, to flow seamlessly from scene to scene, making the passage of time easy to follow.The story itself is adapted faithfully from the original novel. I am eager to see if a second instalment will be made for the book's sequel. I received this book as an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Due to this, the art in my EPUB was unfinished and therefore I do not feel comfortable giving the book 5 stars as I cannot vouch for the quality of the artwork to be consistent throughout the novel. However, I will revisit this when the book is released on the 14th of January 2020.
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  • Shauna
    January 1, 1970
    Every prophet's story begins somewhere and this is the story Lauren Olamina. The story begins behind the Wall. A barrier that protects Lauren and her neighbors. The story follows the family's quest to survive. Drug addicts, scavengers, dogs and fire threaten their way of life. In the midst of growing up, Lauren begins writing her thoughts down. Earthseed the Book of the Living is born. Her thoughts about God, growth and community spur her and strengthen her as she has to grow up fairly quickly. Every prophet's story begins somewhere and this is the story Lauren Olamina. The story begins behind the Wall. A barrier that protects Lauren and her neighbors. The story follows the family's quest to survive. Drug addicts, scavengers, dogs and fire threaten their way of life. In the midst of growing up, Lauren begins writing her thoughts down. Earthseed the Book of the Living is born. Her thoughts about God, growth and community spur her and strengthen her as she has to grow up fairly quickly. Throughout her journey she guides, leads, saves and befriend many. Can she be the leader or preacher who leads a community? Will she stumble and fall or will she follow in her father's footsteps and create a community safe for all. The art was rudimentary which gave the book more meaning and feel. T.he art is in black and white mostly You will experience a wealth of emotions, you'll even wonder about your safety as the book is set in the 2020s. I look forward to reading the second book to see where the journey leads Lauren and her community.
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