In the Hall with the Knife (Clue Mystery, #1)
A murderer could be around every corner in this thrilling YA trilogy based on the board game CLUE!   When a storm strikes at Blackbrook Academy, an elite prep school nestled in the woods of Maine, a motley crew of students—including Beth “Peacock” Picach, Orchid McKee, Vaughn Green, Sam “Mustard” Maestor, Finn Plum, and Scarlet Mistry—are left stranded on campus with their headmaster. Hours later, his body is found in the conservatory and it’s very clear his death was no accident. With this group of students who are all hiding something, nothing is as it seems, and everyone has a motive for murder. Fans of the CLUE board game and cult classic film will delight in Diana Peterfreund’s modern reimagining of the brand, its characters, and the dark, magnificent old mansion with secrets hidden within its walls.  

In the Hall with the Knife (Clue Mystery, #1) Details

TitleIn the Hall with the Knife (Clue Mystery, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 8th, 2019
PublisherHarry N. Abrams
ISBN-139781419738340
Rating
GenreMystery, Young Adult, Thriller, Fiction

In the Hall with the Knife (Clue Mystery, #1) Review

  • karen
    January 1, 1970
    NOW AVAILABLE!!!clue is my favorite movie of all time. y’all can keep your highly esteemed oscar-winning period pieces and your obscure arthouse fillums—i’ll be over here watching this movie where the chick from the go-go’s and the dude from fear both get murrrrderrrred. in a house. with a weapon. <-— no spoilers here! when i first heard about this book, it was as though the heavens opened up and rained down jellybeans: a book based(ish) on my favorite movie, written by the lady who brought NOW AVAILABLE!!!clue is my favorite movie of all time. y’all can keep your highly esteemed oscar-winning period pieces and your obscure arthouse fillums—i’ll be over here watching this movie where the chick from the go-go’s and the dude from fear both get murrrrderrrred. in a house. with a weapon. <-— no spoilers here! when i first heard about this book, it was as though the heavens opened up and rained down jellybeans: a book based(ish) on my favorite movie, written by the lady who brought killer unicorns into our lives? yes and please. and THEN, when i walked into the ABA galley room at BEA to find A GIANT STACK of these just sitting there for meeeee (and, i suppose, other ABA members, but mostly just ME), oh how those jellybeans POURED.much like the storm that stranded the characters in this book! this is an all-new story, not a retelling of the movie, but all your favorite characters are here—in name, anyway, muppet-baby-style: headmaster boddy, beth “peacock” picach, vaughn green, sam “mustard” maestor, finn plum, scarlet mistry, mrs. white, and… orchid mckee. i do not know why peterfreund decided to separate mrs. white from the others by making her an adult character and filling her role with some non canon gal, but i’m sure she had her reasons. (p.s. please tell me your reasons)the plot here is no surprise—it is the plot of the movie and the point of the board game: there is murder! who has done it? and although the murder weapon is never in doubt (HINT: it is part of the title of the book!), other clue-weapons do pop up in the darndest places.here are plenty of winky-nods to the movie, and there are secret passages and secret agendas and secret letters and…secrets. IS this the best locked-room mystery i have ever read? no. but DOES it explicitly reference the most iconic scene from the best movie of all time?yes. three and a half stars, rounded up and i will continue happily with the rest of the series.**********************************************i am very excited for this.very excited.come to my blog!
    more
  • Chelsea Humphrey
    January 1, 1970
    ARGH. On the one hand, this provided so much of what I was looking for in regards to movie references and cheesy nostalgia, yet I still feel torn due to the difficulty in keeping the characters straight and some of the changes that were made. The reveal felt a little off to me, and heads up, there is a cliffhanger leading out for the second book in the series. Overall, this was a fun, breezy read, and I'll likely continue on with the trilogy. More thoughts to come closer to publication date. ARGH. On the one hand, this provided so much of what I was looking for in regards to movie references and cheesy nostalgia, yet I still feel torn due to the difficulty in keeping the characters straight and some of the changes that were made. The reveal felt a little off to me, and heads up, there is a cliffhanger leading out for the second book in the series. Overall, this was a fun, breezy read, and I'll likely continue on with the trilogy. More thoughts to come closer to publication date. *Many thanks to the publisher for providing my review copy via NetGalley.
    more
  • megs_bookrack
    January 1, 1970
    ARC received!!!Amulet Books, thank you so much.Update, 10/1/19: I am really hoping to binge this on the upcoming weekend!Perfect Spooktober read!!!Clue was a big part of my childhood so this is going to be hella nostalgic for me! I cannot wait.
  • Amy Imogene Reads
    January 1, 1970
    We all know the story: The mansion. The colorful guests. The murder. The secret passageways. The weapons. Mr. Boddy was murdered in the lounge with the candlestick. Or was it the wrench? Or maybe the revolver?(In the case of In the Hall with the Knife, I bet you can guess.) I honestly didn't know what to expect when this ARC arrived at my doorstep. I was in love with Clue as a kid (the movie AND the game) and I knew that I'd like it, at the very least. I didn't expect to love it and read it in We all know the story: The mansion. The colorful guests. The murder. The secret passageways. The weapons. Mr. Boddy was murdered in the lounge with the candlestick. Or was it the wrench? Or maybe the revolver?(In the case of In the Hall with the Knife, I bet you can guess.) I honestly didn't know what to expect when this ARC arrived at my doorstep. I was in love with Clue as a kid (the movie AND the game) and I knew that I'd like it, at the very least. I didn't expect to love it and read it in one sitting!In the Hall with the Knife is the perfect read for a casual fall evening. It's fast-paced, the coastal Maine spooky academy was the perfect setting, and the teenage characters were all fun to read in individual POVs. There are some changes to the main script: we have an added POV in Orchid McKee, and Mrs. White was an adult, but I didn't mind these changes—and in a weird way, I really enjoyed Orchid's entrance. In terms of POV switching, I thought the author did a really good job at conveying each character's individual narrative voice. Even if you'd removed the names in the chapter, I would have known who was narrating—that's impressive, given the large cast list. However, hands down, I loved Peacock's entries the best. Everyone else has traditional chapters with third person narration...and then there's Peacock, who is obsessed with fitness and has her POV done within the context of a 1 page workout journal entry with a "notes" field that spills matter-of-fact details about the actual plot. Loved it.Now, definitely keep in mind that this novel doesn't take itself seriously. Heck, the Clue movie notoriously didn't take itself seriously! The ending isn't a surprise to the discerning reader, but that's not why I loved it. I loved it for the cheese, the camp, and the modern twists on the old nods to nostalgia. It's a fun ride, and even more fun when you realize that it's actually a trilogy. We haven't heard the last of this group, and so far there's only been one dead body...(claps hands in excitement)Thank you so much to Amulet Books for an ARC of this title in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Whoever came up with this was a frickin' genius! If you're going to make a novelization of a board game, Clue is absolutely the way to go. It already IS a murder mystery, after all! Now you just have to take the characters, flesh them out, and give them a motive for murder! Setting at an elite boarding school, amongst teenagers, was perfect, and gives the story great appeal. There's even a new character, Orchid McKee, with secrets of her own.
    more
  • Stacee
    January 1, 1970
    Clue is one of my all time favorite movies, so there was absolutely no way I was going to miss this one. This book has a load of characters and we get POV chapters from 6 of them and that was a bit much. I didn’t feel like I really knew any of them and instead of it adding to the mystery, it fell flat.Plot wise, it was good. There wasn’t a lot of build up or tension and the reveal was fairly lackluster; however, I just noticed this is the start of a series, so there’s that. Oh and the ending Clue is one of my all time favorite movies, so there was absolutely no way I was going to miss this one. This book has a load of characters and we get POV chapters from 6 of them and that was a bit much. I didn’t feel like I really knew any of them and instead of it adding to the mystery, it fell flat.Plot wise, it was good. There wasn’t a lot of build up or tension and the reveal was fairly lackluster; however, I just noticed this is the start of a series, so there’s that. Oh and the ending does lean more towards a cliffhanger than a resolution. Overall, it was an interesting set up, but it was missing the fun sparkle the movie had. I’ll likely read the next book. **Huge thanks to Amulet Books for providing the arc free of charge**
    more
  • Jennifer☠Pher☠
    January 1, 1970
    This looks like it was written for the young me. The adult me laughs out loud at the almost $16 Kindle book price. BAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!
  • Caidyn (SEMI-HIATUS; BW Reviews; he/him/his)
    January 1, 1970
    I received this from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review!There was a murder, but god did this suck. I came in here expecting lots of death and just a lot of fun joking, but this was a bit melodramatic and there was barely any death. One character died. One. And then the reveal for who the killer was felt so out of character and it was a bad reveal. All the build and tension for that.I couldn't get the characters down. There was Plum, Green, White, Boddy, Peacock, and Scarlet like in the I received this from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review!There was a murder, but god did this suck. I came in here expecting lots of death and just a lot of fun joking, but this was a bit melodramatic and there was barely any death. One character died. One. And then the reveal for who the killer was felt so out of character and it was a bad reveal. All the build and tension for that.I couldn't get the characters down. There was Plum, Green, White, Boddy, Peacock, and Scarlet like in the original. But then there were random people who were just there. I also never really figured out who was who. There was Plum, but he was never called Plum because they referred to everyone by their first name. Plum, I think, was Finn. Peacock was Beth. Scarlet was just Scarlet.The plot really sucked. Sorry, but it did. It was so boring. And then the reveal about who killed that singular person sucked. Then you have some weird addition to the plot right at the end??? Like, you already lost me. I don't care about this reveal/cliffhanger.All in all, would not recommend. It infuriated me.
    more
  • Mara
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars -- I thought this was a really fun adaptation of a beloved property that delivered an effective, albeit pretty straightforward, isolated closed circle mystery
  • Kaya
    January 1, 1970
    I think we can all agree on two things: one, that mystery trilogies are super hard to do and two, that Clue is one of the BEST movies/games to ever exist. That’s why I was super nervous to read this but I’m happy to report that I was pleasantly surprised by this!Trigger warnings for murder and (challenged) sexism.First off, all of the references were golden. I mean, we have all the characters, and obviously the murder was done in the hall! With the knife!* But the other weapons are casually I think we can all agree on two things: one, that mystery trilogies are super hard to do and two, that Clue is one of the BEST movies/games to ever exist. That’s why I was super nervous to read this but I’m happy to report that I was pleasantly surprised by this!Trigger warnings for murder and (challenged) sexism.First off, all of the references were golden. I mean, we have all the characters, and obviously the murder was done in the hall! With the knife!* But the other weapons are casually mentioned, and the secret passages!!!! Secret passages are your friends in the game, but I guess not here.*not a spoiler, i swear. reread the title.The atmosphere! There’s a huge snowstorm/flood that traps everyone inside an old house on campus and obviously everyone’s different personalities are conflicting and there’s no electricity and it’s so entertaining. It’s not so much of a creepy vibe, but you definitely feel on edge (in a good way!) a lot of the time.The author did an incredible job of introducing each and every character and having them alternate chapters. What’s even better is that every character is clearly hiding a secret, essentially making each an unreliable narrator.Orchid is actually the character I forgot existed in Clue (whoops) but of course she ended up being the one I most related to. I don’t know what that says about me…Scarlet is the gossip of the school, a front-runner in the humanities classes, and is Indian-American! It’s mentioned that she is one of the few people of race in the school, and she aims to fix that.Plum is Scarlet’s best friend and an incredible scientist. Although, his empathy skills could use a little work.Mustard is a military kid, and honestly makes some pretty ignorant, sexist comments that are challenged. He’s also described as having olive skin, and I’m not 100% sure what race he is.Green is a townie, the only kid at Fancy Academy Blackbrook who’s there on scholarship.Peacock’s perspective is only seen through journal entries, and she’s a temperamental tennis star.Kayla and Karlee are random, obnoxiously ignorant girls stuck with our other (far more memorable might I add) characters.Mrs. White is the sweet old lady who’s in charge of Tudor House, where all of our characters end up being trapped.I guessed the ending, but I wasn’t super mad about it? It was honestly a fun ride, and the characters were only half-dumb. As someone who is also half-dumb 90%* of the time, I really couldn’t blame them for missing a few obvious hints.*you guessed it! i am fully dumb the other 10% of the timeThere was quite a lot of set-up before events actually started rolling. I mean, it makes sense! We have a billion and one (yes that is the official count) characters to introduce, put in place, and establish before things can start going down. But I was never actually bored, it helped to know that murder was on its way!There seemed to be a few small plot points left unresolved or vaguely mentioned, but I won’t dwell on that too much. This is going to be a trilogy, after all, and I can’t judge based on the first book! I'd highly recommend this for fans of Truly Devious. And finally, as I said, I guessed the ending which is always a little disappointing, but I can certainly see the potential for future books in this series to shock me!A huge thank you to Amulet Books for the ARC in exchange for an honest review!
    more
  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    The butler did it. Just kidding, there is no butler in this story, though that’s about the level of predictability we’re dealing with. In the Hall with the Knife is a fun book that I didn’t mind reading at all, but the solve is as obvious as they come. *The reader, in the first half of the book, with the cliched mystery plot*Sorry, I had to. I liked the setting for the story and the pacing is good. The writing isn’t great (“...crackling on the ground like breakfast cereal.” Wait...what?), but it The butler did it. Just kidding, there is no butler in this story, though that’s about the level of predictability we’re dealing with. In the Hall with the Knife is a fun book that I didn’t mind reading at all, but the solve is as obvious as they come. *The reader, in the first half of the book, with the cliched mystery plot*Sorry, I had to. I liked the setting for the story and the pacing is good. The writing isn’t great (“...crackling on the ground like breakfast cereal.” Wait...what?), but it also isn’t completely awful. Had the murderer not been so painfully obvious, I would have actually said this was a pretty good attempt to adapt Clue to written form. Aside from the obviousness of the culprit, another thing that bugged me: The reader is given information immediately about the weapon and the location. The “who” is the only thing left up in the air. There is a slight complication regarding the first two, but it still felt a bit disingenuous to the spirit of the game to not write a story where we have the opportunity to figure out all three.I thought the rooms and the names from the game were well incorporated into the book. The weapons (and they’re all there, even if we know exactly which one the killer used right off the bat) felt forced. Technically speaking, a rope and a wrench do make an appearance, but it’s a cringey, dull thud of a plot point. In all, this is fun as long as you don’t expect too much. And I think it’s a good pick for readers on the younger end of the YA demographic: Murdery enough to be exciting, but nothing too graphic or upsetting and zero other adult content. A decent, light mystery. I’ll read the rest of the trilogy.*I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.*
    more
  • Catie
    January 1, 1970
    3 1/2 starsThis was delightful. Fans of the movie and the board game alike will be amused by Peterfreund's creative incorporation of the Clue suspects, the mansion (with all of its hidden passageways), the odd/random weapons, and of course, the delicious motives. This is the start of a series, and Peterfreund solves the initial crime while leaving plenty of unmined scandal and twists to fuel further installments. I will definitely continue!
    more
  • Lauren Stoolfire
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.In the Hall with the Knife by Diana Peterfreund was one of my most anticipated October releases. I mean, it's based on my favorite board game and one of my favorite movies as well. While it's a decent read on it's own and has some fun moments and references, it never quite managed to live up to my love of the game and the movie. I did enjoy how Peterfreund translated it into a boarding school murder mystery where the cast has been I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.In the Hall with the Knife by Diana Peterfreund was one of my most anticipated October releases. I mean, it's based on my favorite board game and one of my favorite movies as well. While it's a decent read on it's own and has some fun moments and references, it never quite managed to live up to my love of the game and the movie. I did enjoy how Peterfreund translated it into a boarding school murder mystery where the cast has been isolated in a mansion-like dorm building during a bout of hostile weather. The characters weren't quite as memorable as I wish they were, and it was a bit difficult for me to keep track of everyone although most everyone has a color-coded name. Overall, though, it's a solid and fun mystery, but I think my own expectations were just a little too sky high to really find myself hooked by this new take on a classic. I do plan on reading the future novels in this series as well as more from this author in the future.
    more
  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    This was fun enough for me to give four stars to, but also could've been better. There are a lot of secrets and they're weren't really revealed well, especially since each character gets a POV so you get multiple cases of characters thinking about their big secret without telling you what it was. In particular, the "secret" that bothered me was (view spoiler)[Oliver is Vaughn's identical twin brother? I feel like you should've mentioned that in his first scene rather than a throwaway line This was fun enough for me to give four stars to, but also could've been better. There are a lot of secrets and they're weren't really revealed well, especially since each character gets a POV so you get multiple cases of characters thinking about their big secret without telling you what it was. In particular, the "secret" that bothered me was (view spoiler)[Oliver is Vaughn's identical twin brother? I feel like you should've mentioned that in his first scene rather than a throwaway line later??? I assume I was supposed to go, "Ohhh, that's why Vaughn was acting so weird" but there are so many characters that I didn't notice anything at all and it just made me confused. (hide spoiler)]I also thought the two K named characters deserved more respect in their portrayal.(For the record, love the board game! Never saw the movie. It was fun anyway!)
    more
  • Alexa
    January 1, 1970
    A super solid boarding school murder book combined with "snowed in in a remote location" murder mystery trope, so if either/both are your jam, In the Hall with a Knife is a satisfying read. And, yes, it's a Clue tie-in novel: there are plenty of winks and nods to the movie, but that wasn't my favorite aspect honestly. The book is strong on it's own for the Blackbrook school and the assembly of characters, who are named after Clue characters (as they should be) but standalone as their own A super solid boarding school murder book combined with "snowed in in a remote location" murder mystery trope, so if either/both are your jam, In the Hall with a Knife is a satisfying read. And, yes, it's a Clue tie-in novel: there are plenty of winks and nods to the movie, but that wasn't my favorite aspect honestly. The book is strong on it's own for the Blackbrook school and the assembly of characters, who are named after Clue characters (as they should be) but standalone as their own characters. Diana Peterfreund has crafted an all-around well-drawn "spoiled rich kids with secrets" boarding school setting + cast.To that end, my favorite aspect of the book was all the worldbuilding and set-up in the first half or so. The atmosphere/tone of the storm, getting to know all the characters with hints of their backstories and secrets... I loved being drawn into the world. Then, despite being a massive fan of the movie, the movie references didn't do much for me--the tone of this book is COMPLETELY different than the film, and that is to the book's credit. It works as it's own thing, and thus for me I didn't need the verbatim lines from the movie/character combos because much of the book stands on its own.But then there were a few twists/secret reveals that didn't quite land for me? There's one "reveal" in a specific character's POV that felt rather anemic to me. It was meant to build tension and work as a red herring for the "whodunit," but something about the execution confused me rather than titillated. I spent half a chapter confused and feeling like a missed something until it became clear what the "twist" was. However, another "secret twist" aspect of a major character I really loved--the whole build up with Orchid was great and I look forward to more on her in the sequels. I was satisfied with the conclusion though the big "bad guy" confrontation scene definitely got a little soapy and the murderer almost felt OOC.I do want to include one very important trigger warning for ED sufferers or survivors. Or really anyone who struggles with disordered eating. My LEAST favorite thing in the book was Peacock's "POV" chapters--she doesn't get direct in-POV chapters but rather her "chapters" are excerpts from her diary, wherein she meticulously tracks everything she eats, how much she exercises, and then brief notes on how she's feeling. I skimmed every single line of food with calories and tallies of exercise. I found it too upsetting. I don't consider myself a special snowflake, but I have suffered from disordered eating in the past, and I find calorie tracking triggering. Anyone who is an ED sufferer/survivor needs to skip this book. A note on the diversity in the book, which is welcome but there was one thing I found slightly disappointing. Among the cast is Scarlet, who is South Asian, and Mustard who is ambiguously referred to as a "fellow person of color" by Scarlet (I thought he was Black b/c it never says in the book and just looked up the Kirkus review that says he has tan skin? I cannot recall AT ALL where in the book it said that--I think it would have been way less coy to just SAY, personally--ambiguous diversity doesn't help anyone?). Mustard is also gay. I was so excited about this! And there were early vibes that maybe Finn (Plum) was queer as well and a potential love interest for Mustard. I was lining up for the shipping! See, Finn and Scarlet are in a "platonic power partnership," which automatically set off queer alarms--made me wonder if one or both of them was ace? But then we find out Finn used to be Peacock's secret boyfriend and I was disappointed. Vaughn (Green) is into Orchid, which leaves no love interest for Mustard in the cast. Give Mustard a boyfriend in the sequel, please! And I'm holding out hope that Scarlet might be queer as well--ace would be great!The mystery of this book wraps up completely (so it can standalone), but it's clear at the end that more is coming. I believe this is planned as a trilogy? I'm here for it. These are solid, accessible mystery YA books that I think would be suitable for younger readers--a good choice for a tween who loved The Westing Game but is looking for the next level. The characters and setting are fun, and I look forward to the series gaining it's own footing beyond the movie/boardgame.
    more
  • Cammie
    January 1, 1970
    In the Hall with the Knife is a fun who-done-it mystery. The characters and setting represent the well-known board game Clue. When the students, staff, and faculty of Blackbrook Academy become stranded by a violent winter storm, the "game" begins. Each character seems to have a plausible motive for murder and readers are kept guessing until nearly the end. While the characters fit certain stereotypes and aren't very developed, the mystery kept the story going until the end. When the second of In the Hall with the Knife is a fun who-done-it mystery. The characters and setting represent the well-known board game Clue. When the students, staff, and faculty of Blackbrook Academy become stranded by a violent winter storm, the "game" begins. Each character seems to have a plausible motive for murder and readers are kept guessing until nearly the end. While the characters fit certain stereotypes and aren't very developed, the mystery kept the story going until the end. When the second of the trilogy is released, I'll be sure to read it.
    more
  • Jacquelyn Simon
    January 1, 1970
    I'd maybe give this book a 2.5 or 3-star rating. I found this book to be very anticlimactic with a predictable ending. I thought this book had SO much promise. I really loved how the different POVs were characters from the board game (except for Orchid, of course.)I found Orchid’s POV to be so interesting honestly the most mysterious part about the plot. A lot of my interest in her plotline can be accredited to her -SPOILER- (view spoiler)[being a celebrity (hide spoiler)] I always find that I'd maybe give this book a 2.5 or 3-star rating. I found this book to be very anticlimactic with a predictable ending. I thought this book had SO much promise. I really loved how the different POVs were characters from the board game (except for Orchid, of course.)I found Orchid’s POV to be so interesting honestly the most mysterious part about the plot. A lot of my interest in her plotline can be accredited to her -SPOILER- (view spoiler)[being a celebrity (hide spoiler)] I always find that fascinating in characters. I'm just still frustrated over that ending.-SPOILER- like, seriously. Don't read if you don't want to be spoiled.(view spoiler)[ I felt the way that the book was set up made the murderer so freaking obvious. Of course, the murderer would be the only one of the characters to not have a POV. How obvious can you get?Also, I was annoyed with the whole Vaughn-has-a-twin plotline. The ending made it seem like it was supposed to be a reveal... But it wasn't? It literally tells you that on page 21. At one point I had a theory that would’ve been much more interesting. I had a theory that Vaughn actually had a split personality disorder and that Oliver was his split personality (that he was aware of). Hear me out. No one ever saw Oliver and Vaughn together, Vaughn was so ”terrified” of his ”brother, ” and Vaughn’s nose bleed. In the scene where Vaughn had a nose bleed, Oliver was nowhere to be found. My thought was that Vaughn had managed to switch personalities (uncontrollably) and the mental act of switching caused his nose to bleed. There were other smaller ”clues” I had to this theory, but honestly, I think it would've made for a much better twist. If you’ve read this book then please send me a message and let me know what you think of my theory. (hide spoiler)]
    more
  • Alina Nshanyan
    January 1, 1970
    It took me so long to actually get invested into this story. I was in a bit of a reading slump when I started it so I probably didn’t pay proper attention to it in the beginning. But aside from that, it was an okay mystery. I haven’t seen the movie but the board game was my favorite when i was a kid. The thing I’m still confused about is Vaughn’s whole storyline with his life and his brother. Not sure what the ending meant, or if I missed anything. Also confused about why Orchid’s story had the It took me so long to actually get invested into this story. I was in a bit of a reading slump when I started it so I probably didn’t pay proper attention to it in the beginning. But aside from that, it was an okay mystery. I haven’t seen the movie but the board game was my favorite when i was a kid. The thing I’m still confused about is Vaughn’s whole storyline with his life and his brother. Not sure what the ending meant, or if I missed anything. Also confused about why Orchid’s story had the stalker element but that never got played out. But I will probably read the next one to see what happens. Kind of sad how my last book of the year wasn’t as good as I hoped it would be.
    more
  • Clinton Read
    January 1, 1970
    This is by far one of the most fun books I have read in a very long time. I was jumping back and forth the whole time on who the killer was. Diana Peterfreud did an amazing job blending the boardgame and the movie of Clue in a new exciting way! I just kept wanting more and more! This will def be one of my favorite books for a very long time to come. I found each of the characters so compiling. It left me soooooo many questions in the end about each and every one of the characters. Also That This is by far one of the most fun books I have read in a very long time. I was jumping back and forth the whole time on who the killer was. Diana Peterfreud did an amazing job blending the boardgame and the movie of Clue in a new exciting way! I just kept wanting more and more! This will def be one of my favorite books for a very long time to come. I found each of the characters so compiling. It left me soooooo many questions in the end about each and every one of the characters. Also That Ending WAS EVERYTHING! I didn't see the killer coming! I can't wait to read more in this series when they come out. I highly recommend everyone check out this brilliant book!
    more
  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    3.5. It’s a YA story based on the board game/movie Clue! And if you know me at all, I had to have this book because I’m obsessed with Clue and anything that is compared to it. Going into the story I knew it was YA and that could mean one of two things. I was either going to be head over heals in love with it or I was going to really hate it. Somehow I find myself in between those two feelings. I liked it and once I was invested I was all in. I didn’t love the characters, but I was able to put 3.5. It’s a YA story based on the board game/movie Clue! And if you know me at all, I had to have this book because I’m obsessed with Clue and anything that is compared to it. Going into the story I knew it was YA and that could mean one of two things. I was either going to be head over heals in love with it or I was going to really hate it. Somehow I find myself in between those two feelings. I liked it and once I was invested I was all in. I didn’t love the characters, but I was able to put that past me to at least want to know who did it. The ending though was a little meh. It’s the first book in the trilogy, but we do find out who killed Mr. Boddy by the end. So now I have no clue (no pun intended) the direction this series is going. In my head I had assumed maybe each of the 3 books would be a different “clue” mystery, but that doesn’t appear to be the case. This honestly should have probably just stuck to being a standalone. At this time I’m waiting for book 2’s synopsis to decide if I will continue with the trilogy or not. 3 stars: ⭐️⭐️⭐️
    more
  • Misti
    January 1, 1970
    I've loved the movie and the board game since I was a kid so of course I had to read this. I thought it was fun. Lots of nods to the movie and the clue keep piling up. Plus, who doesn't love a good -stranded in a storm with no power- type of mystery? The book ends but also sets up for more and I'm sure I'll be back for it.
    more
  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    *heavy breathing*Hello, OFFICIAL most anticipated book of 2019. Y'all don't know how ready I am for this. You can say I'm already in the library with the candlestick because I knocked over the candle in my excitement for this, and now I'm burning the candles in wait for this.
    more
  • Kaethe Douglas
    January 1, 1970
    As a Fan of Truly Devious, boarding schools, and mysteries, not to mention Clue my favorite boardgame and one of my top 10 movies, I am so looking forward to this. And the two more to follow. I particularly like that touch: I choose to see it as an homage to the film's three endings.
    more
  • Katherine Moore
    January 1, 1970
    FULL BLOG REVIEW HERE:http://kamoorephoto.booklikes.com/pos...I am going to hazard a guess and bet that a whole load of readers of this will pick it up out of nostalgia for either the cult classic 1985 film 'Clue' or because they enjoyed the Hasbro board game of the same name that the excellent movie was based on.Or both, which is why I had to read it!This is a modern reimagining of the board game 'Clue' (and when it's brought 'to life' in this way, it takes on the story form like the movie); FULL BLOG REVIEW HERE:http://kamoorephoto.booklikes.com/pos...I am going to hazard a guess and bet that a whole load of readers of this will pick it up out of nostalgia for either the cult classic 1985 film 'Clue' or because they enjoyed the Hasbro board game of the same name that the excellent movie was based on.Or both, which is why I had to read it!This is a modern reimagining of the board game 'Clue' (and when it's brought 'to life' in this way, it takes on the story form like the movie); set in an elite prep school in the woods of Maine called Blackbrook Academy. The characters are all there: Scarlet, Mustard, White, Green, Plum, Peacock, Orchid, and yes, Mr. Boddy. They all become stuck in this grand mansion of a school out on the tip of a rocky peninsula in the middle of what seems to be the storm of the decade, with no power, no way in or out, and then there's a murder.The characters all have secrets, and a lot of them neatly fit stereotypes (rather like the original movie, I suppose, which may grate on some nerves and irritate some readers, but is actually wonderfully campy in the film). If you don't have the movie to constantly compare to (even with the board game as background), the book actually simply works well as a YA fun murder-mystery read: everyone is a suspect, they all seem to have a motive, but it doesn't get too heavy or scary. This is actually much like the vibe of the film; mystery LITE. I would be interested in hearing what people think who have only played the board game, and from those who have not played the game but seen the film; I may have seen the film so many times that I constantly had images of Tim Curry scurrying around a mansion in a butler outfit (he was just SO PERFECT). I do think that Diana Peterfreund has paid great homage to the general 'Clue' board game franchise, and it will bring back some warm fuzzy feelings for fans (unless you expect the characters to be carbon copies of the movie versions, as well as the storyline). It took a little while for me to get fully invested in the story, and much like the film, the 'big event' happens quite the way into the book. The chapters are named after the different characters as they reveal more about each one and follow them through the story. That took a while to get used to (it is used SO much) but I found it useful in separating their story arcs. It's always a huge gamble to write a movie based on a book, so is it just as much of a gamble to write a book based on a movie? I'm not sure. This may be removed enough from the original film (or game) that it will find a different audience anyway. And maybe people will go out and play the board game again??! Who knows.This will be released 10.8.19 on Amulet Books (Abrams) and there are plans for a series of Clue mysteries (at least 2 more books).*I gratefully received this ARC as part of Miss Print’s ARC Adoption Program. Thank you!
    more
  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    With a historic level storm hitting the area, the remaining Blackbrook Academy students sought refuge in Tudor House. They hoped all would be well in the morning, but never believed they would wake to find the corpse of their headmaster, Mr. Body. All became suspects and possible victims as they raced to try and solve the mystery of who did it and why.This was such a fun way to take a walk down memory lane. I fondly remember playing this game in my youth, and could not wait to meet the teen With a historic level storm hitting the area, the remaining Blackbrook Academy students sought refuge in Tudor House. They hoped all would be well in the morning, but never believed they would wake to find the corpse of their headmaster, Mr. Body. All became suspects and possible victims as they raced to try and solve the mystery of who did it and why.This was such a fun way to take a walk down memory lane. I fondly remember playing this game in my youth, and could not wait to meet the teen versions of all the characters. Peterfreund assembled an interesting cast, leveraging a bit of the original and blending them with her own take on on who they could have been as teens.The storm, the campus, and the historic Tudor House all combined to create a mood worthy of the Clue namesake. The house had a rich history and some secrets to hide, while the treacherous weather kept the characters in isolation. It was such a classic mystery setting, and I thought it was utilized well throughout the story.Peterfreund did a fantastic job crafting each character. They each a distinct personality and voice, which made it easy to distinguish between them as the story flipped through the six different points of view. Not only did each character bring their unique point of view to the story, but they each had a secret. Some were revealed, but I was still left wondering about others. And, though the mystery of who killed Mr. Body in the hall with the knife was solved by the end of this book, there were plenty of questions left unanswered for the series' future installments.I had a lot of fun hunting down those Easter eggs giving nod to the original Clue franchise, as I gathered tidbits to aid in solving the mystery at hand. The combination of humor, camp, and tension resulted in a fun mystery, which had me hunting for clues and left me eagerly awaiting the sequel.*ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
    more
  • Audrey
    January 1, 1970
    I am a huge fan of Clue and was so excited when I heard abbot this book. I heard a lot of reviews that agreed it was an okay read and I have to agree.It's current day and a group of students are at the prestigious, and supremely isolated, prep academy Blackbrook. A huge storm is coming into Maine and while many students evacuate a small group is stuck at the school and staying in a dorm with the Headmaster, Mr. Boddy, and the house proctor, Mrs. White. There is conflict amongst the students - I am a huge fan of Clue and was so excited when I heard abbot this book. I heard a lot of reviews that agreed it was an okay read and I have to agree.It's current day and a group of students are at the prestigious, and supremely isolated, prep academy Blackbrook. A huge storm is coming into Maine and while many students evacuate a small group is stuck at the school and staying in a dorm with the Headmaster, Mr. Boddy, and the house proctor, Mrs. White. There is conflict amongst the students - competition, past relationships and they all have secrets. And of course most of our characters are named after the original Clue cast - Mustard, Scarlett, Peacock, Green and Plum. There are some other supporting characters as well.Hours later they discover Mr. Boddy's, um, body....in the conservatory. Very dead. We have a classic whodunit and the game in on. I really wanted so much more from this book and while it was entertaining the mystery itself was not totally compelling to me. I didn't find the characters to be totally fleshed out and this book did have a trope I don't love.I would say if you're a hardcore Clue fan you might find this fun, but not a very compelling mystery on its own. I will pick up the next book to read it because I'm curious and a sucker like that, but definitely not as great as I was hoping.
    more
  • SuperWendy
    January 1, 1970
    My love of mysteries was born when I was a teen but back then (when dinosaurs roamed the Earth) I pretty much had to skip straight to adult books once I outgrew Nancy Drew. Teenage Wendy would have LOVED this book and declared it the BESTEST BOOK EVER! Adult Wendy? I was very captivated with it to start. I loved the premise. I loved how the author utilized the Clue board game aspects. But it kind of lost steam for me towards the end and I dragged my way to the finish line. We get a resolution to My love of mysteries was born when I was a teen but back then (when dinosaurs roamed the Earth) I pretty much had to skip straight to adult books once I outgrew Nancy Drew. Teenage Wendy would have LOVED this book and declared it the BESTEST BOOK EVER! Adult Wendy? I was very captivated with it to start. I loved the premise. I loved how the author utilized the Clue board game aspects. But it kind of lost steam for me towards the end and I dragged my way to the finish line. We get a resolution to the whodunit, but all the kids have various "secrets" - Green's being particularly over-the-top (it's the stuff of soap operas...) and that's left dangling to spin out into the next book in the series. A B- read on my personal scale.
    more
  • Empress Reece (Hooked on Books)
    January 1, 1970
    Clue was my favorite movie and game as a kid. I rented the movie so many times at our little country video store that the owner gave the movie to me one day. He made me the happiest kid in the world that day. I'll never forget that. When I saw this book releasing I knew I had to have it. I bought the pre-release hard copy that very day. Maybe I had too high of expectations going into it but unfortunately the book just didn't do a lot for me. I knew it was a young adult book but seeing the Clue was my favorite movie and game as a kid. I rented the movie so many times at our little country video store that the owner gave the movie to me one day. He made me the happiest kid in the world that day. I'll never forget that. When I saw this book releasing I knew I had to have it. I bought the pre-release hard copy that very day. Maybe I had too high of expectations going into it but unfortunately the book just didn't do a lot for me. I knew it was a young adult book but seeing the characters as kids was kind of jarring. My first thoughts were wait a second, these aren't the characters I know and love. I'm going to continue the series because hey, it's a Clue retelling and I have to see how the story progresses and the characters evolve. I just hope they grow on me a little more in the next book.
    more
  • Nikole Clow
    January 1, 1970
    In the Hall with the Knife is a Clue mystery fans will love filled with thrilling dialogue and intrigue. This first book is loaded with Easter eggs from the original movie and game and multiple mysteries outside of a murder. This book is not just about solving a murder: it’s also about determining who everyone can trust when everyone has something to hide.I thought Peterfreund did a great job staying true to the movie and boardgame while also adding her own personal twists to the story. You get In the Hall with the Knife is a Clue mystery fans will love filled with thrilling dialogue and intrigue. This first book is loaded with Easter eggs from the original movie and game and multiple mysteries outside of a murder. This book is not just about solving a murder: it’s also about determining who everyone can trust when everyone has something to hide.I thought Peterfreund did a great job staying true to the movie and boardgame while also adding her own personal twists to the story. You get the original characters but here’s a twist: they’re teenagers at an elite boarding school who have to solve a murder with no real murder solving skills. But that easily proves difficult when all of them start to suspect one another. Orchid has a potentially deadly past she’s trying to keep buried. Peacock has a secret that could ruin her life and career. Vaughn is living a double life – and no one suspects that he is. Mustard just transferred to this boarding school with a reason he’s not quite ready to reveal. Plum is the golden boy, but being the golden boy comes at a cost. And Scarlet will do anything to succeed at this school – even go to drastic means to come out on top. And then someone turns up dead – someone that each of them has a motive for murdering. But the question is – who really murdered someone?One of my favorite aspects about this book is how Peterfreund revealed something about each character in each of their chapters. Each chapter is a different perspective, and every time something is revealed about that specific character. Some of the secrets I guessed but some I did not see coming. But I thought it was brilliant to reveal a secret in each chapter (and not all of them were outright revealed, some you had to read between the lines or put two and two together). It’s like tiny puzzle pieces fitting together over the length of this novel to create an almost complete puzzle. And with how the story ends, I’m suspecting even more character secrets will be revealed in the next book.There are multiple point of views, as each of the main Clue characters has a voice, but I thought the chapters and voices really flowed well together. Though there isn’t quite a ton of romance, this first book sets the stage for potential romances between some characters in the next two books (and I’m rooting for two in particular!). It was great to see the characters start to rely on one another and trust their instincts and also develop some key life skills that they wouldn’t be able to learn in a classroom.Overall, I thought this was a great book perfect for mystery genre fans and teens that are looking for a way to experience a classic board game in a new way. The killer was slightly easy to guess, but I still thought this was a fun and thrilling mystery read and I cannot wait to read the sequel. In the Hall with the Knife comes out next Tuesday, but you can preorder this fun book now!
    more
  • Sara (A Gingerly Review)
    January 1, 1970
    What a fun take on the classic game! I will continue the series when the next book comes out.
Write a review