forget-me-not
Kara Petrovic reflects on a single relationship in their life, and invites the reader to follow along their journey: from falling at first sight, to seeing this person's true colours reveal themselves before their very eyes. Petrovic paints the picture of pain and betrayal that comes with realizing one is being abused, or in a toxic relationship, and likewise the desperation we feel while we hold onto vehement denial. 

forget-me-not Details

Titleforget-me-not
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 15th, 2019
PublisherKara Petrovic
ISBN-139781796440423
Rating
GenrePoetry

forget-me-not Review

  • Jessica Ciarcz
    January 1, 1970
    3.75 stars ⭐this collection was very well done. i do wish it had been a little longer, because it was more of a chapbook. but i definitely enjoyed the poems and the writing style!full review to come on the blog soon 3.75 stars ⭐️this collection was very well done. i do wish it had been a little longer, because it was more of a chapbook. but i definitely enjoyed the poems and the writing style!full review to come on the blog soon
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  • Jim Bennett
    January 1, 1970
    As always, do not let my star count override your judgement of content. More on the stars, counting, and my rating challenges later. Also as always, look up anything you’re not absolutely certain of here. There are references to Greek mythology, for example.This book is scarily personal and strongly communicates Petrovic’s challenging dilemmas in relationships. For example, in on: coffee cups, ends thus: “i warned you to be wary, /told you there were things /even i cannot touch /but still you re As always, do not let my star count override your judgement of content. More on the stars, counting, and my rating challenges later. Also as always, look up anything you’re not absolutely certain of here. There are references to Greek mythology, for example.This book is scarily personal and strongly communicates Petrovic’s challenging dilemmas in relationships. For example, in on: coffee cups, ends thus: “i warned you to be wary, /told you there were things /even i cannot touch /but still you reached out /and cupped my face in your hands.”In the long poem on: love and other sins, we find these phrases: “in church we sit /five feet apart” and this: “we are two catholic school girls /our knuckles slapped /until rose petals bloom /under the weight /of the sunflower yellow rulers” and this repeated refrain: “(i must not look, /i must not touch).”In to refuse kindly, we find this ending: “come with me, /quiet, begging. /my love: /you know /i cannot.”The final poem, on: endings, includes this: “my mind repeats on one track when i’m around you and it’s that i want to kiss you, /i want to hold you, /i am aching to touch you. / but i can’t afford that, not now, not that i’ve picked my path and /it isn’t you. /i told you i wanted a white picket fence, tigerlily, and /i meant it.”That should give you a feel for what Petrovic has to say, and how well she says it. Now for my star count boilerplate. My personal guidelines, when doing any review, are as follows: five stars means, roughly equal to best in genre. Rarely given. Four stars means, extremely good. Three stars means, definitely recommendable. I am a tough reviewer. I try hard to be consistent. I think this book easily rates four stars; your personal rating may well be higher. Seriously recommended.
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