Clap When You Land
Camino Rios lives for the summers when her father visits her in the Dominican Republic. But this time, on the day when his plane is supposed to land, Camino arrives at the airport to see crowds of crying people...In New York City, Yahaira Rios is called to the principal's office, where her mother is waiting to tell her that her father, her hero, has died in a plane crash.Separated by distance - and Papi's secrets - the two girls are forced to face a new reality in which their father is dead and their lives are forever altered. And then, when it seems like they've lost everything of their father, they learn of each other.Papi's death uncovers all the painful truths he kept hidden, and the love he divided across an ocean. And now, Camino and Yahaira are both left to grapple with what this new sister means to them, and what it will now take to keep their dreams alive.In a dual narrative novel in verse that brims with both grief and love, award-winning and bestselling author Elizabeth Acevedo writes about the devastation of loss, the difficulty of forgiveness, and the bittersweet bonds that shape our lives.

Clap When You Land Details

TitleClap When You Land
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 5th, 2020
PublisherHot Key Books
ISBN-139781471409127
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Poetry, Fiction, Realistic Fiction, LGBT, Young Adult Contemporary, Family, Audiobook, Teen

Clap When You Land Review

  • chai ♡
    January 1, 1970
    day whatever of social distancing: I read an Acevedo book and restored a semblance of purpose and joy to my lifefull review to come.
  • Emily May
    January 1, 1970
    A queenoffers her hand to be kissed,& can form it into a fistwhile smiling the whole damn time. Perhaps what I love most about Clap When You Land, besides the author's obvious talent for writing moving free verse, is that it brings attention to something that so many of us forgot about or never heard about. Tragedies happen all the time. Some are noticed, when they are newsworthy and drenched in politics-- terrorism, school shootings, for example --but some are left to be grieved only by A queenoffers her hand to be kissed,& can form it into a fistwhile smiling the whole damn time. Perhaps what I love most about Clap When You Land, besides the author's obvious talent for writing moving free verse, is that it brings attention to something that so many of us forgot about or never heard about. Tragedies happen all the time. Some are noticed, when they are newsworthy and drenched in politics-- terrorism, school shootings, for example --but some are left to be grieved only by those directly affected. The rest of the world goes on as normal, not seeing the pain inflicted on the community in question.In November 2001, flight AA587 crashed to the ground on its way to Santo Domingo, killing 265 people on a flight where 90% of the passengers were Dominican or of Dominican descent. Noting that it was not another terrorist attack, the media largely ignored it, but it was a terrible blow to the New York Dominican community.Clap When You Land is the story of two girls - Camino and Yahaira - one in the Dominican Republic and one in New York City. They have never met, never spoken, never known about each other's existence, but when their father is killed in a plane crash on his way to visit Camino, they find each other in the midst of their grief.Both girls have their own struggles, but Camino is especially threatened without her father to protect her. Now the local pimp, a man called El Cero, is hanging around, following her. All she wants is to escape, study premed, have a chance at something better. Then along comes Yahaira and turns her life upside down, changes everything she thought she knew about her father. So he created a theater of his life& got lost in all the different roles he had to play. This is another part of the book and I thought it was done really well. Part of the girls' discovery of each other is also the discovery that maybe their father wasn't quite the man they thought he was. That he was more complex, had many flaws. That even though he was a good father, he might not have been a good husband. In this, the book is something of a bildungsroman. Both girls are matured by the intensity of the loss and the discoveries made after.It is a beautiful story that finds a lot of warmth and hope in the darkness of loss. My only complaint is that Camino and Yahaira's voices were a little too similar. I found it especially hard to distinguish the two in the beginning and had to look for other markers to remember whose chapters we were on. But it's a small complaint. Highly recommended for those who enjoyed The Poet X and other novels in verse.Facebook | Instagram
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  • Warda
    January 1, 1970
    I dont need to read the blurb to know that I will be reading this book. No diggety, no doubt. I don’t need to read the blurb to know that I will be reading this book. No diggety, no doubt.
  • Mariah
    January 1, 1970
    Im gonna need Elizabeth Acevedo to crawl out of my soul because this is too much. Ive said it before and Ill say it again, this woman is incapable of writing anything but 5 star masterpieces.I cant actually talk about this book without breaking down so Im gonna leave it at that.XSo this cover pops up in my feed and I'm like: "Wow".And then I read the synopsys and my mind is like:"Damn, this would probably be great in audiobook format, but maybe I'm just picturing this as an Elizabeth Acevedo I’m gonna need Elizabeth Acevedo to crawl out of my soul because this is too much. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, this woman is incapable of writing anything but 5 star masterpieces.I can’t actually talk about this book without breaking down so I’m gonna leave it at that.XSo this cover pops up in my feed and I'm like: "Wow".And then I read the synopsys and my mind is like:"Damn, this would probably be great in audiobook format, but maybe I'm just picturing this as an Elizabeth Acevedo type of thing."And then I looked up to actually see who wrote this.I swear to god you can *smell* this woman's talent.
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  • Isabella
    January 1, 1970
    "This must be a plane of Dominicans returning home; when you touch down on this soil, you must clap when you land. Para dar gracias a dios. Regrezamos."actual rating: 4.5 stars
  • leynes
    January 1, 1970
    I just preordered this. I never preorder books. Elizabeth Acevedo is just that good. Duh.UPDATE May, 6: I'm so jealous of everyone who has already gotten a hold of this book ... My copy won't arrive until May, 15 and I'm this close (* *) to re-opening my Audible account just to listen to the audiobook of this already.
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  • Kate (GirlReading)
    January 1, 1970
    Elizabeth Acevedo has, once again, proved she is a true master of words. Everything about this book from the plot and the character to the writing and the structure was crafted beautifully. Each time I read a book by Elizabeth, I get more excited about her work. This was such a wonderful story shining light on a topic I've rarely seen discussed in YA and does so in a sensitive and stunning manner. I want to write a three page review on this but honestly? I don't have the words. I was simply Elizabeth Acevedo has, once again, proved she is a true master of words. Everything about this book from the plot and the character to the writing and the structure was crafted beautifully. Each time I read a book by Elizabeth, I get more excited about her work. This was such a wonderful story shining light on a topic I've rarely seen discussed in YA and does so in a sensitive and stunning manner. I want to write a three page review on this but honestly? I don't have the words. I was simply blown away.TW: sexual harassment, sexual assault
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  • Fadwa (Word Wonders)
    January 1, 1970
    CW: talk about cancer, plane crash, parental death, grief, sexual harrassment, stalking, physical assault, sexual assault, labor and delivery, burial.Elizabeth Acevedo did it again, folks. She has written a book that has wrecked me and left me staring into space unable to find the words to articulate my feelings. Damn. This was breathtaking.RTC!
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  • Vee_Bookish // in lockdown or not or maybe
    January 1, 1970
    I'm also a book blogger: Vee_Bookish(ARC provided by NetGalley, my opinions are unbiased)This heartbreaking story of two girls, separated by countries and united by blood and tragedy completely captivated me. I just knew when I read the blurb that this was going to be a great read, the idea of two sisters that did not know of the other until their father passes away on a flight from one to the other was such a unique concept.Camino and Yahaira have such unique voices that I barely ever had to I'm also a book blogger: Vee_Bookish(ARC provided by NetGalley, my opinions are unbiased)This heartbreaking story of two girls, separated by countries and united by blood and tragedy completely captivated me. I just knew when I read the blurb that this was going to be a great read, the idea of two sisters that did not know of the other until their father passes away on a flight from one to the other was such a unique concept.Camino and Yahaira have such unique voices that I barely ever had to check who was speaking, which was a real treat (I can have fully realised characters sometimes, as a treat). I was so fascinated with Camino and her culture and language, as I've never heard stories from the Dominican Republic. She often speaks Spanish, which I do not, but I kept up easily and it made her voice authentic.I had a couple of small issues with the book. Much like Turtle Under Ice it did feel at times that the author thought we needed to reminded often that their father had died, so the story didn't really pick up until Camino Yahaira met. I also wasn't completely sold on it being told in verse, as it often felt like it was just a full sentence, chopped up to look like verse.The best parts were the stories within the story, Camino's friend's baby, Yahaira's girlfried who grows plants on the fire escape, two sisters realising all the parts of their father that belonged to the other, the rich / poor divide between the two. It really is an incredible story.
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  • destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]
    January 1, 1970
    This was absolutely phenomenal. My heart is broken in the best way. RTC💖 diversity: most characters are Dominican (both MCs and almost all side characters), Yahaira is a lesbian, Yahaira's girlfriend is Black, Camino's best friend is Haitian.
  • Carla
    January 1, 1970
    When you touch down on this soil, you must clap when you land. Clap When You Land was my most anticipated book of 2020. Elizabeth Acevedo is one of my favorite authors so I could not add this book to my TBR list fast enough. This review will not give the book justice. I have no words. It was a beautiful story, with beautiful characters all told in Acevedos amazing prose. The subject matter is one that often goes untold, especially in YA books. Family secrets, grief, resentment. There were just “…When you touch down on this soil, you must clap when you land.” “Clap When You Land” was my most anticipated book of 2020. Elizabeth Acevedo is one of my favorite authors so I could not add this book to my TBR list fast enough. This review will not give the book justice. I have no words. It was a beautiful story, with beautiful characters all told in Acevedo’s amazing prose. The subject matter is one that often goes untold, especially in YA books. Family secrets, grief, resentment. There were just so many elements that made this story whole; poverty, class, and colorism being among them. I enjoyed the alternating point of views as well as the secondary characters. This book touched my heart in ways that were both heartbreaking and uplifting, devastating but also hopeful. I love the fact that in each book I have read by Elizabeth Acevedo I close the book and know that I have taken something away from its pages. This time was no different. In addition to this, I was not at all familiar with Flight AA587 ( the second deadliest plane crash in American history) prior to reading. Absolutely heartbreaking. https://www.nbcnews.com/news/latino/g...Actual Rating 4.5/5 stars
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  • faith ✨
    January 1, 1970
    ✈ read this review and others on my blog, pages left unreadWhen am I never disappointed by a book?This question, which strikes true too many times than wanted, is especially relevant for Clap When You Land. I had so many hopes for it, but was unfortunately left underwhelmed and disappointed after finishing it. And while there were many redeeming qualities to it, they sadly did not overpower the things I didnt like about it. To start this review, I do want to say one thing: this book is ✈ read this review and others on my blog, pages left unreadWhen am I never disappointed by a book?This question, which strikes true too many times than wanted, is especially relevant for Clap When You Land. I had so many hopes for it, but was unfortunately left underwhelmed and disappointed after finishing it. And while there were many redeeming qualities to it, they sadly did not overpower the things I didn’t like about it. To start this review, I do want to say one thing: this book is beautiful. From its harrowing but all too real portrayals of grief, the authenticity and strongness of the two main characters Camino and Yahaira’s voices, and even the various other characters, the sweet sapphic relationship, and how beautifully written (in verse) it is, there are so many things to like about it. At one point I was gleefully reading over 200 pages of it, in one sitting—I was completely entranced.I especially admired how well-written Camino and Yahaira’s point of views are. It seemed as if from even 50 pages, I knew everything about them both, and their voices are so easily distinct from one another, but somehow the same. Their feelings, wants, and their separate conflict are conveyed so effortlessly, and I loved reading about them both. This book is very, very character focused; and if I had to describe it, it’s a story of two sisters discovering things of which they had thought otherwise about themselves and others, things both tangible and metaphorical, and also story of just simply . . . their lives. if they’re the only characters I have to read about for the rest of my life, I would have no problem with that. And, I do want to discuss them in depth:Camino: I admired Camino’s independence and will so much – she has a longing dream to study at Columbia and become a doctor in the States, as a girl living in the Dominican Republic, and works at no cost to achieve that goal. But she’s just such a real character, and it’s as if Acevedo picked her from real life and wrote her into a book. I felt when she felt, and her and her aunt might just be my favorite characters I’ve read this year. She’s such a caring person and just so, so, likable. For just a moment I grab my worries by the nape.My silence tells them: Leave me. Leave me.Leave me alone. We will make it. We will be fine.I promise. Some way we’ll survive. Yahaira: Yahaira is just such a quiet, but strong character? She’s a quiet and reserved person and yet has so much thoughts—I almost have no idea how to describe her. I loved her relationship with her girlfriend Dre; it’s so endearing, and to see two girls of color (Yahaira is Dominican-American and Dre is black) being together and loving each other so casually makes me want to lie down in a field of sunflowers and smile (but also shoot myself into outer space). I have words that I have kept secret from Mami,words a better daughter would have told her.I am my father’s daughter, a bad daughtera bad daughter to a good woman, a good woman. But even with that, I can’t help but feel underwhelmed by it. There were so many plot points being told, and very well, but at the end I was just like: I wanted more. I can’t help but wish there was more substance to parts of the story, and I wish some things were just paid more attention to.And I feel as if this book needed to be . . . longer? There’s so much time spent developing the story initially, to the point where there’s barely any interaction between Camino and Yahaira. I so wish there was more of them being together – it isn’t until very late into the book when that happens. I did very well appreciate the time spent developing the story and the characters voices, it’s something I liked a lot about this book, but I wish more time was also spent after Camino and Yahaira meet. A queen offers her hand to be kissed, & can form it into a fist while smiling the whole damn time. So, I’ll leave it at this: Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo was for me, a book that made me feel so conflicted, to the point I don’t even know how to rate it. On one hand, I found the characters and the writing to be so, so, amazing, but on the other wish the storyline could be more deeply developed in the last fractions of it. This is a book I know will resonate with so many people, so I won’t say you shouldn’t pick it up if you’re interested in it, but I just really wish I could love this book . . . and I didn’t. representation: Dominican main character (ownvoices), Dominican-American lesbian main character w/ sapphic black LI, Haitian prominent character, other Dominican prominent characters content warnings: parental death, parental separation & cheating, mentions of sexual assault and sex traffickingI received an e-ARC of this book from Quill Tree Books, a HarperCollins imprint, via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.Blog | Goodreads | Twitter
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  • Julia ✨
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Netgalley and Hot Key Books for the ARC.This book was heartbreaking, it was breathtaking, it was everything and even more.It's no secret I love Elizabeth Acevedo and her books give and take away pieces of my heart every time I read them.But this one really touched my heart more than anything I've ever read from her.If I would give it a realistic rating it would be all the stars in the universe. "Never, ever, let them see you sweat, negra. Fight until you can't breathe, & if you Thank you Netgalley and Hot Key Books for the ARC.This book was heartbreaking, it was breathtaking, it was everything and even more.It's no secret I love Elizabeth Acevedo and her books give and take away pieces of my heart every time I read them.But this one really touched my heart more than anything I've ever read from her.If I would give it a realistic rating it would be all the stars in the universe. "Never, ever, let them see you sweat, negra. Fight until you can't breathe, & if you have to forfeit, you forfeit smiling, make them think you let them win." Camino and Yahaira are both extremely compelling, imperfect but absolutely realistic voices. I adored how we see them going through different but similar stages of grief. How the different cultures and relationship made them who they are. It was so beautiful seeing them connecting and trying to know each other. I love how the author touched cultural differences, sexualities, prejudice and privilege. As usual it felt organic. It wasn't a show-off lesson, it wasn't written to woke people up, it's not her job to do so. But it felt so natural to have those discussions and that's how you do it.I also appreciated how each parent wasn't perfect, because that's not real life. People are messy, people make mistakes. Even a father who looks like the hero for these two girls reveals himself to be a terrible husband for both of their mothers. And the pain and grief for his loss mixed with the anger and betrayal of what he did was so well crafted.I will definitely reread this book as an audiobook because Elizabeth's narrating voice is incredible, and I'm sure I will adore this book even more. trigger warning: death of a parent, grief, sexual assault.
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  • Bookphenomena (Micky)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsCLAP WHEN YOU LAND is a compelling and poignant story of loss, deceit, finding lost relationships and coming of age. This book hit me in the feels almost straight away and kept me emotionally connected to the characters and story all the way through.This captivating story is told from the POV of two teens Camiro and Yahaira who were 16, going on 17. They lived in New York and the Dominican Republic respectively and their lives were a complete contrast both financially but also in terms 4.5 starsCLAP WHEN YOU LAND is a compelling and poignant story of loss, deceit, finding lost relationships and coming of age. This book hit me in the feels almost straight away and kept me emotionally connected to the characters and story all the way through.This captivating story is told from the POV of two teens Camiro and Yahaira who were 16, going on 17. They lived in New York and the Dominican Republic respectively and their lives were a complete contrast both financially but also in terms of freedom, access and prejudice. The story was told in normal narrative with elements of beautiful poetic prose. These aspects weren’t choppy, they wove beautifully into the unfurling story.I am beautiful like a dark-skinned girl that is right here.I’ve always preferred playing black on the chess board.Always advancing, conquering my offending other side.I really was gripped by life in the Dominican Republic and how Camino conducted herself, her life and her relationships. I admired her as a character so much. When Camino and Yahaira finally connected, it was a lot, brimming over on the page.This is one of those books that you just have to read. You will lose yourself and emerge the other side affected. This is a book I will remember and as an already fan of Elizabeth Acevedo, I can confirm that this is my favourite of her books yet.Thank you to Hot Key Books for the early review copy.This review can be found on A Take From Two Cities Blog.
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  • Circe
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so in love with this author. The fact she is Dominican only increases my love for her (I'm Dominican too).I can only say the way she writes all these verses in her books are so painful but at the same time so enchanting because she knows and describes how Dominican culture is and how the young Dominican generation suffers.So... I just gonna say to Elizabeth: Dale pa' allá vieja y gracias por decir tantas cosas que nos callamos.
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  • Never Without a Book
    January 1, 1970
    Elizabeth Acevedo has done it again ♥. Elizabeth Acevedo has done it again 🥺♥️.
  • Ms. Woc Reader
    January 1, 1970
    Describe this book in one word? Brilliant!I love when a book can give you a history lesson without feeling forced. I love when it can discuss topics like colorism and anti-blackness without making it the entire story. This is a story about two sisters discovering each other after their father dies in a plane crash and reconciling their grief but it's also about so much more.There are so many conversation starters in this story. I love that she deliberately made the darker skinned sister the one Describe this book in one word? Brilliant!I love when a book can give you a history lesson without feeling forced. I love when it can discuss topics like colorism and anti-blackness without making it the entire story. This is a story about two sisters discovering each other after their father dies in a plane crash and reconciling their grief but it's also about so much more.There are so many conversation starters in this story. I love that she deliberately made the darker skinned sister the one with the fair skinned mother who has a powerful influential family in the Dominican Republic. It makes some strong statements about colorism and featurism in the Dominican community. She is the sister who is living a privileged life in NYC.Meanwhile the lighter skinned sister lives in el barrio with her aunt who practices Santeria. Though she has more than most in her neighborhood she still has little money. Her father was providing just enough to make ends meet and keep her in a good school.I wasn't familiar with the crashing of flight AA587 and this story was my first time hearing about it. I liked that this story commemorated that event.Papi was for the most part a good father to Camino and Yahaira. He did love them both and tried to split his time between the two of them. Unfortunately he wasn't the best husband for either of their mothers. And while they each have this image of who he is as a person the truth is not quite what they expect. Elizabeth says it best in her author's note, "Most families are messy, most parents will fail to live up the the hero worship of their children."Read a more in depth review athttps://womenofcolorreadtoo.blogspot....
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  • bookreaderinluv but she's tired too
    January 1, 1970
    yo this cover is so fucking beautiful!
  • Anniek
    January 1, 1970
    This was once again a beautiful Elizabeth Acevedo book, and a beautiful verse novel! If the author is narrating the audiobook again, I already can't wait to do a reread.CWs: plane crash, death of a parent, past death of a parent, grief, attempted rape, assault, sexual assault, threat of forced sex work
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  • desmond e
    January 1, 1970
    Twitter 2020 MOST ANTICIPATED BOOKS I was hesitant at first to read The Poet X due to it being in prose, and I felt like I would not enjoy reading that since I don't really like poetry. But I read the first couple of pages while in Barnes and Noble, and was completely blown away. So I absolutely cannot wait to read another book from this author, especially one in prose. This is definitely one of my top books to read in 2020!!!
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  • Lilly (Lair Of Books)
    January 1, 1970
    ***ARC received in exchange for an honest review***PINCH ME I MUST BE DREAMING!!! MY FAVE YA AUTHOR <3!!!FULL REVIEW CAN ALSO BE VIEWED ON LAIR OF BOOKSPLOTWhere to start with what has easily become my favorite read of 2020 thus far? the author writes in her afterward that this story is inspired by the real life events of flight AA587. A flight routinely set from JFK airport to Santo Domingo aka the Dominican Republic. The flight that never made it & crashed in a Queens NY neighborhood ***ARC received in exchange for an honest review***PINCH ME I MUST BE DREAMING!!! MY FAVE YA AUTHOR <3!!!FULL REVIEW CAN ALSO BE VIEWED ON LAIR OF BOOKSPLOTWhere to start with what has easily become my favorite read of 2020 thus far? the author writes in her afterward that this story is inspired by the real life events of flight AA587. A flight routinely set from JFK airport to Santo Domingo aka the Dominican Republic. The flight that never made it & crashed in a Queens NY neighborhood was quickly forgotten about. Just two months after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, news coverage was focused on other potential terrorist threats but the flight AA587 crash was not terrorist related. 260 Souls who were mostly of Dominican descent lost their lives on this flight.Clap When You Land is about the ties that bind in a family, grief, and the sometimes messy secrets that cannot be kept hidden. Told in dual POV we follow Camino & Yahaira who don’t know about one another’s existence. They share the same father who travels between New York & Santo Domingo throughout the year. His absence is always explained as “business” & each of his daughters look forward to his arrivals after a long stay away. On his way to Santo Domingo to spend time with Camino his flight falls into the ocean taking the lives of everyone on board. The news of his passing makes waves both in NY & in Santo Domingo. Many of the family secrets their dad was keeping could no longer stay buried. Camino & Yahaira find out about each each other. This is the story of how they come together, see pieces of their dad in one another, and work through all of the emotions these truths bring.Content Warning: Death of a parent, plane crash, heavy grief, attempted rape (not detailed on the page), premature labor, Cancer, Dengue FeverCHARACTERSCamino Rios – Born & raised in Santo Domingo, Camino is described as having her fathers features with her mother’s slightly lighter complexion. Camino is a strong swimmer with a passion for medicine & a dream to one day study in Columbia University. Camino lives with a aunt who is a Curandera (self taught medical healer) & spends her days as an apprentice taking care of the sick in the neighborhood. Their medicine is a mix of natural herbs for home remedies as well as a connection to the Santos. Camino’s aunt is a Santera who has instilled in her love & respect for the saints who open paths & light the way. Camino is a little rough around the edges as a result of where she’s been raised. Camino is my favorite character, she’s been through so much & still manages to have a nurturing touch and soothing presence.Yahaira Rios – Born & raised in NYC, Yahaira is described as being a mirror image of her father. Dark complexion, tight curls, curvy and a Pro at Chess. Yahaira is a rule follower who connects to her dad by way of Chess, it isn’t necessarily her favorite hobby but she’s a natural just like her dad. Yahaira is a Lesbian with a girlfriend who was also her childhood best friend, I LIVED for their nerd/fashionista love! Yahaira also lives with her mother who is described as a beautiful Dominican bombshell who is the daughter of a very important General in Santo Domingo. Yahaira’s mother has been a keeper of her husbands secrets, my heart really broke for the levels of pain she was feeling.Yano – Although the girls dad has passed away & we never get to see him on the page, his presence is deeply felt all throughout. The man who became very good at living a double life was complex in many ways but one thing was true, he loved his daughters.WRITING & FINAL THOUGHTSElizabeth Acevedo is my Favorite YA author & this book only further solidifies this in my heart. I knew the premise of the book but I didn’t expect to see similarities with my own father in these pages. I lost my dad to natural causes, flew with him to bury him in Puerto Rico and quickly started hearing the rumbles of secrets. Secrets kept from my own father which were very painful & also had to do with paternity. I cried, smiled, and sometimes outright laughed out loud reading this story. There’s something oh so satisfying when you open a book and are met with characters you can relate to. Characters with the same upbringings & even spiritual beliefs.I appreciated the research that went into flight AA587 as well as Dengue fever & its effects on the island. With a return to Acevedo’s novel-in-verse Format, Clap When You Land is a vivid portrayal of the devastation of loss, grief, and forgiveness. It’s also a story that gives us a different perspective, that of the parents who sometimes may be idolized by their children but ultimately are still very humanly flawed. The backstory on Yano & how he came to live two separate lives was painful but not unheard of. This is one I’ll cherish for all the emotions it stirred up in me. Elizabeth Acevedo continues to be such a blessing to Latinx Book Community 🙌🏽
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    CW: Sexual harassment and sexual assaultElizabeth Acevedo is undoubtedly one of my favourite YA authors and this novel only served to cement that.This is the story of two half sisters who dont know that the other exists. One lives in New York with her mother and father and the other lives in the Dominican Republic with her aunt. Their father is killed in a plane crash on his way to the Dominican Republic and the sisters become aware of the others existence in the aftermath. Both Camino and CW: Sexual harassment and sexual assaultElizabeth Acevedo is undoubtedly one of my favourite YA authors and this novel only served to cement that.This is the story of two half sisters who don’t know that the other exists. One lives in New York with her mother and father and the other lives in the Dominican Republic with her aunt. Their father is killed in a plane crash on his way to the Dominican Republic and the sisters become aware of the other’s existence in the aftermath. Both Camino and Yahira Rios are fully fledged characters who have been moulded by two very different upbringings and conditioned by the environments they’ve grown up in. They’re both strong and intelligent women. They feel like real people with real personalities, dreams, concerns and flaws. They both have really great character arcs in this story.As always with Acevedo’s books, she pulls no punches and is not afraid of tackling difficult subjects. Here she looks at poverty in the Dominican Republic and at class and race and the role that plays. She looks at the impact of Yahira and Camino’s father having two families and the impact that this has on them both and on his wife, Yahira’s mother and how Camino and Yahira had very different experiences with their father.Unsurprisingly, Acevedo does all this while writing beautifully. This novel is written in verse and Acevedo really shines here and her distinctive voice comes through. As YA writers goes, I think Acevedo May have my favourite style of writing. She is immensely talented.I also loved the LGBT representation in this book. Yahira is gay and is dating her neighbour. It’s great to have a qpoc as a protagonist in this book. It’s the first time Acevedo has had a queer main character in one of her books and I think she does a great job with Yahira. Her relationship with Andrea is really wonderful and cute and was one of my favourite aspects of the book. In fact, Andrea is in her own right an awesome character and probably my favourite character in the book a whole.I think With the Fire on High is still my favourite Acevedo book but this is also a truly wonderful book and you should definitely pick it up!I feel this review is slightly sparse in detail, I guess that’ll teach me not to leave over a month between devouring a book and writing the review again.*copy provided for free via netgalley in return for an honest review
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  • Andrea Tomé
    January 1, 1970
    A brilliant novel and a raw and honest depiction of Dominican identity, sisterhood and family. Elizabeth Acevedo never disappoints 💜
  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: sexual assaultHaving loved The Poet X and With the Fire on High I had such high expectations for Clap When You Land. And my expectations were only exceeded. I knew I would love Clap When You Land from the very beginning. Acevedo's words are entrancing and they fly off the pages into your heart. It's a book about hopes and dreams, grief and resentment. Clap When You Land is about (Disclaimer: I received this book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: sexual assaultHaving loved The Poet X and With the Fire on High I had such high expectations for Clap When You Land. And my expectations were only exceeded. I knew I would love Clap When You Land from the very beginning. Acevedo's words are entrancing and they fly off the pages into your heart. It's a book about hopes and dreams, grief and resentment. Clap When You Land is about desperation and ambition, but also about secrets and resentment. When the people we love are not who we think they are. It is tender and emotional and did I mention one of the MC's has a sapphic relationship which is totally precious? Clap When You Land is multifaceted and shining. The dual POV style allows readers to connect with both Yahaira and Camino, the ways they process grief differently, their different family structures. When we have to process both the grief in our heart and the new role we have been thrown into. It is heart wrenching and moving. Clap When You Land is also about ambition. How certain people have to sacrifice more for a chance at freedom. How we can feel trapped by the success we have had and look for a sliver of a life from before.full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
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  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    When a plane traveling from New York to the Dominican Republic falls from the ski, Yahaira and Camino's lives are forever changed. With the crash come some very big reveals. Family secrets are unearthed, and both young women must deal with the truth about their father.I will never be able to do this book justice in a review, no matter how many times I write, and rewrite it. This is a story you need to experience yourself. I believe, this multifaceted tale will impact different readers in When a plane traveling from New York to the Dominican Republic falls from the ski, Yahaira and Camino's lives are forever changed. With the crash come some very big reveals. Family secrets are unearthed, and both young women must deal with the truth about their father.I will never be able to do this book justice in a review, no matter how many times I write, and rewrite it. This is a story you need to experience yourself. I believe, this multifaceted tale will impact different readers in different ways, but I have no doubt, it will leave its mark.Acevedo created two wonderful and robust main characters, and as always, she injected so much of her culture into their DNA. I loved how very different these two young women were, and yet, how they were bound to each other. Learning about them, their lives, their families and friends painted this full-color picture for me, and helped me understand the many different pieces, which made up the whole, while not obscuring their differences. Their daily lives, as well as their upbringing, were night and day. It was in these moments, where the author touched upon issues such as economic disparity, toxic masculinity, and grief.I enjoyed getting to be with Yahira and Camino separately, but I really loved, when their worlds collided. Seeing something beautiful rise from the ashes was extremely satisfying for me. And, wow! The ending of this book had my emotions all sorts of everywhere. I was practically weeping, but I promise, my tears were the good kind.This was a touching and moving story of secrets, lies, grief, forgiveness, and family, which was exquisitely told, and imprinted itself on my heart.*ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • Jesse
    January 1, 1970
    The only downside of reading books prior to publication is that the giant mob of people who would flail with me over this book havent read it yet! Im over here flailing alone about the absolutely amazing women helping women vibes making this book so much more than I was expecting. 👏👏👏👏👏 The only downside of reading books prior to publication is that the giant mob of people who would flail with me over this book haven’t read it yet! I’m over here flailing alone about the absolutely amazing women helping women vibes making this book so much more than I was expecting. 👏👏👏👏👏
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  • Vanessa
    January 1, 1970
    Wait. This is another verse novel from our Queen Acevedo??? Sign me up.
  • Michelle (Fluttering Butterflies)
    January 1, 1970
    Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo is my favourite book Ive read so far this year. Such a beautiful story about family, lies, love, forgiveness and grief. These characters came alive, as did the different lives of both main characters Camino in the Dominican Republic and Yahaira in New York as the grief over the death of their father unearths bigger family secrets. It reached a certain point in the story and I felt like I couldnt contain all the complicated feelings coming off these pages Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo is my favourite book I’ve read so far this year. Such a beautiful story about family, lies, love, forgiveness and grief. These characters came alive, as did the different lives of both main characters Camino in the Dominican Republic and Yahaira in New York as the grief over the death of their father unearths bigger family secrets. It reached a certain point in the story and I felt like I couldn’t contain all the complicated feelings coming off these pages and crying seemed to be my only option. Crying over the beauty and truth of this story. Especially in the face of the incredible love between Dre and Yahaira and between Camino and Tia. I’m still welling up thinking about it. Anyway, if it’s not clear, I’m recommending this one. Publishes in the UK 5th May.
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    Elizabeth Acevedo never disappoints me, I simply enjoy her books so much! This one was no exception, I loved how it dealt with so many serious and important themes with such care and skill. Camino and Yahaira are such complex characters who have so much to share with the world and I totally adored both of them. Also, this book is written in verse, which I always find it's a very interesting way to narrate a story. I think the less you know about this novel, the better the reading experience is Elizabeth Acevedo never disappoints me, I simply enjoy her books so much! This one was no exception, I loved how it dealt with so many serious and important themes with such care and skill. Camino and Yahaira are such complex characters who have so much to share with the world and I totally adored both of them. Also, this book is written in verse, which I always find it's a very interesting way to narrate a story. I think the less you know about this novel, the better the reading experience is going to be, I totally recommend this!
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  • Doreen
    January 1, 1970
    Acevedo always seems to touch my heart with her writing and this book is no different. I started it not even 24 hours ago and I just couldn't stop reading. It's an original and messy story, but it is so powerful and I honestly just loved it from the beginning to the end.
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