Pippa Park Raises Her Game
A Contemporary Reimagining of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens for Middle GradersLife is full of great expectations for Korean American Pippa Park. It seems like everyone, from her family to the other kids at school, has a plan for how her life should look. So when Pippa gets a mysterious basketball scholarship to Lakeview Private, she jumps at the chance to reinvent herself by following the “Rules of Cool.”At Lakeview, Pippa juggles old and new friends, an unrequited crush, and the pressure to perform academically and athletically while keeping her past and her family’s laundromat a secret from her elite new classmates. But when Pippa begins to receive a string of hateful, anonymous messages via social media, her carefully built persona is threatened.As things begin to spiral out of control, Pippa discovers the real reason she was admitted to Lakeview and wonders if she can keep her old and new lives separate, or if she should even try.Bonus ContentDiscussion Questions, Author Q&A, and Korean Language Glossary and Pronunciation Guide

Pippa Park Raises Her Game Details

TitlePippa Park Raises Her Game
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 4th, 2020
PublisherFabled Films Press
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Contemporary, Realistic Fiction, Family, Sports

Pippa Park Raises Her Game Review

  • Kailey (BooksforMKs)
    January 1, 1970
    When Pippa Park gets a basketball scholarship to a fancy private school, she feels pressured to pretend like she's rich and cool so that she can fit in with her elite classmates. But how long can she keep up the farce, when her Korean family owns a laundromat and Pippa barely has money to buy a slice of pizza at the school cafeteria? With her grades slipping and her relationships in turmoil, Pippa begins to realize that some of her new friends have family secrets of their own.This retelling of When Pippa Park gets a basketball scholarship to a fancy private school, she feels pressured to pretend like she's rich and cool so that she can fit in with her elite classmates. But how long can she keep up the farce, when her Korean family owns a laundromat and Pippa barely has money to buy a slice of pizza at the school cafeteria? With her grades slipping and her relationships in turmoil, Pippa begins to realize that some of her new friends have family secrets of their own.This retelling of Dicken's "Great Expectations" is utterly brilliant from start to finish! Instead of "Pip", the main character is Pippa. And most of the main characters found in "Great Expectations" have their counterparts in Pippa's story. Not all of them make an appearance, and many are changed in significant ways, but play similar roles in the plot. Various characters are also gender-swapped, and I loved that! I had so much fun reading along, and suddenly realizing, "Oh! This character is supposed to be so-and-so from Great Expectations!" It's not always obvious from the start who each character represents. Many of the new characters names begin with the same letter as the original characters, like a little clue to their alternate identities.However, although many plot points and character roles are similar to "Great Expectations", this book has its own voice, its own story, and its own delightful style!It was especially interesting to see how the author took some basic plot points from Dickens and reimagined them in a modern setting with cell phones, school books, basketball, and the rich Korean-American culture that Pippa enjoys.Speaking of basketball and Korea, I had a unique experience with this book that affected me very closely from the very first page. (Personal story time... I was forced to attend a basketball camp for a week when I was in 6th grade, and I hated it. I have never been good at sports, and I spent the entire week just learning how to dribble. The other campers laughed at me because I had no skills at all, and it was one of the most embarrassing situations of my entire life. Needless to say, I hate basketball now, and you might be wondering... Why would I pick up a MG novel about basketball? Surely, the traumatic memories of my childhood would make me hate this book.)This is where the genius of this book begins to make MAGIC happen! The very first scene is of Pippa playing hoops by herself in a deserted playground. She describes how she loves playing basketball. She feels at home on the court, like she belongs, like all her problems just melt away when she feels the basketball between her fingertips. The writing does such a genius job of describing her passion for this sport, and it reminded me of my passion for music. I'm a professional pianist, and when I sit at the piano I feel at home, like I belong, and all the world just melts away. The writing uses a universal theme of having a passion for an activity, whether it is sports, or music, or art, or anything, so that I can understand that Pippa loves basketball. I can relate to her very closely, even though I don't like the same thing she likes. I understand her as a character because the writing drew me into her world.The writing does the same thing for Pippa's Korean-American family culture. I don't know the first thing about Korea, but I loved learning about it in this book! And I clearly understood Pippa's feeling different from other people, because her family celebrates different holidays and does things in their own way. We all feel different sometimes, and the author uses that universal theme to bring Pippa's story home to each of us.That is why classics remain popular for hundreds of years. They touch on universal ideas that transcend time and apply to any reader of any age anywhere. This book does an excellent job of capturing those deep themes and bringing them to life in a modern setting with a fresh voice.I loved reading this story and seeing which plot points stayed similar to "Great Expectations" and which things were changed. Pippa lives with her sister and brother-in-law, while her mother has stayed in Korea. One of my favorite characters in "Great Expectations" is Joe. He is so sweet and kind, and I loved seeing him reimagined in the character of Jung-Hwa, Pippa's brother-in-law. He really functions like a father figure in her life, encouraging her and working hard to support the family. Each of these characters are quickly given vibrant life in the first few scenes of book. For instance, Jung-Hwa has a little affectionate ritual that he does with Pippa where he boops her nose with his finger each day. Such a small detail with a world of meaning for this sweet family relationship.I loved the complexity of Pippa's relationship with her sister, Mina. Mina is tough on Pippa, nagging her about her grades, her chores, and making her work at the laundromat to earn her allowance. The two sisters argue and fight, but obviously love each other very much. They just aren't always the best at expressing that love to one another. Their character development and the growth of their relationship is one of the best things about this book.Of course, (in true Pip tradition) Pippa gets a crush on some rich boy who barely knows she's alive. The descriptions of how she feels, what she thinks, how she worries about her appearance, and wants to be cool to impress the guy... all these things are so spot on and expressive. We've all had that impossible crush at one time or another.I was so intrigued to read about the "cool" girls at Pippa's new school, The Royals. They seem to befriend Pippa, but we are always wondering what their agenda must be. Are they going to turn on her when they find out the truth about her being poor? Those girls are a mystery, and I loved reading about them right up to the last page when their true colors are revealed.I was delighted with how serious, comedic, and wild this plot ended up being. It starts out with some fairly tame school drama, but went into some intense tragedy and redemption near the end.If you like classics, you will love this Dickens retelling! If you like basketball, Korean-American culture, or just excellent story-telling, you will love this book. It's not just for middle-grade readers either. I'm 37, and I adore everything about Pippa Park!Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher via Media Master Publicity in exchange for a free and honest review. All the opinions stated here are my own true thoughts, and are not influenced by anyone.
    more
  • Jackie
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book in a goodreads giveaway. It’s an interesting book that looks at what it means to follow your dream when everyone else wants you to live by their dreams
  • Karen Arendt
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoyed this story. Pippa is a likable character, as is her friend Buddy. Her struggles to fit in at a new school are authentic as are the situations she experiences. I liked that some of the students at the expensive private school were portrayed as kind and true friends as well, dispelling the stereotype that all rich kids are spoiled. I am looking forward to sharing this story with my students.
    more
  • Jeff S
    January 1, 1970
    Pippa Park Raises Her Game is a very good and entertaining debut novel by author Erin Yun. My wife couldn't put the book down when she began reading it one day last week, and read the entire 262 inviting, easy-reading pages in one night. I was also pulled in once I began reading, curious to remain by Pippa's side to see how her life unfolded at the prestigious Lakeview Private School, after being awarded a scholarship and transferring there from the less esteemed Victoria Middle School. As Pippa Park Raises Her Game is a very good and entertaining debut novel by author Erin Yun. My wife couldn't put the book down when she began reading it one day last week, and read the entire 262 inviting, easy-reading pages in one night. I was also pulled in once I began reading, curious to remain by Pippa's side to see how her life unfolded at the prestigious Lakeview Private School, after being awarded a scholarship and transferring there from the less esteemed Victoria Middle School. As anyone who has survived adolescence knows, life in middle school--or as we called it where I was growing up, junior high--can be a time of anxiety, stressful situations, joy and laughter, tears and triumphs. It is the ultimate growing experience. Pippa goes through it all, leaving her familiar and comfortable surroundings and friends at Victoria for Lakeview. She wants to fit in with her new and "upper-income" classmates and basketball teammates, so she shelters her past--and current--life from them, not wanting to expose her modest upbringing and what they might consider her lower station in life. Like most kids of her age, Pippa just wants to fit in and be accepted.The book flows nicely with a warm tone and a descriptive narrative that is comforting and places you right at home and in school with Pippa. And the small details about her Korean-American upbringing--the family life and expectations, the Korean foods and snacks, and her loveable and kind brother-in-law, Jung-Hwa, bring an additional, savory level of ethnic seasoning to the story.Pippa is an endearing character that you find yourself feeling for, hurting with, relating to, cheering for, and, ultimately, hoping to celebrate with. The book, geared to young readers, yet entirely enjoyable to an older audience such as this 50-something man and his wife, is sweet and charming, interlaced with life lessons, suspense, drama, and fun. I think Pippa Park is destined for even bigger and better things! I hope we will see much more of her and Ms. Yun in the future.
    more
  • Rosemary
    January 1, 1970
    Korean-American seventh grader Pippa Park's is a juggler: living with her older sister and brother-in-law, rather than her Mom, in Korea, she juggles the weight of their expectations; she juggles her responsibilities at home and school, and she juggles schoolwork with her first love, basketball. She receives an unexpected basketball scholarship to an affluent private school, Lakeview Private, and decides to reinvent herself: she doesn't want to stand out as the "scholarship student", especially Korean-American seventh grader Pippa Park's is a juggler: living with her older sister and brother-in-law, rather than her Mom, in Korea, she juggles the weight of their expectations; she juggles her responsibilities at home and school, and she juggles schoolwork with her first love, basketball. She receives an unexpected basketball scholarship to an affluent private school, Lakeview Private, and decides to reinvent herself: she doesn't want to stand out as the "scholarship student", especially among the rich kids, and especially among the members of the basketball team - her former middle school's rivals! But reinventing herself comes with a price, and Pippa discovers that she's getting further away from the person she wants to be while trying to keep pace with the Royals, Lakeview's version of Queen Bees/Mean Girls/the In-Crowd. She can't turn to her sister; she can't turn to her best friend, who won't talk to her anymore; and she certainly can't turn to the Royals. When a series of antagonistic social media messages start showing up, threatening to expose Pippa's real life, she really feels lost.Inspired by Charles Dickens's Great Expectations, Pippa Park Raises Her Game is a relatable middle grade story about a middle schooler dealing with the school stress, family stress,  an unrequited crush (with his own family stress), and the stress of keeping her real life secret from her glam friends at school. She's witty and dorky and just wants to do the right thing, but why is the right thing so hard to do? We want Pippa to get it right, because she's us.Kudos to Erin Yun for making The Royals a complex, smart group of characters, too! They're not vapid Mean Girls, even if some of them - not all, by the way - are straight-up stereotypical. First off, they're not cheerleaders! Let's hear it for breaking the stereotype! They are unapologetically feminine, and they're all business on the basketball court, showing readers that real girls don't always wear pom-poms; sometimes, they slam dunk. There's an interesting subplot with Pippa's tutor-turned-crush, Eliot, and his family's long-standing emotional baggage, which feeds nicely into Pippa's main story.Pippa Park Raises Her Game is a slam-dunk for middle grade readers. It's smart, funny, and gives readers a heroine they can root for.
    more
  • Tara Weiss
    January 1, 1970
    A play on Great Expectations with some fast-paced moves of its own, Pippa Park Raises her Game is the story of a seventh grade girl from a local public school who receives a mysterious scholarship to the prestigious private school in her town to help the basketball team put one in the win column over their rivals. And the rival just happens to be the school from which Pippa transferred. Wanting to keep her roots as a first generation Korean American who works at her family's laundry a secret A play on Great Expectations with some fast-paced moves of its own, Pippa Park Raises her Game is the story of a seventh grade girl from a local public school who receives a mysterious scholarship to the prestigious private school in her town to help the basketball team put one in the win column over their rivals. And the rival just happens to be the school from which Pippa transferred. Wanting to keep her roots as a first generation Korean American who works at her family's laundry a secret from the seemingly perfect private school crowd, Pippa has nothing but challenges on her way to fitting in at her new school, not to mention keeping up her GPA, especially in Algebra. But solving for X becomes only one of Pippa's problems as trouble seems to be guarding her like the defense at the three point line. When it all comes down to the buzzer, Pippa finds a way to take the shot that could put her on the winning team. Erin Yun's debut novel is a slam dunk of a story that takes on major issues like stereotypes, friendship, and fitting in with others. Middle school readers will identify with Pippa's challenges and cheer her on as she learns what it takes to be proud of who you are.
    more
  • Sherri Silvera
    January 1, 1970
    This book was such an enjoyable read and Pippa Park was such a great protagonist. The novel hit all the marks aimed at the target market in a very modern way. The author brought together an immigrant story with the typical themes of friendship and fitting in at school in a masterful way.I want to thank Fabled Films Press for sending an advance copy.
    more
  • Darla
    January 1, 1970
    Pippa Park is a plucky heroine and I love having a new middle grade novel with basketball and Korean culture for readers. Pippa is awarded a scholarship to an elite school with the condition that she keep her GPA at 3.0 and above. Immediately she feels the pressure in keeping up with practice, homework, and helping her sister with the family business. On top of that are the difficulties of finding real friends in her new school. She has real concerns about sharing her life with them as she sees Pippa Park is a plucky heroine and I love having a new middle grade novel with basketball and Korean culture for readers. Pippa is awarded a scholarship to an elite school with the condition that she keep her GPA at 3.0 and above. Immediately she feels the pressure in keeping up with practice, homework, and helping her sister with the family business. On top of that are the difficulties of finding real friends in her new school. She has real concerns about sharing her life with them as she sees them casually dropping large sums of money for mani-pedis and movie marathons. What do you do when your new friends and old friends are side by side in a restaurant? Pippa's struggles are real and authentic. The additional layer of "Great Expectations" retelling was a bit of a stretch and may be confusing to middle grade readers who are still unfamiliar with Dickens. The basketball action and sweet ending will make up for that. Hand this to fans of "Front Desk."Thank you to Fabled Film Press and Edelweiss for a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Lori Harris
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I got an e-ARC from Edelweiss. This does not affect my review.
  • Nicole M. Hewitt
    January 1, 1970
    This review and many more can be found on my blog: Feed Your Fiction AddictionTo sum this book up, it’s Mean Girls for middle graders with the addition of basketball and a big lie that threatens to blow up everything!I know this is a Great Expectations retelling, but honestly, as I was reading this, I couldn’t help but think of Mean Girls often—it just has that vibe (I guess I’d forgotten most of GA, which I read in my high school days, but that didn’t cut down on my enjoyment of the book). This review and many more can be found on my blog: Feed Your Fiction AddictionTo sum this book up, it’s Mean Girls for middle graders with the addition of basketball and a big lie that threatens to blow up everything!I know this is a Great Expectations retelling, but honestly, as I was reading this, I couldn’t help but think of Mean Girls often—it just has that vibe (I guess I’d forgotten most of GA, which I read in my high school days, but that didn’t cut down on my enjoyment of the book). Pippa has just transferred to a private school from the local public school, and she feels like a fish out of water. She wants so much to fit in, but she isn’t really sure how. All of the kids in her class come from money, and they seem to have a bunch of expectations that she has no idea how to live up to. So, she lies. Or, at least, leaves out a whole bunch of details. She doesn’t want them to know that she’s poor or that she came from the public school they seem to despise, so she just leaves those little facts out. Problem is, it gets harder and harder to hide. Plus, she has a crush on the boy that the leader of the Royals also has her eye on—not good—and her relationship with her best friend from her old school ends up becoming very strained.But I have to say that this story ended up veering from the Mean Girls formula in the end, and I was quite pleased with how everything turned out. Pippa not only learned to be proud of who she is, but she also realized that everyone else may not have been judging her nearly as much as she thought (which is probably true 99% of the time in real life). Pippa messes up in this book—she makes some big mistakes, but she also learns from them. And I fell in love with her and found myself rooting for her the whole time!Having basketball as a backdrop will appeal to quite a few kids, but they definitely don’t have to be sports fans to enjoy it—the basketball team is really just used to show the dynamics of Pippa’s new friends. But kids who do like sports will be drawn to that—there are a couple of scenes that highlight basketball, and I felt like they were very well written and I could easily imagine what was happening in the games and practices without having to know a whole lot about the sport. The book also features aspects of Korean-American culture, especially the food, which is described wonderfully!Overall, I think this is a wholly appealing story that will keep kids reading!***Disclosure: I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. No other compensation was given and all opinions are my own.***
    more
  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone seemed to have great expectations for Pippa, but she was struggling to live up to them. Pippa was disappointed, that her sister Mina made her give up her beloved basketball, when her math grade drops. Then fate intervened, and Pippa was offered a basketball scholarship from the local prep school. Not only did they expect her to help them break their losing streak, but she had to maintain a 3.0 GPA, and start over in a new school. Being a "have-not" among the "haves", Pippa hid parts of Everyone seemed to have great expectations for Pippa, but she was struggling to live up to them. Pippa was disappointed, that her sister Mina made her give up her beloved basketball, when her math grade drops. Then fate intervened, and Pippa was offered a basketball scholarship from the local prep school. Not only did they expect her to help them break their losing streak, but she had to maintain a 3.0 GPA, and start over in a new school. Being a "have-not" among the "haves", Pippa hid parts of herself. But, as often happens with secrets and lies, the web of deceit grew and grew, until it collapsed on Pippa, and she was on the verge of losing everything that was important to her - her real friends, her identity, and her sport. Being the odd man out is tough at any age, and being able to handle yourself in such a situation can be tricky. Therefore, I really felt for Pippa, even if I didn't agree with how she handled it. Despite her poor choices, Pippa was a good person. I knew that for sure, because she was so remorseful about her actions, she learned from her mistakes, and she took action to try and fix the mess she made. Yun treated us to some really wonderful things in this story, and I loved the role that family and friendship played. Her older sister, Mina, meant well, and I was glad to see those two start to meet in the middle on some things, but the star was her brother-in-law, Jung-Hwa. He was so wonderful! The relationship he shared with Pippa was pretty special, and I couldn't help but adore this tenderhearted guy. I was also a big fan of Buddy, Pippa's long time bestie, and Helen, one of the "Royals" she befriended at Lakeside. Overall, Pippa won me over as she tried to figure out how to navigate this new world and manage other people's expectations. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
    more
  • Elizabeth Reid
    January 1, 1970
    Ugh, Pippa is a brat! And her brattiness is exhausting. Read my full review here: https://agoodreid.blogspot.com/2020/0...
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC provided by Edelweiss PlusPippa loves to play basketball and struggles a tiny bit in school. She lives with her much older sister, Mina, and Mina's husband, and works in her sister's laundry to help out. Her mother's visa has expired, and she has returned to Korea. Mina pressures Pippa to do well in school, and when Pippa gets a letter that she is invited to attend Lakeview, a local private school on scholarship for her basketball skills, she is very pleased. Even though it means leaving E ARC provided by Edelweiss PlusPippa loves to play basketball and struggles a tiny bit in school. She lives with her much older sister, Mina, and Mina's husband, and works in her sister's laundry to help out. Her mother's visa has expired, and she has returned to Korea. Mina pressures Pippa to do well in school, and when Pippa gets a letter that she is invited to attend Lakeview, a local private school on scholarship for her basketball skills, she is very pleased. Even though it means leaving her best friend, Buddy, and embracing a new way of life, Pippa does her best to fit in. She still struggles with math, but gets tutoring help from the very cute Eliot Haverford, who has his own troubled family life, including a father who is headmaster of Lakeview. She does get in with the popular Bianca and "the Royals"- the popular girls at school, but she has trouble getting along with Olive, and is dismayed to find out that Bianca also has a crush on Eliot. Pippa continues to struggle with math,has to deal with the fact that her mother has been in a car accident and Mina must go to Korea to be with her, and gets mean anonymous notes, but when she helps out Eliot's brother, she manages to get herself in line to be suspended. Will Pippa be able to hold onto her place at Lakeview and not alienate her friends and family?Strengths: This was very reminiscent of The Dork Diaries, with the private school setting, mean girls, and jockeying for popularity. It also had a feel of Elena Delle Donne's Elle of the Ball series, where Elle has to balance school, sports, and her family life. It was nice to see a student having to work in a family business and dealing with a bit of monetary insecurity. The Korean culture was very welcome, as I have had several students with Korean backgrounds who ask to have more books about students with similar backgrounds. I loved the brother-in-law and how well he took care of Pippa.Weaknesses: I'm not a fan of the meanness in The Dork Diaries, and I doubt that anyone in the target demographic will understand that this is a "reimagining of Great Expectations". If it weren't for Aunt Haverford, I wouldn't have seen it at all. Eliot's family backstory was convoluted and seemed out of place.What I really think: I'll purchase this to fill a need for books with girls who play basketball and characters who are Korean, but this wasn't particularly stellar.
    more
  • delph ✨
    January 1, 1970
    Check my review on my blog : here.An e-ARC was provided by the publisher Fabled Film Press in exchange of an honest review. This does not effect my opinion in any way.PIPPA PARK RAISES HER GAME is a straight-forward middle-grade story about a girl, Pippa, who ends up in a private school where rich kids go. She takes it as an opportunity to renew herself, to become the cool kid and be part of the popular one while becoming the star player of her new school’s basketball team.You know what I like Check my review on my blog : here.An e-ARC was provided by the publisher Fabled Film Press in exchange of an honest review. This does not effect my opinion in any way.PIPPA PARK RAISES HER GAME is a straight-forward middle-grade story about a girl, Pippa, who ends up in a private school where rich kids go. She takes it as an opportunity to renew herself, to become the cool kid and be part of the popular one while becoming the star player of her new school’s basketball team.You know what I like the most when I read a book? When I can relate to the story and its main character. Honestly, I knew it was going to be a great story when I thought “if only I had read this story when I was younger.” There were so many times where I could totally relate to Pippa, that young girl who wanted to fit in, to look cool even if it meant to deny her Asian roots. And it’s something that I could totally understand even if it sounds awful. I can’t think about how many times I thought “my classmates won’t like me if I act too Asian” (now that I’m writing this review, I’m thinking: “wtf does too Asian mean.”) There was that one scene in the book where Pippa brings a lunch box from home and one of her new friend tells her that the food — kimchi — smells funny and Pippa feels so embarrassed that she just closes her lunch box and says she’s actually not hungry. Some may think that it won’t happen in real life but it did happen to me when I was in middle school. And it’s all those little things I could relate to that made my reading so much more enjoyable.Pippa was a great protagonist even if some may think that she’s a bit over dramatic especially when it comes to her crush. I totally agree with that but only because I’m a 22 years old young woman. It’s only because I’m that old that I think that it can be seen as over dramatic. But you know what? Who didn’t act like Pippa when they were her age? Who didn’t over think everything when it comes to their crush?Erin Yun wrote a great cast of side characters. I really like her new take on the “popular girls/mean girls” trope. The girls weren’t the cheerleaders but were all part of the basketball team, and I loved that so much? They were all feminine but weren’t scared of breaking that image. Actually not all of them really fit the “mean girls” trope. I mean, Helen was so kind, so sweet and so supportive I just want to hug her.One thing bothered me and it’s actually why I couldn’t give a 5* to this book. I wished the book was a bit longer, maybe one or two chapters longer. I felt like the ending was rushed and some subplots could have been more developed (like with Pippa’s mom at the end). I wished I could have seen more of Mathew, especially since he played an important role.Overall, PIPPA PARK RAISES HER GAME is a great middle-grade book, tackling important subjects as friendship, family and school. I believe young readers will relate to Pippa and her feelings as she tries to fit in an environment that may not want her.
    more
  • michelle
    January 1, 1970
    *Thank you to Fabled Films Press and Media Masters Publicity for a review copy of this book. All opinions are my own.Erin Yun has created a modern day twist on Great Expectations with Pippa Park Raises Her Game. It adds a nice twist to compare it to the original, but Pippa stands on her own. A quality look at the challenges of being a teen, especially being one who doesn't quite fit in for whatever the reason. Pippa struggles with feeling the need to hide who she really is, where she previously *Thank you to Fabled Films Press and Media Masters Publicity for a review copy of this book. All opinions are my own.Erin Yun has created a modern day twist on Great Expectations with Pippa Park Raises Her Game. It adds a nice twist to compare it to the original, but Pippa stands on her own. A quality look at the challenges of being a teen, especially being one who doesn't quite fit in for whatever the reason. Pippa struggles with feeling the need to hide who she really is, where she previously went to school, trying to live up to everyone else's expectations, and thinking you know someone when you really don't know anything. I have a feeling that Pippa's experiences are going to resonate with middle schoolers.Pippa is Korean American and a magnificent basketball player. Unfortunately, she is not so great at math and with bad grades her sister won't let her play basketball. Instead she has to go to private tutoring with a student from Lakeview, the preppy local private school. The twist? Soon after starting tutoring a mysterious benefactor gets her into Lakeview on full scholarship to help their girls' basketball team. At Lakeview, Pippa wants to reinvent herself, but she also feels the need to hide where she went to school and the fact that her family owns a laundromat.The characters are realistic even if some of the plot is a bit far-fetched. But Yun was trying to make the story of Great Expectations a bit more relevant for today's students. I love having a Korean-American girl on the cover and that she is a basketball player. Pippa isn't perfect. She makes mistakes and a number of bad choices, but she tries to fix them. Great to have a good story like this that takes on realistic issues but isn't a depressing topic. I definitely think there is a place for this book in a school library.
    more
  • V
    January 1, 1970
    The Premise:Great Expectations for modern middle graders with a female Korean-American Pip.Mom's Review:Seventh grade Pippa Park lives with her sister and brother-in-law in the US; her mother lives in Korea. Pippa is an exceptional basketball player but a poor mathematician, and her sister has stipulated math grades must rise before Pippa can rejoin the school's basketball team. Shortly after the start of the school year, Pippa is offered a basketball scholarship to an elite private school. She The Premise:Great Expectations for modern middle graders with a female Korean-American Pip.Mom's Review:Seventh grade Pippa Park lives with her sister and brother-in-law in the US; her mother lives in Korea. Pippa is an exceptional basketball player but a poor mathematician, and her sister has stipulated math grades must rise before Pippa can rejoin the school's basketball team. Shortly after the start of the school year, Pippa is offered a basketball scholarship to an elite private school. She accepts and tries to reinvent herself as totally cool and confident. Between academics, basketball, working at her sister's laundromat, coping with her mother's poor health half a world away, trying to fit in at the new school, and enduring a cyberbully's attacks, it is small wonder that Pippa struggles to meet all her obligations and fails.All in all, Pippa Park Raises Her Game is a fast read. Pippa and her best friend Buddy are relatable, her brother-in-law is admirable and sympathetic, and mean girls Bianca and Caroline are delightfully detestable. At a certain point, readers will be disgusted with Pippa – she denies herself, her family, and Buddy. But she is relatable in her insecurity, her poor choices, and also her efforts to make amends.In the end, Pippa stands up for herself, recognizes her true friends, and realizes what she values. The quick pace of the book, a bit middle-school romance, and some mean-girl drama, make for an exciting page turner. Middle grade and middle school students will find a fun, tense, and gratifying novel in Pippa Park Raises Her Game.Note: An Advance Reading Copy was provided in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Cynthia Parkhill
    January 1, 1970
    Pippa Park, a middle-school student whose family owns a laundromat, receives a basketball scholarship to go to a private school. Once there, she faces new pressures along with her new opportunities, as she sets out to reinvent herself and hide her background from her classmates.The book is intended to be a reimagining of Charles Dickens' Great Expecations so it amused me to look for parallels between this and the classic work. The first, and most overt similarity is in the names of the Pippa Park, a middle-school student whose family owns a laundromat, receives a basketball scholarship to go to a private school. Once there, she faces new pressures along with her new opportunities, as she sets out to reinvent herself and hide her background from her classmates.The book is intended to be a reimagining of Charles Dickens' Great Expecations so it amused me to look for parallels between this and the classic work. The first, and most overt similarity is in the names of the protagonists: Pippa and Pippin. Similar, too, are the protagonists' family circumstance. Pippin lived with his sister and her husband, Joe whereas Pippa lives with her sister Mina and her husband, Jung-Hwa, because their mother, Ji-Mon, had to leave America when her work visa expired.Details of the story-line are updated and subtly changed, but still follow their Dickensian precedent. Hence, instead of a convict named Magwitch whom Pippin encounters in a cemetery, Erin Yun's protagonist is startled one night by a hoodie-wearing stranger in the woods by the basketball court. The Haverford family, of whom the father is administrator at Pippa's new school, also includes upper-classman Eliot who tutors Pippa in math. And the Haverford family is overshadowed by a tragedy that befell their Aunt Evelyn.Whether or not readers recognize parallels between this and Dickens' work, I think that they will enjoy the story for its individual merits. Fitting in, both on and off the court, trying to juggle school and home ... readers will find a lot to relate to in Pippa Park's first-person story.I received a copy of this book through LibraryThing's Early Reviewers
    more
  • Eliza Marie
    January 1, 1970
    I bought this book for my 12 yr old daughter because a friend recommended it, so I bought it ~ even though my daughter hates basketball hahaha Well, to her surprise she LOVED this book (and so did I, at age 53!!) and she even hopes the author has plans on writing more books about Pippa Parks!! I couldn't be more thrilled since I usually have to force my daughter to do her 30 minutes of reading a day, but with this book she did more than 30 minutes and I didn't even have to tell her to read - she I bought this book for my 12 yr old daughter because a friend recommended it, so I bought it ~ even though my daughter hates basketball hahaha Well, to her surprise she LOVED this book (and so did I, at age 53!!) and she even hopes the author has plans on writing more books about Pippa Parks!! I couldn't be more thrilled since I usually have to force my daughter to do her 30 minutes of reading a day, but with this book she did more than 30 minutes and I didn't even have to tell her to read - she happily was reading this book without being told!!! Thank you Ms Yun, for creating such amazing characters that my daughter could really relate to and truly grew fond of! Especially Pippa, not necessary the basketball player, but the middle schooler wanting to fit in, and all the ups and downs that come along with it! And, also all the ups and downs that life throws at you ~ outside of school, too!!I just want everyone to know that this isn't a book just about a girl that loves basketball, it is that but so much more, and with Ms Yun's choice of very descriptive words it is almost like you are watching a movie in your head while reading, if that makes sense!! Like you are SEEING everything not just READING words!! It takes a talented author to do that, I am in awe that Ms Yun is so young and that this is her first book, yet she has that amazing capability of making you feel like you are personally in each scene with the characters!! This is a great book for all pre-teens and older - great first book for Ms Yun!!2 thumbs up from me👍👍 and 2 thumbs up from my daughter 👍👍
    more
  • Kristi Bernard
    January 1, 1970
    Pippa Park lived with her sister Mina and her husband Jung-Hwa. Her mom was back home in South Korea due to an expired visa. Pippa doesn’t always get along with her sister and things seemed to get worse especially since she had poor math grades. Pippa couldn’t play basketball, which she loved, until her grades were better. As a result, Pippa will have a math tutor at Lakeview School.Pipa learned that she would be attending Lakeview on a basketball scholarship. It’s a mystery to her as to who Pippa Park lived with her sister Mina and her husband Jung-Hwa. Her mom was back home in South Korea due to an expired visa. Pippa doesn’t always get along with her sister and things seemed to get worse especially since she had poor math grades. Pippa couldn’t play basketball, which she loved, until her grades were better. As a result, Pippa will have a math tutor at Lakeview School.Pipa learned that she would be attending Lakeview on a basketball scholarship. It’s a mystery to her as to who submitted an application for her. She suspected it was her new tutor, the very handsome and wealthy Eliot Haverford. As she navigates her way through the halls and various teachers she has to remember that she is no longer at Victoria Middle School and must keep her loyalties to her new school and basketball team. Pipa’s motto is to fake it until you make it, but how far will she go to keep up with the rich kids? How far will she go to hide her true self and what will be the end result?Authur Erin Yun has created a great coming of age story for middle grade readers. The characters are fun and kids will be able to relate to them. This quick read is perfect for a class read-a-loud so that teachers can open up discussion about goals, dreams and how to just be yourself.
    more
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fun, enjoyable middle grade novel with a Korean American protagonist. Pippa is a seventh grader and first generation American who excels at basketball, but not so much with math. Her family finds her a math tutor, Eliot, an eight grader at Lakeview, the local private school. One day, Pippa gets a letter from Lakeview - she has been accepted on a scholarship and can start right away.The book follows Pippa as she navigates the ins and outs of private school while trying to keep it a This is a fun, enjoyable middle grade novel with a Korean American protagonist. Pippa is a seventh grader and first generation American who excels at basketball, but not so much with math. Her family finds her a math tutor, Eliot, an eight grader at Lakeview, the local private school. One day, Pippa gets a letter from Lakeview - she has been accepted on a scholarship and can start right away.The book follows Pippa as she navigates the ins and outs of private school while trying to keep it a secret that her sister runs a laundromat, they don't have a lot of money, and that she used to attend Victoria Middle and play on their basketball team - the rival of Lakeview. She ends up being accepted by the Royals, the cool girls on her basketball team. She gets a crush on Eliot, even though he's kind of cold and one of the Royals has her eyes on him, too.There's nothing not to like about this book. Pippa isn't perfect, none of the characters are, and they feel authentic. My thanks to the publisher for an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Trisha Perry
    January 1, 1970
    Pippa has a lot on her mind, but first and foremost is to bring up her math grade so she can get back to being the star player on her schools basketball team. While being tutored by a rich kid from the Lakeview Private school, she receives a offer to go to school there and play basketball, as long as she maintains a good GPA. Pippa is first generation Korean in the States and lives with her sister and her husband, her sister thought basketball took to much of Pippa's time and kept her from Pippa has a lot on her mind, but first and foremost is to bring up her math grade so she can get back to being the star player on her schools basketball team. While being tutored by a rich kid from the Lakeview Private school, she receives a offer to go to school there and play basketball, as long as she maintains a good GPA. Pippa is first generation Korean in the States and lives with her sister and her husband, her sister thought basketball took to much of Pippa's time and kept her from getting good grades, but when the offer of free private school comes she changes her mind about basketball, but often nags Pippa about the grade condition. This was a great book portraying the Korean lifestyle and pressures that go with it, as well as normal teenage life. I really liked this book a lot it had action and some huge twists, along with some very interesting characters. It is a book that will keep even reluctant reader reading, it is nice to see a diverse book in the middle grade category. A real Woke book.
    more
  • Kim McGee
    January 1, 1970
    Pippa is a Korean/American girl who dreams of being a basketball star. Her dreams come a bit closer when she wins a scholarship to a private academy one that her guardian sister and brother-in-law could never hope to put her in. The only catch is that she has to keep her grades up and algebra, even with the help of her cute math tutor, is really tough. She also has to make a new set of friends, not let on about her modest upbringing, catch the eye of the math tutor, and perform wonders on a new Pippa is a Korean/American girl who dreams of being a basketball star. Her dreams come a bit closer when she wins a scholarship to a private academy one that her guardian sister and brother-in-law could never hope to put her in. The only catch is that she has to keep her grades up and algebra, even with the help of her cute math tutor, is really tough. She also has to make a new set of friends, not let on about her modest upbringing, catch the eye of the math tutor, and perform wonders on a new basketball team. So many pertinent issues that are at the forefront of every middle school are discussed such as, bullying, friendship, puberty, family drama and just finding your place. Add to that a thoughtful look at the demands and stress of conforming to a different ethnic culture and you have an idea of the headaches Pippa is dealing with. This smart and likable character covers a lot of big issues with a solid 3 point shot and will speak to a broad group of readers. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.
    more
  • Kristin Crouch
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Media Masters for sharing a copy of Pippa Park Raises Her Game with Collabookation.Living with an older sister who is acting as your mom is a challenge. Pippa loves basketball, but her sister has taken her off the team because her grades are slipping. When a piece of mail from the prestigious Lakeview Academy arrives, offering Pippa a full scholarship if she'll play basketball, it seems like a miracle.But Lakeview is full of wealthy students who shun scholarship recipients, and Thank you to Media Masters for sharing a copy of Pippa Park Raises Her Game with Collabookation.Living with an older sister who is acting as your mom is a challenge. Pippa loves basketball, but her sister has taken her off the team because her grades are slipping. When a piece of mail from the prestigious Lakeview Academy arrives, offering Pippa a full scholarship if she'll play basketball, it seems like a miracle.But Lakeview is full of wealthy students who shun scholarship recipients, and Pippa can't keep up economically. So when she finds a magazine article full of advice on how to fit in, she follows it. Can Pippa keep up appearances, grades, and friendships? Kids will appreciate how Pippa never really feels like she fits perfectly anywhere. With elements of mystery, crushes, and family struggles, readers will identify with the many struggles of adolescence. Recommended for students in grade 6 and up.
    more
  • Michael Kott
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ARC from the publisher, Fabled Films Press, in return for an honest review. Honestly? I finished this book quickly as it was an engaging story of a Korean girl trying to fit into a private school. Her adventures, good and bad, were interesting and the story was well written by first time author Erin Yun. I'd follow Pippa anywhere.I might add, having two of my grandchildren currently attending a private school, that it has been the best experience for both of them. They love their I received this ARC from the publisher, Fabled Films Press, in return for an honest review. Honestly? I finished this book quickly as it was an engaging story of a Korean girl trying to fit into a private school. Her adventures, good and bad, were interesting and the story was well written by first time author Erin Yun. I'd follow Pippa anywhere.I might add, having two of my grandchildren currently attending a private school, that it has been the best experience for both of them. They love their year there in which they were warmly received and are valued by the school for their exposure to other cultures. Being military brats has exposed them to the cultures of several foreign countries and made them better students. They didn't just visit countries in Asia and the Middle East, they lived there. Erin's portrayal of characters like Helen and others who made Pippa feel welcome, mimics my grandchildren's experience and added to the accuracy of Pippa's story.
    more
  • Shirley Freeman
    January 1, 1970
    Twelve year old Pippa lives in an apartment with her hard-working sister and brother-in-law. Seven years ago, Pippa's mom had to go back to Korea when her work visa ran out. Mom (by telephone) and sister (in person) have very high expectations of Pippa. They expect perfect grades, perfect behavior and hard work in her sister's laundromat. They are not particularly impressed with Pippa’s mad basketball skills although her skills are the catalyst for being recruited away from her public middle Twelve year old Pippa lives in an apartment with her hard-working sister and brother-in-law. Seven years ago, Pippa's mom had to go back to Korea when her work visa ran out. Mom (by telephone) and sister (in person) have very high expectations of Pippa. They expect perfect grades, perfect behavior and hard work in her sister's laundromat. They are not particularly impressed with Pippa’s mad basketball skills although her skills are the catalyst for being recruited away from her public middle school to an elite private school. There Pippa tries to re-invent herself as one of the 'cool' kids by hiding her former 'uncool' immigrant, laundromat-working, public school self. Things go awry. But in the end Pippa, her family and her new basketball team learn some important lessons about being cool and not cool. Pippa is a likeable character who makes very human mistakes but also demonstrates true grit. This middle reader will be published in Feb. 2020.
    more
  • Seung S
    January 1, 1970
    I am a Korean woman and was told about this book by a family member, who enjoyed it very much and thought that I would, too. She was right. I loved it. The author does a very good job introducing some Korean customs and describing family relationships. I like how she introduces some Korean foods and snacks, and some other other aspects of Korean-American culture. So, of course, I appreciated that, and I found the main character, young Korean-American Pippa Park, to be engaging and true-to-life, I am a Korean woman and was told about this book by a family member, who enjoyed it very much and thought that I would, too. She was right. I loved it. The author does a very good job introducing some Korean customs and describing family relationships. I like how she introduces some Korean foods and snacks, and some other other aspects of Korean-American culture. So, of course, I appreciated that, and I found the main character, young Korean-American Pippa Park, to be engaging and true-to-life, as was the rest of her small family. The entire book is entertaining and held my attention from the first page to the last. Once I started to read, I didn't want to stop, so I just kept going. I never once felt bored or lost interest. Though this book may be for younger readers, I think it is great for people of all ages. Nicely done, Ms. Erin Yun!
    more
  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Light, easy middle-grade novel follows Pippa as she attends a new school on a basketball scholarship. Any similarities to Great Expectations are minimal, and the book bears more resemblance to Mean Girls or Pretty in Pink. Certain plot elements - the Haverford family drama, a car accident, low-effort bullying - seemed more like distractions from the main narrative. I also wasn't a fan of how Pippa swooned over Eliot, despite his attitude towards her. Pacing a little uneven: the first half kind Light, easy middle-grade novel follows Pippa as she attends a new school on a basketball scholarship. Any similarities to Great Expectations are minimal, and the book bears more resemblance to Mean Girls or Pretty in Pink. Certain plot elements - the Haverford family drama, a car accident, low-effort bullying - seemed more like distractions from the main narrative. I also wasn't a fan of how Pippa swooned over Eliot, despite his attitude towards her. Pacing a little uneven: the first half kind of dragged on like a cliche after-school special, then the last half rushed to tie off loose ends. Probably still enjoyable for fans of basketball and diverse characters, but otherwise nothing memorable.
    more
  • Cat
    January 1, 1970
    Middle schoolers will love this story! I think everyone who's been this age will relate to it. Middle school can be so off putting to so many of us. Clics start forming and everyones going through puberty (that whole hormone mess); and boyfriends and girlfriends, and social groups, sports, band, etc....ugh! I'm glad that's all over with! But for those still there, maybe this book will be a consolation that you aren't alone. We've all been there. Maybe this will make whatever you're going Middle schoolers will love this story! I think everyone who's been this age will relate to it. Middle school can be so off putting to so many of us. Clics start forming and everyones going through puberty (that whole hormone mess); and boyfriends and girlfriends, and social groups, sports, band, etc....ugh! I'm glad that's all over with! But for those still there, maybe this book will be a consolation that you aren't alone. We've all been there. Maybe this will make whatever you're going through, look a bit better! Oh, and you will survive these years, and it really won't matter in 10 years. This was a fast, interesting read. Christmas gift for a 6th-8th grader in your life?!I received an arc from the publisher in exchange for a fair review.
    more
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    When Pippa Park's mother is sent back to Korea, she moves in with her older sister and brother-in-law. Pippa's sister loves her, but pushes her hard, sometimes too hard. When her math grade slips, Pippa's sister tells her she won't be able to play on the school basketball team unless she brings it up.Enter Eliot, a math tutor from the prestigious private school nearby. He is able to explain math in a way Pippa can finally understand. But, he has problems of his own. When Pippa is offered a When Pippa Park's mother is sent back to Korea, she moves in with her older sister and brother-in-law. Pippa's sister loves her, but pushes her hard, sometimes too hard. When her math grade slips, Pippa's sister tells her she won't be able to play on the school basketball team unless she brings it up.Enter Eliot, a math tutor from the prestigious private school nearby. He is able to explain math in a way Pippa can finally understand. But, he has problems of his own. When Pippa is offered a scholarship to the same prestigious private school as Eliot, she sees it as a way to start over and reinvent herself. But what happens if her new friends find out she's a scholarship kid? Or worse, that she used to go to their rival school?The story is well-crafted and the characters and plot are realistic. Definitely recommended for middle grade fans of sports, friendship, and realistic fiction.
    more
  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    This is an engaging story about navigating friendships and the struggle to fit in. Now that Pippa has transferred from her public school to a prestigious private school, she wants to keep the fact that she is a scholarship student a secret. She must also keep her grades up, so she can continue playing basketball, while helping her family with their laundromat business. Managing family and school life presents challenges for Pippa, but she learns the importance of being herself. This is another This is an engaging story about navigating friendships and the struggle to fit in. Now that Pippa has transferred from her public school to a prestigious private school, she wants to keep the fact that she is a scholarship student a secret. She must also keep her grades up, so she can continue playing basketball, while helping her family with their laundromat business. Managing family and school life presents challenges for Pippa, but she learns the importance of being herself. This is another book that will be relatable for middle grade readers and also appeal to those who are sports fans.
    more
Write a review