Blood
The Grammy- and Academy Award- nominated singer-songwriter's haunting, lyrical memoir, sharing the story of an unthinkable act of violence and ultimate healing through artMobile, Alabama, 1986. A fourteen-year-old girl is awakened by the unmistakable sound of gunfire. On the front lawn, her father has shot and killed her mother before turning the gun on himself. Allison Moorer would grow up to be an award-winning musician, with her songs likened to "a Southern accent: eight miles an hour, deliberate, and very dangerous to underestimate" (Rolling Stone). But that moment, which forever altered her own life and that of her older sister, Shelby, has never been far from her thoughts. Now, in her journey to understand the unthinkable, to parse the unknowable, Allison uses her lyrical storytelling powers to lay bare the memories and impressions that make a family, and that tear a family apart. Blood delves into the meaning of inheritance and destiny, shame and trauma -- and how it is possible to carve out a safe place in the world despite it all. With a foreword by Allison's sister, Grammy winner Shelby Lynne, Blood reads like an intimate journal: vivid, haunting, and ultimately life-affirming.

Blood Details

TitleBlood
Author
ReleaseOct 29th, 2019
PublisherDa Capo Press
ISBN-139780306922688
Rating
GenreAutobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction, Music, Crime, True Crime, Mystery, Audiobook

Blood Review

  • Julie Ehlers
    January 1, 1970
    Allison Moorer's excellent 2000 album The Hardest Part is a song cycle about an on-and-off relationship, and as such it covers the highs and lows, the breaking up and getting back together, the anger and sadness and love and lust. After the last song, "Feeling That Feeling Again," fades out, there's a pause, and then a hidden track, "Cold Cold Earth," starts up. This song tells the story of the early morning when Moorer's father shot and killed her mother and then himself on their front lawn. Allison Moorer's excellent 2000 album The Hardest Part is a song cycle about an on-and-off relationship, and as such it covers the highs and lows, the breaking up and getting back together, the anger and sadness and love and lust. After the last song, "Feeling That Feeling Again," fades out, there's a pause, and then a hidden track, "Cold Cold Earth," starts up. This song tells the story of the early morning when Moorer's father shot and killed her mother and then himself on their front lawn. Moorer and her sister, singer/songwriter Shelby Lynne, both teenagers at the time, were in the house when it happened.If you're a fan of Allison Moorer and/or Shelby Lynne, as soon as you hear about this you immediately want to know more, and with Blood Moorer finally obliges. The result is as tough a read as you might imagine. It's difficult to overstate how sad this book is. As Moorer herself notes, this subject is never closed. You just don't get closure on your father killing your mother on your lawn and then turning the gun on himself.Just because someone can write lyrics and music doesn't mean they can write a book, but as it turns out, Moorer has an MFA in creative writing from The New School, and it shows here in the best possible way. Blood is an astoundingly effective portrayal of an Alabama childhood and a vivid portrait of both of her parents. Where it's most memorable, though, is simply in conveying what it's like to grow up in an abusive household with an alcoholic father. Moorer is not shy about revealing the ways both she and Lynne struggled and still struggle with the reverberations of not just the murders but everything that preceded them. It's not that optimistic; it doesn't end particularly happily. But you will close this book having learned a few things about what we carry with us into the future when our past is just about as dark as it can possibly be.
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  • Ron S
    January 1, 1970
    Astonishing. While the facts of this heart wrenching story are well known, Moorer's gifts as a writer, in the telling, come as a revelation. Highly recommended.
  • Tracie Gutknecht
    January 1, 1970
    Non-fiction/MemoirAllison Moorer and her sister are fairly well known singer-songwriters. What isn't well known is that their father shot their mother and then shot himself. Blood is Allison's story. Her life growing up in rural Alabama leading to the death of her parents. There are some stories throughout that touch on her life after the tragic event, but primarily the book focuses on the ages of about 5 to 14.Allison's ability to write beautifully and thoughtfully are without question.Love is Non-fiction/MemoirAllison Moorer and her sister are fairly well known singer-songwriters. What isn't well known is that their father shot their mother and then shot himself. Blood is Allison's story. Her life growing up in rural Alabama leading to the death of her parents. There are some stories throughout that touch on her life after the tragic event, but primarily the book focuses on the ages of about 5 to 14.Allison's ability to write beautifully and thoughtfully are without question.Love is rarely a simple concept when people get their hands on it, and it certainly wasn't simple in our family. It was there, but it wasn't a grounding force, it was something we chased.Her memoir is filled with anecdotes and the "chapters" progress non-linearly which gave the book a disjointed dreamlike quality. The pages are filled with her desire to understand, come to peace with the events and move on. As such, some points are belabored. She keeps coming at the problem from different angles trying to come up with an alternate ending. Writing a review of a memoir is always tricky. These are the author's memories and stories, so who am I to critique them? All I can then do is write about my experience of reading theirs. The prose is gorgeous, but the story dragged for me. Anyone from a dysfunctional family will relate to this memoir and will find that Ms. Moorer has done an excellent job of expressing the feelings and results of growing up that way.I read somewhere that one of the best things a person can do is to "give up hope for a better past." Here I sit, trying to work it all out, not giving up that hope at all, trying to find proof that we weren't and aren't ruined by it all. The only proof I have of that is who we ended up being. We are okay, but we are not unbroken. The verdict, however, is still out.
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  • Tonstant Weader
    January 1, 1970
    Blood is a heartbreaking memoir by Allison Moorer, the country musician. I love music and have a few of her albums, but I had no idea about her history. I didn’t know she was Shelby Lynne’s sister, or that she married Steve Earle and later, Hayes Carll. I am a huge fan of Earle and Carll, but had no idea of their connection to Moorer. I also had no idea that Lynne and Moorer’s father murdered their mother before killing himself.Battered woman are most likely to be killed when they leave and she Blood is a heartbreaking memoir by Allison Moorer, the country musician. I love music and have a few of her albums, but I had no idea about her history. I didn’t know she was Shelby Lynne’s sister, or that she married Steve Earle and later, Hayes Carll. I am a huge fan of Earle and Carll, but had no idea of their connection to Moorer. I also had no idea that Lynne and Moorer’s father murdered their mother before killing himself.Battered woman are most likely to be killed when they leave and she was leaving—and he must have believed she was really leaving. Moorer was just fourteen and Lynne a recent high school graduate. What a devastating thing to happen and at such a young age. She talks about decimation, how it is losing a tenth, but she lost her mother and father. She lost half her family. She also grew up in a home terrorized by the whims of an angry man. Of course, he could charm, he could be fun, and of course, there was love. But there was also fear. That is a hard thing.Moorer writes about her memories, trying to unearth the reality of her mother and her father. There is the natural and unrewarding effort to ask what if. There is the natural and unrewarding assumption of complicity and blame. She recounts the times she thinks she should have done something or said something—but we know and she, in her mature wisdom, knows that this was a death dance that began before she was even born. There were two actors who could have changed the trajectory and they are both dead.Blood excells at capturing the chaos and unpredictability of living with a violent alcoholic. The chapters skip from past to present and from happy memories to terrifying ones. Moorer is a songwriter. Songwriters are poets. She has the poet’s felicity with language. Reading her memoir is at times beautiful and at times harrowing. I loved her memoir and yet will not recommend it to everyone. If reading about violence and the abuse of women, children, and animals is traumatizing, this book will be traumatic. However, I do think there is much of value to reading this memoir.Moorer reveals her manifest coping skills, even as a child. She reveals the negative effects of growing up with an abusive father, how it affects adult relationships, though she speaks in general, not specific terms. She asks why her mother stayed and comes to understand the threat—her father threatened to kill not just his wife, but their children and her parents. It seems to be possible her mother put her life in jeopardy to save her children. Protection.This memoir is informative, harrowing, and hopeful—in the end, it is hopeful more than anything else.I received an ARC of Blood from the publisher through Shelf Awareness.https://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpre...
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  • Naomi Krokowski
    January 1, 1970
    Alison Moorer is a great writer. No surprise if you’re already a fan of her songwriting, which if you’re not I highly recommend her. As a woman who also had an Alabama girlhood, I was aware that she and her also fabulous singer songwriter sister Shelby Lynne had lost their parents gruesomely as teens. Not surprisingly, this book is not an easy or lighthearted read in any way. Yet like most difficult things, it’s highly worthwhile.
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  • Tracee
    January 1, 1970
    This book is one that I would recommend to someone who has went through anything traumatic in their life. It shows that you are not alone and that what you go through in your past makes you who you are today. It’s ok to remember what you’ve been through, even if it’s hard, as long as you keep going everyday. I felt like this was a healing thing for the writer and that writing your thoughts down about what you go through in life is a form of therapy. I think it would help anyone going through a This book is one that I would recommend to someone who has went through anything traumatic in their life. It shows that you are not alone and that what you go through in your past makes you who you are today. It’s ok to remember what you’ve been through, even if it’s hard, as long as you keep going everyday. I felt like this was a healing thing for the writer and that writing your thoughts down about what you go through in life is a form of therapy. I think it would help anyone going through a difficult time to write it down even if no one sees it. I’m glad I read this book.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Changed my life.
  • Brian Bennett
    January 1, 1970
    My god this is a brutal read - in a good way.
  • Nicole Wagner
    January 1, 1970
    Oof.I admit that I opened this book looking for some trauma porn. By that I mean, I looked forward to escaping my own paltry stresses by living within a distant tragedy experienced by other people. It's a distinctly human pleasure, right? I didn't expect this memoir to be so intimate and so relatable. I haven't been through anything like the ne plus ultra in trauma that the author faced when she was a young teenager. Yet, it's as possible to drown in twenty feet of water as it is to drown in two Oof.I admit that I opened this book looking for some trauma porn. By that I mean, I looked forward to escaping my own paltry stresses by living within a distant tragedy experienced by other people. It's a distinctly human pleasure, right? I didn't expect this memoir to be so intimate and so relatable. I haven't been through anything like the ne plus ultra in trauma that the author faced when she was a young teenager. Yet, it's as possible to drown in twenty feet of water as it is to drown in two hundred feet of water. Childhood trauma is variable and can be insidious. The author's style moves between straight first-person narrative and a more stream-of-consciousness style. It reads quite like a diary, and though I've read in a few other reviews that it strikes some readers as slow, it strikes me as authentic. It's the way our thoughts naturally waffle when we're trying to process the unthinkable. We assign significance to small things; we make connections. I thought the author did a profound job revealing herself in these pages. It was a powerful memoir, and I'm really grateful to have been able to read it ahead of publication thanks to an advance reader copy I received from the publisher.
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  • Cass
    January 1, 1970
    While music has always been a strong and faithful companion throughout my life, I confess I had not heard of Allison or her sister Shelby. But I will confess, I know what it's like to be a daughter of an alcoholic, to be constantly moving, to feel terrified, to be on the run, to be dirt poor. Moorer has written a memoir about her childhood, her life before and after her father shot and killed her mother before turning the gun on himself. Moorer is a brilliant writ5e and paints scenes with her While music has always been a strong and faithful companion throughout my life, I confess I had not heard of Allison or her sister Shelby. But I will confess, I know what it's like to be a daughter of an alcoholic, to be constantly moving, to feel terrified, to be on the run, to be dirt poor. Moorer has written a memoir about her childhood, her life before and after her father shot and killed her mother before turning the gun on himself. Moorer is a brilliant writ5e and paints scenes with her words, unlike any I've come across. This is difficult to read, due to the violence and cruelty as her father was abusive. Heartbreaking and still somehow uplifting read.
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  • Caroline
    January 1, 1970
    An incredible story of love, survival, strength, and the fragility of forgiveness. The only reason I didn't give it 5 stars is that I found the narrative slow-moving early on.
  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    When I saw that Allison Moorer had a book out, I was immediately interested. When I learned that the book was about her parents and a horrible murder/suicide, I was intrigued. Since I had the chance to meet the author and get a copy of the book and companion CD of the same name, I jumped on the opportunity for this experience.I sat next to an older lady who asked me, “Have you been listening to Allison’s music for very long?” I said “A few years…” (trying to downplay my response), then thought When I saw that Allison Moorer had a book out, I was immediately interested. When I learned that the book was about her parents and a horrible murder/suicide, I was intrigued. Since I had the chance to meet the author and get a copy of the book and companion CD of the same name, I jumped on the opportunity for this experience.I sat next to an older lady who asked me, “Have you been listening to Allison’s music for very long?” I said “A few years…” (trying to downplay my response), then thought aloud that those few years had been in the late 1990’s when I heard “A Soft Place to Fall” and watching The Horse Whisperer. Collectively, the movie, the song, and the rest of Allison’s album, “Alabama Song”, destroyed me. I have been a fan ever since.Hearing Allison reading certain sections of her beautiful and haunting memoir created a similar magic spell across the room and we listened with rapt attention.Cracking the book open on my own when I got home later on that day, I found in my hands a riveting, haunting memoir written with poignant interstitial pieces between each section of prose. In each format, she relives the experience, its effects, and the repercussions in hers and her Shelby Lynne’s life from then until now. She strongly urges her sister (sissy) to seek help from therapy and other modes as Sissy and her son are the only remaining links to that family that still remain. I read each page rapt with attention and feeling my heart go to a vulnerable place where I wish I could have helped this young teenager out in her time of extreme sadness and loss. Of course, throughout, the loss of her mother and father create a depression in her life that she deals with and references often throughout the book. The interesting motivating factor for her writing this book (and pursuing/obtaining an MFA in Creative Writing) is for her son, John Henry. While highly autistic, she wanted to document her life and that of his deceased grandparents so that he could understand one day. The nudge to do this, she explained, was in a conversation with the late Maya Angelou who pushed her to say something about the void of parents and why inquired of her why she was keeping things brief by saying she and her sissy were orphans and not discussing the matter further.I have to imagine that writing a book like this that anyone could read and releasing it to the world has to be a scary thing. Even scarier when the subject matter is grisly and has a long road of pain that leads up to the end of hers and Shelby Lynne’s parents lives. Getting up to read and being vulnerable enough to open up to these experiences shows me how brave she is. I admire the courage and fortitude it took to reach this step. I only hope now that she can do as she wishes for herself in one of the tracks on the companion CD and “Heal”.“Help me lay my weapons down, Help me give the love I feel, Help me hold myself with kindness, And help me heal, Remove all of the false, Show me what is real, Oh Lord, help me heal.” (Moorer & Gauthier, 2019)In the meantime, I will be wishing her the best and hoping for another follow-up novel. When she does, I will happily be there and among the first in line.
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  • Bett
    January 1, 1970
    “He shrank her until she almost disappeared. She decided that she didn’t want to disappear anymore. Then he disappeared her for good.” Allison Moorer, Blood.I write this review of this beautifully written memoir with a caveat. Although I never met her, Ms. Moorer and I grew up in the same places in south Alabama. We have more than that in common.I was raised in Jackson, Alabama, where Allison's maternal grandparents lived. She and her sister attended the schools in Jackson, and so did I, though “He shrank her until she almost disappeared. She decided that she didn’t want to disappear anymore. Then he disappeared her for good.” Allison Moorer, Blood.I write this review of this beautifully written memoir with a caveat. Although I never met her, Ms. Moorer and I grew up in the same places in south Alabama. We have more than that in common.I was raised in Jackson, Alabama, where Allison's maternal grandparents lived. She and her sister attended the schools in Jackson, and so did I, though years before either of them. I believe one of my younger sisters was in school and band with one of them. Allison grew up poor, with an alcoholic, abusive father. So did I. Her father was a musician. So was mine. Our mothers are buried in the same cemetery. One other thing we have in common: for years I have been struggling to write a memoir of my family history. Where I have struggled, Allison Moorer succeeded with more pain, more love, more forgiveness, and more writing skill than I could bring to bear."There were enough incidents of his hitting my mother that I could, in my “believed it was” memory, assume that it happened all the time; every Friday night, or every pay day, every time she set him off. How many times did it actually happen? How many times does it take to terrify a child, before a child begins to hate and fear her father? I only know that I did hate him." WIP, Bett NorrisSo you see, I do know, viscerally, all about Ms. Moorer's childhood.Allison Moorer has written this memoir of her childhood with a steady eye. She pulls no punches when looking at her father, nor when examining herself, and her sister, and the effects of growing up in fear.She is proud of inheriting a talent and a love of music from her parents. It took me many more years to admit that I inherited a love of reading, language, and writing from both my father and my mother.Like Ms. Moorer, I know how hard it is to be grateful to someone who may have given you a gift, but took so much more from you.I am profoundly grateful to her for writing these brave words, these shared and shamed experiences, because this memoir has helped me, in a way that only a child of abuse and alcoholism can help another, if only in being able to recognize the damage, the guilt, and the gift.I also highly recommend Moorer's new album, also titled blood, as it is intended as a companion to the book.
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    More reviews and book-ish content @ Club Book Mobile & Andrea RBKBlood: A Memoir by Allison Moorer is a really, really emotional real - like off the charts y'all. As a teenager, Allison's mother is shot and killed by her father, and he then kills himself. Allison hears the gunshots, and she sees the aftermath. The memoir is her reflecting on what led her family to that point and where she goes from that day. The way the story is told is a bit choppy, but that works well because you see how More reviews and book-ish content @ Club Book Mobile & Andrea RBKBlood: A Memoir by Allison Moorer is a really, really emotional real - like off the charts y'all. As a teenager, Allison's mother is shot and killed by her father, and he then kills himself. Allison hears the gunshots, and she sees the aftermath. The memoir is her reflecting on what led her family to that point and where she goes from that day. The way the story is told is a bit choppy, but that works well because you see how the memory of her family comes back to her in pieces. Throughout she revisits what she remembers of her parents, and all that happened before that terrible day. This is a powerful read as she delves deep into places of her memory that are definitely painful, but also they are what she has left of her parents. This memoir is full of so much raw emotion. She's revisiting her childhood as an adult, and that takes many different directions. She's also able to tap into the parts that brought her joy, while still sharing what made it tough. Throughout, there is also a thread of resilience as you see all she has overcome. This is a beautifully written memoir that is also full of incredible tragedy. Thanks to Hachette Books for the advanced copy of this soon to be released read.
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  • Dai Guerra
    January 1, 1970
    I always find it hard to rate and review a memoir because it is the telling on someone else's life and how do you judge the recounting of someone's life. This memoir does a great job of recounting the events of Allison Moorer's life that lead up to the tragedy of her parent's death. It was beautifully written and the story was told in a way that you got to watch as she challenged herself through the emotions from her past. The way that the story not only told the events from the past but I always find it hard to rate and review a memoir because it is the telling on someone else's life and how do you judge the recounting of someone's life. This memoir does a great job of recounting the events of Allison Moorer's life that lead up to the tragedy of her parent's death. It was beautifully written and the story was told in a way that you got to watch as she challenged herself through the emotions from her past. The way that the story not only told the events from the past but included reflections about Morrer's feelings towards those events as an adult with her own child were moments that I thought captured the whole story nicely. I thought it was such a great way to process her emotions and also leave the past in the past because no matter how she dwells on it, what happened there already happened.
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  • Joy Johnston
    January 1, 1970
    If you are fans of the talented musicians Allison Moorer and Shelby Lynne, this is a must-read. The story of their parents' murder-suicide has at times unfairly overshadowed their music careers. I'm glad Moorer decided to write this definitive account so that the focus can return to the sisters' music.As some critical reviews have noted, Moorer does not follow a linear timeline when recounting her childhood. She moves from past to present reflections. I knew this going in and didn't have trouble If you are fans of the talented musicians Allison Moorer and Shelby Lynne, this is a must-read. The story of their parents' murder-suicide has at times unfairly overshadowed their music careers. I'm glad Moorer decided to write this definitive account so that the focus can return to the sisters' music.As some critical reviews have noted, Moorer does not follow a linear timeline when recounting her childhood. She moves from past to present reflections. I knew this going in and didn't have trouble following the narrative. This book touches on so many tough themes that we still grapple with today: abusive relationships, child abuse, alcoholism, economic struggles, post traumatic stress disorder, forgiveness. It is understandably not an easy read, but I found Moorer's personal account of the darkest day of her life impactful.
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  • Marianne Evans
    January 1, 1970
    I too grew up in Alabama; a place where everybody had guns. It was normal to respect, revere and glorify them. It was oh so common to see pickup trucks with gun racks boasting rifles in the back window. As I’ve aged I can look back and remember many stories of murders, suicides, and deadly accidents. I can’t, for the life of me, remember one single story where someone actually saved their family’s life with the use of a gun. I now believe that holding a gun gives a false sense of security. I I too grew up in Alabama; a place where everybody had guns. It was normal to respect, revere and glorify them. It was oh so common to see pickup trucks with gun racks boasting rifles in the back window. As I’ve aged I can look back and remember many stories of murders, suicides, and deadly accidents. I can’t, for the life of me, remember one single story where someone actually saved their family’s life with the use of a gun. I now believe that holding a gun gives a false sense of security. I would feel just a safe holding an angry rattlesnake in a flimsy cage as to have a gun locked in a closet of my house. The details of Allison Moore’s mama’s and daddy’s shot bodies were too gruesome to bear.
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  • Laura Cee
    January 1, 1970
    Blood is one of the most gut-wrenching memoirs I have ever read. Life changed in a moment for Allison Moorer. Her mother walked past her one pre-dawn morning, never to return. Allison heard the shot that ended her Mama's life by her Daddy's hand. I four beats later, his suicide was complete. Blood chronicles her thirty year quest for closure, haunted by a host of why's, what ifs, and what might have beens. Bound by blood to a legacy of dysfunction, Allison struggles with the trauma of her Blood is one of the most gut-wrenching memoirs I have ever read. Life changed in a moment for Allison Moorer. Her mother walked past her one pre-dawn morning, never to return. Allison heard the shot that ended her Mama's life by her Daddy's hand. I four beats later, his suicide was complete. Blood chronicles her thirty year quest for closure, haunted by a host of why's, what ifs, and what might have beens. Bound by blood to a legacy of dysfunction, Allison struggles with the trauma of her childhood. Allison Moorer's strength of character and her determination to move forward will be inspirational to anyone who has ever struggle with the past.
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  • Angie Simmonds
    January 1, 1970
    Allison Moorer, country singer and sister of Shelby Lynne also a country singer recounts what happened to her family one terrible day when her father shot her mother and then turned the gun on himself.Allison's memoir is written with a sadness so deep it thickly permeates each page. She alternates chapters with factual accounts of their family life and reflections of what her life has been since the tragedy. How has this settled deep in her bones and become a part of everything she has done and Allison Moorer, country singer and sister of Shelby Lynne also a country singer recounts what happened to her family one terrible day when her father shot her mother and then turned the gun on himself.Allison's memoir is written with a sadness so deep it thickly permeates each page. She alternates chapters with factual accounts of their family life and reflections of what her life has been since the tragedy. How has this settled deep in her bones and become a part of everything she has done and become? Her reflections are mournfully lyrical and I found myself heavy of heart while reading it.4 stars
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  • Baigh
    January 1, 1970
    "Blood: A Memoir" is profoundly complex and masterfully written in lyrical prose. A story you will never forget, it is heart-wrenching, beautiful, haunting and often graphic. (Trigger warnings: Murder, suicide, domestic abuse, and detailed descriptions of blood spatter patterns. Not for the squeamish.) Full of gritty, raw, honesty, if you can read this story of a truly, horrific crime and its aftermath without it affecting you, please seek professional help. You may have a heart made out of "Blood: A Memoir" is profoundly complex and masterfully written in lyrical prose. A story you will never forget, it is heart-wrenching, beautiful, haunting and often graphic. (Trigger warnings: Murder, suicide, domestic abuse, and detailed descriptions of blood spatter patterns. Not for the squeamish.) Full of gritty, raw, honesty, if you can read this story of a truly, horrific crime and its aftermath without it affecting you, please seek professional help. You may have a heart made out of stone.."Blood: A Memoir" will be released on Oct 29th by Da Capo Press (Hachette Books).
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  • Shawna
    January 1, 1970
    The narrative felt fractured. I suppose that could be a deliberate stylistic choice given the subject matter and author, I've found that the vignettes made the story harder to follow as you have to reorient yourself every 3 pages. It was profound and tragic, but it felt like there was still a lot left unsaid. I'd really love to hear her sister's side of the story and all the dysfunction in her life that the author alluded to.
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  • LeAnn Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    No one should have to go through what Allison and her sister did. There are few people who could withstand such suffering and evidentially process the trauma into profound lyrical prose.The author wrote (paraphrased): Home is not a place but some kind of peace. Home is a presence of mind and to be thankful for a roof over my head, wherever that might be.John Henry is a beautiful blessing to Allison. I hope for the them the home of peace.The story is an inspiration.
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  • Tim Lowe
    January 1, 1970
    Blood is a gut-wrenching truth on every page memoir.It is difficult to write about horrible things in a beautiful manner, and there are only a few authors who do it well. Allison Moorer tells her family history in a way that makes you feel like her best friend hearing her secrets after being sworn to secrecy.I hope Allison Moorer has more books in her (hopefully with a lighter subject for her sake).
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  • Shannon Courington
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. A phenomenal read! Allison writes with such beauty and grace. She doesn’t sugar coat the horrible reality of domestic violence and its effects. Her memoir is an authentic, raw account of life, death, grief, and pain; but ultimately it’s a survival story. I’m still processing the emotions I have connected to this one-it’s unlike any memoir I’ve read.
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    BeautifulI really couldn’t understand my attraction to this book, after hearing Allison Moore’s on NPR. Why should I want to read a book so similar to my own childhood? I am so very grateful I did. So beautifully and well written. She has such grace dealing with her painful childhood memories. You cannot change the past. You can only learn to go from here.
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  • Carly Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    Moving memoir about her abusive father (he killed her mother and then committed suicide when Moorer was 14) and growing up in rural/small town Alabama in the 1970s and 1980s. Told in lyrical snippets of memory and more straight forward recollections this is at times hard to read but beautifully told book about abusive families and surviving and forgiving.
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  • Lisa Bertelson
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully written about a horrific childhood and its repercussions. But still a pretty depressing story, despite her making some sort of peace with it
  • Derek
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent and moving account of perpetually coming to grips with an unimaginable life event.
  • Jamie Lyon
    January 1, 1970
    Brutal and honest. Amazingly well written but hard to read.
  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    Terribly sad, beautifully written.
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