The World Ends in April
Is middle school drama scarier than an asteroid heading for Earth? Find out in this smart and funny novel by the author of The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl.Every day in middle school can feel like the end of the world.Eleanor Dross knows a thing or two about the end of the world, thanks to a survivalist grandfather who stockpiles freeze-dried food and supplies--just in case. So when she reads about a Harvard scientist's prediction that an asteroid will strike Earth in April, Eleanor knows her family will be prepared. Her classmates? They're on their own!Eleanor has just one friend she wants to keep safe: Mack. They've been best friends since kindergarten, even though he's more of a smiley emoji and she's more of an eye-roll emoji. They'll survive the end of the world together . . . if Mack doesn't go away to a special school for the blind.But it's hard to keep quiet about a life-destroying asteroid--especially at a crowded lunch table--and soon Eleanor is the president of the (secret) End of the World Club. It turns out that prepping for TEOTWAWKI (the End of the World as We Know It) is actually kind of fun. But you can't really prepare for everything life drops on you. And one way or another, Eleanor's world is about to change.

The World Ends in April Details

TitleThe World Ends in April
Author
ReleaseSep 3rd, 2019
PublisherListening Library
ISBN-139780593104538
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction, Contemporary, Fiction, Juvenile

The World Ends in April Review

  • Melanie Brinkman
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes life changes can feel like the end of the world.Thanks to her survivalist grandpa, Eleanor knows a thing or two about the end of the world. It's always been just in case. But when she stumbles across a Harvard scientist's prediction of an asteroid hitting the Earth in April, she knows her family will be prepared. And as long as her friend, Mack is still around, things might be okay.But this life-changing news is hard to keep quiet. Suddenly Eleanor herself finds at the head of a school Sometimes life changes can feel like the end of the world.Thanks to her survivalist grandpa, Eleanor knows a thing or two about the end of the world. It's always been just in case. But when she stumbles across a Harvard scientist's prediction of an asteroid hitting the Earth in April, she knows her family will be prepared. And as long as her friend, Mack is still around, things might be okay.But this life-changing news is hard to keep quiet. Suddenly Eleanor herself finds at the head of a school club informing her peers about TEOTWAWKI. Unfortunately, she can't prepare for everything. A story of impending ends and beautiful beginnings. A of tale the things we know and the things we discover.Trigger warnings for mention of a dead parent, anxiety, an induction of panic, and domestic tension.Often exasperated, anxious Eleanor isn't prepared. Not for being alone, the possibility of losing her best friend, nor the gain of new ones. Even though she caused some panic, her kind, caring heart was in the right place as she shared her knowledge on preparedness. As someone whose fears also often get the best of them, I found her to be relatable.From an eccentric grandfather, to a frustrated father, from a happy-go-lucky friend, to a frenemy who may just lose the enemy title, to the people on the internet, Eleanor influenced and was influenced by a lot of people. Lovingly drawn, the diverse supporting cast was easy to picture as they counted down the days with Eleanor. Some believed her, some didn't, and they provided a nice balance throughout the story. While I like how each relationship progressed, I wished their development would've been a bit more blended into the story. A ray of sunshine and a slightly spiteful spitfire, her friends, Mack and Londyn, were my favorites of the supporting cast.The end of the world as we know it might not be as bad as it sounds. Through Eleanor's story, we saw that change will come to pass, and that endings may create new beginnings in friendships, family situations, school, and day-to-day life. A light-hearted contemporary about change, The World Ends in April was a heart full of friendships, STEM elements, and checking the reliability of the things you believe. Maybe the end of the world doesn't scare us all, but Stacy McAnulty perfectly captured the hold fears, insecurities, and worries can have on our minds. Vivid and smart, this tale was perfectly paced.Don't wait until April to read this.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC provided by NetgalleyEleanor Dross is not having a successful middle school experience. Aside from her best friend, Mack, she has few people with whom she connects, and once she tries to dye and cut her own hair, she gets a lot of negative comments from her peers that make her even more anxious about everything. Londyn, who was somewhat friendly in elementary school, is downright scary now, and throws a ball in Eleanor's face in gym class. When Eleanor finds out that an asteroid is headed E ARC provided by NetgalleyEleanor Dross is not having a successful middle school experience. Aside from her best friend, Mack, she has few people with whom she connects, and once she tries to dye and cut her own hair, she gets a lot of negative comments from her peers that make her even more anxious about everything. Londyn, who was somewhat friendly in elementary school, is downright scary now, and throws a ball in Eleanor's face in gym class. When Eleanor finds out that an asteroid is headed to earth and impact will occur in the spring, she is very concerned. Her Grandpa Joe is a survivalist "prepper" who runs frequent bug out drills and expects Eleanor and her two younger brothers to have their bags packed and organized. While she hasn't really enjoyed the drills lately, she loves her grandfather, and the thought of an asteroid hitting is a little bit of a relief. Along with Mack, Eleanor starts a "nature club" that is a cover for helping other kids learn how to prepare for TEOTWAWKI (the end of the world as we know it). A sympathetic teacher, Mrs. Walsh, lets the group meet in her room after school. Eleanor is very anxious about running the meetings, especially when Londyn shows up. Londyn challenges Eleanor's thoughts, but is the mos fascinated by the thought of the asteroid. She helps write and pass out a tip sheet, and starts to hang out with Eleanor. Londyn's home life is a bit complicated, since her parents are divorcing and she and her mom are living with an aunt, and she hopes that her father will take the asteroid seriously and come to be with her. Eleanor's father is not happy with her obsession, and as the days tick down, she becomes more and more distraught, especially when she finds out that Mack is going to attend a school for the blind the following year. When the two girls (aided by Mack's distraction of the librarian) take over the video morning announcements and warn the students about what is supposed to happen in April, they get suspended. Does it even matter, since the world is supposed to be hit in a few days?Strengths: We know Eleanor. We see her in the hallways at school all the time. Perfectly pleasant enough child, does okay in school, but has trouble making friends and just dealing with classmates. This is exactly the sort of student who would obsess over something like an asteroid. It's this verisimilitude that draws me to McAnulty's work; like The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl, the synopsis of book didn't make it seem like it would interest me, but the writing and characters drew me right in. Mack's limited vision, and the way he manages, is a great addition to the story-- it's a fine line writing between writing a blind character and a character who is blind, and McAnulty nails it. She is also very matter-of-fact when describing characters, saying that they are white, black, etc. and mentioning a defining characteristic. I liked that. The grandfather is a terrific character, the father's frustration and apprehension warranted, and the bits about reliable resources will warm any librarians heart. I loved that Mrs. Walsh and the father were very supportive and asked good questions about Eleanor's feelings. Weaknesses: This was a bit on the long side, and the cover is not fantastic.What I really think: Definitely purchasing. It may take a little bit of hand selling, but it's a great story of middle school insecurity that students will read once they pick it up.
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  • Laura Gardner
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to @mrsoslibrary for sharing this ARC with #kidlitexchange! The World Ends In April by @stacymcanulty comes out 9/3/19!.〰️〰️I loved Miscalculations of Lightning Girl so SO much so I knew I would read anything @stacymcanulty wrote. This one isn't quite as good (4⭐️), but it's still wonderful. Elle, Mack and Londyn are quirky, lovable and fully human just like Lucy, Windy and Levi. The way Elle and Londyn especially almost wish an asteroid would end the world as they know it is in turns hea Thanks to @mrsoslibrary for sharing this ARC with #kidlitexchange! The World Ends In April by @stacymcanulty comes out 9/3/19!.〰️〰️I loved Miscalculations of Lightning Girl so SO much so I knew I would read anything @stacymcanulty wrote. This one isn't quite as good (4⭐️), but it's still wonderful. Elle, Mack and Londyn are quirky, lovable and fully human just like Lucy, Windy and Levi. The way Elle and Londyn especially almost wish an asteroid would end the world as they know it is in turns heartbreaking and illuminating. The frenzy that Elle creates with her dire prediction about the world ending is both funny and a bit terrifying. It certainly kept me turning the pages late into the night! Oh, and I LOVE the cover -- the way the asteroid creates a question mark is brilliant. .〰️〰️I have one gripe, which is that I think there was a bit of a missed opportunity in this book -- one of the Nature Club members is concerned about climate change. I wanted to see the club take the energy and excitement about preparing for the end of the world and turn it into preparing for and helping raise the alarm about climate change. .〰️〰️Description: Eleanor Dross hates middle school, but also hates prepping for end times with her survivalist grandfather. When she finds out about a large asteroid that's predicted to hit earth, all that changes. Soon she and her best friend Mack are in charge of a Nature Club that's really a TEOTWAWKI (the end of the world as we know it) club, helping their fellow classmates prepare for end times. Elle doesn't want the world to end, but it sure would help prevent Mack from going off to a new school for the blind. Londyn doesn't want the world to end, but maybe it would help her parents get back together. What if the world does end...but what if it doesn't?.〰️〰️#librariansofinstagram #librariesofinstagram #mglit #mgbooks #ilovemg #theworldendsinapril #stacymcanulty #booksbooksbooks #bookreview #bookstagram #bookstagrammer
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  • Michele
    January 1, 1970
    But what if it doesn't? Even if the asteroid doesn't end the world as we know it, many things will never be the same for Eleanor. I think this book would be a great read-aloud. While teachers wouldn't want to encourage all of Eleanor's behaviors, she does have to face the consequences of her actions. Tons of STEM elements are explored as well as a discussion on the reliability of information sources. When Eleanor believes the asteroid is going to hit the Earth, she doesn't sit back and worry wit But what if it doesn't? Even if the asteroid doesn't end the world as we know it, many things will never be the same for Eleanor. I think this book would be a great read-aloud. While teachers wouldn't want to encourage all of Eleanor's behaviors, she does have to face the consequences of her actions. Tons of STEM elements are explored as well as a discussion on the reliability of information sources. When Eleanor believes the asteroid is going to hit the Earth, she doesn't sit back and worry with fear. She takes action to educate her diverse group of family and friends so that they all have the best chance of survival.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    3.5! quality middle grade
  • Christina (A Reader of Fictions)
    January 1, 1970
    The concept's relatively interesting, and the central theme of being careful what internet sources you trust is a good one for the youths today. The emotional arcs, however, didn't entirely resonate.
  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Even though this book is about an impending apocalypse, it's upbeat, funny, and entertaining. And, really, it's not about the end of the world at all. It's about friendship—finding friends, losing friends, and the fear of being alone, with no friends. Everyone, especially middle schoolers in the throes of the friend-drama years, can relate to some aspect of this novel. That's what makes it so engaging. Add in likable characters, a trendy prepper plot, and vivid storytelling and THE WORLD ENDS IN Even though this book is about an impending apocalypse, it's upbeat, funny, and entertaining. And, really, it's not about the end of the world at all. It's about friendship—finding friends, losing friends, and the fear of being alone, with no friends. Everyone, especially middle schoolers in the throes of the friend-drama years, can relate to some aspect of this novel. That's what makes it so engaging. Add in likable characters, a trendy prepper plot, and vivid storytelling and THE WORLD ENDS IN APRIL is a winner all around. I loved it.
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  • Amber Webb
    January 1, 1970
    April is coming. Are you prepped and ready for TEOTWAWKI? Eleanor and Mack have been friends for forever, but it seems like things are changing just a bit and now the end of the world is coming! Prepping for the end, making new friends, learning about yourself and those around you; middle school is tough! The story was entertaining and a fun read. What I love about McAnulty’s middle grade books is the characters. She writes about middle school kids that are often on the outskirts and who have th April is coming. Are you prepped and ready for TEOTWAWKI? Eleanor and Mack have been friends for forever, but it seems like things are changing just a bit and now the end of the world is coming! Prepping for the end, making new friends, learning about yourself and those around you; middle school is tough! The story was entertaining and a fun read. What I love about McAnulty’s middle grade books is the characters. She writes about middle school kids that are often on the outskirts and who have their own struggles, but manage to find a way through. The World Ends in April was a book I am sure middle grade readers will love!
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  • Robin Bonne
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Stars. This was a very cute story. The only problem I had during reading was that the characters are supposed to be 12 but they act, speak, and have access to technology like 14-15 year olds would. I interact with children of all ages everyday and twelve year olds are definitely not this mature.
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  • papilionna
    January 1, 1970
    I know this is a middle grade, but Eleanor feels much younger than twelve. In fact, she reads really stupid. Also, I don’t believe kids these days would mindlessly believe one cheap website without looking for further proof. I gueeeeess this is a good book to teach children to be careful with internet sources, but all in all it’s unnecessarily long and irritating. Londyn was the only one who made this book bearable. I really felt for her.
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  • Afoma Umesi
    January 1, 1970
    The World Ends in April is a unique, insightful, and sensitive look at the way some children handle change. Among other things, it shows the value of credible information sources and explores how kids can better deal with difficult life situations. With a strong cast lovable — albeit stubborn — characters, this is a book worth reading.If you enjoy books featuring characters with a physical disability, STEM-related books, or books about grandparents, you’ll enjoy this one. Read the full review on The World Ends in April is a unique, insightful, and sensitive look at the way some children handle change. Among other things, it shows the value of credible information sources and explores how kids can better deal with difficult life situations. With a strong cast lovable — albeit stubborn — characters, this is a book worth reading.If you enjoy books featuring characters with a physical disability, STEM-related books, or books about grandparents, you’ll enjoy this one. Read the full review on my blog.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Tale about an anxious kid who preps for the end of the world. Her relationships with family and friends felt fleshed out and believable, and the characters were interesting. Nice parallel between preferring the the end of the world as we know it to a best friend leaving. The plot dragged a bit in the middle, and I could have done without some of the drama between Eleanor and her new goth friend.
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  • Susan Bazzett-Griffith
    January 1, 1970
    After reading and loving and even writing a book report on Counting By 7s, my son and I were both excited to read McAnulty's second book, but in a stereotypical sophomore slump, this book was not nearly as good as her debut. My son actually abandoned it about 1/3 of the way through because he thought the narrator was stupid and the plot bored him. I powered through, hoping for better, but the book simply lacked the good pacing and the emotional impact the other novel did. The story is about a mi After reading and loving and even writing a book report on Counting By 7s, my son and I were both excited to read McAnulty's second book, but in a stereotypical sophomore slump, this book was not nearly as good as her debut. My son actually abandoned it about 1/3 of the way through because he thought the narrator was stupid and the plot bored him. I powered through, hoping for better, but the book simply lacked the good pacing and the emotional impact the other novel did. The story is about a middle schooler who has a prepper grandfather and gets duped by a website into believing the end of the world is coming, so she shows her friends and they form a club to prep for the end of the world- themes of friendship and fear of the future/unknown as well as the dangers of trusting unreliable internet sources are not subtle. The writing is clear enough that even unsavvy or younger aduiences can clearly see that the website is bad if they've had any internet instruction at all. Additionally, the subplot and underlying conflict of the protagonist being sad about her best friend maybe going to a school for the blind the next year is heavy-handed and without much suspense. It was too long, and while the character of Londyn was perhaps the book's saving grace, the book is very long, and I don't think quite good enough to hold younger/ target audience readers attention. Only 2 stars.
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  • Lizz Axnick
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl. I recommended it to many people. I was so excited to get my hands on this book. I will say this, Stacy McAnulty is a great writer. She creates great settings and wonderful, relatable characters. My problem with this book, which McAnulty goes so far even to mention, is reliable sources. Eleanor Dross finds this website, takes the guy kind of at face value and starts preparing for the end of the world. It helps (or adds to her paranoia) that her grand I LOVED The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl. I recommended it to many people. I was so excited to get my hands on this book. I will say this, Stacy McAnulty is a great writer. She creates great settings and wonderful, relatable characters. My problem with this book, which McAnulty goes so far even to mention, is reliable sources. Eleanor Dross finds this website, takes the guy kind of at face value and starts preparing for the end of the world. It helps (or adds to her paranoia) that her grandfather has been practicing bug out drills with her since she was small and is a self-proclaimed prepper of all things doomsday. Eleanor mentions at school that they took a media class on reliable sources and how Wikipedia is a no-no. However, she delves into this madness based on the word of a scientist, who is fired for his predictions (which was likely because there was no reliable source for any of his evidence!) and then all the other stuff she finds online she does not even bother checking sources. Yet, she questions why the media is not alerting the planet to this stuff. Unlike The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl, I didn't find much to be uplifting about this group. I think I identified most with Londyn and I thought some of her accusations about Eleanor weren't that far off the mark. I kept hoping for a reprieve or some kind of "moral of the story" long before the ending. It took too long. I found myself dreading picking this up again because the book is just so sad and depressing. The world is ending and Eleanor feels the rug is being pulled out from under her. I soldiered through to the end but I was disappointed. I will definitely consider reading anything else McAnulty writes but this is not a book I am likely to revisit.
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  • Katie Reilley
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Stacy McAnulty and Random House Kids for sharing an ARC with our #bookexpedition group! Some days in middle school can feel like the end of the world. So when Elle discovers a Harvard professor’s prediction that an asteroid will hit Earth, Elle knows she needs to protect her family. With help from her survivalist “prepper” Grandpa Joe, her best friend Mack, and Londyn, the girl who’s determined to destroy her in PE, Elle begins her preparations for TEOTWAWKI when SHTF. Only...what i Thank you to Stacy McAnulty and Random House Kids for sharing an ARC with our #bookexpedition group! Some days in middle school can feel like the end of the world. So when Elle discovers a Harvard professor’s prediction that an asteroid will hit Earth, Elle knows she needs to protect her family. With help from her survivalist “prepper” Grandpa Joe, her best friend Mack, and Londyn, the girl who’s determined to destroy her in PE, Elle begins her preparations for TEOTWAWKI when SHTF. Only...what if it doesn’t? What if Mack’s leaving Elle to go to an amazing school for the blind is really the end of Elle’s world? Or what if Londyn’s family problems are the end of her world? Or what if Professor Cologne is...wrong?With an excellent author’s note, back matter on past impact events, asteroid facts, information on readiness kits, and a checklist for legitimate sources, this novel will definitely CRASH into middle grade readers.
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  • Violet Sinclair
    January 1, 1970
    DISCLAIMER: I received a digital review copy of THE WORLD ENDS IN APRIL via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.3.5 stars I was quite excited to read this when I found out it was coming out. The premise seemed interesting, and given that I like McAnulty’s other middle-grade contemporary, THE MISCALCULATIONS OF LIGHTNING GIRL, I was sure I was going to love this one as well.Granted, this book did seem to drag during the middle portion, but overall, it was a great story with great writing a DISCLAIMER: I received a digital review copy of THE WORLD ENDS IN APRIL via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.3.5 stars I was quite excited to read this when I found out it was coming out. The premise seemed interesting, and given that I like McAnulty’s other middle-grade contemporary, THE MISCALCULATIONS OF LIGHTNING GIRL, I was sure I was going to love this one as well.Granted, this book did seem to drag during the middle portion, but overall, it was a great story with great writing and fun characters.Will I be purchasing a copy in September?I’d settle on a definite maybe.
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  • Tory
    January 1, 1970
    *see-saw hand gesture* While the plot was a bit lacking for me, I LOVED the representation of her blind friend Mack, and all the great explanation that went along with him. I learned a lot about the various levels of blindness in a very gentle way! The plot felt a little stretched out and thin at times. I kind of needed a fast-forward button. But I liked that she wasn't free from the consequences of her actions (whether they were good-intentioned or not) and the cover is excellent. I won't stock *see-saw hand gesture* While the plot was a bit lacking for me, I LOVED the representation of her blind friend Mack, and all the great explanation that went along with him. I learned a lot about the various levels of blindness in a very gentle way! The plot felt a little stretched out and thin at times. I kind of needed a fast-forward button. But I liked that she wasn't free from the consequences of her actions (whether they were good-intentioned or not) and the cover is excellent. I won't stock this in hardcover but I'll probably carry it once it comes out in paperback!
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  • Lorena
    January 1, 1970
    By default, any book that I do not finish gets one star. Let me just start by stating that my children and I LOVED The Miscalculations of Lightening Girl. This book just couldn't compete. The plot was a cute idea, especially with the crazy 2020 year that we've been having, and the narrator was fantastic, but the execution of the story ... ugh!I'm sure this book is meant for middle grades, but that doesn't mean it has to have flat, cliché dialogue. The main character has a little chip on her shou By default, any book that I do not finish gets one star. Let me just start by stating that my children and I LOVED The Miscalculations of Lightening Girl. This book just couldn't compete. The plot was a cute idea, especially with the crazy 2020 year that we've been having, and the narrator was fantastic, but the execution of the story ... ugh!I'm sure this book is meant for middle grades, but that doesn't mean it has to have flat, cliché dialogue. The main character has a little chip on her shoulder, which gets old fast. I listened to half of the book, thinking I was almost done. When I saw I still had four hours to go, I gave up. I can't believe how long the story was going to drag on. I couldn't imagine what else the author had to share with us! One super annoying and repetitive theme throughout all of the book that I read was that EVERY TIME a new character was introduced, the character's name was immediately followed with a comma and a phrase that identified the character's race (e.g., "Maria, a Latina girl, ..."). This is obnoxious on several levels. Number one (in no particular order), this felt like an overt attempt to include all races into her book so that the author appears to be the most liberal and inclusive person ever. Seriously, this middle school has to be the most racially diverse school in America. Number two, I think it is unnecessary and insensitive to classify people primarily and solely by race. It gives the impression that their race is the most important facet about a person, so important that it is the only description given about a person. Number three, if the race of a character is so important to bring to the reader's attention, the author should have found ways to show how the character's race is relevant to the story and incorporated those details (show, don't tell).All in all, I had to quit this book because it was boring. I can't believe I actually gave it four hours of my life.
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  • Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    “We’re stuck in the world as we know it.” (311)And the world as Eleanor Dross knows it is not a happy world, especially middle school. “I follow my team to our court. My plan is to stay out of the way and not draw attention to myself. This is always my plan when it comes to sports or any class participation. I’m basically an armadillo during school hours. If you don’t move, you become invisible.” (22-23) Middle-school student Elle lives with her father and two younger brothers. She has only one “We’re stuck in the world as we know it.” (311)And the world as Eleanor Dross knows it is not a happy world, especially middle school. “I follow my team to our court. My plan is to stay out of the way and not draw attention to myself. This is always my plan when it comes to sports or any class participation. I’m basically an armadillo during school hours. If you don’t move, you become invisible.” (22-23) Middle-school student Elle lives with her father and two younger brothers. She has only one friend, Mack Jefferson, who may be planning to go to the Conrad School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, leaving her alone next year. Her Grandpa Joe is a prepper, constantly testing his grandchildren on survival skills—the contents of their BOBs (bug-out bags), eating MREs (meals—ready to eat) and other preparations for disasters. “Bad stuff happens, and it’s my job to protect my family.” (16)And then Elle sees an end-of-the-world notice on the Internet. A Harvard astrophysicist posted a prediction of an asteroid that will hit the earth in the Spring with significant consequences for life. Elle becomes obsessed and starts a school science club, which is really a MAG (Mutual Aid Group), to prepare for TEOTWAWKI (The End Of The World As We Know It). Now she can show off her expertise and also get attention and make some friends. She even begins to bond with Londyn, a childhood friend and current enemy recently ostracized by the popular girls, who uses the disaster to scare people. Londyn and Norie, as she has always called her, collaborate on a newsletter, the Doomsday Express. They become tentative friends, both having their reasons for looking forward to TEOTWAWKI, Londyn who thinks this will bring back her father who abandoned them and Elle who thinks it will keep Mack from leaving.But what is the disaster is a hoax? How will Elle be treated? Will there be a different TEOTWAWKI?Stacy McAnulty’s new novel is about middle school, science, space, authenticating sources, friendship, and family, and features diverse characters.
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  • Sally Kruger
    January 1, 1970
    Since it sort of feels like our world did end in April, I thought I should read this book. Also, the author Stacy McAnulty is the author of one of my favorite middle grade book THE MISCALCULATIONS OF LIGHTNING GIRL. This book features another great female character dealing with an unusual situation.Eleanor and her two younger brothers are being raised by their father. Her mother has been dead for seven years. Eleanor doesn't fit in with most kids her age. Mack, her best friend since forever, is Since it sort of feels like our world did end in April, I thought I should read this book. Also, the author Stacy McAnulty is the author of one of my favorite middle grade book THE MISCALCULATIONS OF LIGHTNING GIRL. This book features another great female character dealing with an unusual situation.Eleanor and her two younger brothers are being raised by their father. Her mother has been dead for seven years. Eleanor doesn't fit in with most kids her age. Mack, her best friend since forever, is blind. She has been helping him out since she was paired up with him in early elementary school. They have a lot in common and are rarely apart.With the start of seventh grade, Eleanor is feeling even more left out than usually. She gets teased for her ugly haircut and pick last for teams in gym. If it wasn't for Mack, she'd have no friends. When Eleanor stumbles across a website detailing an asteriod about to hit the Earth, she becomes obsessed. It doesn't help that her grandfather is a diehard prepper. He has his own bunker and is constantly drilling the kids on what to do if the world is threatened. She learns as much as she can about the impending disaster and soon involves Mack and a few other kids at school. They have months to prepare so she begins sharing what she has learned from her grandfather through the years in hopes of saving her fellow students and their families.Although, the kids believe the facts Eleanor and her new friend Londyn collect, the adults try to discredit the Harvard professor predicting the coming doom. April 7 is the day the world is supposed to end, but will all of Eleanor's preparations be for nothing? THE WORLD ENDS IN APRIL is chillingly relatable to events of today. Some people believe in being prepared and others just dismiss the warnings meant to keep them safe.
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  • Lizz Axnick
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl. I recommended it to many people. I was so excited to get my hands on this book. I will say this, Stacy McAnulty is a great writer. She creates great settings and wonderful, relatable characters. My problem with this book, which McAnulty goes so far even to mention, is reliable sources. Eleanor Dross finds this website, takes the guy kind of at face value and starts preparing for the end of the world. It helps (or adds to her paranoia) that her grand I LOVED The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl. I recommended it to many people. I was so excited to get my hands on this book. I will say this, Stacy McAnulty is a great writer. She creates great settings and wonderful, relatable characters. My problem with this book, which McAnulty goes so far even to mention, is reliable sources. Eleanor Dross finds this website, takes the guy kind of at face value and starts preparing for the end of the world. It helps (or adds to her paranoia) that her grandfather has been practicing bug out drills with her since she was small and is a self-proclaimed prepper of all things doomsday. Eleanor mentions at school that they took a media class on reliable sources and how Wikipedia is a no-no. However, she delves into this madness based on the word of a scientist, who is fired for his predictions (which was likely because there was no reliable source for any of his evidence!) and then all the other stuff she finds online she does not even bother checking sources. Yet, she questions why the media is not alerting the planet to this stuff. Unlike The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl, I didn't find much to be uplifting about this group. I think I identified most with Londyn and I thought some of her accusations about Eleanor weren't that far off the mark. I kept hoping for a reprieve or some kind of "moral of the story" long before the ending. It took too long. I found myself dreading picking this up again because the book is just so sad and depressing. The world is ending and Eleanor feels the rug is being pulled out from under her. I soldiered through to the end but I was disappointed. I will definitely consider reading anything else McAnulty writes but this is not a book I am likely to revisit.
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  • Valerie McEnroe
    January 1, 1970
    Kid rating: 3 starsAdult rating: 4 starsThere's no question that Stacy McAnulty has writing talent. Everything about this book is well-developed. I just found the whole thing a little bit too unrealistic. Eleanor's pretty much been brainwashed by her grandfather her whole life. He's a crackpot who believes there's going to be a disaster that leaves humanity in a fight for existence. Nuclear war. Asteroid hitting the earth. Could be any number of things. The point is to be prepared with food, wat Kid rating: 3 starsAdult rating: 4 starsThere's no question that Stacy McAnulty has writing talent. Everything about this book is well-developed. I just found the whole thing a little bit too unrealistic. Eleanor's pretty much been brainwashed by her grandfather her whole life. He's a crackpot who believes there's going to be a disaster that leaves humanity in a fight for existence. Nuclear war. Asteroid hitting the earth. Could be any number of things. The point is to be prepared with food, water, shelter, safety gear, etc. Eleanor knows all of this since her grandfather has been leading her in survival training exercises for as long as she can remember. Now her blind, best friend Mack is in on it too. It's been an annoyance to Eleanor, until she finds a website claiming an asteroid is going to hit the Earth in less than a year. She freaks out and feels it's her responsibility to warn as many people as she can, starting with her classmates. She forms a nature club which is really just a cover for her apocalypse club. To her dismay, her nemesis, Londyn, joins the club. She's sure it's for sabotage, but Londyn really seems to have an interest in advancing the cause. Eleanor's dad is beside himself, trying desperately to convince her it's all a hoax, but she's 100% sure the world will end in April.Any kid who can be brainwashed by the internet so easily needs counseling. I didn't enjoy Eleanor as a character. She's whiny and bossy. I much preferred Matthew Landis's book It's the End of the World as I Know It. More down-to-earth, believable, and sweet. I think this one is a hard sell.
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Seventh grader Eleanor Dross has never really taken her grandfather's preparations for the apocalypse seriously. But when she stumbles upon an article online from a Harvard astrophysics professor predicting that an asteroid will strike the planet in April, she becomes increasingly obsessed with this doomsday scenario. She shares what she's learned with her best friend, Mack, who is visually impaired and considering moving to a different school that caters to others like him. But Mack shares what Seventh grader Eleanor Dross has never really taken her grandfather's preparations for the apocalypse seriously. But when she stumbles upon an article online from a Harvard astrophysics professor predicting that an asteroid will strike the planet in April, she becomes increasingly obsessed with this doomsday scenario. She shares what she's learned with her best friend, Mack, who is visually impaired and considering moving to a different school that caters to others like him. But Mack shares what Elle has told him, and the news spreads to other classmates. Elle ends up starting a nature club, a thinly-disguised extracurricular activity designed to help her classmates get ready for life after the asteroid arrives. Strangely enough, Elle's enemy, Londyn, joins the club, and helps her write a newsletter about the approaching end of the world as we know it. Readers will feel quite a lot of empathy with Elle as she becomes caught up in this topic, and even when her father assures her that everything will be and this is all a hoax, she refuses to believe it. It's hard not to like Elle with all her earnestness and attempts to educate and inform those around her. Elle makes some mistakes, disappoints her classmates, and realizes that some changes are inevitable and there is no way to get ready for every change that comes our way. Sometimes all we can do is sit back and let it happen. I really enjoyed how the characters develop in this book and how patient Mack is with Elle. In case there are readers who will be caught up in the drama of the scenario described here, the author has provided reassuring asteroid facts and information about the impact of these forms.
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  • Josephine
    January 1, 1970
    i simply adored The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl, so I was excited to read this book. It’s very good too, but it’s no Lightning Girl. Setting is middle school and EVERY day in middle school can feel like the end of the world.Eleanor Dross has been greatly influenced by her grandfather who is a prepper, (survivalist), and stockpiles freeze-dried food and supplies–just in case. One day while browsing websites, Eleanor reads about a Harvard scientist’s prediction that an asteroid will strike E i simply adored The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl, so I was excited to read this book. It’s very good too, but it’s no Lightning Girl. Setting is middle school and EVERY day in middle school can feel like the end of the world.Eleanor Dross has been greatly influenced by her grandfather who is a prepper, (survivalist), and stockpiles freeze-dried food and supplies–just in case. One day while browsing websites, Eleanor reads about a Harvard scientist’s prediction that an asteroid will strike Earth in April. This concerns Eleanor but she knows her family will be prepared. So, she goes on a mission to warn her classmates. She especially wants to protect her one and only friend, Mack. They’ve been best friends since kindergarten. She says he’s more of a smiley emoji and she’s more of an eye-roll emoji. She hopes they will survive the end of the world together . . . if Mack doesn’t go away to a special school for the blind.A secret End of the World Club is formed with disastrous results for Eleanor. (I like my pun.) It turns out that prepping for TEOTWAWKI (the End of the World as We Know It) is actually kind of fun until you get suspended. Hold your breath as April 7th approaches accompanied by a killer asteroid.The book I finished before starting this was Gail Jarrow’s, Spooked! How a Radio Broadcast and The War of the Worlds Sparked the 1938 Invasion of America. It is quite a study on human behavior and how easily we can be fooled whether it be the 1930’s or the 2000’s.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    Originally posted at https://bickeringbooks.wordpress.com/...Summary: Eleanor Dross knows how to survive the end of the world. She isn’t a prepper and neither is her father but Eleanor’s grandfather is a prepping fanatic. Eleanor always thought that his lessons were silly that is until she finds the website, a website that predicts an asteroid is going to hit the Earth in April and life as we know it will be over. Eleanor teams up with her best friend, Mack, and her kind of frenemy, Londyn, to g Originally posted at https://bickeringbooks.wordpress.com/...Summary: Eleanor Dross knows how to survive the end of the world. She isn’t a prepper and neither is her father but Eleanor’s grandfather is a prepping fanatic. Eleanor always thought that his lessons were silly that is until she finds the website, a website that predicts an asteroid is going to hit the Earth in April and life as we know it will be over. Eleanor teams up with her best friend, Mack, and her kind of frenemy, Londyn, to get her classmates ready to survive TEOTWAWKI. Eleanor wants to make sure everyone is safe but she has to compete with adults, including her dad, who won’t take the threat seriously. Can Eleanor convince everyone to listen to her so she can save her family and friends?Review: There is so much good in this book but unfortunately there is also some not so good things about this book. Eleanor is a strong female character, the type that we need to see more of in children’s books. She isn’t going to just sit there and listen to everyone else, no, our main character is going to spring into action and try to save herself and her loved ones. That aspect of the book was great. Also, great was the portrayal of Eleanor’s best friend, Mack, who is the antithesis of what you usually see in this kind of book. He was positive and proactive and didn’t let the fact that he was blind slow him down. Mack was just kind of neat. I also appreciated how McAnulty was able to teach a gentle lesson about acceptance through the character of Londyn with Eleanor having to really get to know the other girl to learn what was going on in her life so they could bridge the gap to friendship. However, many aspects of this book just didn’t really work for me. The group of middle schoolers seemed way too eager for the end of the world. They loved their meetings and planning what to do once it’s TEOTWAWKI. I had difficulty believing that it took so long for any parent to get involved. There were a lot of meetings and discussions among the student and not one of their parents thought it was odd? Also, Eleanor obviously had other issues that her father and grandfather didn’t seem to notice or address. Was she this all because she was upset and nervous about Mack changing schools because of her mother’s death? The issue was never really resolved and I would be a much happier reader if it had bee. In all, the book was fine and many tweens will enjoy it but this adult needed a little more character development.
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  • Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*
    January 1, 1970
    The World Ends in April by Stacy McAnulty, 362 pages. Random House, 2019. $17. Content: Language: G; Mature Content: G; Violence: G. BUYING ADVISORY: EL, MS – OPTIONAL AUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGE Eleanor is a middle schooler whose grandfather is a survivalist and she has been run through drills her whole life, just in case. When Eleanor reads of an asteroid that is headed towards earth and will crash into the planet in April, Eleanor begins to take her grandfather’s skills seriously. Eleanor shares The World Ends in April by Stacy McAnulty, 362 pages. Random House, 2019. $17. Content: Language: G; Mature Content: G; Violence: G. BUYING ADVISORY: EL, MS – OPTIONAL AUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGE Eleanor is a middle schooler whose grandfather is a survivalist and she has been run through drills her whole life, just in case. When Eleanor reads of an asteroid that is headed towards earth and will crash into the planet in April, Eleanor begins to take her grandfather’s skills seriously. Eleanor shares her concerns with her best friend, Mac, and together they start a survivalist club at school. But when Eleanor’s father hears of her obsession and fears, he tries to stop her club and forbids Eleanor from talking to her grandfather about the end of the world. I loved McAnulty’s book, The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl, so I was super excited about this book. I enjoyed the beginning of the book and the premise of Eleanor’s middle school drama, but by the end I was frustrated with Eleanor’s inability to listen to those who loved her over the rantings of a scientist online. The ending was hard to read because Eleanor couldn’t get out of her own way and it became too predictable. Reviewer, C. Petersonhttps://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2020...
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    More reviews and book-ish content @ Club Book Mobile & Andrea RBKThe World Ends in April by Stacy McAnulty was such an unconventional premise, but it worked really well. Eleanor is a middle schooler, but she learns the end of the world is coming. She is first familiar with "prepping" because her grandpa is all about that life. Doing her own research she realizes that a Harvard professor has predicted an asteroid is going to hit early, and it will have deadly consequences. Eleanor tells her frien More reviews and book-ish content @ Club Book Mobile & Andrea RBKThe World Ends in April by Stacy McAnulty was such an unconventional premise, but it worked really well. Eleanor is a middle schooler, but she learns the end of the world is coming. She is first familiar with "prepping" because her grandpa is all about that life. Doing her own research she realizes that a Harvard professor has predicted an asteroid is going to hit early, and it will have deadly consequences. Eleanor tells her friend Mack because she wants him to be okay. However, she makes the mistake of telling him at the lunch table, and others find out. Soon they've formed the Nature Club (as a cover for the End of the World Club) to start preparing for what's to come. While this sounds like the darkest of premises, it's really such a wonderful story of friendship and family and even how we consume information. I loved how it explored how Eleanor wasn't so much navigating the potential arrival of an asteroid, but instead the relationships and realities of middle school. It was a story that had such heart, and y'all, I just loved it.
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  • Angie
    January 1, 1970
    Eleanor isn't really into her grandpa's prepper activities. She doesn't enjoy keeping a bugout bag or any of grandpa's little test runs. Then she reads that an asteroid is going to hit earth in the spring. Suddenly it is The End of the World As We Know It and she wants to be prepared. She starts reading everything she can find from the Harvard professor who has predicted the asteroid strike. She even convinces her friend Mack to start a survivalist club at school. Then she and Londyn start a new Eleanor isn't really into her grandpa's prepper activities. She doesn't enjoy keeping a bugout bag or any of grandpa's little test runs. Then she reads that an asteroid is going to hit earth in the spring. Suddenly it is The End of the World As We Know It and she wants to be prepared. She starts reading everything she can find from the Harvard professor who has predicted the asteroid strike. She even convinces her friend Mack to start a survivalist club at school. Then she and Londyn start a newsletter with information about the asteroid and tips for survival. As the date of impact gets closer, things escalate and end up with Eleanor and Londyn hijacking morning announcements and getting suspended. I wasn't sure what to expect out of this story, but I enjoyed Eleanor's obsession. The reader, just like Eleanor's father, knows this is a hoax and that we shouldn't believe everything you read on the internet. Eleanor however is convinced and wants to convince others. The interesting thing is that she truly believes the end of the world is coming and in a way is looking forward to it. Because she doesn't do well in school or have a lot of friends, she actually believes things would be better in a post-apocalyptic world. There are definitely kids like Eleanor who do obsess over things, just maybe not to the extent she takes it. You can truly feel her devastation when the world does not end.
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  • Paula
    January 1, 1970
    Bizarre timing for this book to have made the Maine Student Book Award nominee list for 20-21 during a global pandemic. We meet Eleanor Dross, a middle schooler whose grandfather is a "prepper" (doomsday survivalist) as she stumbles across a website by a Harvard scientist who announces the earth will be stuck by a 300 mile wide asteroid in April. She realizes this only gives her and her friends about half a year to prepare for impact. With the help of her blind friend, Mack, and her frenemy, Lon Bizarre timing for this book to have made the Maine Student Book Award nominee list for 20-21 during a global pandemic. We meet Eleanor Dross, a middle schooler whose grandfather is a "prepper" (doomsday survivalist) as she stumbles across a website by a Harvard scientist who announces the earth will be stuck by a 300 mile wide asteroid in April. She realizes this only gives her and her friends about half a year to prepare for impact. With the help of her blind friend, Mack, and her frenemy, London, they create a nature club at school to help one another prepare for TEOTWAWKI (The End of the World As We Know It). I think if I had read this last year it would have had a different response. I'm not sure that readers will want to "escape" to a doomsday scenario these days. Well written, interesting characters, a good book. If you haven't read Stacy McAnulty's The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl I'd go there until our world returns to a bit more normalcy.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    This was a nice book about friendship, prepping for a possible apocalypse, and realizing that no matter what, you still have to deal with your friends and family. I had pretty high hopes for this one, and overall, they were met. I did have some reservations about the story in general though-especially the fact that while Eleanor is VERY concerned about the possible asteroid that is headed towards earth, the author doesn't explicitly deal with WHY she is so concerned about it. This felt like a mi This was a nice book about friendship, prepping for a possible apocalypse, and realizing that no matter what, you still have to deal with your friends and family. I had pretty high hopes for this one, and overall, they were met. I did have some reservations about the story in general though-especially the fact that while Eleanor is VERY concerned about the possible asteroid that is headed towards earth, the author doesn't explicitly deal with WHY she is so concerned about it. This felt like a missed opportunity to me to have a conversation about and exploration of anxiety in middle grade readers. The "prepper" information in the book was solid, it had some good information at the end with additional resources, and it showed that no matter what, the sun will rise tomorrow (unless we're in an impact winter, but that's another story). Recommended for students in grades 4-7. Hand to readers who enjoyed McAnulty's earlier work The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl and those who like realistic fiction with a side of adventure.
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