Eat Joy
This collection of intimate essays by some of America's most well-regarded writers explores how food can help us cope in dark times―whether it be the loss of a parent, the loneliness of moving to a new country, the heartache of an unexpected breakup, or the fear of coming out. Luscious, full-color illustrations by Meryl Rowin are woven throughout, and accompanying each story is a recipe from the writer’s own kitchen.Lev Grossman explains how he survived on “sweet, sour, spicy, salty, unabashedly gluey” General Tso’s tofu after his divorce. Carmen Maria Machado describes learning to care for herself during her confusing young adulthood, beginning with nearly setting her kitchen on fire. Claire Messud tries to understand how her mother gave up dreams of being a lawyer to make “a dressed salad of tiny shrimp and avocado, followed by prune-stuffed pork tenderloin, served with buttered egg noodles” for her family. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie remembers a childhood friend―who later died as a soldier in Nigeria―with a pot of fragrant jollof rice. What makes each tale so moving is not only the deeply personal revelations from celebrated writers, but also the compassion and healing behind the story: the taste of hope.

Eat Joy Details

TitleEat Joy
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 29th, 2019
PublisherBlack Balloon
Rating
GenreFood and Drink, Food, Nonfiction, Writing, Essays, Cookbooks, Short Stories, Cooking, Autobiography, Memoir, Foodie, Food Writing, Anthologies

Eat Joy Review

  • Patricia
    January 1, 1970
    I found this book very comforting for myself. These are moments of grief or sadness that various writers have experienced with comforts foods which made them feel better. I quite enjoyed reading this book, and I highly recommend it to all!
  • Paris (parisperusing)
    January 1, 1970
    This collection features intimate essays from incredible writers — including Alexander Chee, Melissa Febos, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Laura Van Den Berg — sharing the comfort foods that helped get them through tough times. As someone who has always seen cooking more of a cultural expression of self-love, I can certainly see how the act of preparing a home-cooked meal can also be therapeutic and remedial. While I didn’t always associate cooking as intimately as shown here, reading Laura’s essay o This collection features intimate essays from incredible writers — including Alexander Chee, Melissa Febos, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Laura Van Den Berg — sharing the comfort foods that helped get them through tough times. As someone who has always seen cooking more of a cultural expression of self-love, I can certainly see how the act of preparing a home-cooked meal can also be therapeutic and remedial. While I didn’t always associate cooking as intimately as shown here, reading Laura’s essay on battling anorexia and seeing her mother through her health struggles with eggy cuisines and Melissa’s romantic, inward self-discovery through writing and the love of an old boyfriend, passion which manifests in a slow-roasted pork dish — despite her placid vegetarianism — really gave the domestic art a new sense of sentimentality. I spent the night reading these stories and these recipes, many of which I’ll be filching for my own kitchen shenanigans soon enough.Thanks, Catapult and Black Balloon Publishing, for gifting me with a finished copy!
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  • tinabel
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful and lovely collection of short autobiographical stories, centered around one of my favourite things—food! Complete with easy, homey recipes and reminisces about life and love, happiness, hardship and heartbreak, each piece is a bite-sized look into the interior lives of some of the world's most celebrated writers.
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  • Rachel Watkins
    January 1, 1970
    Humans have an intimate relationship with food. EAT JOY gives us the stories of some of our most beloved writers as they share big moments in their lives and the recipes that were a part of it. Covering big topics like growing pains and loss, to healing and homecoming, these stories are delicious. EAT JOY is a perfect host/hostess gift.
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  • Gretchen Alice
    January 1, 1970
    An endearing and thoughtful compilation of essays from a legitimately great assortment of writers. Obviously I am heavily invested in both books and food and this combined the two of those interests admirably. Would make a great holiday gift for any foodies in your life.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    For lovers of food and reading. Short but insightful essays on the role and power of food in our lives. It also has recipes which I can’t wait to try.
  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    There are moments in our lives which imprint on our souls, and often when we recollect them, our memories entangle with sensory information. The visceral quality of food as it relates to memory is unparalleled—sometimes we eat our favorite foods as comfort during grief, or a dish prepared by a friend becomes healing food from then on. Eat Joy is a lively collection of autobiographical stories in which food plays a starring role (recipes included—and they are lovely!). A diverse selection of celebra There are moments in our lives which imprint on our souls, and often when we recollect them, our memories entangle with sensory information. The visceral quality of food as it relates to memory is unparalleled—sometimes we eat our favorite foods as comfort during grief, or a dish prepared by a friend becomes healing food from then on. Eat Joy is a lively collection of autobiographical stories in which food plays a starring role (recipes included—and they are lovely!). A diverse selection of celebrated authors tell stories of growth and loss, healing and homecoming, and the resulting collection is nothing short of magical.
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  • Ellen | spoilerkween
    January 1, 1970
    Eating is truly one of the things I take the most pleasure out of in life, and joy is one of my favorite words, and y’all are going to want to get your hands on this one. It has stories from so many wonderful authors including @cheemobile, @carmenmmachado, @chimamanda_adichie and lots more. They all bring something different to the table (lol) about how good impacts our lives in different ways — it’s so much more than just nourishment that sustains us. Certain meals contain memories and give us Eating is truly one of the things I take the most pleasure out of in life, and joy is one of my favorite words, and y’all are going to want to get your hands on this one. It has stories from so many wonderful authors including @cheemobile, @carmenmmachado, @chimamanda_adichie and lots more. They all bring something different to the table (lol) about how good impacts our lives in different ways — it’s so much more than just nourishment that sustains us. Certain meals contain memories and give us strength. Such an impressive collection.
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  • Catapult
    January 1, 1970
    An illustrated anthology of essays about the comfort foods—and recipes—that helped writers survive painful times in their lives. With contributions from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Anthony Doerr, Colum McCann, Lev Grossman, Carmen Maria Machado, Claire Messud, Maile Meloy, Alexander Chee, Edwidge Danticat, and many more.
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  • Alice
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a delight! The essays are each different, and each is accompanied by a recipe. Sometimes the recipe is simple (pour into bowl, eat) or very complicated (two pages long!), and each recipe is in some way connected to the essay, which appears first. I especially loved the essay by a gay writer who was bullied and found solace in baking. The writing is gorgeous. I won't say the writing in the essays is always as good that that one but the writing is always heart-felt and emotionally sa This book was a delight! The essays are each different, and each is accompanied by a recipe. Sometimes the recipe is simple (pour into bowl, eat) or very complicated (two pages long!), and each recipe is in some way connected to the essay, which appears first. I especially loved the essay by a gay writer who was bullied and found solace in baking. The writing is gorgeous. I won't say the writing in the essays is always as good that that one but the writing is always heart-felt and emotionally satisfying.
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  • Fred
    January 1, 1970
    This might be the most misnamed book ever. For a book ostensibly about food and joy, it's awfully depressing. Food as a link to a refugee's past; as a balm for illness, as consolation in times of heartbreak, depression, an grief; as a way to salvage a broken relationship, to comfort a dying man, a divorcee alone in his apartment -- there isn't one story here that speaks to joy. Food connected to the sorrow of dealing with Alzheimer's, accompaniment to cremating a father, to remind one of the sad This might be the most misnamed book ever. For a book ostensibly about food and joy, it's awfully depressing. Food as a link to a refugee's past; as a balm for illness, as consolation in times of heartbreak, depression, an grief; as a way to salvage a broken relationship, to comfort a dying man, a divorcee alone in his apartment -- there isn't one story here that speaks to joy. Food connected to the sorrow of dealing with Alzheimer's, accompaniment to cremating a father, to remind one of the sad passage of time, of dealing with bullying - these are meaningful tales, but joyless.
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  • Natalie Eve
    January 1, 1970
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