F*ck Your Diet
Fans of Issa Rae and Phoebe Robinson will love this collection of laugh-out-loud funny and insightful essays that explore race, feminism, pop culture, and how society reinforces the message that we are nothing without the perfect body. By the time Chloé Hilliard was 12, she wore a size 12—both shoe and dress—and stood over six feet tall. Fitting in was never an option. That didn’t stop her from trying. Cursed with a “slow metabolism,” “baby weight,” and “big bones,”—the fat trilogy—Chloe turned to fad diets, starvation, pills, and workouts, all of which failed. Realizing that everything—from government policies to corporate capitalism—directly impacts our relationship with food and our waistlines, Chloé changed her outlook on herself and hopes others will do the same for themselves. The perfect mix of cultural commentary, conspiracies, and confessions, F*ck Your Diet pokes fun at the all too familiar, misguided quest for better health, permanent weight loss, and a sense of self-worth.

F*ck Your Diet Details

TitleF*ck Your Diet
Author
ReleaseJan 7th, 2020
PublisherGallery Books
ISBN-139781982108618
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Writing, Essays, Humor, Audiobook

F*ck Your Diet Review

  • Susie Dumond
    January 1, 1970
    In this hilarious and refreshing memoir, comedian Chloe Hilliard takes on diet culture and the way society teaches us to think about our bodies. From junk food to the meat industry to standards of beauty, Hilliard has a lot to say, and I loved every word. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Nathalia
    January 1, 1970
    Chloe Hilliard pulls no punches with how she's struggled with dieting, weight loss, weight gain, body image, and learning to love the skin that she's in. Each chapters discusses different moments of her life - some of which are painful topics, but she's got a wicked sense of humor to cut the pain. This book is for anyone who's struggled with their weight and has finally decided that it's much better mentally, emotionally, and physically to try and be healthy rather than trying to be thin.
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  • Never Without a Book
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 but bumped to 4 because much of what Hilliard experienced with her body struggles, I did as well. This book is worth the read. https://www.instagram.com/p/B7Vu7k1gp...
  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    I usually don't laugh out loud while reading but this book had me at a whole new level. Hilliard weaves her journalism background with her messy childhood to produce a surprisingly well-researched memoir filled with food and admirable naiveté. I loved getting a glimpse into her hilarious, insightful world.
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  • Heather Brose
    January 1, 1970
    *I received an advanced copy of this book from Gallery Books in exchange for an honest review."... perfection is overrated and impossible to achieve. Understanding that frees you up to focus on being healthy, unique, and confident. That is my prayer for you."I really enjoyed reading "F*ck Your Diet: And Other Things My Thighs Tell Me". It was super relatable and educational. I experienced all the emotions while reading this book. I laughed out loud often, became teary eyed at some parts and *I received an advanced copy of this book from Gallery Books in exchange for an honest review."... perfection is overrated and impossible to achieve. Understanding that frees you up to focus on being healthy, unique, and confident. That is my prayer for you."I really enjoyed reading "F*ck Your Diet: And Other Things My Thighs Tell Me". It was super relatable and educational. I experienced all the emotions while reading this book. I laughed out loud often, became teary eyed at some parts and angry at other times (due to the treatment toward Chloé), but overall I was inspired. Although we differ in age and race, I felt like we had shared experiences to varying degrees with our relationship with food, being bullied because of weight, struggling with self worth, and trying out different diets/lifestyle choices (being vegetarian, vegan, etc).I feel like Chloé was extremely courageous to share her experiences as it takes a lot of vulnerability to do so. I am thankful that she did, because it was comforting to know I wasn't alone in my own experiences with food, weight gain and self worth. I really loved how funny this book was and how Chloé used humor to cut some of the seriousness. I usually listen to audio books of comedic writers like Mindy Kaling, Tiffany Haddish and Phoebe Robinson, but I still had laugh out loud moments despite not reading them in the pace/delivery exactly from the author. I also really loved the research and history included in each chapter to get her point across. It was very compelling and I learned a ton I never knew about Reagan, Kellogg's, racial bias in healthcare and plastic surgery, just to name a few. I hope other readers get as much as I did out of her memoir. It's certainly a journey and hard work towards loving the skin you're in and to focus on being healthy vs a weight goal. I felt like this book helped to give me some motivation to take steps towards loving myself and making better decisions. Thank you for sharing a bit about your life, Chloé!--- edit after I saw another review ---I am sure there are going to be white people who feel butthurt about some of the things expressed in this book (as we can already see in some of these reviews). Chloé's experiences were totally valid and I hate that she had to experience the negative ones, especially those related to race. As a white person, I didn't feel like she was being racist in her book to share the experiences she had and her observations about the people involved in those experiences. In the summary of the book, it explicitly talks about how Chloé includes politics and race in her book, and I'm not sure what readers are going to expect since most POC experience racism from white people...I know the privilege I have as a white person and I don't get upset at the creator/writer/director when I watch/read/listen to something about the racism of white people. It makes me angry that it's still occurring and even angrier when white people say that a POC can be racist towards white people...no. Just no. I can step back and understand that Chloé is making an observation about her experience, but doesn't feel every single white woman acts the way she described in her experiences working with white women...etc. If you're getting upset it's likely because what you're reading is hitting a little too close to home.
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  • Shannon Rochester
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for my digital copy in exchange for an honest opinion. I requested this book because I loved the cover and I loved the title. I TOUGHT it was going to be a book written by someone who has fought with their weight all along and some funny stories might come from it. But this is the book that taught me to look a little closer at the description of the book. I absolutely loved chapter one...and just when I was getting settled into it, my mouth started Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for my digital copy in exchange for an honest opinion. I requested this book because I loved the cover and I loved the title. I TOUGHT it was going to be a book written by someone who has fought with their weight all along and some funny stories might come from it. But this is the book that taught me to look a little closer at the description of the book. I absolutely loved chapter one...and just when I was getting settled into it, my mouth started dropping open...this was the most political and racist book I have ever personally read. And yes, it is still racism when it is against white people. Once the first literal mouth drop happened, it started happening even more for every chapter I went in...So many of the things she talks about happening to her(usually because of someone white) also happened to myself or other people I know who did not happen to have color in their skin. I thought this would be some sort of sisterhood book...only MY sisterhood actually does include everybody. You cannot be talking about how racist someone is, all the while literally talking about your problems with white people...To me, you are either part of the solution or part of the problem. I never judge people based on something they can't control. None of us can choose what color our skin is, what gender we were born to, who our parents are or what they taught us when we were young(among other things) but we CAN choose who we want to be as we grow up. We can choose how to treat people. We can choose to change so many of our circumstances in life.. I don't judge people based on color, whether they like boys or girls or both, how much money they have, where they live, how they talk, what they dress like...how tall or short they are...blah blah blah. I only judge people on whether or not they are an ass in life.
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  • Sammie
    January 1, 1970
    You can find my full review on my blog, The Writerly Way, here.Many thanks to NetGalley and Gallery Books for an eARC in exchange for an honest, unbiased review. From the moment I saw the title, I knew I needed to read this book. It clearly spoke to me.I’m going to confess that I had absolutely no idea who Chloé Hilliard was … and I almost prefer it that way. I mean, yeah, sure, I read books from comedians I know, but sometimes it’s fun just to discover some nonfiction with no pre-judgment or You can find my full review on my blog, The Writerly Way, here.Many thanks to NetGalley and Gallery Books for an eARC in exchange for an honest, unbiased review. From the moment I saw the title, I knew I needed to read this book. It clearly spoke to me.I’m going to confess that I had absolutely no idea who Chloé Hilliard was … and I almost prefer it that way. I mean, yeah, sure, I read books from comedians I know, but sometimes it’s fun just to discover some nonfiction with no pre-judgment or expectations.F*ck Your Diet is part memoir, part social commentary. It’s one woman’s journey to self-acceptance, while also acknowledging the ways society sets her up for failure.Sometimes it’s easier to avoid the pitfalls when you know what they are and can see them coming. When I picked up this book, I had absolutely no idea what to expect, and overall, I was pleasantly surprised. Hilliard clearly has spent some time poking around in my brain, because this book was so freaking relatable, despite the few times her and I just didn’t see eye-to-eye.My Thoughts:- There were several chapters that were enlightening as to what it’s like growing up as a lower class black girl, and it was nice seeing another person’s perspective. Some of the experiences were funny, especially regarding Hilliard’s grandmother and family, and some were just insightful and uplifting. Of course, some were downright depressing, because life happens. The thing I particularly loved is that Hilliard was honest and raw about all of it, even the negative things, and constantly emphasized the fact that life is a journey. It can’t all be coasting downhill.- At times, there’s a hard critical look at the role/place of people of color in society in general. If you can’t go in with an open mind, this book probably isn’t for you, because it’s got some hard truths and some even harder opinions. Hilliard doesn’t shy away from the race thing. Some of it was hard to read, even for myself, but that’s the beauty of an opinion. Hilliard doesn’t take a “woe is me” approach, and often tries to lighten social commentary with humor surrounding her own experience, which made it a nice balance of lightness with the dark. The way Hilliard called out problems while also finding the positives in them and the potential they can lead to something made it more of an uplifting read.- Hilliard talks a lot about body image and an attempt to get healthy, and I feel attacked, y’all, but also oddly seen? There were times I just couldn’t stop laughing, because her struggles were things I also struggled with. Clearly, we’re kindred souls whose thighs are just undermining everything we try to do. Stupid thighs. Hilliard takes the reader through a montage of diets and fitness regimes she tried with varying success, always with a slightly tongue-in-cheek approach. Hilliard calls out the struggles some people have in this regard, including food deserts, lack of access, and lack of education. - I went into this book expecting 100% less facts and statistics than were presented. I was impressed, not gonna lie. I thought this would just be cute little anecdotes, but nope. Hilliard cuts no slack at all in calling out problems with society, backed up with statistics (and yes, she cites her sources). The book doesn’t read like a disertation, don’t get me wrong, but she’s clearly thought about her past experiences and added up all the factors that led her there. While it’s true that our choices are our own, there are sooo many factors that lead us to any one decision. Hilliard pieces together some of these influences to give a broader picture. Sticking Points:- Hilliard is very passionate about some things, so her narrative at times becomes very preachy and prescriptive. Which felt weird, considering the overall vibe the book seems to be going for is love yourself and overall acceptance. She’s very pro-vegan and anti-red meat. Which is fine. But I love bacon and hamburgers. Sometimes together, but also apart.- I confess: I skimmed the chapter on sex. I KNOW. I’m disappointed in myself, too. Especially since the whole point of the chapter, or the part I actually read, was that it’s important to have these discussions because sex matters. And I agree. But let’s just say that our experiences in this arena are vastly different, as are our opinions, so I just passed on this one.- Based on the title and blurb, I thought this would be about Hilliard’s struggle with weight and self-acceptance, and it was, but it was also a whole lot more, to the point where it felt a little random. There were a lot of chapters about a lot of things, and it eventually came back to the health/weight stuff, but it was sometimes a bit meandering. It wasn’t bad, necessarily, but I didn’t expect it, and I had a little trouble at times following the train of thought and circling back to the original idea.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Don't judge this book by its cover.I imagine that because Hilliard, who I'd heard nothing of before getting my hands on a free copy of this book, is known for her comedy the publishers decided on this ridiculous title and cover. It looks and sounds like a pop celebrity memoir, and there's nothing wrong with that genre... but that's not this book at all.Hilliard's book is part memoir, part research/expose on systemic oppression like racism, fatphobia, misogyny. She covers food deserts, tokenism, Don't judge this book by its cover.I imagine that because Hilliard, who I'd heard nothing of before getting my hands on a free copy of this book, is known for her comedy the publishers decided on this ridiculous title and cover. It looks and sounds like a pop celebrity memoir, and there's nothing wrong with that genre... but that's not this book at all.Hilliard's book is part memoir, part research/expose on systemic oppression like racism, fatphobia, misogyny. She covers food deserts, tokenism, beauty standards, American food consumption, veganism, typecasting, and much more in a nuanced, thoughtful, and honest voice. Her writing is informed by her first career as a journalist, as well as her work in comedy. I loved this book, but never would have picked it up on my own had it not fallen into my lap. I truly worry the marketing of this will keep it from the readers who would love it best, which is a shame. Hilliard's book is a pleasure, smart and relatable and informative. I hope it gets th attention it deserves.
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  • Sonia
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I won a preview copy.A memoir about including dieting, body conscious issues, being a young woman of color, the trials of the work place and love. I wouldn't say this book was funny but it had it moments. It was more a catalog of one women's personal journey. While I am sure I'm not the reading demographic for this book I felt at times Chloe was too self focused rather that realizing many woman (not just POC) have many of the same journeys at work and with their body issues. I worked Disclaimer: I won a preview copy.A memoir about including dieting, body conscious issues, being a young woman of color, the trials of the work place and love. I wouldn't say this book was funny but it had it moments. It was more a catalog of one women's personal journey. While I am sure I'm not the reading demographic for this book I felt at times Chloe was too self focused rather that realizing many woman (not just POC) have many of the same journeys at work and with their body issues. I worked in publishing, as a chubby middle aged brunette (in a world where skinny blonde women rule) I wasn't given any extra mentoring and was first in line to be laid off. Now I work in Tech a world where sexism and ageism rule and diversity is just a buzz word that companies use to sound good. There is a lot of recommend in this book about eating disorders, discrimination, owning your body and sex. I think this would be a great book for a young woman that doesn't quite fit in and wants to know they are not alone.
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  • Diane Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    Chloe Hilliard is a female comedienne who has had it with diets. In fact, F*ck Your Diet.This is a humorous book describing the author’s journey from fried Southern food to veganism (mostly). Beginning as a young child, Chloe was thick. Chocolate was her first word. She had a “torrid love affair with cereal”. Many of her stories, like being forced to eat everything on her plate because of starving African children, will seem eerily familiar—at least to women of a certain age and girth.However, Chloe Hilliard is a female comedienne who has had it with diets. In fact, F*ck Your Diet.This is a humorous book describing the author’s journey from fried Southern food to veganism (mostly). Beginning as a young child, Chloe was thick. Chocolate was her first word. She had a “torrid love affair with cereal”. Many of her stories, like being forced to eat everything on her plate because of starving African children, will seem eerily familiar—at least to women of a certain age and girth.However, it is also much more. As the author states, “I never imagined this would venture into systematic oppression, political agendas, conspiracy theories, sex tips, and traumatizing relationships.” If you love food documentaries like Super Size Me and Food, Inc., you should read F*ck Your Diet—especially if you are a thick woman of any color. I enjoyed it plus it made me forgive myself for the French fries I ate for breakfast this morning. 4 stars!Thanks to Gallery Books and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Niamh
    January 1, 1970
    This is the kind of sorta-memoir that I love. It's personal, it's raw and it's funny. Each essay circumvents history, pop culture, personal memories and anecdotes to bring you stories of Hilliard's life growing up as, what she calls, a 'fat kid' and how she's begun accepting her body and taking care of it in a variety of ways. It's not condescending or judgemental, but shines a light on modern diet culture and the unhealthy ideologies that work amongst it. Hilliard has a casual, conversational This is the kind of sorta-memoir that I love. It's personal, it's raw and it's funny. Each essay circumvents history, pop culture, personal memories and anecdotes to bring you stories of Hilliard's life growing up as, what she calls, a 'fat kid' and how she's begun accepting her body and taking care of it in a variety of ways. It's not condescending or judgemental, but shines a light on modern diet culture and the unhealthy ideologies that work amongst it. Hilliard has a casual, conversational style of writing that I could listen to for hours and I hope that she continues to write essay collections like this about her views on the world.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway. While I did enjoy this book more than I expected to, there were times I found myself skimming through entire sections because they focused too much on food rants. The parts that focused more on Chloe's own life experiences were highly enjoyable and inspiring, and I wish there had been more of them. Overall I wouldn't say I disliked the book, but some of it was a bit too broad spectrum for my taste and I would have preferred a more personal I received a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway. While I did enjoy this book more than I expected to, there were times I found myself skimming through entire sections because they focused too much on food rants. The parts that focused more on Chloe's own life experiences were highly enjoyable and inspiring, and I wish there had been more of them. Overall I wouldn't say I disliked the book, but some of it was a bit too broad spectrum for my taste and I would have preferred a more personal touch.
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  • Lelia Nebeker
    January 1, 1970
    Her humor comes through in every story, but you really see her background as a journalist as she offers thoroughly researched asides that touch on issues related to America's relationship with food. She uses her own experiences to shed light on racism, socioeconomic issues, and how Western culture views women's bodies. This book has much more sustenance to it than the popcorn and cookies on the cover would lead you to believe!
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  • Jenna Blair
    January 1, 1970
    This book was hilarious - I couldn’t put it down. I loved her recounts (often funny) on her life growing up in the 90’s and working in the 2000’s. She takes us beyond her struggle with food and touches on love, relationships, climbing the cooperate ladder with a little politics thrown in. No matter where you fall on the political spectrum you may learn a thing or two (from the perspective of a strong, smart, black woman in America) and certainly laugh along the way!
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  • Marisha Murphy
    January 1, 1970
    F*ck Your Diet and Other Things My Thighs Tell Me really is a hilarious collection of conspiracy, culture, confessions. Each essay tells the tale of her life and relationship with food in pieces. I enjoyed the facts she said infused in all her stories. Very relatable, funny, and informative. My favorite combo.
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  • Quanita
    January 1, 1970
    I've had this on order for months and was not disappointed. If there is one word to describe it, it is educational. The main takeaway is accept yourself as you are. Deserves more than five stars.
  • Afriendlylibrarian
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Interesting facts. Not my kind of humor. Informative.
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