The Accomplice
“Gripping and authentic…Kanon’s imagination flourishes [and] the narrative propulsion is clear. A thoroughly satisfying piece of entertainment that extends a tentacle into some serious moral reflection.” —The New York Times Book Review The “master of the genre” (The Washington Post) Joseph Kanon returns with a heart-pounding and intelligent espionage novel about a Nazi war criminal who was supposed to be dead, the rogue CIA agent on his trail, and the beautiful woman connected to them both.Seventeen years after the fall of the Third Reich, Max Weill has never forgotten the atrocities he saw as a prisoner at Auschwitz—nor the face of Dr. Otto Schramm, a camp doctor who worked with Mengele on appalling experiments and who sent Max’s family to the gas chambers. As the war came to a close, Schramm was one of the many high-ranking former-Nazi officers who managed to escape Germany for new lives in South America, where leaders like Argentina’s Juan Perón gave them safe harbor and new identities. With his life nearing its end, Max asks his nephew Aaron Wiley—an American CIA desk analyst—to complete the task Max never could: to track down Otto in Argentina, capture him, and bring him back to Germany to stand trial. Unable to deny Max, Aaron travels to Buenos Aires and discovers a city where Nazis thrive in plain sight, mingling with Argentine high society. He ingratiates himself with Otto’s alluring but wounded daughter, whom he’s convinced is hiding her father. Enlisting the help of a German newspaper reporter, an Israeli agent, and the obliging CIA station chief in Buenos Aires, he hunts for Otto—a complicated monster, unexpectedly human but still capable of murder if cornered. Unable to distinguish allies from enemies, Aaron will ultimately have to discover not only Otto, but the boundaries of his own personal morality, how far he is prepared to go to render justice. “With his remarkable emotional precision and mastery of tone” (Kirkus Reviews, starred review), Joseph Kanon crafts another compelling and unputdownable thriller that will keep you breathlessly turning the pages.

The Accomplice Details

TitleThe Accomplice
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 5th, 2019
PublisherAtria Books
ISBN-139781501121425
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Thriller, Novels, Spy Thriller, Espionage, War, World War II, Mystery

The Accomplice Review

  • Paige
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great piece of espionage fiction! It was sexy and fast-paced. The dialogue was fierce and tangible. A spy-thriller-romance set against the backdrop of history made for a great read. It is as described: In 1962, Aaron seeks to justify his Uncle Max’s last wish in hunting down a Nazi, Otto Schramm, who never payed for his war crimes. Otto served as a medical doctor for the Nazis, performing tortuous medical experiments on children and sending others to the gas chambers. Aaron flies to This is a great piece of espionage fiction! It was sexy and fast-paced. The dialogue was fierce and tangible. A spy-thriller-romance set against the backdrop of history made for a great read. It is as described: In 1962, Aaron seeks to justify his Uncle Max’s last wish in hunting down a Nazi, Otto Schramm, who never payed for his war crimes. Otto served as a medical doctor for the Nazis, performing tortuous medical experiments on children and sending others to the gas chambers. Aaron flies to Buenos Aires from Hamburg to find Otto who has been using a different identity. But, after meeting Otto’s daughter, Aaron is unsure if he can fulfill his quest. Thematic elements: War crimes is obviously a major topic, considering the subject and setting. Aaron internally struggles to rectify capturing Otto. How is justice served to the dead when their lives cannot be replaced? How do you properly punish someone responsible for the deaths of innocent victims? Does it matter how they died, once gone? Can a death serve a purpose, or can it be useful? Is there such thing as a useful death?My technical notes: The first 17% is mainly dialogue where Max is trying to convince Aaron to find the ex-Nazi, Otto, and bring justice to the Jews that Otto harmed or killed by bringing Otto back to Germany for trial. Aaron’s actual espionage quest in action does not begin until 25% when he arrives in Buenos Aires. Most of the book is energetic dialogue between the characters, the characters in spy-action, or sexy time. The first 15-20% it took me while to adjust to the pacing of the names of characters, because their interaction moves so quickly. Otto Schramm, the Nazi criminal Aaron is chasing, is fictitious. I really enjoyed the dynamic characters and the complexity of their relationships. I didn’t plan on reading this so quickly, but the relationships and plot were a driving force, so I finished it sooner than anticipated. Thank you to NetGalley and Atria for a copy! Opinions are my own. More on this: -Joseph Kanon is the author of The Good German which was made into a movie starring George Clooney and Cate Blanchett. -If you are interested in reading about Nazi doctors, I highly recommend Doctors from Hell: The Horrific Account of Nazi Experiments on Humans. It is not very long, has pictures, and is written by a journalist, so it is not a very tedious nonfiction read. Doctor's From Hell review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...
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  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    Joseph Kanon’s The Accomplice stirs up a hell of a historical hornet’s nest. It begins with a conversation between a Nazi hunting uncle and his CIA nephew. The uncle, a survivor, believes that he is close to the end of his life. The man he’s been hunting ever since the end of the war, Otto Schramm, is believed to be dead but Max Weill is not so sure. Aaron, the nephew, is reluctant to take on his uncle’s mission. After all, in 1962, the Nuremberg Trials are long over. Some convicted Nazis have Joseph Kanon’s The Accomplice stirs up a hell of a historical hornet’s nest. It begins with a conversation between a Nazi hunting uncle and his CIA nephew. The uncle, a survivor, believes that he is close to the end of his life. The man he’s been hunting ever since the end of the war, Otto Schramm, is believed to be dead but Max Weill is not so sure. Aaron, the nephew, is reluctant to take on his uncle’s mission. After all, in 1962, the Nuremberg Trials are long over. Some convicted Nazis have already completed their sentences. In spite of Max’s tenacity, its a random siting of Schramm in Hamburg of all places that breaks through Aaron’s resistance...Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, for review consideration.
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  • Maine Colonial
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free publisher's advance reviewing copy.If you’re interested in this book, you probably know the story of Josef Mengele, the infamous doctor who “sorted” new arrivals at Auschwitz and subjected many to horrific tortures. Mengele escaped to South America and was never captured, eventually dying in a swimming accident. Unsatisfying, right? What Kanon seems to be doing here is using the fictional Otto Schramm as a Mengele stand-in, but this time his death is a fake and our protagonist, I received a free publisher's advance reviewing copy.If you’re interested in this book, you probably know the story of Josef Mengele, the infamous doctor who “sorted” new arrivals at Auschwitz and subjected many to horrific tortures. Mengele escaped to South America and was never captured, eventually dying in a swimming accident. Unsatisfying, right? What Kanon seems to be doing here is using the fictional Otto Schramm as a Mengele stand-in, but this time his death is a fake and our protagonist, Aaron Wiley (born Weill), is going to track him down and bring him to some sort of justice.Aaron works for the CIA, but he’s a junior agent. He goes after Schramm unofficially, as an obligation to his Uncle Max, who was forced to work for Schramm at Auschwitz, where Max’s young son was gassed. The action of the book takes place in Buenos Aires, where Aaron tracks down Schramm and some of his Nazi friends. Aaron also becomes involved with Hanna, Schramm’s daughter, at first as a way of getting to Schramm, but maybe there is something more there.This book reminded me a little bit of Marathon Man, the 1976 movie adapted by William Goldman from his best-selling book. It’s a similar setup, with a young Jewish man up against a despicable and ruthless war criminal. And, like Marathon Man, this is an excellent, atmospheric thriller. I always have high hopes for a Joseph Kanon novel, and he delivers here.
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  • William Koon
    January 1, 1970
    As we used to say back home about a tobacco crop, Joseph Kanon’s The Accomplice is “fair to middlin’.” That is, it’s good. Just not that good. I keep waiting for him to drop another The Good German. This one is about Nazi hunting in 1962, that is post-Eichmann, post Hannah Arendt. The plot is fairly simple on the surface, but Kanon has enough joy and juice to make it more than interesting. From Germany to South America, from the CIA to the Mossad and with a love story that teeters on passion, As we used to say back home about a tobacco crop, Joseph Kanon’s The Accomplice is “fair to middlin’.” That is, it’s good. Just not that good. I keep waiting for him to drop another The Good German. This one is about Nazi hunting in 1962, that is post-Eichmann, post Hannah Arendt. The plot is fairly simple on the surface, but Kanon has enough joy and juice to make it more than interesting. From Germany to South America, from the CIA to the Mossad and with a love story that teeters on passion, the novel engages and wraps us up in a comfy “what’s next?” Along the way we have some astute comments upon human nature such as “The Jews who built that thought they were German. But the Germans didn’t think so." The work just needed a bit more soul.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Every time I review a book by Joseph Kanon I say the same thing: he’s done it again. That is not to say the story is the same, but THE ACCOMPLICE is Kanon’s usual historical fiction/thriller with characters in situations I’m sure they can’t get out of but always do. Presentation is always smart dialog, no long paragraphs describing scenery as in so many other novels. This book is, as Kanon’s books always are, excellent.Aaron Wiley feels obligated to find Otto Schramn, a doctor who performed Every time I review a book by Joseph Kanon I say the same thing: he’s done it again. That is not to say the story is the same, but THE ACCOMPLICE is Kanon’s usual historical fiction/thriller with characters in situations I’m sure they can’t get out of but always do. Presentation is always smart dialog, no long paragraphs describing scenery as in so many other novels. This book is, as Kanon’s books always are, excellent.Aaron Wiley feels obligated to find Otto Schramn, a doctor who performed medical experiments on Jews during World War II. It is now the 1960s, and Aaron’s uncle Max Weill, who has been tracking and turning in Nazis since his imprisonment at Auschwitz, has spotted Schramm in Germany but dies soon after.So Aaron deduces that Schramm has left for Buenos Aires and follows him there. With assistance from a German newspaper reporter, an Israeli agent, a CIA station chief, and even Schramm’s daughter, Aaron hunts for Schramm, a monster turned crazy man.
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  • Bob
    January 1, 1970
    Well-Worth Reading!Joseph Kanon has a proven track record for writing finely paced Cold War espionage thrillers with a flair for atmospheric detail, intriguing characters and suspenseful plotting, and his latest book, The Accomplice, definitely adds to his success. As stated in the book’s description, The Accomplice’s plot involves a Nazi war criminal who was supposed to be dead, the rogue CIA agent on his trail and the beautiful woman connected to them both. Without having to resort to a book’s Well-Worth Reading!Joseph Kanon has a proven track record for writing finely paced Cold War espionage thrillers with a flair for atmospheric detail, intriguing characters and suspenseful plotting, and his latest book, The Accomplice, definitely adds to his success. As stated in the book’s description, The Accomplice’s plot involves a Nazi war criminal who was supposed to be dead, the rogue CIA agent on his trail and the beautiful woman connected to them both. Without having to resort to a book’s hero being involved in non-stop fights, shootings, and car chases, Kanon has crafted another intelligent thriller that relies on emotional precision and a mastery of tone to compel the reader to turn the pages at a brisk pace in order to try to figure out whom is deceiving whom and what happens next.I highly recommend The Accomplice to fans of intelligent espionage/spy/suspense novels that are reminiscent of books by other current and former masters of this genre, such as John LeCarre, Len Deighton, Graham Greene, Alan Furst and Olen Steinhauer. #The Accomplice #Net Galley
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    When Max, an Auschwitz survivor turned Nazi hunter, sees one of his former tormentors, he enlists his nephew Aaron to catch him. Otto Schramm, doctor and contemporary of Mengele, sent Max’s son to the gas chambers and used Max to experiment on Jewish children. But there’s one problem – the world thinks Otto died two years earlier in a car accident.To prove Otto is still alive, Aaron goes to Buenos Aires to trail Otto’s alluring daughter Hannah. Of course things get complicated between them, and When Max, an Auschwitz survivor turned Nazi hunter, sees one of his former tormentors, he enlists his nephew Aaron to catch him. Otto Schramm, doctor and contemporary of Mengele, sent Max’s son to the gas chambers and used Max to experiment on Jewish children. But there’s one problem – the world thinks Otto died two years earlier in a car accident.To prove Otto is still alive, Aaron goes to Buenos Aires to trail Otto’s alluring daughter Hannah. Of course things get complicated between them, and when the CIA and Mossad get involved, it’s a race to find Otto and extradite him to stand trial. With Eichmann’s recent arrest still on their minds, the German expats of Buenos Aires are justifiably nervous. This is my first encounter with veteran author Kanon, and I appreciated his style of writing and his characters. He’s really good at writing conversational dialogue, which matters here where so much of the story is the characters exchanging ideas. I especially liked how Aaron had to constantly think on is feet and improvise depending on who has the best lead on Otto or determining how to get him out of Argentina once he’s accosted. I respected Hannah’s complexity how she dealt with her father’s guilt. The underlying theme of serving justice was a bit heavy-handed, but it was relevant. This novel was intriguing, sexy, fast-paced, and thought-provoking. I received a copy of this book via the Amazon Vine program
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  • Linda Bond
    January 1, 1970
    There are a handful of great spy writers – John Le Carré for one, and Joseph Kanon is another. It’s the era of the Cold War when everyone relied on spies to ferret out the bad guys and this often involved digging up the whereabouts of Nazi criminals. Max Weill will never forget Dr. Otto Schramm who, like Mengele, carried out terrible experiments on prisoners at Auschwitz, was responsible for the deaths of his family, and escaped to South America after the war. Dying himself, he passes the baton There are a handful of great spy writers – John Le Carré for one, and Joseph Kanon is another. It’s the era of the Cold War when everyone relied on spies to ferret out the bad guys and this often involved digging up the whereabouts of Nazi criminals. Max Weill will never forget Dr. Otto Schramm who, like Mengele, carried out terrible experiments on prisoners at Auschwitz, was responsible for the deaths of his family, and escaped to South America after the war. Dying himself, he passes the baton of the search for the Nazi on to Aaron Wiley of the CIA. This is a taut, nerve-wracking story of a hunt for justice. If you like intelligent tension, you’ll love this latest book from a consummate writer of spy thrillers.I met this book at Auntie's Bookstore in Spokane, WA
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    Sharp dialogue and well-developed characters make for a briskly paced read. Kanin is in fine form and delivers a compelling story. His stellar reputation in the spy/thriller genre continues to be well-deserved, Aaron, a desk analyst for The Company takes on his dying uncle’s wish to bring a Nazi war criminal hiding in Argentina to justice, Jumping from Hamburg to Buenos Aires in the army 1960s, Kanon successfully recreates the time and places his characters inhabit. Credible, moving and a Sharp dialogue and well-developed characters make for a briskly paced read. Kanin is in fine form and delivers a compelling story. His stellar reputation in the spy/thriller genre continues to be well-deserved, Aaron, a desk analyst for The Company takes on his dying uncle’s wish to bring a Nazi war criminal hiding in Argentina to justice, Jumping from Hamburg to Buenos Aires in the army 1960s, Kanon successfully recreates the time and places his characters inhabit. Credible, moving and a delight to read,
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  • Julianne
    January 1, 1970
    I won this ARC from a Goodreads giveaway! Thank you to Goodreads and Atria Books for the opportunity. This book seemed like a wonderful premise but it just didn’t deliver for me. I found it al a bit boring and the main character annoyed me. He was so wishy-washy. It definitely wasn’t the worst, but I don’t think I’d read it again.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    The Accomplice is a fast-paced, well-tuned espionage/historical thriller filled with intricate characters and plot twists. Kanon paints the scenes so masterfully, that the reader is drawn into the action from beginning to end.The novel take place in 1962. Aaron Wiley works behind a desk for an unnamed American intelligence agency. He visits his dying uncle, Max Weill, in Hamburg, Germany. Max, a doctor, was pulled from the selection lines at Auschwitz by Otto Schramm a Nazi doctor who reported The Accomplice is a fast-paced, well-tuned espionage/historical thriller filled with intricate characters and plot twists. Kanon paints the scenes so masterfully, that the reader is drawn into the action from beginning to end.The novel take place in 1962. Aaron Wiley works behind a desk for an unnamed American intelligence agency. He visits his dying uncle, Max Weill, in Hamburg, Germany. Max, a doctor, was pulled from the selection lines at Auschwitz by Otto Schramm a Nazi doctor who reported to Mengeles and performed tortuous experiments on the prisoner subjects. Schramm made Max assist him in his sadistic work, and Max never got over the trauma of being made an accomplice to such horror. After the war, he became a noted Nazi-hunter. Now, convinced he has seen the supposedly dead Schramm, he enlists Aaron's help to bring him back to Germany to face trial.Aaron tracks Schramm to Argentina, enlisting the help of a German reporter, an Israeli agent and a CIA section head to bring Schramm to justice. He becomes involved with Schramm's daughter as well. Each of these characters has a different opinion as to what should happen to Schramm. What would be adequate justice for the crimes Schramm committed? Is it possible to be had? We hear the Schramm describing his work in his own words, and see him through several varying viewpoints. How far are the members of the team to capture Schramm willing to go? What moral and ethical lines are they willing to cross? How many of them will become accomplices to evil as well?My thanks to NetGalley and Atria Books for allowing me to read an ARC of The Accomplice in exchanged for an unbiased review. All opinions expressed here are my own.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    The Accomplice is a fast-paced, well-tuned espionage/historical thriller filled with intricate characters and plot twists. Kanon paints the scenes so masterfully, that the reader is drawn into the action from beginning to end.The novel take place in 1962. Aaron Wiley works behind a desk for an unnamed American intelligence agency. He visits his dying uncle, Max Weill, in Hamburg, Germany. Max, a doctor, was pulled from the selection lines at Auschwitz by Otto Schramm a Nazi doctor who reported The Accomplice is a fast-paced, well-tuned espionage/historical thriller filled with intricate characters and plot twists. Kanon paints the scenes so masterfully, that the reader is drawn into the action from beginning to end.The novel take place in 1962. Aaron Wiley works behind a desk for an unnamed American intelligence agency. He visits his dying uncle, Max Weill, in Hamburg, Germany. Max, a doctor, was pulled from the selection lines at Auschwitz by Otto Schramm a Nazi doctor who reported to Mengeles and performed tortuous experiments on the prisoner subjects. Schramm made Max assist him in his sadistic work, and Max never got over the trauma of being made an accomplice to such horror. After the war, he became a noted Nazi-hunter. Now, convinced he has seen the supposedly dead Schramm, he enlists Aaron's help to bring him back to Germany to face trial.Aaron tracks Schramm to Argentina, enlisting the help of a German reporter, an Israeli agent and a CIA section head to bring Schramm to justice. He becomes involved with Schramm's daughter as well. Each of these characters has a different opinion as to what should happen to Schramm. What would be adequate justice for the crimes Schramm committed? Is it possible to be had? We hear the Schramm describing his work in his own words, and see him through several varying viewpoints. How far are the members of the team to capture Schramm willing to go? What moral and ethical lines are they willing to cross? How many of them will become accomplices to evil as well?I found this to be an engrossing read and highly recommend it!Many thanks to NetGalley and Atria Books for allowing me the privilege of reading this book in exchange for an unbiased review. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Becky Motew
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsA fantastic read! I raced through it in a day. Gripping from start to finish, suspenseful and riveting. It's 1962. Some of the big Nazis have been put on trial and hung. Many of them are in the wind, though, escaped hither and yon, and since the Eichmann capture, the world's appetite for justice seems to have abated. Aaron Wiley's Uncle Max is still on the job, though. His zeal is driven by his own coerced wartime service under Otto Schramm at Auschwitz. (The fictional Schramm is 4.5 starsA fantastic read! I raced through it in a day. Gripping from start to finish, suspenseful and riveting. It's 1962. Some of the big Nazis have been put on trial and hung. Many of them are in the wind, though, escaped hither and yon, and since the Eichmann capture, the world's appetite for justice seems to have abated. Aaron Wiley's Uncle Max is still on the job, though. His zeal is driven by his own coerced wartime service under Otto Schramm at Auschwitz. (The fictional Schramm is certainly a stand-in for the infamous Dr. Mengele, the Angel of Death, who in real life was never caught.) Aaron takes up his uncle's cause, not to assassinate Nazis but to bring them to trial. Supposedly, Schramm has died in an auto crash in Argentina, But Max sees him out for a stroll in Hamburg. And so the stage is set for the hunt. Mossad is involved peripherally and the CIA as well, but Aaron takes on the task, logistically and morally, largely by himself. Believe it or not, there is a love story in the middle of everything and a good one. How could any author make us believe a Jew would fall in love with a Nazi or a relative of a Nazi. But this is JK at the top of his game. The dialogue is superb. We get a real sense of the characters and their quirks and sometimes their odd logic. The Buenos Aires background, particularly the scene in Recoleto cemetery, is first rate. I know I've read a good book when I want to go to the place where the story is set.Tip of the hat.
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  • Candace
    January 1, 1970
    Joseph Kanon's specialty is fleshing out those events around the end of the Second World War. "Leaving Berlin" follows famous expatriots as they gather in what will soon be East Berlin; in "Los Alamos " a murder brings the police to the town where scientists from all over the world have gathered to develop the atomic bomb; "Istanbul Passage" presents a neutral city at a time when spy networks are being dismantled, scientists are up for grabs, and Jews are trying to get to Palestine. Now we have Joseph Kanon's specialty is fleshing out those events around the end of the Second World War. "Leaving Berlin" follows famous expatriots as they gather in what will soon be East Berlin; in "Los Alamos " a murder brings the police to the town where scientists from all over the world have gathered to develop the atomic bomb; "Istanbul Passage" presents a neutral city at a time when spy networks are being dismantled, scientists are up for grabs, and Jews are trying to get to Palestine. Now we have "The Accomplice," set in 1962, following the capture and execution of Adolph EIchmann by the Mossad. A Nazi hunter sees a reportedly deceased Nazi in Berlin,and sends his nephew to Buenos Aires to find him. Those South American nations, especially Argentina under Peron, hosted a number of Nazi escapees, and, it would seem, had enabled this killer to fake his own death.It's a good story. But I missed the remarkable ambiance Kanon is usually able to create in this Europe-based stories. Besides street names, I didn't get much of a sense of Buenos Aires during the early '60s. Peron was still alive, exiled in Madrid with his buddy Franco, and the country was morphing into a greater Fascist state. Those undercurrents would have been unmistakable. Nonetheless, this is a cracking tale with an exotic setting. I'm in awe of Kanon's ability to discover more and more shades to World War II and it's aftermath. Ready for the next one.3.5 stars~~Candace Siegle, Greedy Reader
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  • Deon Stonehouse
    January 1, 1970
    Aaron Wiley’s mother didn’t survive Hitler’s reign of terror, his father has died, his last remaining relative is his uncle Max Weill, still living in Germany. Max was a good physician until he was shipped to Auschwitz and forced to assist Dr. Otto Shramm in his cruel experiments. Max survived, but he put aside medicine to hunt Nazis, seeking some meagre justice for their crimes.By 1962 Max is ill and tired. Aaron, worried about his uncle, took leave from his job as a CIA analyst to spend time Aaron Wiley’s mother didn’t survive Hitler’s reign of terror, his father has died, his last remaining relative is his uncle Max Weill, still living in Germany. Max was a good physician until he was shipped to Auschwitz and forced to assist Dr. Otto Shramm in his cruel experiments. Max survived, but he put aside medicine to hunt Nazis, seeking some meagre justice for their crimes.By 1962 Max is ill and tired. Aaron, worried about his uncle, took leave from his job as a CIA analyst to spend time trying to persuade Max to retire, to take better care of himself. But for Max hunting war criminals isn’t a job, it is a calling. He wants to hand off his files to the nephew who is like a son to him but Aaron is a new generation, not so inclined to dedicate his life to seeking aging Nazis. Then Max sees Shramm, a man who supposedly died years earlier, the shock results in a heart attack and soon after he dies. At first reluctant, Aaron starts sifting the information painstakingly gathered by Max, and is soon convinced that Shramm is indeed alive. Aided by a reporter and the Israelis (efficient Nazi hunters in their own right), and against the wishes of the CIA, Max, a desk jockey with no field experience, goes to Argentina to catch the elusive Nazi. The path to the father might just be through Shramm’s beautiful daughter, Hanna. Dark secrets, moral ambiguity, and a hell of a good story.
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  • Joy Matteson
    January 1, 1970
    It’s 1962 in Communist Germany, when Holocaust survivor Max Weill glimpses his supposedly dead Nazi captor and camp doctor Otto Shramm alive and well on the streets of Hamburg. Max’s failing health prevents him from chasing Schramm down himself, so he begs his CIA analyst nephew Aaron Wiley to finish the job he started. Aaron’s trail leads him to the fast paced streets of Buenos Aires, Argentina, where his warmest lead takes the form of Otto’s hauntingly beautiful daughter Hanna, who has plenty It’s 1962 in Communist Germany, when Holocaust survivor Max Weill glimpses his supposedly dead Nazi captor and camp doctor Otto Shramm alive and well on the streets of Hamburg. Max’s failing health prevents him from chasing Schramm down himself, so he begs his CIA analyst nephew Aaron Wiley to finish the job he started. Aaron’s trail leads him to the fast paced streets of Buenos Aires, Argentina, where his warmest lead takes the form of Otto’s hauntingly beautiful daughter Hanna, who has plenty of her own secrets. The kind of justice in store for Otto, when money is scarce and the hunt is complex, no one can ascertain. The expert narrator for this novel of thrilling espionage is Jonathan Davis, who performs Aaron’s inquisitive American nature with aplomb and a bit of swagger. His German accents are flawlessly delivered, and the rapid fire dialogue between the Argentine government agents and German reporter Fritz are well delineated and easy to follow. Of special note are Davis’ action scenes, which are narrated with such attacking grace and speed it’s not difficult to imagine that Davis is getting sucker punched by a Nazi doctor himself. Davis’ voice sprints through the air to keep the listener on the edge of their seats as Aaron’s hunt for Otto Schramm follows to its thrilling conclusion. Recommended for listeners who enjoy John Le Carre and other classic literary espionage tales.
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  • Beverley Albright
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book on the goodreads giveaway and this is my review. I wanted to like this book more than I did. The premise was very intriguing. But, I think, the main character, Aaron let me down. He was never committed to being anything. At first, he didn't want to help his uncle track the war criminal. Then, as his uncle convinced him somewhat that it needed to be done, he half way helped. After his uncle's death, he felt obligated, but his heart wasn't in it. After meeting, Hannah, the daughter I won this book on the goodreads giveaway and this is my review. I wanted to like this book more than I did. The premise was very intriguing. But, I think, the main character, Aaron let me down. He was never committed to being anything. At first, he didn't want to help his uncle track the war criminal. Then, as his uncle convinced him somewhat that it needed to be done, he half way helped. After his uncle's death, he felt obligated, but his heart wasn't in it. After meeting, Hannah, the daughter of the suspected war criminal, he let his feelings get in the way of any real decision. He was back and forth so much as to who he wanted to be or not to be that I couldn't really believe him in any role. He only reacted to happenings around him. It was a bit lightweight for a book that, supposedly, was about the hunting of the men who perpetuated the atrocities of the Nazis. I wanted more and didn't get it. Nothing felt real...only just enough to pretend to care. Not even sure who was the Accomplice and who wasn't. Though, I did think the ending was somewhat interesting.
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of "The Accomplice" from the goodreads giveaway. The book takes place in around 1962. It is seventeen years after the fall of the Third Reich. Max Weill and his family were victims of the horrors of the Holocaust. He saw his whole family killed at Auschwitz. He tells his nephew, Aaron Wiley he wants him to find Otto Schramm who escaped to Argentina . Otto Schram is a Nazi who helped kill Otto's family. Aaron Wiley is an American CIA desk analyst. Max is in poor health and wants I received a copy of "The Accomplice" from the goodreads giveaway. The book takes place in around 1962. It is seventeen years after the fall of the Third Reich. Max Weill and his family were victims of the horrors of the Holocaust. He saw his whole family killed at Auschwitz. He tells his nephew, Aaron Wiley he wants him to find Otto Schramm who escaped to Argentina . Otto Schram is a Nazi who helped kill Otto's family. Aaron Wiley is an American CIA desk analyst. Max is in poor health and wants his nephew to find Otto in Argentina and bring him back to Germany to stand trial.Aaron travels to Buenos Aires a country many Nazis fled to after the end of the War. He finds that Otto has a daughter, he plans to meet her hoping she can give clues of where Otto is hiding. A pretty interesting novel. the author Joseph Kanon writes a good novel of trying to track down the Nazis that helped kill millions of Jewish people.I found myself turning the pages hoping that Aaron succeeds in finding Otto Schramm to get him the punishment he deserves.
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  • Ralph Blackburn
    January 1, 1970
    The Accomplice by Joseph Kanon- Hunting a high profile supposedly dead Ex-Nazi in 1962 Buenos Aires, Aaron Wiley struggles to complete the quest his dying uncle bequeathed to him just before he died. Though he works for American intelligence, he is not truly suited for moving from behind a desk and out into that dangerous field. But there is a woman. A blond beauty, who also happens to be the daughter of his target. Only after meeting her and getting to know her does Aaron realize how in over The Accomplice by Joseph Kanon- Hunting a high profile supposedly dead Ex-Nazi in 1962 Buenos Aires, Aaron Wiley struggles to complete the quest his dying uncle bequeathed to him just before he died. Though he works for American intelligence, he is not truly suited for moving from behind a desk and out into that dangerous field. But there is a woman. A blond beauty, who also happens to be the daughter of his target. Only after meeting her and getting to know her does Aaron realize how in over his head he really is.Always count on Joseph Kanon to mix romance and espionage in such an intriguing way. Lots of conversation in this book as with most Kanon tales. Always a treat to see what words he will use and how the delivery matches the mood and the players. Might be a little slow for someone looking for blazing guns and explosions, but still powerful in its own way.
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  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    I won this ARC in a Goodreads Giveaway. This is the first thing I've read by the Author.I wish I could give partial stars in the reviews, I would have given this 3.5. I had a real hard time getting started with this book, it felt like I was missing some important back story, kind of like I came in on book 3 or 4 of a series. Once I got past the first couple of chapters the pace of the book picked up but I was still having some difficulties in liking the characters (the good guys, the bad guys I won this ARC in a Goodreads Giveaway. This is the first thing I've read by the Author.I wish I could give partial stars in the reviews, I would have given this 3.5. I had a real hard time getting started with this book, it felt like I was missing some important back story, kind of like I came in on book 3 or 4 of a series. Once I got past the first couple of chapters the pace of the book picked up but I was still having some difficulties in liking the characters (the good guys, the bad guys are easy to hate in this). As the pace picked up the flow improved as well, it almost felt like the author wasn't comfortable with the story until he got more into it. The book finishes well, but much of the ending is predictable chapters before the final page.
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  • Daniel Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    Spellbinding thriller from author Joseph Kanon. Aaron Wiley is an American intelligence officer who returns to his native Germany to visit his ailing uncle and Nazi hunter, Max Weill. Will having lunch at an outdoor café, Max sees Otto Schamm, a Nazi colleague of Joseph Mengele at Auschwitz. Otto Schramm is assumed dead after a car accident. But, clearly he’s very much alive. Before Max dies Aaron pledges to bring Otto Schramm to justice. But, are his loyalties to the United States or to his Spellbinding thriller from author Joseph Kanon. Aaron Wiley is an American intelligence officer who returns to his native Germany to visit his ailing uncle and Nazi hunter, Max Weill. Will having lunch at an outdoor café, Max sees Otto Schamm, a Nazi colleague of Joseph Mengele at Auschwitz. Otto Schramm is assumed dead after a car accident. But, clearly he’s very much alive. Before Max dies Aaron pledges to bring Otto Schramm to justice. But, are his loyalties to the United States or to his family.
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  • John Sklar
    January 1, 1970
    A good, uncomfortable book. The story is unpleasant.What did I expect in a story of Nazi hunters in the years after the war. Kanon pulls no punches and tells the story the way it might really happen. I spent a week in Buenos Aires a few years ago and his descriptions of the city and its flavor are spot on. I hope he got a vacation out of the book. It is obvious that Nazis ended up in South America. We don't know much of how they got there and how they were sustained as members of the upper A good, uncomfortable book. The story is unpleasant.What did I expect in a story of Nazi hunters in the years after the war. Kanon pulls no punches and tells the story the way it might really happen. I spent a week in Buenos Aires a few years ago and his descriptions of the city and its flavor are spot on. I hope he got a vacation out of the book. It is obvious that Nazis ended up in South America. We don't know much of how they got there and how they were sustained as members of the upper classes in these countries. This book gives us some of that.
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  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    A bedside promise, to keep searching for a Nazi doctor who did the unthinkable at Auschwitz, sends Aaron Wiley hunting in Argentina, Bolivia, Spain, and Germany, in person and by electronic questioning. This is Joseph Kanon doing what he does best: weaving a story in and through disparate characters and giving us the only possible conclusion. I read this EARC courtesy of Atria Books and Edelweiss. pub date 11/05/19
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  • Pamela Aronson
    January 1, 1970
    More over John LeCarre. Joseph Kanon has definitely made his mark as one of the best spy/thriller writers. Kanon delivers a compelling story full of intrigue and twists . His main characters are fully developed with crisp dialogue and realistic interactions. The Accomplice is a fast paced, thought-provoking novel with a credible ending. I highly recommend this novel and am looking forward to his next book.
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  • Rose
    January 1, 1970
    This kept me reading until the very end. When a Nazi doctor who is believed to be dead is seen walking the streets Aaron is left to bring justice to this Nazi criminal. I was on the edge of my seat with this book. I couldn't put it down. I highly recommended this book. I would like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with a copy free of charge. This is my honest and unbiased opinion of it.
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  • Mary Rounds
    January 1, 1970
    I am not good at reviews, but I can say I really enjoyed this book. It is probably one of the best spy, and WWII Nazi hunter stories I have read. The author writes in a very easy to read style that keeps you wanting to read and also, disappointed when it ends. I have read two other Joseph Kanon books, and I intend to read more of them after reading this story.
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  • Larry Fontenot
    January 1, 1970
    Kanon usually writes with a sure hand, a sense of history and great intensity. This book is no different, but I found parts of it straining my credulity. I was really offended by how quickly the pursuit turned romantic, and some of the plot grew a bit over the top. Still, I liked the elements of pursuits of a Nazi in Argentina. The ending seemed a bit contrived, although exciting.
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  • Jeremy
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting storyThe story itself was excellent. Fast paced and to the point. My only problem was some of the dialogue was broken up in conversations and it took a while to get used to.
  • Jackie
    January 1, 1970
    When I started this book, I thought oh no, not again ... but, I was pleasantly surprised it was the same old story told in a new way (for me anyway). Lots of action, characters were likeable, and I didn't predict the ending. Thank you Goodreads and Atria Books for the ARC.
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  • Aletha Pagett
    January 1, 1970
    This is a compelling novel about the search for a Nazi doctor after his emigration to South America. It has it all--history, murder, love and sex. Found this book from Goodreads to be an excellent read.
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