Meet Me in the Future
“One of the best story collections of the past few years.” —Booklist, starred review“16 hard-edged pieces that gleam like gems in a mosaic.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review“Kameron Hurley is a badass.” —Annalee Newitz, author of AutonomousWhen renegade author Kameron Hurley (The Light Brigade; The Stars Are Legion) takes you to the future, be prepared for the unexpected. Yes, it will be dangerous, frequently brutal, and often devastating. But it’s also savagely funny, deliriously strange, and absolutely brimming with adventure.In these edgy, unexpected tales, a body-hopping mercenary avenges his pet elephant, and an orphan falls in love with a sentient starship. Fighters ally to power a reality-bending engine, and a swamp-dwelling introvert tries to save the world—from her plague-casting former wife.So come meet Kameron Hurley in the future. The version she's created here is weirder—and far more hopeful—than you could ever imagine.

Meet Me in the Future Details

TitleMeet Me in the Future
Author
ReleaseAug 20th, 2019
PublisherTachyon Publications
ISBN-139781616962968
Rating
GenreShort Stories, Science Fiction, Fiction, Anthologies

Meet Me in the Future Review

  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    I'm generally not that big into short stories and by way of Hurley's introduction, I might have expected her to do a so-so job with these... but Hurley lies. The writer's talents are equal across novels and short fiction. Sorry, Hurley, you're good! lolIndeed, most of these stories are pretty amazing, delving not only into her Nyx fiction and Legion fiction and even Light Brigade, but this collection has a ton of stories that kicked me hard from a different world altogether. The only other serie I'm generally not that big into short stories and by way of Hurley's introduction, I might have expected her to do a so-so job with these... but Hurley lies. The writer's talents are equal across novels and short fiction. Sorry, Hurley, you're good! lolIndeed, most of these stories are pretty amazing, delving not only into her Nyx fiction and Legion fiction and even Light Brigade, but this collection has a ton of stories that kicked me hard from a different world altogether. The only other series I haven't read is the Worldbreaker Saga and I'm honestly at a loss as to guess whether the other set of related stories revolving people jumping corpses is related to that or whether this is a taste of a brand new series to come.If it is, I'm TOTALLY DOWN FOR IT.Hey! Hey! But what about THIS short story collection? Is it GOOD?Sorry? Didn't I say?It's totally engrossing. :) Taken on its own without knowing any of the other novels, it completely works and showcases so much fungal growth, corpse making, body-horror, sexual-orientation-swapping, space-opera, disease-ridden, dog-loving joy as anyone could possibly want. And the worldbuilding is always extremely intense. :) I will get around to her other novels, but in the meantime, I am on auto-read for anything new that Hurley throws at us. Eagerly.
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  • Acqua
    January 1, 1970
    I could sum up my thoughts about Meet Me in the Future by saying that all the stories were, if not always good, at least solid, but not one of them was memorable on its own the way I find short stories can be. These stories are not pretty. They’re not necessarily satisfying. They would, however, be really interesting to discuss, and I wouldn’t be surprised if that was the whole purpose of how some of these were written. They’re meant to be shared and talked about, not read and put down, I think. I could sum up my thoughts about Meet Me in the Future by saying that all the stories were, if not always good, at least solid, but not one of them was memorable on its own the way I find short stories can be. These stories are not pretty. They’re not necessarily satisfying. They would, however, be really interesting to discuss, and I wouldn’t be surprised if that was the whole purpose of how some of these were written. They’re meant to be shared and talked about, not read and put down, I think.As you’d expect from something Kameron Hurley wrote, many of them are about war. War is an element in the past, still casting a shadow on the main character (Elephants and Corpses), it’s something that is seen as inevitable by a society, but is also a direct danger to it (The Red Secretary, oh had this story a lot to say), or something that is paradoxically seen by some as “bringing civilization” even as it actually destroys it (The War of Heroes), something that is always inherently tied to the dehumanization of someone (When We Fall) and horror, horror, horror as much as an instrument to keep the attention away from the actual enemy (The Light Brigade – I recommend skipping this one if you want to read the book, however), something that needs to end (The Improbable War).Not all of these were anything remarkable when read on their own. Inside the collection, it’s a running thread, and there is for sure a lot to discuss.There’s also, of course, a lot of queerness and discussions about gender. The collection starts with a body-hopping mercenary who happens to be a trans man (Elephants and Corpses), and presents gender as something not tied to bodies, even though still relevant to the person, and continues with stories about violent matriarchies (The Women of Our Occupation, possibly my least favorite story, I’m not that interested in reading about speculative reverse sexism), stories in which gender is never stated (The Light Brigade), stories in which there’s only one gender (Warped Passages), and stories in which there are at least four different genders recognized by the society (The Plague Givers, my favorite story). In these stories, women are allowed to be ugly, to be dirty - queer, disabled, brown women are allowed to be all of these things without ever be seen as anything but wholly human, the way a man could be portrayed. The idea that women have to be beautiful is so woven into everything, even everything fictional, that these stories almost feel jarring.And, since we’re talking about women and imperfections, here women are allowed to be evil or morally gray, humans with the capacity to experience a full spectrum of emotions. I will always be there for portrayals of queer women that are all but soft and unproblematic; in Garda we get a woman who is divorcing from her two wives (if the story had been about that, instead of becoming about a mystery with a main character who wasn’t Nyx but felt exactly like Nyx from the Bel Dame Apocrypha series, I would have liked it a lot more), and in The Plague Givers we get a story about the consequences of a very toxic f/f relationship in a world where magic can bring plague (I loved this one so much).There are a couple stories that felt like filler (notably, The Fisherman and the Pig was a completely unnecessary sequel to Elephants and Corpses), but overall, this is a collection with a lot of things to say; the average rating might be a weak 3.5 stars, but the whole is more than a sum of its parts.Elephants and Corpses – 4 starsWhen We Fall – 4 starsThe Red Secretary – 4 starsThe Sinners and the Sea – 3.5 starsThe Women of Our Occupation – 2 starsThe Fisherman and the Pig – 2 starsGarda – 3 starsThe Plague Givers – 4.5 starsTumbledown – 4 starsWarped Passages – 4 starsOur Faces, Radiant Sisters, Our Faces Full of Light – 2.5 starsEnyo-Enyo – 3 starsThe Corpse Archives – 2.5 starsThe War of Heroes – 3.5 starsThe Light Brigade – 4.5 starsThe Improbable War – 3 stars
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  • Silvana
    January 1, 1970
    I read the stories already via Patreon. Fantastic collection of diverse, layered, strong characters and worldbuilding. It is Kameron Hurley, after all, so I am definitely and unapologetically biased.
  • Hélène Louise
    January 1, 1970
    Good stories even if I've appreciated some more than others.The author's touch is always here, strong women who frequently have jobs, strengths and habits usually gifted to male characters, diverse sexuality and animals - with a special care about them (the reader doesn't need to be afraid that horrible things will happen to them).He worlds imagined are all rather harsh and injust, this is not some bedtime stories !I took time to read them all, because if all different they have many shared poin Good stories even if I've appreciated some more than others.The author's touch is always here, strong women who frequently have jobs, strengths and habits usually gifted to male characters, diverse sexuality and animals - with a special care about them (the reader doesn't need to be afraid that horrible things will happen to them).He worlds imagined are all rather harsh and injust, this is not some bedtime stories !I took time to read them all, because if all different they have many shared points (thanks to the author's personality) and Ì needed to pause regularly, not to get tired.
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  • Jim
    January 1, 1970
    I loved APOCALYPSE NYX when I got to read it and I have yet to pick up the GOD'S WAR books or anything else by Hurley, but I did get to read the short stories in MEET ME in the FUTURE and I must say, I was even more impressed with her raw, beautiful stories and characters. Hurley is unapologetic about the stories (read her Introduction for more information).I will hunt her books down and read them all. There are very few authors I feel that way about, but Hurley is definitely one of them.
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  • Serena
    January 1, 1970
    I got this e ARC from Netgalley after requesting it. I enjoy short stories or anthologies,"Meet Me in the Future" asks how futures could play out - both ours and for worlds in fiction. What's the future if not something of a reflection of history's many nows, like a glimpse in a mirror or still water, a the kaleidoscope of possibilities, changeable still because every person carries their history and the history of imagined and dreamed stories. A lot of these short stories understandably dance b I got this e ARC from Netgalley after requesting it. I enjoy short stories or anthologies,"Meet Me in the Future" asks how futures could play out - both ours and for worlds in fiction. What's the future if not something of a reflection of history's many nows, like a glimpse in a mirror or still water, a the kaleidoscope of possibilities, changeable still because every person carries their history and the history of imagined and dreamed stories. A lot of these short stories understandably dance between biology and technology. Elephants and Corpses - Nev, a old "body mercenary", someone who if they die in one body can - if they've touched a dead body nearby - swap their "soul" or "spirit" into the dead body and animate it. He holds onto humanity though a animal contact, a elephant and later a turtle given to him by Tera his "body manager". Occult religious business and body mercenary workshop mix and Nev sorts out what he can from the mess left. When We Fall - I'd love to have a much longer story on Aisha, a jack of all trades and her fleet of warship's avatars Mirabelle and others of the Komani Enterprises freed by a tomato. The Red Secretary - Arkadi negotiates and must make a connection with a soldier who knows their end, because they've killed the enemy and gotten their hands dirty, who hold a weapon hostage, with nothing to lose because the end of the war means all who have bloodied their hands get incinerated. The Sinners and the Sea - Arret must choose the truth, the story, he can live with, the one that tells of a sea burying sinners hundreds of years ago and being a Guardian means containing ancinet relics - or that the relics are from people murdered by Guardians only a generation ago, and his people living in the sky survivors chosen by no god at all. The Women of Our Occupation- I had a little laugh with this story, when the world Feminazi comes up, likely I'll be showing this story to someone. The Fishermen and the Pig- Another Nev story, after living as a old fisherman for years with only a pig and a turtle for company, he gets caught up in a nercomancer plot to bring back the dead with black toxin from a long ago war, although I didn't like Branka's cliffhanger ending. Garda-A who done it mystery with a serial killer involving alien "boys" after a future war; focus is on Abijah's divorce to two wives and how she works with Pats, who she's known in that war. The Plague Givers - I would love a whole novel on Elzabet Addisalam, swamp dwelling stuffed hydra making former Plague Hunter with her history of a former lover a Plague Giver Hanere, their son Makdas, her partner Kelab -and later Lealez. Tumbledown- Sarnai, who got plague as a child and lost her legs and her fathers and mother to it on a alien world where dogs and bears don't seem to look as the ought to, uses a sled to get tumbledown plague serum to a distant village. Warped Passages - Malati and pilot and Kariz a engineer are siblings who lost their mother to the anomaly that holds their generation ships of the Legion still, caught in space, trapped, their choices are to change themselves or be changed. Our Faces, Radiant Sisters, Our Faces Full Of Light!- Moria follows generations of her mothers, grandmothers, and likely sisters, aunts and other women who fight monsters, for one less monster they'll trade their lives a sacrifice for the promise of generations of women to come. Enyo-Enyo -A fascinating dark take on how a ship takes to life among the stars and how time passes and acted out in "snapshots" of different futures. The Corpse Archives - Anish and Chiva make and unmake a history of aliens, their people, and their stories written on bodies, textbooks of "history". The War of Heroes - Yousra, a midwife, makes a choice to take the war to the alien "heroes" who have made her people monstrous. The Light Brigade- The war, a corporate one against aliens, people from Mars who turned barren Earth to free paradise, turned soldier who fight them into light, who can see glimpses of the future and can travel, like light, anywhere - and possibly, any when. The Improbable War - Khiv uses the wall, a engine of memory to the souls of soldiers, to fight a old enemy and end war, forever.
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  • Corvus
    January 1, 1970
    Kameron Hurley has quickly become on of my favorite fiction authors. I have been immersing myself in her collection of works and adding more to my shelf to read next. I was excited to get the chance to read her forthcoming short story collection, Meet Me in the Future, for the aforementioned reasons but also because I had not read any of her short stories yet.Short story collections are this odd measure of diversity in talent in which a favored author can perform unexpectedly badly or a mediocre Kameron Hurley has quickly become on of my favorite fiction authors. I have been immersing myself in her collection of works and adding more to my shelf to read next. I was excited to get the chance to read her forthcoming short story collection, Meet Me in the Future, for the aforementioned reasons but also because I had not read any of her short stories yet.Short story collections are this odd measure of diversity in talent in which a favored author can perform unexpectedly badly or a mediocre author can rock your world. They can often be a collection of amazing stories mixed with ones that are so bad it is difficult to understand how they were allowed to be published at all. In Hurley's case, an excellent author of novels performs excellently in the short story realm as well, despite her claims in the introduction that she is not a short fiction writer. I started bookmarking my favorite stories to list in this review. But, by the end of the book, I had bookmarked most of the stories which basically made the practice unnecessary. It is rare not only that someone performs superbly across mediums but also that a collection of shorts is excellent the whole way through. It is obvious that these stories were written and chosen with care and intent to produce something great.I want to focus a bit on the introduction, because it was enlightening to me why it is that Hurley draws me in so well even when she is covering themes that don't often attract me. I often think I am not really into themes of war, grotesque and gory body horror, or which lean more fantasy than science fiction at times. Yet, I feel completely immersed in Hurley's works that often completely center these things. I have come to realize that it is how someone presents them to me that matters. The reality is that not enough authors' writing involving these themes has the insight Hurley's has. She discusses in the introduction that she lives with serious chronic illness and disability and had grandparents who lived through the Nazi occupation, one of whom was captured on suspicion of being part of the French resistance movements. I also knew that she is a feminist who is formally educated in South African resistance movements (available in the author biography at the end of the book.) These all inform her writing in ways that captures a reality of struggle and suffering that is not just written for the sake of shock or disturbance.The ways disability and illness inform several stories is in intimate and real portrayals of disabled life. There is one character with leg braces who describes formerly being told she is "lucky' by doctors who only focus on her ability to eventually walk again and not her permanent catheter, her (implied) ostomy bag, her sex life, or that trauma is never "lucky." This is an experience countless sick and disabled people have dealt with with doctors, self included. This character is not portrayed as a victim nor is she portrayed as inspirational, which are often the only fates for those with disabilities. She's a disabled person being human with advantages and struggles. Other stories often also include excretory functions and other fun stuff we often ignore in injury and violence because we are too squeamish or afraid. Yet, disruption of these functions is common in illness, injury, and/or disability and often requires outside help and support from both technologies and human beings. Basically, Hurley has a realistic take on what it likes to be sick and/or disabled that is likely formed by her own experiences.Another theme in many stories is that of gender nonconformity, transgender experiences, and straight up cross-gender body swapping. Again, Hurley goes at these themes in a way that separates her from others who either make the story all about the person's gender or who tokenize trans and GNC characters for points with no understanding of gender dynamics. Hurley's portrayal of these characters and societies is unique and fantastical while still holding on to the here and now enough that we can recognize them. LGBTQ and polyamorous women of many kinds are a common theme in Hurley's books and stories. This was present across most of the stories in the book. But, the creative ways Hurley explored multiple genders via futuristic or parallel words and multiple stories about body swapping was more present in this book.There are a couple of stories that may excite those who have read and enjoyed "The Stars are Legion" and "The Light Brigade." (Possibly others, but I have not read all of her books yet.) They include inspiration for the books or events that predated the narratives in the novels. There are familiar themes of technology combining with flesh in ways that are different from the usually human or android representations. There are themes of colonization and oppression that capture the horrific realities via the medium of fiction. There are repeated occurrences of nonhuman animals used as a vehicle for oppression via the description of their commonplace mistreatment as an excuse for mistreatment of marginalized humans. Hurley manages all of these things in ways I have not experienced in other science fiction and/or fantasy that I have read. There are times when Hurley's messages are heavy handed, which can bother me, but for some reason does not when she does it. There are many other times where the themes and messages are woven intricately in complicated ways throughout the stories, creating the experience of the story as reality, even if it's in space, a parallel world, or a million years in the future.If you like Hurley's work, you will likely enjoy this book. If you are unfamiliar with her work, I think this book could be good to dip your toes into it. Overall, it is a good representation of her styles and talent. "Meet Me in the Future: Stories" is due out in August of 2019 and is definitely a recommended read.This was also posted to my blog.
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  • Littlebookterror
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a refreshing collection of sci-fi short stories. I love the ideas that were explored no matter how vague or precise and spelled-out. There is something out there for everyone but I can tell you already that it pulls on your heartstrings, engages your mind and is a great conversation starter. I want to delve deeper into all these stories, dissect their meaning and find out what they convey for us personally.If you don't want to be spoiled for anything, keep the Introductions to the This was such a refreshing collection of sci-fi short stories. I love the ideas that were explored no matter how vague or precise and spelled-out. There is something out there for everyone but I can tell you already that it pulls on your heartstrings, engages your mind and is a great conversation starter. I want to delve deeper into all these stories, dissect their meaning and find out what they convey for us personally.If you don't want to be spoiled for anything, keep the Introductions to the end. They will add a lot no matter if you read them first of last.Elephants and Corpses // ★★★★✩Lovely intro and interesting concept to start with. I want to know so much more about Nev.When We Fall // ★★★★✩I feel like the story skipped a few important parts but otherwise, it was good.The Red Secretary // ★★★★★I loved this, it was perfect.The Sinners and the Sea // ★★★★✩This came back around in the end and the idea is super frightening. Terrifying.The Women of Our Occupation // ★★★★✩My emotional response was very strong to this one.The Fisherman and the Pig // ★★★★✩Not as interesting as the first story Nev appeared in but the world is just so fascinating.Garda // ★★✩✩✩I struggled with this one.The Plague Givers // ★★★★✩Oh man, what a tale.Tumbledown // ★★★★★From the setting to the story, to Sarnai, I loved every bit of this.Warped Passages // ★★★★✩Again, this was just fascinating. I loved the characters in this one, especially.Our Faces, Radiant Sisters, Our Faces Full of Light // ★★★★✩Short but poignant.Enyo-Enyo // ★★★★✩A mindfuck but, oh, I freaking loved it.The Corpse Archives // ★★★★✩Give me all the feelings about all kinds of things.The War of Heroes // ★★★✩✩This took a turn I didn't expect but I was honestly confused for most parts.The Light Brigade // ★★★✩✩This was good but didn't quite grab me as the other ones did.The Improbable War // ★★✩✩✩This one was too short for me.I received an advanced reading copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Ying
    January 1, 1970
    Kameron Hurley is becoming one of my favourite authors, I'm always excited when a new book comes out.I would describe this collection as:-Diverse (in gender, character's sexual orientation, world building, style, etc)-Gritty-Post-apocalypticI really loved reading these. I don't think I disliked any of them. The vibe I got from the collection was that these were stories set in universes that perhaps couldn't go further than the short story itself.. like maybe the author didn't know how to expand Kameron Hurley is becoming one of my favourite authors, I'm always excited when a new book comes out.I would describe this collection as:-Diverse (in gender, character's sexual orientation, world building, style, etc)-Gritty-Post-apocalypticI really loved reading these. I don't think I disliked any of them. The vibe I got from the collection was that these were stories set in universes that perhaps couldn't go further than the short story itself.. like maybe the author didn't know how to expand the universe into a full length book or series, which is why they remain short stories. This isn't to say they were incomplete just.. finished? I also felt like the short story format allowed the author to end the story where it ended rather than keep going in some stories. I did feel like some of the stories could have been expanded a bit more, but I guess then they'd be entering novella territory.Nonetheless it was still a great collection. Kameron Hurley is always diverse in their writing style, and as a result every universe is unique. I very easily fell in love with each character. I love the futuristic post-apocalypse style of many of the stories, it's my jam. I did wish there were more happy endings.
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  • Patrick St-Denis
    January 1, 1970
    Given how much I enjoyed Kameron Hurley's Apocalypse Nyx last year, you can imagine my enthusiasm when the folks at Tachyon emailed me a digital copy of her upcoming collection of short stories, Meet Me in the Future. It was pure delight to be reunited with Nyx and Rhys, if only for the span of five short fiction pieces. Apocalypse Nyx recaptured everything that made the Bel Dame Apocrypha such a memorable read.Meet Me in the Future would be a totally different beast. Collected for the first tim Given how much I enjoyed Kameron Hurley's Apocalypse Nyx last year, you can imagine my enthusiasm when the folks at Tachyon emailed me a digital copy of her upcoming collection of short stories, Meet Me in the Future. It was pure delight to be reunited with Nyx and Rhys, if only for the span of five short fiction pieces. Apocalypse Nyx recaptured everything that made the Bel Dame Apocrypha such a memorable read.Meet Me in the Future would be a totally different beast. Collected for the first time, here were sixteen disparate short stories that had first appeared in various anthologies and magazines. But with its myriad themes and characters, would the book stand well on its own? Although each novella acted as a stand-alone vignette and was episodic in nature, the five stories that comprised Apocalypse Nyx formed a whole that worked quite well. Indeed, there were enough threads linking them together to create a work that stood well on its own.Collecting short fiction pieces from a variety of sources can be tricky. After all, nearly all anthologies and collections of short stories are filled with lackluster material that act as filler to supplement the quality tales. Ye of little faith that I am, I should have known that it wouldn't be the case with Kameron Hurley. Although some are definitely better than others, overall the stories contained within the pages of Meet Me in the Future are all good reads in their own right. Even better, though disparate in style and tone, there are enough recurring themes explored throughout the tales that the book stands rather well on its own.Here's the blurb:When renegade author Kameron Hurley (The Light Brigade; The Stars Are Legion) takes you to the future, be prepared for the unexpected. Yes, it will be dangerous, frequently brutal, and often devastating. But it’s also savagely funny, deliriously strange, and absolutely brimming with adventure.In these edgy, unexpected tales, a body-hopping mercenary avenges his pet elephant, and an orphan falls in love with a sentient starship. Fighters ally to power a reality-bending engine, and a swamp-dwelling introvert tries to save the world—from her plague-casting former wife.So come meet Kameron Hurley in the future. The version she’s created here is weirder—and far more hopeful—than you could ever imagine.The best aspect of Meet Me in the Future is that it showcases the length and breadth of Kameron Hurley's fertile and unconventional imagination. If you have yet to give the author a shot, this collection of short stories is the perfect opportunity to remedy that sad state of affairs. In the introduction, Hurley explains that she is obsessed with bodies and their problems and disabilities. Which explains why so many of her protagonists are flawed in so many ways. This book also features an enormous amount of diversity, be it in terms of gender non-conformity, sexual orientations, narrative styles, etc.And even if the worldbuilding can be quite different from one short story to the next, this facet tends to be grimdark and post-apocalyptic more often than not. The author's fascination with biology, bugs, and technology also colors most of these tales in Hurley's own unique style.Can't say much about each short story without spoiling anything, so I will let you have the pleasure of savoring each of them when you read this collection. I will say this, however. Nev, main character of "Elephants and Corpses" and "The Fishermen and the Pig", deserves a novel-length project, if only to discover more about this body mercenary and his/her world. Some really cool stuff in both of those stories, with potential for countless more!My favorites include "The Red Secretary", "The Sinners and the Sea", "The Plague Givers", "Tumbledown", and "The War of Heroes". But as I mentioned, every piece offers something different and is worth the read. Even "Enyo-Enyo", which is a veritable mindfuck of a story!Meet Me in the Future demonstrates yet again just how gifted and unique an author Kameron Hurley truly is. This is definitely one of the speculative fiction titles to read in 2019. Or any other year, for that matter!Here's to hoping that Hurley has more quality stories in the pipeline, for I'd take another such collection every few years. Highly recommended.For more reviews, check out www.fantasyhotlist.blogspot.com
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  • Kend
    January 1, 1970
    Single-author collections tend to be, in my experience, less cohesive and less consistent in some way than multiple-author collections curated by an editor or editorial team; this is because editors have the advantage of nearly unlimited material to start with, and can winnow down to just those bits and bobs that are synchronous in style or subject or otherwise meet the editors' collective impulse. Single-author collections tend to have a smaller pool of potential bits and bobs to choose from, a Single-author collections tend to be, in my experience, less cohesive and less consistent in some way than multiple-author collections curated by an editor or editorial team; this is because editors have the advantage of nearly unlimited material to start with, and can winnow down to just those bits and bobs that are synchronous in style or subject or otherwise meet the editors' collective impulse. Single-author collections tend to have a smaller pool of potential bits and bobs to choose from, and they tend to be collected for no other reason than that the author still likes them, or at least likes them enough not to mind that they will forever stand as testament to their short-form skills.Kameron Hurley's collection is one of the most consistent I've ever read. The style holds steady, yes, and the voice too, but it's the way the characters are thrown into their worlds that is perhaps most consistent of all. Hurley drops hints here and there, whether it's a direct quote from a certain Senate Majority Leader or it's a story which talks to certain failures of the United States healthcare system, that her futures are rooted in an almost unbelievably horrific present––and she's not playing coy about the biographical elements of certain stories. (The book's introduction is a must-read for context.)On the one hand, a cursory read of Meet Me in the Future might seem to convey a singular message: Treat your fellow-travelers with kindness, because you never know what shit they've been through. On the other hand, despite powerful loves and an equally powerful range of friendships and other relationships, Hurley's characters always end up facing their demons alone and mostly unaided. "When We Fall" is an exception to this, of course, and its early placement in the book might just be to offset the existential dread of the stories which sandwich it, "Elephants and Corpses" and "The Red Secretary." Whatever the case may be, it's a bit of a joyful tease in the midst of the general order of Hurley's shorts. So: treat your fellow-travelers as well as you're able, but take no shit from the universe, unless you have to, and if you have to, you might as well make an art or a science out of it. And have a drink afterward.There are a LOT of whiskey metaphors, similes, and ... well, actual shots of whiskey.My personal favorite stories from this lineup are "The Red Secretary" (because DOGS! which ... is part of the point, I guess?) and "Tumbledown." Two stories are seeds or hints at what would become The Stars Are Legion ("Warped Passages") and The Light Brigade (story of same name). And of course it's always interesting to see a story grow a bit from its seeds. Each story is shot through with a vein of hope, but each story is also grim, grim, grim. Consistently grim. Each story is a window to a future I don't mind witnessing, and in fact find utterly fascinating, but wouldn't much like to visit in person.But maybe, just maybe, that's because we're all living in a present that I wouldn't visit, either, if I could help it. If that didn't spark yet another deep existential crisis.
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  • Harrison Schweiloch
    January 1, 1970
    Kameron Hurley is a treasure. I first heard about her on Ann Leckie’s blog a few years ago, when Leckie had gushed about Hurley’s The Stars Are Legion several months before it was published. When it finally came out, I got a copy from the library and was blown away. Her worldbuilding was so intricate and her characterization so amazing. I still find myself, years later, thinking about different scenes and being haunted by some of her imagery. (Also, I never stop smiling when I think of the alter Kameron Hurley is a treasure. I first heard about her on Ann Leckie’s blog a few years ago, when Leckie had gushed about Hurley’s The Stars Are Legion several months before it was published. When it finally came out, I got a copy from the library and was blown away. Her worldbuilding was so intricate and her characterization so amazing. I still find myself, years later, thinking about different scenes and being haunted by some of her imagery. (Also, I never stop smiling when I think of the alternate title: http://www.kameronhurley.com/wp-conte...)Earlier this year, I just had to buy Hurley’s The Light Brigade, which I found to be unputdownable. A masterpiece! It’s going on my Hugo nomination ballot next year for sure.So I was thrilled when I saw that her new short story collection, Meet Me in the Future, was coming out this summer! I received an eARC from NetGalley and tore through it! If the Stars Are Legion was a banquet, this collection of Hurley’s short fiction was like a chef’s table of small, delectable plates that leave you wanting more. This collection is filled with a wide range of different kinds of stories – fantasies and science fictional tales, adventures and dramas, small character moments and big wows.Two of the stories are in the same universe, following a body-swapping soldier who can upload his mind into corpses and reanimate them when they feel that they are about to die. Once again, Hurley’s worldbuilding skills are top notch. In a short story, an author has so much less space with which to create a fully realized universe, but time and again Hurley managed this monumental task. Some stories were quite emotionally moving, such as the one where a child has to accompany her mother to a war memorial.Even in her serious pieces, Hurley’s trademark humor shines through. I nearly chortled out loud on my morning commute reading her hostage negotiator’s reasoning for requisitioning a dog. For Fans of The Stars Are Legion, there is a story here that is a possible prequel, explaining a bit about how that universe came to be. The collection also includes the original short story version of The Light Brigade that Hurley later developed into her novel. It is a fascinating read after having enjoyed the novel – it is like an unpopped kernel of corn, just waiting to explode.I cannot recommend this short story collection enough. If you are not familiar with Kameron Hurley’s work, it is an excellent introduction and jumping off point. After reading this, I am going to check out her Worldbreaker Saga and the Bel Dame Apocrypha series. If you have read her novels before, then you definitely should buy this collection. I’d like to thank the publisher and NetGalley for the eARC I received – all opinions are my own. I’ll leave you with the table of contents to peruse. Buy this book!“Elephants and Corpses”“When We Fall”“The Red Secretary”“The Sinners and the Sea”“The Women of Our Occupation”“The Fisherman and the Pig”“Garda”“The Plague Givers”“Tumbledown”“Warped Passages”“Our Faces, Radiant Sisters, Our Faces Full of Light!”“Enyo-Enyo”“The Corpse Archives”“The War of Heroes”“The Light Brigade”“The Improbable War”
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  • Sadie Slater
    January 1, 1970
    Kameron Hurley is someone whose work I've been meaning to read for ages. I was going to buy The Stars are Legion after hearing it described at Nine Worlds a couple of years ago as "lesbians in space", which seemed very relevant to my interests, but then it turned out that it's no longer available as an ebook in the UK, so when I received a e-ARC of her new short story collection, Meet Me in the Future, via Netgalley, it seemed like the ideal opportunity to give her work a try.There are sixteen s Kameron Hurley is someone whose work I've been meaning to read for ages. I was going to buy The Stars are Legion after hearing it described at Nine Worlds a couple of years ago as "lesbians in space", which seemed very relevant to my interests, but then it turned out that it's no longer available as an ebook in the UK, so when I received a e-ARC of her new short story collection, Meet Me in the Future, via Netgalley, it seemed like the ideal opportunity to give her work a try.There are sixteen stories in Meet Me in the Future, all set in far-distant futures. Some are clearly set on other planets, some in space, some might be on far-future Earth. Some of the futures feel like the future, with spaceships and imagined technology; some are futures which feel more like fantasy, set in more low-tech societies. The latter category includes two stories which I particularly liked, 'Elephants and Corpses' and 'The Fisherman and the Pig', which are about the same character, body mercenary Nev, who has the ability, at the moment of death, to transfer his conciousness into any corpse within range. Other favourites included 'When We Fall', an absolutely delightful love story about an orphan and a spaceship; 'The Sinners and the Sea', which is set in a society of floating islands above a drowned, dead world and reminded me rather of Le Guin; 'The Plague Givers', set in a world of steamy, plesiosaur-haunted swamps, with a wonderful too-old-for-this-shit middle-aged heroine racing against time to prevent the lover and enemy she defeated thirty years earlier from unleashing a plague that will destroy everyone in their world, with bonus multiple and fluid genders; 'Tumbledown', the story of a paraplegic woman racing across a frozen planet to try to deliver a vital serum to a plague-threatened community; and 'Warped Passages', which I gather from Hurley's introduction is a prequel of sorts to The Stars are Legion, set on a hige space fleet which has been trapped for three generations by an anomaly which holds their ships in place. Hurley's writing vividly evokes the very different worlds her stories are set in; her characters are sympathetic and human and interesting. Some of the stories make for difficult reading; there's a lot of war and violence and destruction in them, and some body-horror which I struggled with ('The Corpse Archive' was almost too much for me), but they are often beautiful and generally hopeful stories, ending with the prospect of better things to come even where the futures they describe are darker. The collection is also delightfully diverse; there are lots of queer, trans and non-binary characters, women in traditionally 'male' roles such as soldiers and priests, and societies where women are privileged over men, and there are also explorations of disability and race issues through a science fictional lens. I liked this a lot, and will definitely be reading more of Hurley's work in future.
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  • Ali
    January 1, 1970
    Kameron Hurley (The Light Brigade, The Stars are Legion) is an award winning author of novels, essays, and short stories in the science fiction, fantasy, and feminist genres. Her upcoming book, Meet Me in the Future, is an expansive collection of short stories that surround the idea that maybe our science fiction future isn't all chrome and lasers. Her introduction is just as important as the stories that follow it. You gain so much context for her visions of the future. "Some are gooey, icky, s Kameron Hurley (The Light Brigade, The Stars are Legion) is an award winning author of novels, essays, and short stories in the science fiction, fantasy, and feminist genres. Her upcoming book, Meet Me in the Future, is an expansive collection of short stories that surround the idea that maybe our science fiction future isn't all chrome and lasers. Her introduction is just as important as the stories that follow it. You gain so much context for her visions of the future. "Some are gooey, icky, sticky futures that are messy and hopeful and maudlin all at the same time." And, her stories are just that. Gooey, icky, sticky. Messy, hopeful, maudlin. They are so much like life that they feel like they could be happening now. Except for the whole body jumping, floating cities, and sentient biological spaceships thing.Meet Me in the Future is possible the best short story collection I've ever picked up. Period. After every story I turned to my husband and said "no wait, that's the best one." I stopped writing starred ratings of individual stories after about the 5th 5 star review. I was particularly fond of one of the stories that comes early in the book. When We Fall is a short story about a future in which sentient biological spaceships are a part of our universe. The story revolves around a down on her luck technician who has the misfortune to be in the wrong place at the wrong time and be involved in a nearly deadly mishap with a warship that contains an AI operating system. This is a story of love, connection, and humanity. It is also a story about healing, both physically and mentally. It is beautifully rendered and the world she builds, even in such a short amount of words, is vivid. You connect with Aisha, the aforementioned technician, as easily as you would a character set in the modern day. Questions of home and belonging and love and what it means to be real are all at the heart of this story. "What did it mean that I felt more connection with a ship's avatar - the avatar of a ship that nearly killed me! - than I did with another human being? Did it mean anything? Did it matter? " - Kameron Hurley "When We Fall"All of the short stories that Hurley presents are similarly engaging. They tackle similar questions. She never shies away from the big questions. What makes us human? How do we connect with each other? How do we feel about the fleetingness and fragility of the human body? What is the difference between being alive and living? I wanted these stories to go on forever. I can't recommend Meet Me in the Future highly enough. A 5 star collection of short stories. Thank you to Tachyon Publications and Netgalley for the eARC for review!
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  • Maxine Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    Elephants and Corpses was my very first introduction to Kameron Hurley's writing several years back when Tor had it on their site. It was a first class story that made a lasting impression, yet its only in the last year that I have started buying and reading more of Hurley's work. I sit back now and want to kick myself. So of course when I saw this on NetGalley I hit request as fast as I could and then put everything else on the backburner as soon as I was approved, even though I had a couple of Elephants and Corpses was my very first introduction to Kameron Hurley's writing several years back when Tor had it on their site. It was a first class story that made a lasting impression, yet its only in the last year that I have started buying and reading more of Hurley's work. I sit back now and want to kick myself. So of course when I saw this on NetGalley I hit request as fast as I could and then put everything else on the backburner as soon as I was approved, even though I had a couple of months before it's release day.Well it was worth bumping it to the top of my tbr because I enjoyed the hell out of every single story in this collection. As someone who finds short stories very hit and miss, I was surprised. Every single story stood on it's own. If I was to rate them individually the lowest was a 4 star. I can't stress enough that this is an amazing feat. Every single story is absolute quality.Lucky for me I got to revisit Elephant and Corpses in this collection and I loved it just as much the second time. And we get a second story with Nev, which was fantastic. Nev's world and history is so rich and well put together. A person who can jump from corpse to corpse and use the bodies as their own. Nev doesn't easily divulge much information, but from the fascinating tidbits dropped along the way, especially in the second story, I'm really hoping Hurley will decide to give us a longer story in Nev's world. Whether it be about Nev or another body merc, maybe even during the war, I wouldn't mind.'Bodies are only beautiful when they aren't yours. It's why Nev had fallen in love with bodies in the first place. When you spent time with the dead you could be anyone you wanted to be. They didn't know any better. They didn't want to have long conversations about it.'Hurley has the ability to catch you within the first paragraph. Her writing is full of humour, sarcasm and heart. She uses her writing to ask what happens next, what will the future look like. Most of her stories have a sense of darkness. They are set in worlds ravaged by war, she shows the consequences of war and how really when one war finishes a new one is started. In Red Secretary we are in a world where the government sends those who fight in their war to death once it's over and they go willingly."When they said the war was over, I was glad," Arkadi said. "I thought it would get easier after that. But it's harder now. It's harder to fight your own people. Harder to see what's right."Each of the stories have what I see as a powerful message. I wanted to pull quotes from every one. We have strong feminist stories, women dominated worlds. Stories that highlight how lack of education can be used by the people in power to control the masses. Another that shows how technology might be used in the future. Inclusive stories, you will find yourself inside this book.Each story flows, has incredible characters and kind of fills me with a sense of dread. Some of these stories really hit a bit close to home. They reflect very heavily on the way some of the Governments around the world are behaving now and have in the past. Each story may be set in a different future, but they are all incredibly relevant to where we are now."Do you know the power of story?" Moravas said. "It takes only a single generation to change the entire story of a people. Ten years. You take the children off to state schools. You tell them a story. You make it illegal to tell any other. People forget. The world moves on..."I received a copy of this from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Tina
    January 1, 1970
    This ARC was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review!Short stories usually aren’t my genre of choice, but I love Kameron Hurley’s writing. She didn’t disappoint! These stories are imaginative, exciting, quick-paced and full of the visceral descriptions of violence and human (or alien) anatomy that are her marker. As with her novels, there are feminist overtones to her stories and inclusive takes on gender and sexuality. The collection is at times poignant, at oth This ARC was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review!Short stories usually aren’t my genre of choice, but I love Kameron Hurley’s writing. She didn’t disappoint! These stories are imaginative, exciting, quick-paced and full of the visceral descriptions of violence and human (or alien) anatomy that are her marker. As with her novels, there are feminist overtones to her stories and inclusive takes on gender and sexuality. The collection is at times poignant, at others emotional, generally thought-provoking, and always entertaining.Some of the stories interweave or take place in the settings of her novels, but this shouldn’t prevent newcomers from reading – while I enjoyed seeing more of the world from The Stars are Legion, I haven’t read all her books so they only made me want to seek these out. The tales share a lot of the same themes – disablement, betrayal, sacrifice, people being controlled/held down by those in power, xenophobia, false history, and war. Not only that, but the majority of the characters are female or female-identifying. The fantastic thing about Hurley’s characters is that these women aren’t all young, beautiful, intelligent (what female protagonists seem to have to be). Her women are ugly, stupid, selfish, old, career-focused, mothers, sisters, lovers. They are, as women are in real life, varied and complex. You can identify with almost all of them on some level. It’s a powerful, poignant collection. In truth, while I give this collection 4 stars, the best stories are in the first half. It’s possible I was fatigued by the time I reached the end (because Hurley’s writing can sometimes be a mental exercise to understand the worlds she creates), but my favourites were the stories with Nev (“Elephants and Corpses” and “The Fisherman and Pig”). I wish those had been novels! I also very much enjoyed: “When We Fall”, “The Red Secretary”, “War of Heroes”, “Warped Passages”, “Tumbledown”, and “The Light Brigade”. I found “Enyo-Enyo” and “The Corpse Archives” the least interesting (perhaps because I had trouble following them). The rest were solid stories I enjoyed but they either moved too quickly, their theme was a little obvious, or what she was attempting didn’t work for me. Overall, I very much enjoyed this collection and will be buying it in physical form!
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  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published on my blog: Nonstop Reader. Meet Me in the Future is a collection of 16 works of short fiction by Kameron Hurley. Released 20th Aug 2019 by Tachyon, it's 288 pages and available in paperback, audio, and ebook formats. All of the stories are previously published between 2006 and 2018, but collected here for the first time. The author has also written an erudite and thought provoking introduction (not previously published elsewhere) in which she discusses the writing process Originally published on my blog: Nonstop Reader. Meet Me in the Future is a collection of 16 works of short fiction by Kameron Hurley. Released 20th Aug 2019 by Tachyon, it's 288 pages and available in paperback, audio, and ebook formats. All of the stories are previously published between 2006 and 2018, but collected here for the first time. The author has also written an erudite and thought provoking introduction (not previously published elsewhere) in which she discusses the writing process, some history, what things really mean (hint: don't be lazy, we should figure it out ourselves), and shares other thoughts about creativity, the writer's life, and the world in a really personal conversational style. I felt as though we were talking about deep stuff over the last half bottle of wine at 3 in the morning.These stories are top shelf fiction. Every story I read was the best one yet. I had planned to read them slowly and savor them. That certainly didn't happen. I wound up reading late into the night and almost missed my work bus stop the next morning. It's difficult to pick out a standout story from the collection, but if forced, When We Fall was amazing and made me sniffle (in a good way).It's unclear from the publishing info available online, but the eARC I received has a handy interactive table of contents as well as interactive links and references. I hope the ebook release version does also. I've really become enamored of ebooks with interactive formats lately. Presumably that feature will carry through to the final release version.Five stars. Beautifully curated collection of extremely well written stories.Disclosure: I received an ARC at no cost from the author/publisher for review purposes.
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  • Elaine Aldred
    January 1, 1970
    I have begun to regard Kameron Hurley as my go to for writing fantasy and science fiction stories with brilliantly developed characters and worlds, whatever their length.In this collection, Hurley takes the world we know and understand, placing people we can easily relate to into bizarre realities that make perfect sense.For me, engagement with characters in a story is very important. That the worlds Hurley’s characters walk in, no matter how strange or challenging, feel real means I have no tro I have begun to regard Kameron Hurley as my go to for writing fantasy and science fiction stories with brilliantly developed characters and worlds, whatever their length.In this collection, Hurley takes the world we know and understand, placing people we can easily relate to into bizarre realities that make perfect sense.For me, engagement with characters in a story is very important. That the worlds Hurley’s characters walk in, no matter how strange or challenging, feel real means I have no trouble becoming emotionally involved.There were certainly echoes of other writing of Hurley’s, such as Apocalypse Nyx and, more recently, The Light Brigade where the character keeps time shifting and experiencing the results in the present. But this feels more as if you can, as a writer, sense what it is like to gather up ideas, playing with them in one context with the potential for transferring them to another. Or trying out complex concepts and scenarios in the short form where they can be more easily tracked, then going on to craft them anew for a much more sustained work. This makes Meet Me in the Future forensically intriguing and enlightening for any writer, no matter what the genre.Despite some of the stories giving the sense of experimentation, it does not mean that they are not fully formed and equally affecting as Hurley’s later work, as well as coming over not only as something fresh both in terms of Hurley’s writing, but also a collection of stories within the science fiction/fantasy genre.Meet Me in the Future is definitely one for my writing reference collection, to be bought as a hardcopy, making it easier to leaf through and have as a tangible example of Hurley’s writing.Meet Me in the Future was courtesy of Tachyon Publications via NetGalley.
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  • Realms & Robots
    January 1, 1970
    Meet Me in the Future is a collection of brilliance filled with powerful central characters and staggering inventiveness. Hurley is undeniably one of the best science fiction authors of any time as evidenced by the punch each of these stories packs. There’s no time for dalliances in these works. They strike at the heart immediately, throwing us into any number of worlds that immediately make sense. It’s a treat to see this comprehensive glimpse into Hurley’s imagination. A few of my favorites: E Meet Me in the Future is a collection of brilliance filled with powerful central characters and staggering inventiveness. Hurley is undeniably one of the best science fiction authors of any time as evidenced by the punch each of these stories packs. There’s no time for dalliances in these works. They strike at the heart immediately, throwing us into any number of worlds that immediately make sense. It’s a treat to see this comprehensive glimpse into Hurley’s imagination. A few of my favorites: Elephants and Corpses is an enthralling look at death and what comes after. We get a dual perspective: one from a body mercenary who can transfer into dead bodies, the other from a body manager who can speak to the dead. The delicate balance of life and death is blatantly ripped apart, leaving behind a conversation on the importance of living your life.Our Faces, Radiant Sisters, Our Faces Full of Light! is a great bit of flash fiction, detailing the making of a hero. A woman ventures out into a monster-filled wilderness to protect her city. We see her bravery on display as she refuses to give up even though the odds are impossible. It’s a quick story but it tells so much about the timeline of a legend. We see that initial sacrifice, the rise to greatness, and the eventual faded reminder that still inspires even though the person is long forgotten. The Light Brigade is a mind blowing tale examining alternate perspectives of the same war. We see the 24-hour news cycle convincing mankind that aliens are their doom when, in reality, we are our own worst enemy. The concept of traveling by light is fascinating, leaving stunning visuals amidst this fast-paced narrative. I was floored at how much character development was packed into this short of a space. It’s a true testament to Hurley’s abilities as a storyteller.
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  • Ana
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley for giving me a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.I DNF-ed at around 70% because I felt like I was just pushing myself through the stories. It's a little puzzling why they failed to hold my interest - part of it might be that I'm in the mood for longer stories that I can immerse myself in right now, and another part could be that the very particular atmosphere of this collection wasn't my cup of tea at the moment.Pretty much all the stories here deal with w Thank you to NetGalley for giving me a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.I DNF-ed at around 70% because I felt like I was just pushing myself through the stories. It's a little puzzling why they failed to hold my interest - part of it might be that I'm in the mood for longer stories that I can immerse myself in right now, and another part could be that the very particular atmosphere of this collection wasn't my cup of tea at the moment.Pretty much all the stories here deal with war, occupation, murder, serving terrible causes... they are extraordinarily inventive in setting and technology, mixing organic with inanimate, fantasy with science fiction. But they all shared a visceral, grim grisliness that built up into feeling one-note.They played a lot with timelines, bodies, structures, and while I normally love innovation in speculative fiction, in this case I found myself averse to having to work so hard for understanding. I think because it didn't feel like there was a payoff. To me the author's introduction was the most interesting part of the whole book, but I think there's a lot of people who might love to sink their teeth into just these kinds of gristly tales.
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  • Lor
    January 1, 1970
    The first two stories in this collection caught me up immediately. Elephants and Corpses leads you into a piece about body-jumping mercenaries – definitely the way to get me reading. It also offered a unique way to view gender dysphoria, something which is risky to do in the first place, but that landed in a really, really interesting way in the story, and continues later in the collection.The set up of alternative families, particularly in When We Fall, drew me in a whole lot too. An AI and a m The first two stories in this collection caught me up immediately. Elephants and Corpses leads you into a piece about body-jumping mercenaries – definitely the way to get me reading. It also offered a unique way to view gender dysphoria, something which is risky to do in the first place, but that landed in a really, really interesting way in the story, and continues later in the collection.The set up of alternative families, particularly in When We Fall, drew me in a whole lot too. An AI and a mechanic, a guy and his elephant, a woman and her two wives; there’s a lot of non-normative families, which admittedly don’t always work out for the characters, but I love how they exist in the tales.Each story is usually backgrounded by some distant war, or past war, or approaching war. War is never fully central to the story, which I’m glad for, but it does inform a lot of the narratives. Knowing war’s proximity to each piece assists in forming an understanding of the current climate of the place, which I honestly just thought was really cool. Plus, all of the characters and spaces are fulfilling. Some don’t really reach their full potential and I’d love to see a couple of them in expanded works, but as far as short stories go, they’re incredible.
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  • Sam
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 Stars. Thanks to NetGalley and Tachyon Publications for providing me with an e-ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.I was really expecting to love this book, but it sadly fell a bit short for me. I really liked the concept, and I enjoyed some of the individual stories, but overall, I found the experience of reading this collection to be a bit tedious. I think Hurley explores the same themes (such as gender and a a person's relationship with their own body) in a lot of her fictio 2.5 Stars. Thanks to NetGalley and Tachyon Publications for providing me with an e-ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.I was really expecting to love this book, but it sadly fell a bit short for me. I really liked the concept, and I enjoyed some of the individual stories, but overall, I found the experience of reading this collection to be a bit tedious. I think Hurley explores the same themes (such as gender and a a person's relationship with their own body) in a lot of her fiction, and while I think that can be a good thing, in the case of a short story collection, it can make all of the stories start to bleed together in the mind of the reader. At least, that is something I found to be true for myself. I have read and enjoyed one of Kameron Hurley's novels (The Stars Are Legion), and am interested in reading more from her in the future... but I think I will stick with her longer fiction going forward.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    This collection of 16 stories, three of which are new, explore themes of what it means to be human whilst trying to survive disease, disaster, war and genocide, and oppressive governments. The stories are dark and gritty, set in worlds with strange diseases, weird biotech and bioengineering, and societies that subvert expectations.Hurley doesn't write conventionally pretty, dainty women. Her women are battle-scarred and haunted, strong and rough. They're grizzled swamp-dwelling sorceresses. They This collection of 16 stories, three of which are new, explore themes of what it means to be human whilst trying to survive disease, disaster, war and genocide, and oppressive governments. The stories are dark and gritty, set in worlds with strange diseases, weird biotech and bioengineering, and societies that subvert expectations.Hurley doesn't write conventionally pretty, dainty women. Her women are battle-scarred and haunted, strong and rough. They're grizzled swamp-dwelling sorceresses. They're disabled plague survivors making an Iditarod-like serum run on an alien planet. They're hostage negotiators talking down desperate rogue soldiers. They're a terrifying conquering army.If you've been looking for a place to start with Hurley's work, this is a great entry point. This collection showcases her edgy, incisive, visceral approach to sci-fi.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    As I am a big fan of Kameron Hurley maybe this review is biased ;) but honestly the collection is both alarming and amazing at the same time. Everything contained in this collection is beautifully written. If I had to relate this to something I would say it's close to Karin Tidbeck's Jagganath collection. Eerie, delicate, and at the same time a bit violent in parts. Almost like a grotesque interpretive dance that you cannot drag your eyes away from.Some of these stories are tiny little bursts of As I am a big fan of Kameron Hurley maybe this review is biased ;) but honestly the collection is both alarming and amazing at the same time. Everything contained in this collection is beautifully written. If I had to relate this to something I would say it's close to Karin Tidbeck's Jagganath collection. Eerie, delicate, and at the same time a bit violent in parts. Almost like a grotesque interpretive dance that you cannot drag your eyes away from.Some of these stories are tiny little bursts of fiction, some are longer tales. Works well for not sitting down to read them all at once if you like that sort of thing. I read this from beginning to end in the order they were listed in, and found the layout to be satisfying. It was to experience the short version of The Light Brigade.
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  • Delara
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first book of Hurley's short stories, the second book of hers that I've read (The Stars are Legion is one of my absolute faves), and I'm glad to report that in MEET ME IN THE FUTURE, she continues to melt my mind. Kameron invites us into her imagination, each story vividly realized with characters who are impossible to not care about. I have a few standout faves that I'll likely return to when I need a diverse AF sci-fi pick-me-up. One of the things I really liked was the recurrence o This is my first book of Hurley's short stories, the second book of hers that I've read (The Stars are Legion is one of my absolute faves), and I'm glad to report that in MEET ME IN THE FUTURE, she continues to melt my mind. Kameron invites us into her imagination, each story vividly realized with characters who are impossible to not care about. I have a few standout faves that I'll likely return to when I need a diverse AF sci-fi pick-me-up. One of the things I really liked was the recurrence of themes throughout, tying each story together in a cohesive thread. Also, organic spaceships. I will never, ever tire of them!This book is LGBTQIA sci-fi. I thoroughly enjoyed it!* note: this book contains The Light Brigade, the short story that became her published novel
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  • Pamela Scott
    January 1, 1970
    https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres...ARC from @TachyonPub and voluntarily reviewedI’ve only read one book by the author, Apocalypse NYX. I clearly have been missing out. I love short story collections. I try to read a few every year. A short story is perfect for reading in small dibs and drabs. I don’t often read science fiction so wasn’t sure what to expect her. I enjoyed every story in this collection. Some of the stories are based on characters and events from her other fiction which made https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres...ARC from @TachyonPub and voluntarily reviewedI’ve only read one book by the author, Apocalypse NYX. I clearly have been missing out. I love short story collections. I try to read a few every year. A short story is perfect for reading in small dibs and drabs. I don’t often read science fiction so wasn’t sure what to expect her. I enjoyed every story in this collection. Some of the stories are based on characters and events from her other fiction which made me want to read more of her work. I love the range and diversity of the stories. They are a crazy mix that somehow works. The stand out story is When We Fall which blew me away. I also loved Elephants And Corpses.
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  • Doon
    January 1, 1970
    Loads of great stories in this collection, and I think overall a stronger collection than last year’s Apocalypse Nyx (also a great collection imho). My personal favourites from Meet Me In The Future were: Elephants and CorpsesThe Red Secretary The Fisherman and the PigThe Plague Givers Tumbledown The Corpse ArchivesThe Light Brigade (which became the awesome novel which came out earlier this year). I loved both The Plague Givers and Tumbledown so much I wanted them to be novel length, though all Loads of great stories in this collection, and I think overall a stronger collection than last year’s Apocalypse Nyx (also a great collection imho). My personal favourites from Meet Me In The Future were: Elephants and CorpsesThe Red Secretary The Fisherman and the PigThe Plague Givers Tumbledown The Corpse ArchivesThe Light Brigade (which became the awesome novel which came out earlier this year). I loved both The Plague Givers and Tumbledown so much I wanted them to be novel length, though all the stories were good.
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  • Scooter McDermitt
    January 1, 1970
    Think of all the adjectives for great and then make-up a couple dozen extra. Full review coming soon as I can catch my breath. 5 stars - You should read this yesterday.4 stars - Like a brownie without walnuts, still good, but could have been great.3 stars - Like Icarus, it flew a little too close to the sun. 2 stars - If you woke up in a Tijuana jail with no recollection of the night before and only this book, you might still be better off counting the cracks in the ceiling. 1 star - Gift it to Think of all the adjectives for great and then make-up a couple dozen extra. Full review coming soon as I can catch my breath. 5 stars - You should read this yesterday.4 stars - Like a brownie without walnuts, still good, but could have been great.3 stars - Like Icarus, it flew a little too close to the sun. 2 stars - If you woke up in a Tijuana jail with no recollection of the night before and only this book, you might still be better off counting the cracks in the ceiling. 1 star - Gift it to Albert Fish
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  • Graham Vingoe
    January 1, 1970
    Meet Me in The Future is the first book I've completed by Kameron Hurley, who is one of the most engaging columnists in the field today. There is a lot of good stuff in there but overall I found it a bit of a slog to finish. Quality of the writing is high but there's only so much war-related content I can handle without getting a little bored. There are some great lines and images throughout many of the stories but I tend to prefer more idea-s orientated science-fiction (Ted Chiang for example). Meet Me in The Future is the first book I've completed by Kameron Hurley, who is one of the most engaging columnists in the field today. There is a lot of good stuff in there but overall I found it a bit of a slog to finish. Quality of the writing is high but there's only so much war-related content I can handle without getting a little bored. There are some great lines and images throughout many of the stories but I tend to prefer more idea-s orientated science-fiction (Ted Chiang for example). Overall, though It was enough for me to make sure that I keep an eye out for future work by her.
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  • Rouyuan
    January 1, 1970
    An enjoyable collection of sci-fi short stories that can be read as standalones. If there's one thing Hurley excels at, it's jamming novel-sized creativity into short stories without making them feel too brief to be enjoyed. I specifically like that despite how dire her worlds are, how twisted the stories can get, there somehow remains a touch of hope. My personal favourites would have to be "Our Faces, Radiant Sisters, Our Faces Full of Light" and "The Light Brigade".
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