A Divided Loyalty (Inspector Ian Rutledge, #22)
Scotland Yard detective Ian Rutledge is assigned one of the most baffling investigations of his career—a cold murder case with an unidentified victim and a cold trail with few clues to follow.Chief Inspector Brian Leslie, a respected colleague of Ian Rutledge’s, is sent to Avebury, a village set inside a great prehistoric stone circle not far from Stonehenge. A young woman has been murdered next to a mysterious, hooded, figure-like stone, but no one recognizes her—or admits to it. And how did she get there? Despite a thorough investigation, it appears that her killer has simply vanished.Rutledge, returning from the conclusion of a case involving another apparently unknown woman, is asked to take a second look at Leslie’s inquiry, to see if he can identify this victim. But Rutledge is convinced Chief Superintendent Jameson only hopes to tarnish his earlier success once he also fails.Where to begin? He too finds very little to go on in Avebury, slowly widening his search beyond the village—only to discover that unlikely—possibly even unreliable—clues are pointing him toward an impossible solution, one that will draw the wrath of the Yard down on him, and very likely see him dismissed if he pursues it. But what about the victim—what does he owe this tragic woman? Where must his loyalty lie?

A Divided Loyalty (Inspector Ian Rutledge, #22) Details

TitleA Divided Loyalty (Inspector Ian Rutledge, #22)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 4th, 2020
PublisherWilliam Morrow / HarperCollins Publishers
ISBN-139780062905550
Rating
GenreMystery, Historical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Crime, Historical Mystery

A Divided Loyalty (Inspector Ian Rutledge, #22) Review

  • Beata
    January 1, 1970
    I am delighted to see that Charles Todd (the writing duo) is back in a great style. I have been a fan of the Rutledge series for many years now, and in my opinion Book 22 is one of the best in it. It is 1921 and Ian Rutledge is tasked with finding a murderer of a woman whose body is found in a stone circle in Avebury, ancient though not that famous as Stonehenge. The investigation was originally conducted by Chief Inspector Leslie who failed to track down the murderer. This case will test Ian's I am delighted to see that Charles Todd (the writing duo) is back in a great style. I have been a fan of the Rutledge series for many years now, and in my opinion Book 22 is one of the best in it. It is 1921 and Ian Rutledge is tasked with finding a murderer of a woman whose body is found in a stone circle in Avebury, ancient though not that famous as Stonehenge. The investigation was originally conducted by Chief Inspector Leslie who failed to track down the murderer. This case will test Ian's loyalty to the extreme.I always enjoy the way Rutledge analyzes each clue and puts puzzle pieces correctly. This and his quiet though disturbed by the past personality make me reach out for every offering by the writing duo.
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  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    It has been a pleasure to be back in the capable hands of the mother/son duo who comprise Charles Todd. I have been away too long. At this point in Inspector Ian Rutledge’s story it has been some three years or so since the end of the war and his return to Scotland Yard. Those years have not been easy as he continues to live with the side effects of the shell shock he suffered during trench warfare. And he continues to have Hamish as a constant vocal reminder of his worst wartime memory.While It has been a pleasure to be back in the capable hands of the mother/son duo who comprise Charles Todd. I have been away too long. At this point in Inspector Ian Rutledge’s story it has been some three years or so since the end of the war and his return to Scotland Yard. Those years have not been easy as he continues to live with the side effects of the shell shock he suffered during trench warfare. And he continues to have Hamish as a constant vocal reminder of his worst wartime memory.While quotations are not encouraged from ARCs as texts may change prior to publication, there is one that I want to include as it is so much a part of Rutledge and his daily existence. Shell shock, it was called. Breaking under fire. But Rutledge couldn’t accept that he’d been the lone survivor... He’d sacrificed one to save the many. For Nothing. And when the war was over Hamish came home with Rutledge in the only way possible. Not as a ghost, not as a living man, but as a voice that haunted Rutledge night and day. A reminder of that night. Survivors guilt, Dr. Fleming had called it. Seeing in Hamish MacLeod all the many dead he’d sent into battle... ...and the voice hadn’t faded with the Armistice. Dr. Fleming...had also warned him that it might never stop... (p 25)In this episode, Rutledge has completed a complicated murder inquiry when he is tasked with re-investigating the murder of an unidentified woman found near one of the standing stones at Avebury in Wiltshire. The original investigating officer is someone Ian knows reasonably well, as well as his superior at the Yard, so the situation has the potential to be awkward. The investigation begins and Rutledge and the reader learn about the town and setting of Avebury, the stones and other early sites in the area. All contribute to the story, the attempt to identify the woman, etc. Why was she killed, and why in Avebury of all places?As with the books in the series I have read before, this novel is well written, includes psychological insights on many characters, not only Rutledge, has a good sense of history, and well done settings.I recommend this book highly and, personally, I intend to return and read those few episodes I have neglected, some of which are waiting on my kindle.I received a copy of A Divided Loyalty through the Goodreads Giveaway program. The review is my own.
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  • Micheal
    January 1, 1970
    **I won this novel from a giveaway on GoodReads and was asked for an honest review**This is my first read by authors; Charles Todd. This novel is also #22 in the series, "Inspector Ian Rutledge". Even though this novel is #22 in the series, the authors did an excellent job in not letting the reader feel lost with the characters and if I didn't know any better this novel could easily be a stand alone novel. The story is set in England, 1921 just after WWI. The main character is a very likable **I won this novel from a giveaway on GoodReads and was asked for an honest review**This is my first read by authors; Charles Todd. This novel is also #22 in the series, "Inspector Ian Rutledge". Even though this novel is #22 in the series, the authors did an excellent job in not letting the reader feel lost with the characters and if I didn't know any better this novel could easily be a stand alone novel. The story is set in England, 1921 just after WWI. The main character is a very likable Scotland Yard Inspector and the reader gets that feeling that you are right there with him attempting to solve several mysteries/murders. I really did enjoy this novel from beginning to end, the authors really had me guessing at every turn of the page. For anyone interested in the genres of; crime, fiction, historical fiction, and/or mystery then I would recommend these authors and series.
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  • Sharon Huether
    January 1, 1970
    The Year 1921 after the War.Scotland Yards detective Ian Rutledge was assigned to a cold murder case with few clues.When letters were found in a secret place, Chief Inspector Brian Leslie was baffled. Someone had forged his signature and handwriting. He was protecting his wife, but in the long run the blame was on him.I want to thank Harper Collins Publishing Incl for sending me this interesting book.
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  • Barbara Rogers
    January 1, 1970
    Series: Inspector Ian Rutledge #22Publication Date: 2/4/2020Number of Pages: 336Betrayal, shock, dismay, regret, and sadness are all felt by Ian Rutledge as he solves his latest case. As always, the story is well-written and excellently plotted with twists and turns throughout. While this is the twenty-second book in the series, it can easily be read as a standalone – but since it is a great series, I’m sure you’ll want to run right out and get some of the earlier books. Ian is one of those Series: Inspector Ian Rutledge #22Publication Date: 2/4/2020Number of Pages: 336Betrayal, shock, dismay, regret, and sadness are all felt by Ian Rutledge as he solves his latest case. As always, the story is well-written and excellently plotted with twists and turns throughout. While this is the twenty-second book in the series, it can easily be read as a standalone – but since it is a great series, I’m sure you’ll want to run right out and get some of the earlier books. Ian is one of those characters that you really come to like and wish the best for him – all the while knowing how he suffers from the war. Not all wounds can be seen on the outside. It is February of 1921 and Ian Rutledge, along with most of England, is still trying to put the war behind him. Although the war ended in November of 1918, Ian is still suffering greatly from shell shock. Balancing his duties as a Scotland Yard inspector and managing his symptoms is definitely not for the faint of heart. After his last big case, The Black Ascot, he is still in disfavor with his superiors and he knows he has to walk on eggshells for a while. After all, the Chief Superintendent still has his letter of resignation in his desk drawer and has let Ian know that he’ll pull it out and accept it at the slightest misstep.After wrapping up a case in Shropshire, Ian was called into Chief Superintendent Markham’s office. Ian’s new assignment was to take a second look at a case that Chief Inspector Brian Leslie hadn’t been able to solve. Leslie was an excellent investigator as well as a friend and colleague, so Ian was sure that nothing had been missed in the investigation and was a little resentful to have been given the assignment. However, it was his assignment now so he’d best be off to Avebury.Avebury is a bit of an eerie place as it is built in the center of an ancient stone circle. The body of the murdered woman was found at the foot of one of those stones. Ian retraces the steps taken by Leslie and discovers he is finding the same things as Leslie did. However, Ian is like a dog with a bone – he just doesn’t turn loose. As he stretches his imagination to picture how the murder could occur, how the murderer got the victim to where she was murdered without being seen and a myriad of other things – the clues just don’t add up. He slowly begins to suspect the unthinkable – yet there is no way to prove any of it.Ian is drawn to the lovely young woman who was murdered. It pains him, and the rest of Avebury, to know that this young woman doesn’t even have a name on her gravestone because they can’t identify her. Ian is determined to identify her, to learn her story and to find justice for her.In this taut, gripping tale you’ll cry for this young woman and root for Ian to identify her and bring her murderer to justice. Then, just when you think you have it all figured out, the author plagues you with doubt. You can’t be sure of what happened until the very end.I voluntarily read and reviewed an Advanced Reader Copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • The Book Shelf
    January 1, 1970
    I love the Inspector Ian Rutledge mysteries. The author(s) set the tone and the background expertly. The pace is just right and the clues unfold as Inspector Rutledge finds them. The characters are well-drawn and complex. I am so glad that I have discovered this series.
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  • Judy Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    Back up to a full five stars for this book and I'm so glad to be able to say that. I thoroughly enjoyed this book #22 in the series and it kept me focused on something other than what was happening to a friend in the real world. Every year I look forward to the latest Inspector Ian Rutledge novel from the mother and son team who write as Charles Todd. Rutledge is given a no-win assignment by Chief Superintendent Markham when he is sent out to find the identity of a murder victim which another Back up to a full five stars for this book and I'm so glad to be able to say that. I thoroughly enjoyed this book #22 in the series and it kept me focused on something other than what was happening to a friend in the real world. Every year I look forward to the latest Inspector Ian Rutledge novel from the mother and son team who write as Charles Todd. Rutledge is given a no-win assignment by Chief Superintendent Markham when he is sent out to find the identity of a murder victim which another Scotland Yard Inspector was unable to solve. Rutledge finds himself investigating a murder where the female victim was left dead beside one of the stones of Avebury. Charles Todd is absolutely expert in describing atmosphere and building tension in the stories. Add to the cold, rain and fog the atmosphere of those huge, almost brooding, standing stones and I had prickles zipping along my arms for most of the time I was reading this very satisfying mystery. The authors have done a superlative job in this story of explaining the element of the story which lends it almost a mystical air; Hamish MacLeod, the Army corporal whose voice lingers in the mind of Rutledge since 1916 following the horrible incident in the trenches. There is a character, Dr. Mason, who was so well developed it makes me sad to think he has been left behind. This is a difficult to solve mystery beginning with the identity of the victim and continuing on through all of the actions which take place both in Wiltshire and London. A very well concealed murderer had me reading almost frantically trying to make sure I picked up all the clues. I could have just taken my time because I didn't get there until it was revealed. A lovely, engrossing reading experience.
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  • Irene
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent is an understatement! I have followed Ian Rutledge since book one and have loved all the stories of cases he has solved. This is byfar the best of them all. Ian Rutledge (the main character) is like a dog with a bone, he doesn't stop until he has all the answers to solve his case no matter the cost. I don't know how two people can weave a tale the way "Charles Todd" does but it is a work of genius. If you have never read any of their many books before you are in for a real treat. Thank Excellent is an understatement! I have followed Ian Rutledge since book one and have loved all the stories of cases he has solved. This is byfar the best of them all. Ian Rutledge (the main character) is like a dog with a bone, he doesn't stop until he has all the answers to solve his case no matter the cost. I don't know how two people can weave a tale the way "Charles Todd" does but it is a work of genius. If you have never read any of their many books before you are in for a real treat. Thank you!
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    I was thrilled to learn that I'd won an Advanced Reader's Edition of the latest installment of the Inspector Ian Rutledge series. I have dipped in and out of this series, but this was the first time that I'd wished that I'd read the previous book before diving in. Despite missing the full backstories on certain plot points, I still thoroughly enjoyed this novel from start to finish. It made me want to go back and read its most immediate predecessors to find out what happened, which I'd say is a I was thrilled to learn that I'd won an Advanced Reader's Edition of the latest installment of the Inspector Ian Rutledge series. I have dipped in and out of this series, but this was the first time that I'd wished that I'd read the previous book before diving in. Despite missing the full backstories on certain plot points, I still thoroughly enjoyed this novel from start to finish. It made me want to go back and read its most immediate predecessors to find out what happened, which I'd say is a good sign. As I've come to expect from this writing duo, I found the writing style engaging and loved that the location was just as integral to the story as the characters were. The historical details that were woven in brought the time and place to life; I always appreciate the careful research that the authors do for this series to ensure the setting is just right. Rutledge is sent to the village of Avebury, which is set inside a great prehistoric stone circle not far from Stonehenge, to investigate a seemingly impossible case on the heels of solving another one. A respected colleague already investigated the murder of an unidentified woman found near the stones, reaching no conclusions about the motive or murderer. None of the villagers recognize the woman, who seems to have been lured to the village only to be killed. Rutledge is convinced that his supervisor has set him up to fail and that he will reach no better conclusion than his more senior colleague. However, the meticulous Rutledge soon begins to unearth clues that take him down unexpected paths, leading to dangerous conclusions. I found the pacing to be excellent and liked how Rutledge's investigation proceeded slowly, building up to the big reveal. Like Rutledge, the reader is reluctant to believe, but cannot ignore, the evidence as the pieces come together. While the revelation of the murderer's identity was not entirely a surprise, the events that take place afterwards are and provide quite the cliffhanger ending. I am curious to see the direction the series takes based on how this one ended. Many thanks to William Morrow for my Goodreads Giveaways win and giving me a sneak peek at the latest Rutledge novel!I used this for the 2020 POPSUGAR Reading Challenge advanced prompt "a book by an author who has written more than 20 books." This is number 22 in the Rutledge series. There are also 11 entries in the equally excellent Bess Crawford series (which I adore!), two stand-alone novels, and several novellas and short stories.
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  • Maxine
    January 1, 1970
    It is 1921 and Chief Inspector Brian Leslie of Scotland Yard is sent to Avebury, a small village near Stonehenge to solve a murder. The body of a young woman was found near a prehistoric stone circle. No one seems to recognize her or know how she could have got there. It would have been too far to walk especially at night and no one saw the lights of an automobile despite how clear the night was. Despite all his efforts, Leslie gives up on the case. She remains nameless and there are no clues to It is 1921 and Chief Inspector Brian Leslie of Scotland Yard is sent to Avebury, a small village near Stonehenge to solve a murder. The body of a young woman was found near a prehistoric stone circle. No one seems to recognize her or know how she could have got there. It would have been too far to walk especially at night and no one saw the lights of an automobile despite how clear the night was. Despite all his efforts, Leslie gives up on the case. She remains nameless and there are no clues to the identity of the killer.Inspector Ian Rutledge, having just solved a similar case of a nameless woman, is sent to see if he can learn any more. Rutledge knows this is a no-win for him. The Chief Superintendent is hoping he'll fail and, thus, tarnish his reputation. If he somehow solves the case, it will look bad not only on Leslie who is liked and respected but it could also reflect badly on the Yard itself.Still Rutledge is determined to try. As he retraces Leslie's footsteps, he begins to suspect that the perpetrator may be someone very close to the case. After another body is found near the stones, he knows the murderer will do anything, including, if necessary, killing Rutledge to stop him from finding out what really happened.A Divided Loyalty is the 22nd historical mystery entry in the Inspector Rutledge Mysteries by the mother-and-son team, Charles Todd and, like the rest of the series, it is very well-written and compelling. It is not so much about the action which is minimal or even really the denouement but how Rutledge gathers together the pieces to solve the mystery. It stays true to post-WWI era and the settings are interesting especially the stone circle and a cave near it which serve to add a dark even creepy atmosphere to the story. As you can probably guess from the review, I am a fan of this series and recommend it highly to anyone who enjoys historical fiction or just complex puzzles in their mysteries.Thanks to Edelweiss+ and William Morrow Publishing for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review
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  • Mary Kearney
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book in this series I have read. I really enjoyed it. I received it as an advanced copy. The story moves at a good pace and kept me interested. I plan to read more in the series.
  • Susie James
    January 1, 1970
    I was delighted to have won an advance reader's copy of "A Divided Loyalty" by the mother-son personae of Charles Todd via Goodreads! A good reading experience, indeed, during the past crisp weekend in Carroll County, Miss.; set in England, 1921, with characters and background still suffering from World War I experiences and haunted by all of the foggy isle's previous centuries -- intriguing as certain characters among the monoliths of Avebury and the alter ego of Detective Ian Rutledge, who I was delighted to have won an advance reader's copy of "A Divided Loyalty" by the mother-son personae of Charles Todd via Goodreads! A good reading experience, indeed, during the past crisp weekend in Carroll County, Miss.; set in England, 1921, with characters and background still suffering from World War I experiences and haunted by all of the foggy isle's previous centuries -- intriguing as certain characters among the monoliths of Avebury and the alter ego of Detective Ian Rutledge, who suffered with him in war torn France (Hamish)! I very much liked this crime novel, which might seem to have very early on given its murderer away. Yet, the psychological intricacies of the story bear witness to the complex denouement. Not a flat-liner. By the way, I appreciated the sites I found online that share images and comments about the Avebury Henge, which along with the intermingled village there, is an integral character in this novel!
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  • Nancy Baker
    January 1, 1970
    Who doesn't love a good Scotland Yard mystery? It is shortly after WWI and those who were "spared" have returned home. Yes, they were spared in the sense that they can still breathe and look somewhat human, but their eyes and their mind still see the horrors and atrocities of war. Those sights haunt them like an addiction. Ian Rutledge is home and back on the force, but he carries with him baggage. It causes him problems from time to time, especially when he hear that voice in his head. His Who doesn't love a good Scotland Yard mystery? It is shortly after WWI and those who were "spared" have returned home. Yes, they were spared in the sense that they can still breathe and look somewhat human, but their eyes and their mind still see the horrors and atrocities of war. Those sights haunt them like an addiction. Ian Rutledge is home and back on the force, but he carries with him baggage. It causes him problems from time to time, especially when he hear that voice in his head. His supervisor is fed up with him and he is still holding Rutledge's resignation letter in his desk, that so far he has refused to accept. In an area outside London lies an ancient circle of stone. The stones aren't as tall as Stonehenge but they are massive, obviously placed strategically by man and the circle of stones covers a large enough area that as a few stones began to fall many years ago, a village begin to spring up in its circumference.A woman's body is found beneath one of the stones and a knife wound is the cause of death. She is not local and the body is giving up no clues as to where she is from, how she arrived in their community or who is responsible for her death. Inspector Leslie is first assigned to the case. He, too, is a veteran of the war and is haunted by his past. Unable to bring closure to the case, it is labeled "undetermined". The case is then handed off to Inspector Rutledge but with little hope of a different outcome. I so enjoyed watching a master sleuth at work - knowing the right questions to ask -- looking outside the box for clues, even if they lead you to an outcome you don't want to fathom. This isn't a Sherlock Holmes/Dr. Watson murder mystery that proves elementary in the end, but it was spiked full of the inner workings of a detective, their perception of individuals and their non-verbal communication. I enjoy a murder mystery that doesn't lay out all of the puzzle pieces for you and makes you work for the final discovery and this author certainly delivered on that end. I received this ARC for an honest review. I am so glad I won a copy as I'm now intrigued to follow this Inspector on past and future cases.
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  • Jessica Asbell
    January 1, 1970
    When Chief Inspector Leslie is called to a murder in Avebury, he tries to give the case to someone else. But when no one else is available, he himself must go down to the small town that has built in the midst of giant stones, similar to Stonehenge. As he hear his inner monologue, we discover that he knows who she is and why she had to die. But he must hide it from everyone else. So when the inquest comes back as "murdered by persons unknown," he thinks he is safe. Until Inspector Ian Rutledge When Chief Inspector Leslie is called to a murder in Avebury, he tries to give the case to someone else. But when no one else is available, he himself must go down to the small town that has built in the midst of giant stones, similar to Stonehenge. As he hear his inner monologue, we discover that he knows who she is and why she had to die. But he must hide it from everyone else. So when the inquest comes back as "murdered by persons unknown," he thinks he is safe. Until Inspector Ian Rutledge gets involved. As Ian searches for clues as to who this woman is and why someone would kill her, he begins to come to an unthinkable conclusion: that Chief Inspector Leslie, a man with whom he has worked at Scotland Yard for years, is the killer. But as the evidence becomes more compelling, Ian is faced with a choice: does he go with what everyone believes, or does he tell the truth and destroy the Yard? Or is all as it seems?In this latest installment of Inspector Ian Rutledge's story, Charles Todd brings you fully into this story, seeing how Ian feels and once again seeing how his shell shock affects everything he does. As Hamish's voice both keeps him safe and at the same time makes life more complicated, Ian continues to hide his shell shock from everyone he meets. His attention to detail makes a case that seemed unsolvable within reach. And his quest for justice for the victim means that he never goes with what is easy or perhaps socially accepted, but instead continues on in a dogged search for the truth. And in a story that appears to be straightforward, Todd does a great job of keeping you guessing. *I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an unbiased review.
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  • Lynn Horton
    January 1, 1970
    The mother-son team of Charles Todd never disappoints. A Divided Loyalty is a gripping story that reveals itself so slowly that I started it several times, only to abandon it for something else. For me, that’s a pacing issue. But the story is so good that I returned to complete it, which means that the writing is as beautiful as ever.In some ways this novel is darker than previous Ian Rutledge books, and in my opinion, less of Rutledge’s personality shines through. His “inner voice,” Hamish, is The mother-son team of Charles Todd never disappoints. A Divided Loyalty is a gripping story that reveals itself so slowly that I started it several times, only to abandon it for something else. For me, that’s a pacing issue. But the story is so good that I returned to complete it, which means that the writing is as beautiful as ever.In some ways this novel is darker than previous Ian Rutledge books, and in my opinion, less of Rutledge’s personality shines through. His “inner voice,” Hamish, is less intrusive in this novel, and I didn’t miss this imaginary character much. Rutledge has developed enough that he doesn’t need Hamish looking over this shoulder, and by the 22nd book in the series, readers know that Rutledge will never forget what he did during the war.Recommended.
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  • Debbie Maskus
    January 1, 1970
    The mother and son team of Charles Todd continue to write a well-balanced mystery. In this novel, Ian Rutledge must reinvestigate a murder in which Chief Inspector Brian Leslie could not find the killer. Rutledge feels that Chief Superintendent Markham has set him up to fail and to lose his job. Charles Todd paints beautiful and chilling scenes of an area close to Stonehenge, where the villagers stumble in this mystic area. Rutledge’s past life enters into many scenes and seems to hinder his The mother and son team of Charles Todd continue to write a well-balanced mystery. In this novel, Ian Rutledge must reinvestigate a murder in which Chief Inspector Brian Leslie could not find the killer. Rutledge feels that Chief Superintendent Markham has set him up to fail and to lose his job. Charles Todd paints beautiful and chilling scenes of an area close to Stonehenge, where the villagers stumble in this mystic area. Rutledge’s past life enters into many scenes and seems to hinder his investigation, but he continues to pursue the killer even when he discovers who the killer could be. I am reminded of the writing of Elizabeth George minus the psychological wanderings.
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  • Candace Noble
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as an advance reader giveaway. As usual with these writers, this book was excellent. It seemed slow at times, but, in retrospect, the slowness and lack of progress mirrored Rutledge's efforts to find the main murderer. I did wonder for some time how the unconnected murders were later found to be similar, but Rutledge did, in fact, determine the commonality. Hamish seemed less vociferous and less abusive than in previous novels. Is his involvement decreasing?
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  • Gretchen
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoy British period novels so A Divided Loyalty was just my cup of tea. This was my first meeting with Inspector Ian Rutledge although I understand that this is one of a series. The Inspector is a systematic officer making sure that he has all his ducks in a row before leading up to the arrest. Of course, that is what made this novel interesting. Please read and enjoy.I received A Divided Loyalty through a goodreads giveaway.
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  • Dennis
    January 1, 1970
    Outstanding Mystery to the last half page.Having read a handful of the Ian Rutledge series books, I can say that all are well written and engage me early on. Those were books I rated as 4 stars, but this one is a 6! About 90% through I was convinced that I knew the perp. But Noooo, there were surprises galore left in the last few pages. Not much doubt that I will be enjoying a lot more of the books from the Charles Todd team in 2020.
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  • David Steele
    January 1, 1970
    I really, really liked this book for its story and atmosphere. Inspector Rutledge is a haunted WWI veteran who has a passion for justice and the truth no matter what the cost to his personal life and career. I also struck me how a hundred years ago people actually talked and listened to each other without having their faces buried in their phones like today. To be sure a terrible time but maybe a better time.(goodreads winner)
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  • Janice Cloutier
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book! I had not read any of the previous books so was a bit lost when old details came up but it did not change my enjoyment of this mystery! Very well written! I loved the detail which the inspector goes through to solve the crime! I really enjoyed this book and will try to pick up some of the others by this author! I truly recommend this book to murder mystery fans, British fans and anyone who enjoys a great read! Many thanks for a great read!
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  • Kathleen Gardiner
    January 1, 1970
    Awesome read! Thanks to GoodReads for sending me a copy for my honest review. I love good, old-fashioned mysteries, and this is a beaut!
  • Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller
    January 1, 1970
    “Chief Superintendent Markham had known what he was doing when he sent Rutledge to the stones. There was nothing here to find. Except for failure.”Regular readers of Charles Todd's stellar Inspector Ian Rutledge series know that his heart hasn't really been in the game lately. World War I is over, yet Rutledge still bares the mental scars from both that and his years as an Inspector at Scotland Yard. It seems pointless that Markham would set Rutledge up for failure when there is an unopened “Chief Superintendent Markham had known what he was doing when he sent Rutledge to the stones. There was nothing here to find. Except for failure.”Regular readers of Charles Todd's stellar Inspector Ian Rutledge series know that his heart hasn't really been in the game lately. World War I is over, yet Rutledge still bares the mental scars from both that and his years as an Inspector at Scotland Yard. It seems pointless that Markham would set Rutledge up for failure when there is an unopened letter of resignation from Rutledge sitting in his side desk drawer. But this is where Rutledge finds himself. The way he sees it, the murdered woman was “someone's daughter. Someone's mother. Possibly someone's wife. What brought her here to die?”Allow me to give you some backstory, which provides the reasoning for all of this. It's February 1921. World War I has been over for nearly three years, yet for Rutledge and many other veterans, they are still fighting that brutal war in some way. In fact, some of my favorite moments in these novels is Rutledge's discussions with Hamish McLeod. Rutledge is the only person who can see or hear Hamish. He is a ghost from Rutledge's experience in WWI, and the talks they have are some of the most interesting and telling in this series. It seems that readers have found out more about Hamish --- as well as Rutledge --- with each passing installment, no matter how quick or seemingly benign the subject matter of their conversations may be.Hamish makes several appearances in A DIVIDED LOYALTY, probably because Rutledge is once again at a moral crossroads and in need of guidance --- or someone to take his hand and show him the right road on which to travel. At the book's opening, we see Rutledge and Chief Inspector Leslie crossing on the front steps to Scotland Yard. It is just after this brief encounter that we find them sent off on different assignments.Leslie is to investigate the murder of a young woman in Avebury, her body found at the base of a large vertical statue of rock. If you have seen or read the Outlander series, you will recognize these stones, typically found in some circular pattern, similar to the larger ones in Stonehenge. Meanwhile, Rutledge is sent to Shropshire where the body of a young lady is found at the bottom of an open grave. She appears to be a stranger to this town, and it is obvious that she was murdered at another location and then placed in the open grave. Leslie is not able to get anywhere with his case, as it seems that the residents refuse to yield any of their secrets.Rutledge's case begins to cross with the events in Leslie's, and it is just a matter of time before Markham pulls Rutledge to handle the higher profile murder in Avebury. Rutledge briefly chats with Leslie to make sure that there are no hurt feelings, and Leslie is happy to turn things over to another set of eyes as he has come up empty. It is not too long into Rutledge's investigation that he notices something that might indicate Leslie could know more about what happened there than he actually has let on.Things begin to snowball slightly in the case, but still not enough to show who might be the guilty party. It will require a much deeper investigation into a town that has no reason but to remain close-lipped and hide their deadliest secrets. It is here where we find those moral crossroads providing the dilemma that gives the novel its title. If Rutledge perseveres and comes up empty, then Markham will have reason to knock him down quite a few notches at work. If instead he agrees with Leslie's admission that there was nothing to find, then he can merely hang his head in shame at work. On the other hand, if the Rutledge we have all grown to know and care for decides to stand up for the victim, a young woman who has no other voice to defend her, then he possibly risks it all if things end in failure.A DIVIDED LOYALTY finds Rutledge at his most vulnerable and persistent, and it is this dichotomy that gives the book its character and tense atmosphere. It is an intense ride to take with him, but one that is well worth it.Reviewed by Ray Palen
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as a gift from the Goodreads giveaway program. But I would definitely have read it without the gift. Charles Todd is/are one of the author/s I follow regularly. I have read most, I think, of the Ian Rutledge series, and I have always found them a good story. These are not easy books. Rutledge is a damaged character, suffering from shell shock of World War One - The Great War. He struggles daily with his memories. The murders he investigates in his job as a detective at I received this book as a gift from the Goodreads giveaway program. But I would definitely have read it without the gift. Charles Todd is/are one of the author/s I follow regularly. I have read most, I think, of the Ian Rutledge series, and I have always found them a good story. These are not easy books. Rutledge is a damaged character, suffering from shell shock of World War One - The Great War. He struggles daily with his memories. The murders he investigates in his job as a detective at Scotland Yard almost always have connections to the war and are definitely set in those first few years when everyone in Britain was still recovering from the trauma of those days.Because the powers that be at Scotland Yard are always trying to get rid of him , something I have a little trouble wrapping my mind around, Rutledge usually gets stuck trying to solve a practically impossible case. In his mind, at least, they are trying to get him to screw up so they can get him to resign. Is this really true, or part of his mental problems that we would now call PTSD. I am never sure. But he is a good detective and he gets the job done and keeps his job, until the next time. I was interested to see that the voice of his dead Corporal, Hamish MacLeod, is less obtrusive and vocal than he has been in the past. Does this mean Rutledge is slowly improving? It is nearly 4 years from the end of the war, but possibly this is just because none of this story is particularly personal to Rutledge as some of them have been previously.At any rate, this is a solid addition to Rutledge’s story, and I look forward to seeing more to come. There are personal hints, as well, that I hope to see explored in those books in addition to providing a satisfying mystery and a glimpse at our own recent past.I recommend this book to anyone who loves a good story and a glimpse at the human mind.
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    Chief Inspector Brian Leslie, a colleague of Ian Rutledge, is sent to Avebury, a village built inside a prehistoric stone circle much larger than Stonehenge. He is to investigate the murder of an unknown woman. The coroner’s inquest concludes that the still unidentified woman was murdered by person or persons unknown. Rutledge is uncomfortable when some time later, he is ordered to Avebury to work his magic of finding the murderer of unidentifiable women. He knows that his boss is setting him up Chief Inspector Brian Leslie, a colleague of Ian Rutledge, is sent to Avebury, a village built inside a prehistoric stone circle much larger than Stonehenge. He is to investigate the murder of an unknown woman. The coroner’s inquest concludes that the still unidentified woman was murdered by person or persons unknown. Rutledge is uncomfortable when some time later, he is ordered to Avebury to work his magic of finding the murderer of unidentifiable women. He knows that his boss is setting him up to fail but can’t decline to go. He knows the trail of the killer has gone cold, the body is unavailable, and any evidence Leslie might have missed is no longer available to be found. He is intrigued, however, when the local doctor tells him that photographs were taken of the woman, but they hadn’t made their way into the official file on this icy cold case.This book is so well written, it grips the reader from the first page to the last. There are enough twists and turns to keep any mystery lover reading into the wee hours of the morning. The characters are well-drawn, so much so, the new reader will come to like and admire Rutledge quickly while those who are familiar with him will feel the comfort of knowing Rutledge like an old, familiar friend.While this is the twenty-second entry in the Ian Rutledge series, the first-time reader of the series need not worry about not being able to understand the characters at all. Todd has done an admirable job of giving the reader just enough back story to bring them current without boring the reader who has read the first twenty-one books to tears.This outing is one of the best in recent years and should be read slowly to savor the joy of reading one of the best historical mystery writers writing today. This book should be at, or very near, the top of your to-be-read list.My thanks to Morrow and Edelweiss for an eARC.
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  • Mary (Biblophile)
    January 1, 1970
    Having read all the previous Ian Rutledge mysteries, I was overjoyed to receive this ARC from Harper Collins publishers.A colleague of Ian's is sent to investigate the murder of a young woman who is found under the shadow of a mysterious stone within a prehistoric stone circle. Although he puts much effort into the case, Chief Inspector Brian Leslie is unable to find the killer or the identity of the young woman. The people of the small village where the murder took place are anxious and Having read all the previous Ian Rutledge mysteries, I was overjoyed to receive this ARC from Harper Collins publishers.A colleague of Ian's is sent to investigate the murder of a young woman who is found under the shadow of a mysterious stone within a prehistoric stone circle. Although he puts much effort into the case, Chief Inspector Brian Leslie is unable to find the killer or the identity of the young woman. The people of the small village where the murder took place are anxious and suspicious.Having just returned from the difficult case of another unidentified young woman who was murdered, Chief Inspector Markam (who wishes to rid himself of Ian) assigns him to look over the case again in hopes he will fail in solving the case.Ian is well aware of Markham's intent and is uncomfortable with having to re-investigate his colleague's case. There is much introspection and doubts of success in Ian's thought processes which is not his usual frame of mind when investigating murder. Not helping the matter are many negative comments from Hamish who always lurks in the back of Ian's mind.I enjoyed the rather dark and sinister atmosphere of this particular story. The pitting of Ian against the unknown killer proved he was a worthy adversary. As Ian follows one thin thread after another, he is horrified to discover he may very well know the killer and unmasking him could be the end of his career. Red herrings and surprises await before we reach the final conclusion.A thoroughly well written mystery that is hard to put down til the final page.
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  • Vicki
    January 1, 1970
    “A Divided Loyalty” by Charles Todd, William Morrow, 336 pages, Feb. 4, 2020.Scotland Yard Inspector Ian Rutledge is on his way to court, so when a body is found in the village of Avebury, Chief Inspector Brian Leslie is sent.A young woman has been murdered next to a prehistoric stone figure. She was stabbed. She is not a local person and didn’t have identification on her.A month later, Rutledge is sent to Tern Bridge, where another woman has been murdered. She also was not a local person. He “A Divided Loyalty” by Charles Todd, William Morrow, 336 pages, Feb. 4, 2020.Scotland Yard Inspector Ian Rutledge is on his way to court, so when a body is found in the village of Avebury, Chief Inspector Brian Leslie is sent.A young woman has been murdered next to a prehistoric stone figure. She was stabbed. She is not a local person and didn’t have identification on her.A month later, Rutledge is sent to Tern Bridge, where another woman has been murdered. She also was not a local person. He does find out her identity and figures out who killed her.Since he was successful, Rutledge is asked to take a second look at Leslie’s inquiry. But Rutledge is convinced Chief Superintendent Jameson only hopes he fails. Should Rutledge be loyal to the victim or the Yard?This is the 22nd in the series set shortly after World War I. You don’t have to read the others to enjoy this book, but it is a really good series. The characters and plotting are excellent. This installment is one of the best.In accordance with FTC guidelines, the advance reader's edition of this book was provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for a review.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    I entered a giveaway on Goodreads and won a copy of this book. I have read several books in the Bess Crawford series by this mother and son writing team but this is my first read in the Inspector Ian Rutledge series. I was not disappointed. This book is #22 in that series. Except for a few things that referred to past events in Rutledge’s life, this could be a stand alone book. Rutledge is out of favor with his superior at Scotland Yard and is sent to Avebury to follow up on an unresolved case I entered a giveaway on Goodreads and won a copy of this book. I have read several books in the Bess Crawford series by this mother and son writing team but this is my first read in the Inspector Ian Rutledge series. I was not disappointed. This book is #22 in that series. Except for a few things that referred to past events in Rutledge’s life, this could be a stand alone book. Rutledge is out of favor with his superior at Scotland Yard and is sent to Avebury to follow up on an unresolved case that had been investigated by Chief Inspector Brian Leslie. An attractive unknown woman has been found murdered near an ancient ring of stones similar to Stonehenge.He finds few clues in Avebury and widens his search in his attempt to identify the unknown victim and her killer. The more he learn, the more the information points to a killer who is one of the Yard’s own, a solution that could bring the anger of his Superiors upon him. Twists and turns up to the end keep the reader guessing. I very much enjoyed this book!
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  • Aristotle
    January 1, 1970
    "Heaven has no rage, like love to hatred turned, nor hell a fury, like a woman scorned."Bloody good story.A police procedural that takes place in 1923 London.Trying to solve a murder without DNA, fingerprints, smart phones, or the internet.Holy cow! How did they solve any crimes back then?The big 'S' word. Ahhhh, follow the sex.My first Charles Todd read and it wont be my last.A young women has been murdered and her body dumped in an open grave. A second woman is found dead next to ancient stone "Heaven has no rage, like love to hatred turned, nor hell a fury, like a woman scorned."Bloody good story.A police procedural that takes place in 1923 London.Trying to solve a murder without DNA, fingerprints, smart phones, or the internet.Holy cow! How did they solve any crimes back then?The big 'S' word. Ahhhh, follow the sex.My first Charles Todd read and it wont be my last.A young women has been murdered and her body dumped in an open grave. A second woman is found dead next to ancient stone ruins. Detective Ian Rutledge and his trusted companion Hamish are on the hunt for the killers.A well written period piece. I'm not fluent in the queen's English so some of the dialogue was a bit awkward.One interesting point about Ian, he fought in the trenches of World War I so he suffers from PTSD. Hamish is just the voice he hears in his head as he goes about solving cases. So there's that.Thanks to goodreads giveaway for the early copy
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  • Shirley
    January 1, 1970
    I have always been a fan of books about Sherlock Holmes, Watson and their solving of mysteries. Although this book is not about that character, Ian Rutledge is a character that certainly can qualify as one much like him. This book is in a series which I have not yet read, but plan to look for as I felt it was very well written and kept me in suspense and I would like to read more about this main character. You have to closely relate to Rutledge as he goes out of his way to solve some murders I have always been a fan of books about Sherlock Holmes, Watson and their solving of mysteries. Although this book is not about that character, Ian Rutledge is a character that certainly can qualify as one much like him. This book is in a series which I have not yet read, but plan to look for as I felt it was very well written and kept me in suspense and I would like to read more about this main character. You have to closely relate to Rutledge as he goes out of his way to solve some murders that he is beginning to find he does not like where the clues are heading as to the suspect. I do not like to go too far in details as I feel each person should enjoy a book without too much information provided by someone else, other than perhaps what the critics might offer. But if you like Sherlock Holmes mysteries, you will enjoy this book.
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