The Other's Gold
An insightful and sparkling novel that opens on a college campus and follows the friendship of four women across life-defining turning pointsAssigned to the same suite during their freshman year at Quincy-Hawthorne College, Lainey, Ji Sun, Alice, and Margaret quickly become inseparable. The leafy green campus they move through together, the idyllic window seat they share in their suite, and the passion and ferocity that school and independence awakens in them ignites an all-encompassing love with one another. But they soon find their bonds--forged in joy, and fused by fear--must weather threats that originate from beyond the dark forests of their childhoods, and come at them from institutions, from one another, and ultimately, from within themselves.The Other's Gold follows the four friends as each makes a terrible mistake, moving from their wild college days to their more feral days as new parents. With one part devoted to each mistake--the Accident, the Accusation, the Kiss, and the Bite--this complex yet compulsively readable debut interrogates the way that growing up forces our friendships to evolve as the women discover what they and their loved ones are capable of, and capable of forgiving. A joyful, big-hearted book that perfectly evokes the bittersweet experience of falling in love with friendship, the experiences of Lainey, Ji Sun, Alice, and Margaret are at once achingly familiar and yet shine with a brilliance and depth all their own.

The Other's Gold Details

TitleThe Other's Gold
Author
ReleaseAug 27th, 2019
PublisherViking
ISBN-139781984878496
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary

The Other's Gold Review

  • Celeste Ng
    January 1, 1970
    A sharply-drawn portrait of a lifelong friendship, THE OTHER'S GOLD follows four young women bearing past traumas and navigating unimagined futures. With an uncanny eye for detail, Elizabeth Ames charts the complex, ever-shifting topography of this "chosen family"--and illuminates the ways our closest friends sustain us over the course of our lives.
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  • Toni
    January 1, 1970
    You're either going to love this book or hate it. If you fall in love with its compelling, engaging writing style and care for Alice, Margaret, Ji Sun and Lainey as they move from adolescence of their freshman year in college to adulthood, you will not want the book to end, or at very least hope for regular updates in future to know how they are doing. If you don't connect with the book, the story is going to seem long and unnecessarily detailed. Life on paper...The four girls were assigned the You're either going to love this book or hate it. If you fall in love with its compelling, engaging writing style and care for Alice, Margaret, Ji Sun and Lainey as they move from adolescence of their freshman year in college to adulthood, you will not want the book to end, or at very least hope for regular updates in future to know how they are doing. If you don't connect with the book, the story is going to seem long and unnecessarily detailed. Life on paper...The four girls were assigned the same suite with a window seat on their first day of college. They thought that they were placed together based on the fact that all of them were second daughters and only later noticed that their last names started with an R, an S and two Ts. As Elizabeth Ames spells her story you see the magic of becoming friends as powerful (if not more) as falling in love. There are people around them: boyfriends, acquaintances, professors, parents, siblings, some of them more important than others, some failing to make anything but a very fleeting impression. It is clear, though, that for Alice, Margaret ,Ji Sun and Lainey, their friendship is in part something that defines them. Perhaps, even more than their families, because it might have begun as a random decision of a housing officer, but it continued by choice, which is evident in how they continued to love and care for each other despite their worst deeds, their shameful mistakes. We are told at the very beginning when the mistakes were made: Alice's before the college, when she was twelve, Ji Sun's in the sophomore year, Margaret's after the graduation and Lainey's already as a mother to her own child. Four mistakes, four parts of the book, one life that led to that moment and one life in which to make sense of what happened and live it down however much it changes you and people around you.Don't think you are not going to judge them- you will. Because, to be honest, they are really inexcusable, those deeds. But you will judge them not as a stranger, but as an invisible friend, trying to see all the reasons and circumstances that led to their lapse of judgement. Reasons they might not be aware of themselves.Are the characters relatable? yes, they are. I could see bits of myself and my own friends in the girls. The characters are unique and wonderfully complex, and go through intense changes moving from one part of the book to another. You know, you feel it in your bones, they will continue evolving long after the book because this is life, and what we've just read is just a glimpse. The issues it deals with are not the easiest. Don't go into the book thinking it will be a light summer read: infertility, sexual harrassment and abuse, miscarriage, depression, adoption are here, among the other topics discussed. But the way the author talks about them is both painfully honest and sensitive. A wonderful debut novel, lyrical, beautifully-written and emotional. Thank you to Edelweiss and Viking (Penguin Publishing Group) for the ARC provided in exchange for an honest opinion.
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  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    I'm finding it difficult to figure out what I want to say in this review because I thought this was just an okay read. I think if I would have connected more with the four main characters, this could have been a more meaningful read like it was for other readers. I just feel like whatever point(s) the author was trying to get across just flew right over my head or something. Lainey, Ji Sun, Alice, and Margaret are all assigned to the same suite during their freshman year in college. They become I'm finding it difficult to figure out what I want to say in this review because I thought this was just an okay read. I think if I would have connected more with the four main characters, this could have been a more meaningful read like it was for other readers. I just feel like whatever point(s) the author was trying to get across just flew right over my head or something. Lainey, Ji Sun, Alice, and Margaret are all assigned to the same suite during their freshman year in college. They become fast friends and the story will follow them thru their school years as well as what life has in store for them after college. The book includes four parts with each part dealing with a mistake made by one of the women. The titles of the mistakes are the Accident, the Accusation, the Kiss, and the Bite. I'll give the author credit, even though I knew the titles ahead of time, I still was caught off guard with the direction the last two parts went in. Even though I didn't really enjoy much of what happened in the second half of the book, I guess I can award points for creativity. My main issue with the book is the four women actually felt like a clique in the sense that I felt like an outsider and therefore never truly understood them completely. I've read many other books about friendships, and this is one of the few times I actually questioned why the characters were friends with one another. I just didn't 100% buy it and I guess that's why the story as a whole didn't really work for me. There's nothing I hated about the book, but there also isn't anything I really loved either. So I guess this goes in the okay but nothing special category. I won a free copy of this book in a giveaway but was under no obligation to post a review. All views expressed are my honest opinion.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars, rounding up. Two reasons: 1)It's a debut 2) I don't think what I disliked about this was the author's fault.This is another book that I have been anxiously awaiting for most of the year. Four girls who become friends their first day of college and that friendship transcends throughout the rest of it and continues on? Hell yeah, sign me up. There couldn't have been a more perfect book description for me. I also really dug the layout. The book is split up into four sections that surroun 2.5 stars, rounding up. Two reasons: 1)It's a debut 2) I don't think what I disliked about this was the author's fault.This is another book that I have been anxiously awaiting for most of the year. Four girls who become friends their first day of college and that friendship transcends throughout the rest of it and continues on? Hell yeah, sign me up. There couldn't have been a more perfect book description for me. I also really dug the layout. The book is split up into four sections that surround an "event" that all four girls deal with differently. Again, I thought this sounded really cool. The first two sections cover college and the last two cover after. So now that I've given you enough information regarding the layout and what it's loosely about I guess I should tell you why I gave it the rating I did. I think Ms. Ames has a real talent. Her writing took me a little while to get used to (I had to pay closer attention at the beginning, but seemed to adapt just fine once I got further into the book) and she tackled some tough issues with a voice that was spot on. There are some trigger warnings for: sexual harassment/assault, childhood sexual abuse, miscarriage/fertility issues and postpartum depression. I will be honest and say that the one issue I identified with was not traumatic to read about in here to me personally, but because I had no idea it was coming and just didn't think it would be something covered in the book as much as it was. If I had known I might have skipped the book altogether. (Despite how well and accurately portrayed it was.)I am also disappointed because I was expecting this book to really move me and it didn't. I desperately wanted it to, but I felt disconnected to the characters. I don't quite understand what made them such fast and everlasting friends. Maybe that's the whole point? Maybe we as readers were like everyone else that surrounded them? Background players who could even read their thoughts, but never were close enough to understand their bond and feel what they felt as closely as they did. I wonder if each section that corresponded with that character's "event" would have been better served coming solely from that person's perspective? It's possible then I could have gotten closer and connected more. I will almost certainly read the author's next work, however I will be sure to adjust my expectations down a bit and not hold so close in my mind the book summary. Maybe that will serve me better in the future.Thank you to Edelweiss, Viking and Elizabeth Ames for the opportunity to read this book and provide an honest review.Review Date: 9/2/19Publication Date: 8/27/19
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsThe Other’s Gold is the story of four young women’s path to adulthood, with ordinary ups and downs elevated through lyrical prose, containing current political and social events seamlessly woven in, making the reader feel like they could have been part of this lucky quartet.Ames has a lovely way of writing, presenting everyday life as a magical secret that she’s willing to share, if you listen closely to her whispered tale…She balances so much- family drama, sisterhood, sexual harassmen 4.5 starsThe Other’s Gold is the story of four young women’s path to adulthood, with ordinary ups and downs elevated through lyrical prose, containing current political and social events seamlessly woven in, making the reader feel like they could have been part of this lucky quartet.Ames has a lovely way of writing, presenting everyday life as a magical secret that she’s willing to share, if you listen closely to her whispered tale…She balances so much- family drama, sisterhood, sexual harassment, feminist ideals, disappointments, triumphs, and more. One can’t help but fall in love with the characters, share in their celebrations, and mourn their mistakes and loses. This debut was top rate, and I highly recommend it!This ARC was provided by Viking/Penguin, in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Joy Matteson
    January 1, 1970
    This book was all kinds of crazy, in the best ways possible. Four women who become a close unit of friends in college each make one terrible mistake in this beautifully written book. These characters are unbelievably well drawn. Each one of them leaps off the page with vivacity and creative energy. I would read 3 more novels with these women featured, their flaws and fierce love for one another were addictive.Perfect summer to fall read for those who need more punchy characters in their lives.
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  • Haley • Fangirl Fury •
    January 1, 1970
    A 2019 favorite and one of the best adult fiction books this mostly YA readers has read in a while! Elizabeth Ames' writing style completely sucked me in, and I just loved this story so much!
  • Jenny
    January 1, 1970
    The Other's Gold is a gorgeous novel, brimming with the romance of budding, full friendships and the way we carry our pasts, our shame, and each other through it all. The four female protagonists meet on a window seat in their freshman dorm. Their friendship is fast and deep, and we too, as readers, fall in love right beside them. While I loved the intensity of their friendship, I also loved each individually, too--despite, and in spite, of each of their mistakes that the book follows. I found m The Other's Gold is a gorgeous novel, brimming with the romance of budding, full friendships and the way we carry our pasts, our shame, and each other through it all. The four female protagonists meet on a window seat in their freshman dorm. Their friendship is fast and deep, and we too, as readers, fall in love right beside them. While I loved the intensity of their friendship, I also loved each individually, too--despite, and in spite, of each of their mistakes that the book follows. I found myself thinking of the characters when I wasn't reading, counting the minutes until I could crack my copy open again and rejoin their lives. I honestly couldn't put this one down! It is so interesting and intense, with a plot that keeps the pages turning quickly. Yet I wanted to slow down as a reader, and take in the beauty of Ames' prose, the nuanced way she can turn the ordinary into the extraordinary, making sharp and witty observations about the worlds her characters live in. I read the last few pages over and over, not wanting my time with the characters, and this story, to end.The Others Gold is exactly the kind of book you'll want to lose yourself in, then press into your own friends hands, so that they can discuss it all with you. Immersive and unpredictable, vivid and emotional, this is the book you will want to revisit again and again.
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  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    Celeste Ng blurbed this and i am not okay
  • LA Brower
    January 1, 1970
    My favorite book of 2019! The Other's Gold is must-read, un-put-down-able, absolutely triumphant debut novel by a major new literary voice. Narrated in spectacular prose with breathtaking emotional intimacy and insight, Ames' big-hearted, character-driven book left me in awe. Simultaneously funny and heartbreaking, joyous and mournful, hopeful and devastating, this profoundly honest exploration of friendship, family, endurance, and forgiveness chronicles the lives four unforgettable female frien My favorite book of 2019! The Other's Gold is must-read, un-put-down-able, absolutely triumphant debut novel by a major new literary voice. Narrated in spectacular prose with breathtaking emotional intimacy and insight, Ames' big-hearted, character-driven book left me in awe. Simultaneously funny and heartbreaking, joyous and mournful, hopeful and devastating, this profoundly honest exploration of friendship, family, endurance, and forgiveness chronicles the lives four unforgettable female friends: Alice, Lainey, Ji Sun, and Margaret. In four intricately interlaced sections, we watch their multidimensional friendship begin, evolve, falter, strengthen, and transform as each lovingly-rendered character makes a momentous mistake, and endeavors to navigate its aftermath, together and alone, for better and worse. For anyone who loves Lorrie Moore's humor and wit, Meg Wolitzer's leap-off-the-page characters, George Saunders' bottomless empathy, Johnathan Franzen's insight into families and foibles (or, more simply, for anyone who loves thematic richness, riveting drama, intimate characterization, and beautiful, inventive prose), I cannot recommend Elizabeth Ames' bravura debut highly enough - each page is worth far more than its own weight in gold.Addendum: It also has the best blurbs, and the most beautiful cover known to man. Read it!
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  • Claire Barfell
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book on Goodreads Giveaways. This is the story of four friends who share the same room in college and their friendship continues afterward. They each make mistakes that are very serious and unusual. For a first novel, this book is unbelievable, what a great imagination and writing ability this author has. I kept wondering what would happen next and felt like I really knew the characters because the reader sees their thoughts and feelings.
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  • Shannon (The Book Club Mom)
    January 1, 1970
    Happy Publication Day to Elizabeth Ames for The Other’s Gold! If you’ve been following me for a little while, then you probably already know that I’m a sucker for books about friendship. They are my very favorite and I absolutely adore reading them. The Other’s Gold is a story about four friends who meet in their freshman year of college. The women all share the same suite at Quincy-Hawthorne College, quickly become friends and form instant bonds. The novel is separated into four parts that cent Happy Publication Day to Elizabeth Ames for The Other’s Gold! If you’ve been following me for a little while, then you probably already know that I’m a sucker for books about friendship. They are my very favorite and I absolutely adore reading them. The Other’s Gold is a story about four friends who meet in their freshman year of college. The women all share the same suite at Quincy-Hawthorne College, quickly become friends and form instant bonds. The novel is separated into four parts that center around a mistake that each of the women make - The Accident, The Accusation, The Kiss and The Bite. The reader follows the friends through their college years, as post graduates and then as they enter parenthood. I loved reading about how these four women evolved and still stayed connected throughout the years. They all make questionable choices, say hurtful things and are a tad unlikable at times! It is admirable how they all support one another and stay so close knit as time goes on. Ames gives the reader the most honest and realistic look at parenthood and the exhausting journey it takes to get there. We read along as the women experience miscarriage, infertility, adoption, and postpartum depression. This joyous and life-changing period in our lives can also be messy, unpredictable and miserable. The parts in the novel revolving around parenthood were my most favorite to read. Thank you to the author and Viking Books for sending me an advance reader’s copy of this fantastic debut. It hits shelves today!
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  • Basic B's Guide
    January 1, 1970
    I had such high hopes for this debut. Unfortunately I was left feeling underwhelmed and quite confused. I’m perplexed as to what the point was of it all. It clearly went over my head. The 4 very unique mistakes presented didn’t leave me with any emotional connection to the characters and felt a bit over the top. In fact, I don’t quite understand the friendships in the story. It might be because we are presented with a group of ladies that have forged instant bonds even before they have embarked I had such high hopes for this debut. Unfortunately I was left feeling underwhelmed and quite confused. I’m perplexed as to what the point was of it all. It clearly went over my head. The 4 very unique mistakes presented didn’t leave me with any emotional connection to the characters and felt a bit over the top. In fact, I don’t quite understand the friendships in the story. It might be because we are presented with a group of ladies that have forged instant bonds even before they have embarked on life. I understand college friendships are often ones we carry through life but they aren’t necessarily instant. These felt very forced and ingenious. Really, I felt like most of these women would dislike one another in real life. I also think the author missed the opportunity to explore some deeper topics. I’m rambling on right now and may circle back with more clarity. Until then I would unfortunately recommend passing on this one.
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    Despite the fact that this is the type of novel that I generally like, I found this book very disappointing. Again, four college roommates bond and become lifelong friends. The women go through college traumas, marriage and motherhood maintaining this relationship. The characters represented a carefully curated group, even to their diversity of background and hair color. All of this managed to feel very contrived. It seemed like the author found inspiration in books such as THE GROUP, but fell s Despite the fact that this is the type of novel that I generally like, I found this book very disappointing. Again, four college roommates bond and become lifelong friends. The women go through college traumas, marriage and motherhood maintaining this relationship. The characters represented a carefully curated group, even to their diversity of background and hair color. All of this managed to feel very contrived. It seemed like the author found inspiration in books such as THE GROUP, but fell short. However, the author tends to plod along and focus endlessly on a few incidents. I found the book very formulaic and predictable. I understand the use of foreshadowing, but readers don’t have to be hit over the head to see where some of the characters are going. I found the relationships rather unbelievable and I was left with a lack of closure. So, I found this novel didn’t live up to my expectations.
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  • Tess
    January 1, 1970
    THE OTHER’S GOLD was such a lovely surprise, so much so that I read it in a day and enjoyed every second. I am such a sucker for female friendship books on college campuses, and love it even more when the story continues after school and we learn about their lives and relationships as they get older. This book has all that and more. The four main characters are well developed, likable yet often frustrating, and realistic. The plot points are shocking, but the friendships are also heartwarming. I THE OTHER’S GOLD was such a lovely surprise, so much so that I read it in a day and enjoyed every second. I am such a sucker for female friendship books on college campuses, and love it even more when the story continues after school and we learn about their lives and relationships as they get older. This book has all that and more. The four main characters are well developed, likable yet often frustrating, and realistic. The plot points are shocking, but the friendships are also heartwarming. I highly recommend this new release for anyone looking for a good book about the ups and downs of enduring female friendships. The writing is poetic and beautiful, and I can’t wait to see more from Elizabeth Ames in the future.
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  • Lazy Line
    January 1, 1970
    This book connected with me so deeply! Its depiction of friendships, college, motherhood, heartache, regret, and lifelong love really hit home for me, and the characters felt as real and complex as some of my own friends. Though their choices and mistakes sometimes made it hard for me to like Lainey, Alice, Ji Sun, or Margaret, I always always loved them, understood them, and wanted to spend more time with them. I think that this is a testament to the author's beautiful writing style and her abi This book connected with me so deeply! Its depiction of friendships, college, motherhood, heartache, regret, and lifelong love really hit home for me, and the characters felt as real and complex as some of my own friends. Though their choices and mistakes sometimes made it hard for me to like Lainey, Alice, Ji Sun, or Margaret, I always always loved them, understood them, and wanted to spend more time with them. I think that this is a testament to the author's beautiful writing style and her ability to give texture and complexity to her characters emotional lives. My only complaint was that the book ended. I hope that Ames writes another book someday that follows these characters through the next chapters of their lives!
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  • Sarah at Sarah's Book Shelves
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Viking Books for an advanced copy of this book.I was incredibly nervous about this debut novel…the premise is everything I normally love in a character-driven story (campus setting, female friendship, etc), but the intangibles are key to these types of novels working well. I shouldn’t have worried because it was 5 stars for me! The writing style took me a minute to get used to (it has some very long sentences and requires a bit of concentration), but it’s gorgeous and Ames is an astute Thanks to Viking Books for an advanced copy of this book.I was incredibly nervous about this debut novel…the premise is everything I normally love in a character-driven story (campus setting, female friendship, etc), but the intangibles are key to these types of novels working well. I shouldn’t have worried because it was 5 stars for me! The writing style took me a minute to get used to (it has some very long sentences and requires a bit of concentration), but it’s gorgeous and Ames is an astute observer of life. The four friends are each dazzling in their own way and, together, their light shines even brighter, making you want to be in their orbit. And, this extends to their pull on each other, creating intriguing dynamics. Ames’s structure of the four mistakes could have been cliche, but her choices of what those mistakes were were brilliant. They are not ones you’d ever guess (trust me, these are not your run-of-the-mill life screw-ups) and I loved exploring the ripple effects of each one on the group. The Other’s Gold is ultimately a story about these characters’ chosen family seeing each other at their very worst moments and exploring how that impacts their relationships moving forward…and, it reminded me of The Interestings and The Ensemble.Visit https://www.sarahsbookshelves.com for more reviews.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Viking and Penguin Random House for this copy in exchange for my honest review. Margaret, Ji Sun, Alice and Lainey meet as freshman suite mates at Quincy-Hawthorne College and immediately become best friends. Though they all come from different backgrounds, they form a bond that other students look at with envy. As boyfriends and girlfriends come and go, their friendship remains constant. Over the years, from college to marriages to children, their friendships weather various storms Thank you to Viking and Penguin Random House for this copy in exchange for my honest review. Margaret, Ji Sun, Alice and Lainey meet as freshman suite mates at Quincy-Hawthorne College and immediately become best friends. Though they all come from different backgrounds, they form a bond that other students look at with envy. As boyfriends and girlfriends come and go, their friendship remains constant. Over the years, from college to marriages to children, their friendships weather various storms. Their relationships change with some growing closer and others having tension but these bonds are always changing. Each woman has a "mistake" in their life, Alice's from before college, Ji Sun's during and Margaret and Lainey's in the years after. Their mistakes - the Accident, the Accusation, the Kiss and the Bite - shake the foundation of their friendships. This book is a beautiful celebration of the power of friendship. It explores how women can accept, support and love each other, even when horrible acts are committed. These four women struggle at times to understand how their friends could behave in such ways and whether these acts define the women or change the others' opinions of them. Should one mistake define a person? Does learning about your friend's worst moment cancel everything good you know about her?The characters are richly developed and their stories are relatable and believable. The women have a friendship that most would envy due to the fact that they always find their way back to each other, even after life takes them in unexpected directions. I found myself wondering if I could accept these mistakes in my own friends while hoping I could be as understanding and supportive as the characters. The Other's Gold would be a phenomenal book club book as there are so many great discussions that spring from it. It explores the idea that people are more than their worst moment and that good people can do awful things. It would be fascinating to examine their mistakes, their behavior afterwards and discuss whether any of their actions are unforgivable in a friend. This book is beautiful and heartbreaking at the same time.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    zero stars! I work at a book store so I get to read ARCs. Sometimes they are good and sometimes they are not. I do not understand how this book ever was published. It is about 4 girls who ended up being roommates in college and become fast friends. "Each of the girls will make a terrible mistake" That is what the blurb says. They do not make "mistakes." They should all be in jail! These are not mistakes, they are choices that each person made with no repercussions except that they feel guilt. Th zero stars! I work at a book store so I get to read ARCs. Sometimes they are good and sometimes they are not. I do not understand how this book ever was published. It is about 4 girls who ended up being roommates in college and become fast friends. "Each of the girls will make a terrible mistake" That is what the blurb says. They do not make "mistakes." They should all be in jail! These are not mistakes, they are choices that each person made with no repercussions except that they feel guilt. That is it! I feel guilty because I ate an extra slice of cake, not because I committed a crime! (view spoiler)[ The first one tried to kill her brother, but it is okay because she was a child herself. NO! That is not okay! The second one accused a professor of sexual assault that never happened because she was mad that it never happened. That is not okay! The third, after she was married, made out with a thirteen year old boy. So lets add pedophilia to this book! (hide spoiler)] I have read 2/3 of this book and I am finished so I will never know the fourth "mistake." Once pedophilia was excused, I’m out. I do not like writing bad reviews but I am a worse person for having read what I read of this book.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    The first section of this book was hard for me to get into but once they got out of the college years I was completely hooked! What a unique and interesting story. I was impressed with Ames' writing and found myself rereading sentences and nodding my head along with the insights she had about female friendship. This very much feels like a book that came from the author's experience and I appreciated how real the characters felt to me. She didn't make caricatures out of any of them and I also app The first section of this book was hard for me to get into but once they got out of the college years I was completely hooked! What a unique and interesting story. I was impressed with Ames' writing and found myself rereading sentences and nodding my head along with the insights she had about female friendship. This very much feels like a book that came from the author's experience and I appreciated how real the characters felt to me. She didn't make caricatures out of any of them and I also appreciated the diverse representation in the story of the different characters. At the start of the story, she notes that each character makes a life-changing decision/mistake and that kept the story moving forward as we slowly unravel what each character's decision is.
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  • Cynthia
    January 1, 1970
    This novel didn’t work for me. I found the characters flat and, ultimately, didn’t care about them. Disappointing read for me, but I may not have been the best audience.
  • Ilyssa Wesche
    January 1, 1970
    I really dug this one. It reminded me of the movie Friends with Money. I liked Ji Sun the best, as I felt she stayed most true to her character. This would have been four star for me but there was not even remotely enough outrage for the Kiss. It mean that was ridiculous.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Cover to cover, my heart was a wonderful, sloppy messy on each page, constantly teetering between exploding with triumphant love and melting into the universal sorrows and trials of tightly woven friendship. It is not enough to say that this is a book about females, about college, or about huge mistakes and their recovery. This is a book about love and genuine human bonds, without the syrupy, trite, or over-wrought sentiments of romance alone, which lack the gritty, earthy challenges of chosen f Cover to cover, my heart was a wonderful, sloppy messy on each page, constantly teetering between exploding with triumphant love and melting into the universal sorrows and trials of tightly woven friendship. It is not enough to say that this is a book about females, about college, or about huge mistakes and their recovery. This is a book about love and genuine human bonds, without the syrupy, trite, or over-wrought sentiments of romance alone, which lack the gritty, earthy challenges of chosen family. It is so easy for each of us to forget the small moments when our souls have cried out the loudest, in joy or pain, as the days and miles go by, as we struggle to maintain deep connections in the face of busy, adult lives. Can I look on new or historical photograph of humans in love and (re)capture the ferocity of those experiences? Elizabeth Ames can. Her voice is genuine, raw, and creamy smooth, masterfully dredging into the corners of our memories and rib cages, demanding that we visit and own our scenes of triumph and sorrow. I know myself, my friends, my chosen family, and others' intimate friend circles so much better after reading this captivating, beautiful, and terrible accounting of a complex social species in action.This is a must-read. MUST.I cannot wait to see which revelations come next from this tremendous Elizabeth Ames. Listen to this one closely.
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    A bunch of forged relationships from women in college that seems to go nowhere and probably wouldn't have endured in real life.I'm not sure the point but for me this felt too forced and too out of left field to make a go of it all.A pact to keep one another's secrets but the secrets were a bit odd and actually felt out of character.If felt rushed as if the author had a timeline to conquer and had to throw it all in the pot to stew and come out with something concrete before the time expired.For A bunch of forged relationships from women in college that seems to go nowhere and probably wouldn't have endured in real life.I'm not sure the point but for me this felt too forced and too out of left field to make a go of it all.A pact to keep one another's secrets but the secrets were a bit odd and actually felt out of character.If felt rushed as if the author had a timeline to conquer and had to throw it all in the pot to stew and come out with something concrete before the time expired.For me it just didn't connect on an emotional or intellectual appeal.
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  • Audrey
    January 1, 1970
    This was fine, very readable. Part 1 (when they first entered college), the language tried too hard and felt forced. But, as the timeline progressed, it smoothed out. This book really captures the love of female friendships and intense bonding when one enters college. Early on, they make a pact to keep each other’s secrets, no matter what. My issue is that some of the characters weren’t quite fleshed out (especially true of Ji Sun) and that the secrets were all kind of odd and not quite true to This was fine, very readable. Part 1 (when they first entered college), the language tried too hard and felt forced. But, as the timeline progressed, it smoothed out. This book really captures the love of female friendships and intense bonding when one enters college. Early on, they make a pact to keep each other’s secrets, no matter what. My issue is that some of the characters weren’t quite fleshed out (especially true of Ji Sun) and that the secrets were all kind of odd and not quite true to character. I received an arc from the publisher but all opinions are my own.
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  • Cassidy
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsThis debut novel was easy to get into as I am a sucker for books about female friendship, especially spanning over years. Overall I liked it and am glad I picked it up, but there was something about the writing style...almost as if Ames is writing with a time limit and trying to get as much information and words down before the buzzer goes off. I would be interested to read her next book, to see if it was any smoother.
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  • Stacey A. Prose and Palate
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 Stars. Review to come.
  • Monica
    January 1, 1970
    THE OTHER'S GOLD is about female friendships and it's complexity, strength, and importance throughout our lives. We meet Lainey, Ji Sun, Alice, and Margaret when they first meet each other at a fictional college and we grow with them through college, marriage and children. The book is organized by pivotal parts named after a mistake that each of our 4 characters commit - The Accident, The Accusation, The Kiss and The Bite. I liked how Ames laid out her book. It kept me interested and constantly THE OTHER'S GOLD is about female friendships and it's complexity, strength, and importance throughout our lives. We meet Lainey, Ji Sun, Alice, and Margaret when they first meet each other at a fictional college and we grow with them through college, marriage and children. The book is organized by pivotal parts named after a mistake that each of our 4 characters commit - The Accident, The Accusation, The Kiss and The Bite. I liked how Ames laid out her book. It kept me interested and constantly reading because I need to know the mystery of the mistake and what happened following. I enjoyed the first two stories but the last two made me uncomfortable and was unrealistic (at least I hope so...). The Kiss and The Bite both had me drop my book in shock in a 'wtf' way. For The Kiss - there was so much more that could've and I wish had been told. Instead I felt like it was treated like a side note and then ignored. I guess that might be the point but I felt unsatisfied with it's "ending". For The Bite - I can't say much without spoiling it but readers will understand when they get to it. I also felt that the entire book spent too much time on Lainey's POV and so by the time I got to her act, I was just tired of her character and it didn't help me to sympathize (but will anyone sympathize?? I can't wait to discuss this particular situation with others). What Ames does best is create amazing characters. Her writing of their thoughts, emotions, actions, etc. leave you finishing the book like you know them personally. I was really looking forward to THE OTHER'S GOLD. Personally, I enjoy books that are set in college and focus on the friendships. And the review from Celeste Ng made me even more excited to get my hands on this ARC. Alas, I think I had too high of expectations. It was fine, it was okay. But I do think it'll create great discussions and I definitely suggest it for a long-standing book club.
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  • Gayle
    January 1, 1970
    Full review at: http://www.everydayiwritethebookblog....The Other’s Gold by Elizabeth Ames has one of those plots I like – four friends from college and how they fare into adulthood. Margaret, Lainey, Ji-Sun and Alice meet as freshmen when they share a suite at an elite East Coast school. They come from different backgrounds, but become fast friends, enjoying an intimacy and closeness that persists through four years in the same suite.The Other’s Gold is structured around four mistakes, one made Full review at: http://www.everydayiwritethebookblog....The Other’s Gold by Elizabeth Ames has one of those plots I like – four friends from college and how they fare into adulthood. Margaret, Lainey, Ji-Sun and Alice meet as freshmen when they share a suite at an elite East Coast school. They come from different backgrounds, but become fast friends, enjoying an intimacy and closeness that persists through four years in the same suite.The Other’s Gold is structured around four mistakes, one made by each of the main characters at some point in their lives. They are pretty significant mistakes, which impact the course of their lives and affect their families, and later, their friends and husbands. I don’t want to spoil anything by saying what the mistakes were, but they form the narrative structure of The Other’s Gold, allowing Ames to shift focus among the four women and delve more deeply into their individual stories.I really enjoyed this one. It read quickly and Ames is a beautiful writer. The women were frustrating at times, and made questionable decisions, but I felt invested in their lives and friendships and wanted to see how things ended up. I liked Ames’ use of detail – never extraneous, always making me feel a part of the scene. My only complaint is that I had trouble connecting to one of the women – Lainey – throughout the book. I found her inconsistent and difficult to relate to. Maybe we are just really different, but she isn’t like anyone I have known and I didn’t find her all that credible.I really liked it and recommend it – makes a great end of summer read.
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  • Madeleine
    January 1, 1970
    First off, I would like to thank the publisher for the free book.I really enjoyed The Other's Gold, though I will say that it took turns and and went into directions that I had not anticipated. So, fair warning: this is not your typical book that explores female friendships and the ways that they shift and evolve over time (though this is of course a huge part of it).It brings up ethical dilemmas that are incredibly difficult to grapple with, and demonstrates that things may not always be so cut First off, I would like to thank the publisher for the free book.I really enjoyed The Other's Gold, though I will say that it took turns and and went into directions that I had not anticipated. So, fair warning: this is not your typical book that explores female friendships and the ways that they shift and evolve over time (though this is of course a huge part of it).It brings up ethical dilemmas that are incredibly difficult to grapple with, and demonstrates that things may not always be so cut and dry (no matter how badly we want to believe that). Our response to morally problematic actions are not necessarily always brave; our actions in this sort of aftermath may be far more nuanced, problematic, or shameful than we might like to admit because of how we feel about the people who have behaved in egregious ways.Set up in four parts, THE OTHER'S GOLD looks at four life-altering mistakes that each respective woman makes at some point, the ways in which these mistakes can have lasting consequences, and can be the result of trauma, desire, or fear. It asks difficult questions of us as readers; asks whether we would be able to forgive, what we would have done, would we have remained silent, or made excuses?Ultimately I found this book entirely addictive, and was captivated by all of the characters who, yes, all behaved terribly in a variety of ways (and to varying degrees), but all felt very real and very human. Some of the plot points I definitely struggled with (like some things were far more problematic and upsetting than were recognized in the story), but ultimately I found it to be a compelling story.
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