Black Radical
William Monroe Trotter (1872– 1934), though still virtually unknown to the wider public, was an unlikely American hero. With the stylistic verve of a newspaperman and the unwavering fearlessness of an emancipator, he galvanized black working- class citizens to wield their political power despite the violent racism of post- Reconstruction America. For more than thirty years, the Harvard-educated Trotter edited and published the Guardian, a weekly Boston newspaper that was read across the nation. Defining himself against the gradualist politics of Booker T. Washington and the elitism of W. E. B. Du Bois, Trotter advocated for a radical vision of black liberation that prefigured leaders such as Marcus Garvey, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr. Synthesizing years of archival research, historian Kerri Greenidge renders the drama of turn- of- the- century America and reclaims Trotter as a seminal figure, whose prophetic, yet ultimately tragic, life offers a link between the vision of Frederick Douglass and black radicalism in the modern era.

Black Radical Details

TitleBlack Radical
Author
ReleaseNov 19th, 2019
PublisherLiveright
ISBN-139781631495342
Rating
GenreBiography, Nonfiction, Biography Memoir

Black Radical Review

  • Casey Cep
    January 1, 1970
    Reviewed this remarkable biography of William Monroe Trotter for The New Yorker: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/20...Wonderful use of one life to illuminate a broader intellectual movement.
  • Lalaa #ThisBlackGirlReads
    January 1, 1970
    This is a well researched and impressive biography of activist and newspaperman William Monroe Trotter. Born in Boston he attended Harvard with dreams and aspirations of forging a new world where racial equality was prominent. Trotter’s views made him both influential as well as controversial. He spoke out against racial representation, politics and black civil rights. He began a career in real estate making him one of the wealthiest black men in New England. With his wealth, he launched the This is a well researched and impressive biography of activist and newspaperman William Monroe Trotter. Born in Boston he attended Harvard with dreams and aspirations of forging a new world where racial equality was prominent. Trotter’s views made him both influential as well as controversial. He spoke out against racial representation, politics and black civil rights. He began a career in real estate making him one of the wealthiest black men in New England. With his wealth, he launched the Guardian using it as a platform for his activism. The book does a great job of telling a story of a man that has been left untold for so long. This is an informative, and well-written biography that offers context on how this prominent figure helped shape civil rights activism.
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  • Margaret Gabriele
    January 1, 1970
    Very well written. A fascinating view of not only William Monroe Trotter but the time in which he lived. I grew up in Boston,so I was familiar with his name but didn't know much about him until I read the book.
  • Michelle Olms
    January 1, 1970
    Great book
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