Midnight Radio
An intriguingly interwoven tale of four lives changed by a mysterious late-night radio broadcast that wakes them up from their mundane existences. Each tale speaks to different social issues without pandering to a political agenda: LGBT+ rights, racism, social network addiction, and the difficult decision between settling down versus following your dreams. Each tale is told in a vivid, polychromatic illustration style that flows from one character to another and back again in a uniquely identifiable fashion.

Midnight Radio Details

TitleMidnight Radio
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 4th, 2019
PublisherLion Forge
ISBN-139781942367994
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, LGBT, Contemporary, Adult

Midnight Radio Review

  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Four separate stories of young people in San Francisco. Most of them were boring and we weren't given a larger context to care or identify with any of them. The stories didn't connect any more than one character might walk through the background of another character's story. Where the book excelled was the art. Each character had his or her own monochromatic palette which I really liked. Received a review copy from Lion Forge and NetGalley. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the Four separate stories of young people in San Francisco. Most of them were boring and we weren't given a larger context to care or identify with any of them. The stories didn't connect any more than one character might walk through the background of another character's story. Where the book excelled was the art. Each character had his or her own monochromatic palette which I really liked. Received a review copy from Lion Forge and NetGalley. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.
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  • Etienne
    January 1, 1970
    Great great read! It talks about social issues of our modern world, but also about young adult that try to find they path into life and who they really are. Being themselves vs social pressure. I love the art, love the subject and love those four stories that mixed up perfectly while bringing their own style.
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  • Sleepless
    January 1, 1970
    I read most of this book while listening to the Eurovision songs (Please, someone talk to me about Eurovision, no one in Russia is passionate enough about this) and wearing a t-shirt that is tie-dyed with the trans colors and says "Genderless Society" so I don't think I've ever been more of a gay icon. Anyway, this is a sweet book. I haven't read a graphic novel in ages and I really was pleasantly surprised by how engaged I was. It took a while to get into it but by page 50, I was so intrigued. I read most of this book while listening to the Eurovision songs (Please, someone talk to me about Eurovision, no one in Russia is passionate enough about this) and wearing a t-shirt that is tie-dyed with the trans colors and says "Genderless Society" so I don't think I've ever been more of a gay icon. Anyway, this is a sweet book. I haven't read a graphic novel in ages and I really was pleasantly surprised by how engaged I was. It took a while to get into it but by page 50, I was so intrigued. We get to know quite a few stories, from an instagram celebrity to a Latin Robin Hood. It's split into parts but somehow, it all flows together. I think the art here is phenomenal. It's simply beautiful. The artist decided to give each story a different color and it works so well. I enjoyed it a lot. All in all, very nice book. If you like current topics and good art, you'll like this book.Thanks to Netgalley for providing me with a copy in return for a review. What I'm Taking With Me - Seika and her narrative were fantastic, like I loved her so much. - The colors, ah, so good - I wish I had a physical copy because this is beautiful.
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  • Basma
    January 1, 1970
    This was surprisingly a very pleasant read. I went into it knowing absolutely nothing and I was really surprised by the story and the art.. It's beautiful. It's such a joy when I can't tell what the art will be like and then get blown away by it. Sometimes the cover is an indication but not always. And since I'm rambling about the art I should mention the choice of using certain color/shades for each of the stories was a perfect decision. It made each individual story stand out.This graphic nove This was surprisingly a very pleasant read. I went into it knowing absolutely nothing and I was really surprised by the story and the art.. It's beautiful. It's such a joy when I can't tell what the art will be like and then get blown away by it. Sometimes the cover is an indication but not always. And since I'm rambling about the art I should mention the choice of using certain color/shades for each of the stories was a perfect decision. It made each individual story stand out.This graphic novel tells the story of 4 different and diverse people each going through their own stuff in life. There's a story about a guy working in a corrupted company doing a job he hates, a Japanese women struggling with the threat of deportation and having to go through some undercover stuff, there's the silent teen who is an instagram star struggling to find his voice and lastly, a queer woman who is angry and in doubt and trying to follow her dreams. Each one of those characters has a set of color palette that fits their story and that makes it so much easier to follow once their stories switches back and forth and again, I loved that.There's a voice at the beginning of the story that comes from a radio program and all of the characters seem to have something inside them that ticks once they hear the words and the story unfolds and makes sense at the end but each story is showing a different life, a different perspective and shows how that voice in the radio program resonated with them. There's a beautiful flow within the story and how it's narrated. It discusses a lot of different topics without necessarily having it spelled out for us, if that makes sense. It's a bit sad that diversity is not yet the norm and without spelling things out for us we go back to thinking of the default that's been so brainwashed in our heads but I very much appreciate when authors and illustrators make an effort to make their work as diverse as they possibly can within the scope of the story and I enjoyed that a lot in this book.Some of the character's arc feels like things you've heard over and over and could potentially be something that's a little overdone such as focusing primarily on the notifications, likes and instant gratification when talking about social media or how crushing the 9-5 jobs are...etc. Even though a part of me would have much preferred a story where this was handled in a different perspective, I still enjoyed the story as is because that's the story the writer/artist wanted to share.It's a nice, fun and quick read. Beautiful artwork and overall enjoyed the writing. I look forward to picking up more work from Iolanda Zanfardino.(I received a free e-book copy of this title from NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.)
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  • Skirmish
    January 1, 1970
    Book Reaction: https://neverhollowed.wordpress.com/2...Rating: 2 Stars – it’s a struggle to finish the damn bookI received a copy of Midnight Radio from Lion Forge via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
  • Cas
    January 1, 1970
    I love when books give me an existential crisis and make me question everything I have or haven’t done! Midnight Radio is an illustrated story that follows the perspective and stories of four vastly different yet similar characters that while they intersect at times, they’re entirely separate. There’s a man that’s a game developer that works for a corrupt corporation with blood on their hands; a queer woman with big dreams, bigger fears, and a lot of doubts; a Japanese woman blackmailed by cops I love when books give me an existential crisis and make me question everything I have or haven’t done! Midnight Radio is an illustrated story that follows the perspective and stories of four vastly different yet similar characters that while they intersect at times, they’re entirely separate. There’s a man that’s a game developer that works for a corrupt corporation with blood on their hands; a queer woman with big dreams, bigger fears, and a lot of doubts; a Japanese woman blackmailed by cops into cooperating with a sting to keep her visa; and a selectively mute Instagram star with a sick sister and an overabundance of emotions that has led to his isolation from even his best friend. All four of these characters live in an impasse in their lives, moving without really going anywhere as they struggle with social and personal issues. When there’s a sudden disruption on a radio station, the hasty and passionate message left by an anonymous voice resonates with the characters and haunts them until things start clicking. The artwork was done in a loose line kind of style, semi-realistic polychrome with strict color tones for each character that kept them distinct and separated. Rather than done in a spectrum of colors, each character’s chapters are done in a specific shade (Mike = green, Joanne = red, Seika = blue, Stephen = yellow) and I want to say this was an underhanded psychological thing, too, since *gestures vaguely* there’s a proven science to certain colors eliciting certain emotions so it provided a strange kind of depth to each character’s story.Though it did tend to favor a cliché approach to the misanthropic view of social media so there was nothing unique there, I did really like this more than I was expecting to. Which really isn’t saying much considering I actually had no idea what I was going into (what can I say, I have the attention span and memory of a toddler on a sugar high so it’s like I never even read the summary to begin with), but my point stands anyway.So all in all, this was a good plot with beautiful artwork that I would definitely recommend for a quick read.Warnings: nudity, homophobia/transphobia (mentions of parental abuse and homophobic remarks in general), gun violence, mention of a mass shooting (I think this is meant to be in reference to the Pulse shooting), use of racial slursRep: POC main and secondary characters, queer MC, and a trans woman as a secondary character
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  • Ije the Devourer of Books
    January 1, 1970
    This was both interesting and well drawn. It is four different stories set within an overarching story. The four main characters of each story are each facing complex challenges and difficulties some of which seem impossible to resolve. Each character hears a mysterious late night pirate radio broadcast which both inspires and pushes them to think beyond their circumstances and when they do they find that they are able to surmount and undermine the barriers facing them. The characters are as div This was both interesting and well drawn. It is four different stories set within an overarching story. The four main characters of each story are each facing complex challenges and difficulties some of which seem impossible to resolve. Each character hears a mysterious late night pirate radio broadcast which both inspires and pushes them to think beyond their circumstances and when they do they find that they are able to surmount and undermine the barriers facing them. The characters are as diverse as the problems facing them. A young man has stopped speaking because his sister is ill. He only communicates through social media and this means of communication both hampers and frees him raising questions about love, support and life. A career man finds himself working for a profitable company but his job means working against truth, freedom and courage. A young woman face grief and fear as she seeks to break free of a painful event and a family who don't understand her. Another woman is threatened with deportation if she refuses to do some undercover work for the police. I think the way the stories are told is engaging. At first I couldn't understand that each story is separate and I was trying to see what held them together. It is the radio broadcast that holds them together but in very different ways.It is an interesting novel and nicely illustrated. One that requires quiet reflection to truly appreciate it.Copy provided by Diamond Publishing via Netgalley in exchange for an unbiased review.
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  • Jill Kenna
    January 1, 1970
    This book is about four people and their interwoven stories. There is Robin Hood, the art thief, who is recreating paintings so he can swap them out and take the money back to his community in Mexico. Next we have Instaking, who doesn't speak anymore. The third story is Inner Pulse, about a young girl who was involved in a nightclub shooting. Lastly, there's The Woodpecker, a hacker who is trying to expose a corporation who may have killed seven people. Of all these stories I really enjoyed The This book is about four people and their interwoven stories. There is Robin Hood, the art thief, who is recreating paintings so he can swap them out and take the money back to his community in Mexico. Next we have Instaking, who doesn't speak anymore. The third story is Inner Pulse, about a young girl who was involved in a nightclub shooting. Lastly, there's The Woodpecker, a hacker who is trying to expose a corporation who may have killed seven people. Of all these stories I really enjoyed The Woodpecker and the Inner Pulse story lines the most out of the four. I also really liked the fact that all of the different stories were different colors. It really helped keep all of the different story lines separated. The stories were all pretty good but I didn't really connect with the art thief or the teenager that wouldn't talk (it was never revealed why he wouldn't talk either which was kind of annoying to me). Overall though I think think is a pretty great read for anyone. Because of the multiple story lines I think that a lot of people can find something to relate to.
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  • Dini Kamayana
    January 1, 1970
    Midnight Radio is a short, thought-provoking graphic novel that is beautifully illustrated. It follows four characters who currently find themselves lost or in difficult social and personal situations that they're struggling to navigate or deal with. Each storyline is rich with emotion and the issues that the characters face are very relevant to modern times; especially with how easy it is for people to pretend to be someone they're not with the use of social media and the internet, and the pres Midnight Radio is a short, thought-provoking graphic novel that is beautifully illustrated. It follows four characters who currently find themselves lost or in difficult social and personal situations that they're struggling to navigate or deal with. Each storyline is rich with emotion and the issues that the characters face are very relevant to modern times; especially with how easy it is for people to pretend to be someone they're not with the use of social media and the internet, and the pressure to conform to society's idea of "normal" (whatever that is), instead of just being their individual selves. I really enjoyed Stephen's storyline (yellow!) and I probably liked Seika's (blue) the least, as it felt the least genuine (imo).To be honest, I found it quite difficult to follow the storylines and to keep up with what was happening with each character, but the "Oh!" moment towards the end was very well done. Everything clicked into place without me even having to look back at earlier pages. I liked that despite the characters all living very different and separate lives, there was one element that connected them all, and it wasn't done in a contrived way. I thought that the illustrations, while not the clean sharp lines that I usually love, added a sense of fluidity to the movement of the characters. At first, the use of the bright neon-colored boxes for the different characters was slightly jarring, but I ended up appreciating how it made it easier for me to follow the storylines--I am also just generally a fan of bright colors! I have to say that there is a lot of text in these pages, that initially put me off because I find it tiresome to read such small text cramped together in a small space, but I'm glad that I kept reading! Perhaps the concept of the storylines weren't anything new or extra special, but I was still able to enjoy it because I haven't seen it done in this format before.A review of this book will be posted on my blog (http://dinipandareads.home.blog) closer to the release date. Thanks to Netgalley, the author and publisher for providing me a free copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Ruthsic
    January 1, 1970
    Warnings: nudity, homophobia (mention of parental abuse of a trans person, and homophobic remarks in general), gun violence, mention of a mass shooting, use of racial slursRep: Has POC main and secondary characters and a trans woman as a secondary characterMidnight Radio is an anthology of four stories that intersect, and the way it was designed lended very well to how it was rendered. The four stories are done in four different color tones, and while they intersect at times, they are separate a Warnings: nudity, homophobia (mention of parental abuse of a trans person, and homophobic remarks in general), gun violence, mention of a mass shooting, use of racial slursRep: Has POC main and secondary characters and a trans woman as a secondary characterMidnight Radio is an anthology of four stories that intersect, and the way it was designed lended very well to how it was rendered. The four stories are done in four different color tones, and while they intersect at times, they are separate and playing out together through the book instead of going one by one.There's a game developer who is stuck in a job he doesn't like, working for a corporation that has bloodied hands, a Japanese girl who seeks freedom but is being threatened with deportation unless she co-operates with a sting, a selectively mute teen who is an Instagram star and communicated in real life through the captions on his post, with a sick sister and a trans friend who needs his support, and finally, a queer woman who has been afraid and in doubt. The stories start out confusing, but as we reach towards the end, the connections make sense. I did find that for most of the story it was leaning a little bit on cliches ('boo social media is so terrible', 'what problems do these young online stars have anyway?' sort of things) rather than presenting a new perspective on a situation, but it did a good job with each character's development nevertheless.The artwork of this book was beautiful, and I loved the loose line work, the subtle semi-realistic style, and the strict color tones that kept things distinct and precise. I would like to mention, though, that due to the color tone, sometimes the text would be difficult to read. The expressions and poses felt exaggerated at times, but overall I would say the storyboard was cleverly done with smooth transitions and good flow to the action of the characters.Verdict: a decent story-line, and beautiful artwork.Received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review from Lion Forge, via Edelweiss.
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  • xueh wei
    January 1, 1970
    I managed to breeze through this in one hour. It's a graphic novel about four lives, and they all touch on some social commentary (queerness, insta fame, social justice, & vigilantism). I found the storylines to be a little underdeveloped, but I enjoyed the art enough.*I received this copy through Netgalley in return for an honest review.
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  • Sheila Loosevelt
    January 1, 1970
    I was provided this graphic novel (as an advanced reader copy) by NetGalley. All views expressed in this review are my own.My favorite thing about this was the use of color. Midnight Radio is composed of four stories that all seem to overlap in some way, but each protagonist has their own color associated with their story. Every panel of each story was comprised of colors from the corresponding monochrome color palette. I was a bit confused about the nature of each story (beyond just how and why I was provided this graphic novel (as an advanced reader copy) by NetGalley. All views expressed in this review are my own.My favorite thing about this was the use of color. Midnight Radio is composed of four stories that all seem to overlap in some way, but each protagonist has their own color associated with their story. Every panel of each story was comprised of colors from the corresponding monochrome color palette. I was a bit confused about the nature of each story (beyond just how and why they connected), but I felt satisfied at the end. There seemed to be overlapping themes of conformity and release, with each character in the middle of their story, leaving readers to piece together their truth.
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  • Annette Jordan
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the artwork and color schemes of this collection of interwoven stories. Midnight radio follows the stories of four different young people, each facing difficult decisions. Each of their stories is shown in a particular color, so as the pages turn and the colors change it is obvious at a glance which story is being told. The link between them is a strange radio broadcast that inspires them to make the changes they need in their lives . Robin Hood follows the story of a young Japanese woma I loved the artwork and color schemes of this collection of interwoven stories. Midnight radio follows the stories of four different young people, each facing difficult decisions. Each of their stories is shown in a particular color, so as the pages turn and the colors change it is obvious at a glance which story is being told. The link between them is a strange radio broadcast that inspires them to make the changes they need in their lives . Robin Hood follows the story of a young Japanese woman forced to infiltrate a group of art thieves, Instaking is about a young man who has chosen to communicate only via social media, The Woodpecker is a man trapped in the toxic culture of a corrupt corporation and Inner Pulse is the story of a young woman caught up in a tragic nightclub shooting. The stories feel very current with their emphasis on LGBT+ rights, social conscience and social media, and I found myself really enjoying all of them.I read and reviewed an ARC courtesy of NetGalley and the publisher, all opinions are my own.
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  • Littlebookterror
    January 1, 1970
    This is an incredible single issue comic featuring four stories that are basically about life.The art is gorgeous. Each character has its own colour scheme which attributes to the feeling and atmosphere of each part. I was enjoying all the backgrounds of the places we explored, the author really took their time to create these real, lived in spaces. In general, all stories are very real and I could see myself meeting them on the street by accident.I was invested right from the beginning. Mike (t This is an incredible single issue comic featuring four stories that are basically about life.The art is gorgeous. Each character has its own colour scheme which attributes to the feeling and atmosphere of each part. I was enjoying all the backgrounds of the places we explored, the author really took their time to create these real, lived in spaces. In general, all stories are very real and I could see myself meeting them on the street by accident.I was invested right from the beginning. Mike (the green story) was probably my favourite just because his facial expressions and outlook on life resonated with me. Steph's story was just as beautiful even if I am still not entirely sure what it all means.I was missing a more conclusive ending but I was generally satisfied.I received and advanced reading copy on Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Didi
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel impressed me so much. Went in blind and have no expectations at all. Some parts, the illustrations looked like a draft and raw, I guess it’s meant like that.
  • Thelizyouknow
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Edelweiss for the complimentary advance review copy of this title.Midnight Radio is a one-off graphic novel. Four separate stories are intertwined, and the mangaesque line art is a different color--monochrome red, blue, green or yellow--depending on the particular story. I really like the realistic artwork, but it took me a while to figure out the significance of the colors.All four stories are dark and urban, ranging from the misdeeds of big business to relationships and identity, tie Thanks to Edelweiss for the complimentary advance review copy of this title.Midnight Radio is a one-off graphic novel. Four separate stories are intertwined, and the mangaesque line art is a different color--monochrome red, blue, green or yellow--depending on the particular story. I really like the realistic artwork, but it took me a while to figure out the significance of the colors.All four stories are dark and urban, ranging from the misdeeds of big business to relationships and identity, tied together by a mysterious radio broadcast and an identity theme: what are you willing to do to deny yourself, or be yourself? The characters, older teens or young adults, make their way through the perils of modern life to a realization of who they are.This is by no means the fastest moving graphic novel I've ever read, but the pace suits the introspective nature of the content. Even the stories that have a good deal of action in them are more about the characters' internal struggles, so the lingering look we get at their struggle is very appropriate.Each of the characters, whether villain or hero, is a well-developed individual with a definite arc. I particularly liked Joanne's struggle with the social milieu in which she moves, but my hands-down favorite has to be poor Mike--or perhaps his boss. The magic is the two together.In any event, Midnight Radio is a lovely work, and I recommend it for aficionados of graphic storytelling with a domestic focus.
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  • Jenny
    January 1, 1970
    Reading graphic novels has been my pleasure these past few weeks. Most of them I got from NetGalley. The book cover art impressed me, so I jumped into it without knowing what this is about.This novel narrates an interwoven story about four main characters: a guy who works on a corrupted company; a Japanese girl who is forced to go undercover or else she will face deportation; a teenage Instagram star who cannot voice himself; and a queer woman who struggles with her identity and dreams. Each cha Reading graphic novels has been my pleasure these past few weeks. Most of them I got from NetGalley. The book cover art impressed me, so I jumped into it without knowing what this is about.This novel narrates an interwoven story about four main characters: a guy who works on a corrupted company; a Japanese girl who is forced to go undercover or else she will face deportation; a teenage Instagram star who cannot voice himself; and a queer woman who struggles with her identity and dreams. Each character has their own color scheme which suited the theme and atmosphere of their narratives. Plus, it also helps readers to follow the transition of the story without confusing them.Midnight Radio speaks volumes about different social issues in this modern world. I felt connected to some of the characters. It made me question a lot of things about myself. Is it worth a risk to follow your dreams or is it better to just settle for something safe and ordinary? Is it better to just stay quiet and not express emotions lest people will just misjudge you?Overall, Midnight Radio is a delightful quick read with beautiful artwork.4.5/5 stars!
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  • Megan McCaffrey
    January 1, 1970
    (This review was originally posted on my blog “Megan Reads” http://megansreviewingjourney.tumblr.... )Netgalley gave me this ARC in exchange for an honest review.Since this is a short graphic novel, I won’t discuss any particular plot points because they’d be spoilers.The art was nice. Each character’s story had a different color. Each story was memorable, distinct, and would form a great stand alone book. I liked the themes of each section. All protagonists were sympathetic and dynamic; I enjoy (This review was originally posted on my blog “Megan Reads” http://megansreviewingjourney.tumblr.... )Netgalley gave me this ARC in exchange for an honest review.Since this is a short graphic novel, I won’t discuss any particular plot points because they’d be spoilers.The art was nice. Each character’s story had a different color. Each story was memorable, distinct, and would form a great stand alone book. I liked the themes of each section. All protagonists were sympathetic and dynamic; I enjoyed their stories. Subtle story telling adds more excitement to the plots. I do wish the radio played a bigger role in the story. Since the summary mentions the stories are interwoven, I would've liked to see more intertwining as the stories are mostly independent. My final complaint is that the ending of Joanne’s story confused me.While Midnight Radio is a brief story, I’d recommend this well illustrated and characterized book.
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  • Lenni A.
    January 1, 1970
    A mysterious late-night broadcast interrupts regular radio broadcasting; impacting the lives of four very different people.I honestly don't want to spoil too much of this because it's gorgeous to read this book. Each of the different characters and stories have a different color palate. This was an absolute delight to read. It features people of color, LGBT, and an aging rocker with out seeming pandering or ticking off marks on a checklist. It may start off slow but it sets itself up for a satis A mysterious late-night broadcast interrupts regular radio broadcasting; impacting the lives of four very different people.I honestly don't want to spoil too much of this because it's gorgeous to read this book. Each of the different characters and stories have a different color palate. This was an absolute delight to read. It features people of color, LGBT, and an aging rocker with out seeming pandering or ticking off marks on a checklist. It may start off slow but it sets itself up for a satisfying conclusion and sticking to theme of being true to yourself and living your dreams. I finished this book genuinely touched; even if it was a little too much of a happy ending. I'm too cynical I guess. 4.9 out of 5.
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  • Kate Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    Color plays a huge role in Midnight Radio, as there are four different POVs present. But what creates a more subtle yet equally important impact is the panel layout. The way it heightens as the story itself rises is brilliant. It brings the emotions of the story front and center. I also love the kind of sketchy, not-so-neat lines of the art because, in a way, it makes the character more true-to-life.With shorter stories such as this, you don't really expect a lot of character development but the Color plays a huge role in Midnight Radio, as there are four different POVs present. But what creates a more subtle yet equally important impact is the panel layout. The way it heightens as the story itself rises is brilliant. It brings the emotions of the story front and center. I also love the kind of sketchy, not-so-neat lines of the art because, in a way, it makes the character more true-to-life.With shorter stories such as this, you don't really expect a lot of character development but there was enough to keep the story going.Lastly, the way the story handled current issues was not in-your-face and I like how that brought out the nuances even more. I got an e-ARC from Edelweiss for this.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Review copy courtesy of Edelweiss. I enjoyed this story. Four young adults living in San Francisco are dissatisfied with their lives and don't know how to make it better--they are all affected by hearing radio broadcasts. I liked the diversity present in these stories, and I liked having each person's story in a different color scheme---helped me keep everything straight.
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  • Katherine
    January 1, 1970
    Great graphic novel about living your truth. The timeline got me confused a few times, but over all I loved it. Love the diversity and LGBT representation. Thanks to Edelweiss+ and the publisher for the eARC.
  • Loren
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel had a bit of a slow start but by the end it was woven together nicely. It had parts that were very relevant to current events but they were framed in such a way that they will be understandable even beyond those events.
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the art, but the story...yeesh. Melodramatic much? I can't help but feel the real point of these characters' experiences was completely missed in the effort to amp up the drama in them. As if there isn't enough poignancy and pain and urgency in just the experiences, themselves. They only matter if they're epic! If it's them against the world! If it's the choice between Moral Right and Moral Wrong!Right. Because finding your way, especially as a millennial or Gen Z adult coming into your I liked the art, but the story...yeesh. Melodramatic much? I can't help but feel the real point of these characters' experiences was completely missed in the effort to amp up the drama in them. As if there isn't enough poignancy and pain and urgency in just the experiences, themselves. They only matter if they're epic! If it's them against the world! If it's the choice between Moral Right and Moral Wrong!Right. Because finding your way, especially as a millennial or Gen Z adult coming into your own, can't possibly be nuanced and compelling on its own merits. I guess only Russians in classic literature deserve that sort of treatment. Or poets. Or diarists caught up in holocausts.
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  • Ru
    January 1, 1970
    The art was very good. I had a hard time keeping track of each protagonist's story because there were just so many, but it was clever to draw each in a different color palette. The thing I struggled with in this book is that there's nothing new about this misanthropic view of social media where it isolates people and makes us forget how to communicate. I was incredibly bored by that, though I was surprised to find that Stephen's arc ended up being my favorite. Still; how hard is it to write empa The art was very good. I had a hard time keeping track of each protagonist's story because there were just so many, but it was clever to draw each in a different color palette. The thing I struggled with in this book is that there's nothing new about this misanthropic view of social media where it isolates people and makes us forget how to communicate. I was incredibly bored by that, though I was surprised to find that Stephen's arc ended up being my favorite. Still; how hard is it to write empathetically and lovingly about social media? We all use it! There's value in it beyond the instant gratification of notifications! Also boring and overdone: the idea that giving up your dreams to work an office job is bad and soul-sucking. Obviously the corporation in the hacker arc was morally corrupt, but people need to pay bills, dude! Even when I was working office jobs, I always found time to do that AND feed my artistic hobbies! So, 3/5 stars. I did legitimately enjoy it, but I also kind of wanted to yell at it.
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.Overbearing preaching about social media. It made me not want to finish, but I did. I liked parts about the other stories, but found it hard to read because the messages were so overbearing and preachy. The art was beautiful and I liked the idea of assigning one color per character, especially because you have 4 different perspectives.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    I went in not having a clue what the book was about. It's beautifully done, I love the use of color to differentiate between stories--I think 4 in one book is difficult to accomplish, but I got the gist of all of them. It's a cool idea, overall.
  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    Four distinctive, and distinctly coloured, stories are in this graphic novel – how could they possibly combine? You get a young waitress who could have been doing something else, and who hates her parents. You get a pillock fixated on selfies and insta-likes, and not so much on his ill baby sister. You get a bloke suffering with blocking hacker/saboteurs off his bosses' homepage concerning lethal slimming pills. You get a woman inveigled into providing wire-tapped evidence of some people who wan Four distinctive, and distinctly coloured, stories are in this graphic novel – how could they possibly combine? You get a young waitress who could have been doing something else, and who hates her parents. You get a pillock fixated on selfies and insta-likes, and not so much on his ill baby sister. You get a bloke suffering with blocking hacker/saboteurs off his bosses' homepage concerning lethal slimming pills. You get a woman inveigled into providing wire-tapped evidence of some people who want to swap real artworks for forgeries. The problem, unfortunately, is that they don't really combine at all, beyond the titular entity and a go-get-em message over the airwaves. What we have then is four very unusual looks at how modern American youth may be going and getting 'em, whoever 'em are, but not much else. All the same, however, with its many monochrome segments, its fresh artwork and its non-corporate feel, I did quite like it. It's just not as superior as it thinks it is.
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  • Tamara
    January 1, 1970
    Midnight Radio is the tale of 4 people. Mike, a former anarchist who became an IT person in a cubicle job; Joanne, a waitress; Seika, a Japanese immigrant who has found herself in trouble; and Steph, a teenager who speaks through his instagram.I really enjoyed the art style. I liked how each character had a color and it really did seem to fit them. Steph's storyline was my favorite. He decides, for some reason, to stop talking and only uses his instagram to communicate, but we find out more of h Midnight Radio is the tale of 4 people. Mike, a former anarchist who became an IT person in a cubicle job; Joanne, a waitress; Seika, a Japanese immigrant who has found herself in trouble; and Steph, a teenager who speaks through his instagram.I really enjoyed the art style. I liked how each character had a color and it really did seem to fit them. Steph's storyline was my favorite. He decides, for some reason, to stop talking and only uses his instagram to communicate, but we find out more of his story and seem to know exactly why he stopped talking. I wish there was a bit more development in their stories. I felt like Seika had the least amount of story and background. Or maybe it's just because I didn't enjoy her storyline as much as the rest?
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  • Louis Skye
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really interesting set of stories about characters connected to the LGBTQ+ community. The characters are fascinating and eccentric in various ways. They're troubled people, hemmed in by a society that cares little about them. There are references to real-life incidents that makes it more hard-hitting and poignant.I loved the art, even though this is not the style I'm usually attracted to. The four colour schemes for the characters gave the stories a compartmentalised feel but also cap This was a really interesting set of stories about characters connected to the LGBTQ+ community. The characters are fascinating and eccentric in various ways. They're troubled people, hemmed in by a society that cares little about them. There are references to real-life incidents that makes it more hard-hitting and poignant.I loved the art, even though this is not the style I'm usually attracted to. The four colour schemes for the characters gave the stories a compartmentalised feel but also captured the mood of the stories.I enjoyed reading this.
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