I Hope You Get This Message
Seven days. Seven days. The Earth might end in seven days.When news stations start reporting that Earth has been contacted by a planet named Alma, the world is abuzz with rumors that the alien entity is giving mankind only few days to live before they hit the kill switch on civilization.For high school truant Jesse Hewitt, though, nothing has ever felt permanent. Not the guys he hooks up with. Not the jobs his underpaid mom works so hard to hold down. Life has dealt him one bad blow after another — so what does it matter if it all ends now? Cate Collins, on the other hand, is desperate to use this time to find the father she’s never met, the man she grew up hearing wild stories about, most of which she didn’t believe. And then there’s Adeem Khan. While coding and computer programming have always come easily to him, forgiveness doesn’t. He can’t seem to forgive his sister for leaving, even though it’s his last chance.With only seven days to face their truths and right their wrongs, Jesse, Cate, and Adeem’s paths collide even as their worlds are pulled apart.

I Hope You Get This Message Details

TitleI Hope You Get This Message
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 22nd, 2019
PublisherHarperTeen
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Young Adult, LGBT

I Hope You Get This Message Review

  • Chaima ✨ شيماء
    January 1, 1970
    [rips your door off of the hinges] DID SOMEONE MENTION GAY SCI-FI?
  • Cece (ProblemsOfaBookNerd)
    January 1, 1970
    Full review to come. For now, I’ll just say that if you liked We Are the Ants then this is the book you need to read next.
  • R.F. Kuang
    January 1, 1970
    So...this was really. flipping. good. Long RTC. Put this one on your TBRs, you won't regret it.
  • Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin
    January 1, 1970
    One of the two books in the Owlcrate October box! Click on GOODIES LINK to see the goodies! GOODIES LINKI thought this book was good!! I loved how things mostly came together at the end!! Jesse ended up being my favorite character because of the wolves 😉🐺Happy Reading! Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾
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  • Farah Rishi
    January 1, 1970
    SHRUGS. I dunno, I mean, it IS a book I worked pretty hard on, so I will shamelessly give Past Farah five stars. You did good, kid. You tried your best. And that's enough in my (proverbial) book.
  • ellie
    January 1, 1970
    UPDATE: I JUST REALIZED THIS IS GAY SO IM EVEN MORE EXCITED TO READ IT NOWholy shit this cover is so beautiful!! look at it!!
  • Benjamin
    January 1, 1970
    I hope you get how much I need this book in my life.
  • Fadwa (Word Wonders)
    January 1, 1970
    I finally finished this after over two weeks, i think. And I just? I don't have words for that ending? It's so tender but it broke my heart in a way i can't pinpoint. What exactly happened to get such a visceral reaction out of me? i'm not sure.
  • ♡ Dakota ♡ (Sarcasm is my middle name)
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t normally read Science Fiction... ok that’s a lie. I don’t read Science Fiction. But this seems less Science Fiction and more contemporary which I also don’t read a lot of... but the synopsis really sells it to me.
  • Noa ☾
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5 It reminded Adeem of one of the poems his sister had shared with him once, one by Rumi. In the poem, Rumi banters with God over life’s usual philosophical questions: what to do with that pesky thing called a heart, where to focus one’s eyes, etcetera, etcetera. But when Rumi asks God what to do with his pain and sorrow, God tells him, “Stay with it. The wound is the place where the Light enters you.” tw : suicide attempt (in the past, not depicted), mental health issues, Some books just stick with you for/>Some 3.5/5 It reminded Adeem of one of the poems his sister had shared with him once, one by Rumi. In the poem, Rumi banters with God over life’s usual philosophical questions: what to do with that pesky thing called a heart, where to focus one’s eyes, etcetera, etcetera. But when Rumi asks God what to do with his pain and sorrow, God tells him, “Stay with it. The wound is the place where the Light enters you.” tw : suicide attempt (in the past, not depicted), mental health issues, Some books just stick with you for reasons beyond your immediate comprehension. This is what happened with I Hope You Get This Message and I. Ever since I've finished it, it quietly sat in the back of my head. Lately, I've been thinking about the end of the world a little (dark, much ? a little but it's not that bad) and thinking about how We as Humans hurt the Earth and how it's eventually going to fight back and We (and the future generations) will (are) suffer(ing) from it greatly.I Hope You Get This Message follows three characters, Adeem, Jesse and Cate as they experience essentially the end of the world. An entity known as Alma warns humans that they will terminate our existence in the next seven days. All hell breaks loose and our main characters try to navigate this announcement however they can.Rishi's writing is beautiful and fluid. It's also full of little gems of wisdom (“Be kind, Adi. Life’s too exhausting as it is to hold on to anger so tightly.” OOF) ✨The characters ✨ 💜Adeem “It’s convenient to sit back and do nothing when everything goes to hell,” continued Adeem, only a little quieter. “People like him blame the problems we face on the natural order. Or God. Or a lack thereof. But the moment we sit back and do nothing while everything falls apart—that’s why we have problems in the first place. That’s why this is happening.”  Adeem is Pakistani-American and so is the author ! Adeem goes after his sister who, after coming out to her religious Muslim family, ran from home (without saying goodbye to Adeem). I really felt Adeem's struggle : while he is angry at his sister for running away and abandoning him, there's also this part of him that wishes she had trusted him enough to know he wouldn't have rejected her. I appreciated the way Rishi described sibling relationships because most of the time, they're far from simple and I always love to read about it.  💜Jesse "The thing about wanting to die was that people always assume it’s the constant pain that gets to you, the pain that convinces you to do something, anything, to make it stop, and Jesse’s depression was painful at first, all sporadic tugs and pulls beneath his skull, like a stubborn specter that clung to his mind with sharp teeth." Jesse was my favorite character. His reaction to Alma is to pretend he built this machine that's able to communicate with the "aliens" and this attracts a bunch of people desperate for just a little bit of hope. This opened my eyes about how much emotional baggage we carry as human beings and how easy, almost natural, it is for us to assume that everything is okay when really, everything is Really Not. Jesse's relationship with his mom was beautiful and heartbreaking and I'll talk more about him in the "themes" section. I really did love Jesse's evolution/thought process throughout the book and I thought he was well-written and complex. 💜Cate was probably the character I felt the "less" about. She didn't strike me with her personality or her arc. Cate decides to leave her mom to go find her dad, whom she's never met (which is a brave thing to do). Her resilience truly was something to admire but I can't lie to you and say she will stick with me (unlike the book in its entirety for example). ✨ Themes ✨1) We are not our parents and other complex family intricacies. The reason why I loved Jesse so much is because of his relationship with his family but also his thought process when it came to his relationship with his dad. "Sure, crows manipulated. Crows deceived. But crows also survived—it was their trickery that kept them alive."I felt Jesse's anger and personal conflict. It reminded me that We Are Not Our Parents and that trauma needs to be dealt with because unfortunately, it doesn't just go away.  “But I don’t want you to keep pretending you’re okay. I don’t want you to keep downplaying the hurt you feel like you’re not even human. You keep it up—all these lies to yourself, to other people, and soon you’re not going to know who you are.” Jesse is definitely a character that will stay with me for some time. 2) Companionship is Important and it's something fundamental that we gravitate towards. Finding friendship, and I mean Real, Unapologetic, True Friendship is rare. It's not something that happens on a daily basis. This book reminded me why I love to read about friendships (and if you need to know anything about me, it's that it's my favorite thing and I literally cannot shut up about it). 3) Hope is not Dumb, it's Necessary. At some point in the book, Jesse is confronted with his utter rejection of Hope as a driving factor of humanity.  “You wanna know why people believe in you? It’s because hope gives people something to hold on to. It makes them feel better. It gives them a reason to keep fighting. People need hope right now, Jesse. Desperately. And there’s nothing wrong with that.” While on the one hand, I deeply understand Jesse's point of view, I also truly believe that Hope Is Necessary. And to be completely honest with you, it's with that type of dialogue that Rishi made me fall in love with her writing. Her way of putting things into perspective and moving me to the point of tears needs more recognition.  “But isn’t that the point of hope? And faith, even? That you have it and you hold on to it and you protect it, even when it’s impossible? Isn’t that when you need hope the most? You can’t blame people for wanting to feel better.”“You know, the worst part of it all,” said Corbin, “isn’t that you were profiting off people’s hope. It’s that you look down on people for having any hope at all.”  I feel like this book was emotionally violent for me on two different levels :  ✨ one is that it is really brutal : the reality of the matter IS that some kids have to grow up way too fast and that it's so fucking unfair but it is what it is. While the three MCs are teenagers, this book is also a testimony that sometimes kids have to grow up too fast, and they have to face things they're no ready to face that are yet inevitable. ✨ two is that there's an inherent softness to what Rishi is saying. There's this quote in the book “remind the ones you love there’s something still worth fighting for” and it reminded me of Keanu Reeves (9:51) on Stephen Colbert. I don't know how to put it into words eloquently so I'll just shut up and ask you to read the book. ✨My Only "Criticism"✨I wish there had been more light-heartedness. Okay hear me out, yes it's the end of the world (or at least the end of A World aka as we know it) BUT there was some serious potential to (for lack of better words) "lighten" the story a bit (maybe that's just a personal preference and honestly the author did this very well at some point : “Man,” he choked. “Your body doesn’t give a shit about timing, does it? That’s why we’re in jail? Seriously? Did it not get the memo about the impending alien attack?” “Are you . . .” Cate blinked back her disbelief. “Adeem, are you asking me if my uterus knows about Alma?” )ALSO I WANT TO FRAME THIS QUOTE :“What do you think we should do, just snooze our way through the freaking apocalypse?” (probably because it's what I would do)✨In Conclusion ✨I loved this comment about the end of the world and the inherently brief nature of humanity. The ending did not fully satisfy me (actually it didn't satisfy me AT ALL) but I think it's the reason I liked it (paradoxical, I know). I'm a sucker for looking at a book in its entirety and not just focusing on One Thing I Disliked. And with I Hope You Get This Message, I enjoyed it in its entirety, and its message. Blog | Goodreads | Twitter
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  • Sahil Javed
    January 1, 1970
    i will support pakistani authors till the day i die.
  • TL
    January 1, 1970
    Liked the story well enough (real life kept interfering with my reading time for various reasons). Part of the ending had me smiling, ther part felt "Meh" about.
  • Emily Berge
    January 1, 1970
    "Your pain is where the light enters you."This book. I don't have words for how much I love it.It's beautifully written, laced with sadness, and anger, and most of all hope. Farah Naz Rishi is a simply incredible writer. This book is important. I can't wait for more people to read it.
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  • Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)
    January 1, 1970
    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight But the thing about the end of the world was this: either everything mattered, or nothing did. Are we all so excited for the release of I Hope You Get This Message? Because frankly, we need to be. This is the possible-end-of-days book I have been dying for. I love the concept, but in the books I have read, the execution hasn't quite met my expectations. Not so here! The author really nails all the chaos and conteof Iall /> You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight But the thing about the end of the world was this: either everything mattered, or nothing did. Are we all so excited for the release of I Hope You Get This Message? Because frankly, we need to be. This is the possible-end-of-days book I have been dying for. I love the concept, but in the books I have read, the execution hasn't quite met my expectations. Not so here! The author really nails all the chaos and contemplation that the threat of end times would really bring with it.Your problems don't disappear just because death might be imminent. In fact, they become more urgent in many cases. In this book, we're treated to the perspectives of three young people: Cate, Jesse, and Adeem. They're all incredibly different, which makes their stories each so compelling. I loved them each in their own way, even when they didn't make the best choices. Because even when humanity's sheer existence could be ending, here they all are, still trying to live fully. And what that means to each one is so, so compelling and thought provoking. What would matter to you most at the end of days? How far would you go to make the last few moments, if that's what they end up being, count?As you can imagine, relationships are a huge focus. Family, friends, romantic partners, even enemies find themselves in each others' company as the clock counts down. Obviously, you can imagine that some of these relationships are just heartwarming and lovely, but some are really complicated too. Of course, as you have mere hours to make sure you've said everything you need to say, it's imperative to make every word, every action count. Because of this, every single interaction in the book seems really important and worthwhile.The story itself is powerful and moving, even hopeful in spite of the circumstances. There is a ton of diversity, from mental health issues, to LGBT+ characters, to a variety of ethnic and cultural backgrounds. And it's extra powerful because when the end of the world comes, it comes for us all. Bottom Line: A compelling and thought provoking story mixed with a ton of emotional pull, this is one you absolutely cannot miss.
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  • Neville Longbottom
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 - An alien planet has sent a communication to Earth saying they’re going to exterminate humanity in seven days. Jesse, Cate, and Adeem’s paths cross as they’re trying to get to unfinished business before the supposed end of the world. This is definitely a sci-fi story that is more about the characters and their emotional journeys rather than the aliens themselves. It’s probably an overused comparison at this point, but if you enjoyed Shaun David Hutchinson’s We Are the Ants, then I’d say to give 4.5 - An alien planet has sent a communication to Earth saying they’re going to exterminate humanity in seven days. Jesse, Cate, and Adeem’s paths cross as they’re trying to get to unfinished business before the supposed end of the world. This is definitely a sci-fi story that is more about the characters and their emotional journeys rather than the aliens themselves. It’s probably an overused comparison at this point, but if you enjoyed Shaun David Hutchinson’s We Are the Ants, then I’d say to give this book a shot. It similarly deals with mental health, difficult family relationships, friendships, and queer characters while also having a light sci-fi element. My only real complaint is that I wish there was a little bit more emotional resolution at the end of the book. We definitely do get some, but I think even just 10 more pages to wrap up the different emotional journeys and relationships between the characters would’ve improved this a lot for me. This is an extremely strong debut and I look forward to reading more from Farah Naz Rishi in the future.
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  • Aimal (Bookshelves & Paperbacks)
    January 1, 1970
    omg this book 😭🖤 i didn’t want it to enddd and i have so many questions but in the best way
  • Danielle (Life of a Literary Nerd)
    January 1, 1970
    “But the thing about the end of the world was this: either everything mattered, or nothing did.” I Hope You Get This Message is a fantastic story with hope and a bit of heartbreak at its core. If you’re in the market for a sad and uplifting book, look no further. When Earth decodes a message from a distant planet, Alma, warning of an impending apocalypse in 8 days 3 teens converge as they’re each looking for answers or at least something to keep them sane. Things I Liked I absolutely loved getting to see the “But the thing about the end of the world was this: either everything mattered, or nothing did.” I Hope You Get This Message is a fantastic story with hope and a bit of heartbreak at its core. If you’re in the market for a sad and uplifting book, look no further. When Earth decodes a message from a distant planet, Alma, warning of an impending apocalypse in 8 days 3 teens converge as they’re each looking for answers or at least something to keep them sane. Things I Liked I absolutely loved getting to see the IAC’s (Interplanetary Affairs Committee) debate about Project Epoch’s (Earth) fate. I always love trials or debates in stories, so I loved seeing it here. You really got to see the complexities of the issue and how not everyone had the same thoughts. There’s some excellent commentary on global warming and environmentalism. I LOVED getting to read the messages sent out by all the different people. They were like wonderful messages in a bottle- some humorous, some heartbreaking, but excellently placed in the story for some levity. The story is partially set in (view spoiler)[ ROSWELL (hide spoiler)]! Could you ask for a better setting for an alien apocalypse story, I don’t think so. The characters are all so flawed and real. Jesse, Cate, and Adeem are all using this supposedly last bit of time on Earth looking for something - security, answers, but they’re also running away from their problems and doing things the wrong way. It’s a messy alien-end-of-the-world scenario, but it’s deeply human and realistic. Things I Didn’t Like I don’t know if this type of story can ever be satisfying? I think it does as well as it can narratively, but there’s always going to be an element of what if that will just bug you .I can best describe I Hope You Get This Message as a story that is both touching and heartbreaking. It’s hopeful and tragic and everything in between. It’s shows us the worst in humanity, and maybe why it should be saved. It’s a book that you want to read slowly, to spend as much time with these characters as you can because their time is limited. It’s a thought provoking book, you’ll not soon forget.I Received a copy of the book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • OonaReads
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsIf aliens sent a message to Earth and told us that the entire human kind would be eradicated because of our behaviour on the planet, I would simply think ‘that’s fair’
  • Leo
    January 1, 1970
    I’m here for the sci-fi and the queer 🏳🌈. I’m here for the sci-fi and the queer 🏳️‍🌈.
  • Bethany
    January 1, 1970
    "Your pain is where the light enters you." (adaptation of a quote from Rumi)I Hope You Get This Message is a book about trauma and brokenness, but also about hope. If you found out that aliens were going to destroy the world in a matter of days, what would you do? What would the people around you do? And how might you seek closure or redemption? In this book, debut author Farah Naz Rishi explores these questions through the perspectives of three teenagers whose lives end up intersect "Your pain is where the light enters you." (adaptation of a quote from Rumi)I Hope You Get This Message is a book about trauma and brokenness, but also about hope. If you found out that aliens were going to destroy the world in a matter of days, what would you do? What would the people around you do? And how might you seek closure or redemption? In this book, debut author Farah Naz Rishi explores these questions through the perspectives of three teenagers whose lives end up intersecting in unexpected ways.Jesse Hewitt never lets anyone get close. Not the string of guys he hooks up with, not his mandated counselor, and not his underpaid, overwhelmed mom who is struggling to make ends meet. His life is a series of blows and he lashes out in return. So why should it matter if the world is ending?Cate Collins has always existed on the fringes, hiding the fact that she takes care of her schizophrenic mom, with all the painful highs and lows. Now, she is desperate to find the father she has never known before time runs out. She is willing to risk it all on an apocalyptic road trip fraught with danger.Adeem Khan is a Muslim-American boy obsessed with coding, programming, and radios. But when his sister left home years earlier after coming out to her family, she left a gaping hold and a lot of bitterness. Adeem hasn't forgiven her, but he wants answers and is determined to find his sister before the world ends.The aliens are deliberating over the fate of humanity and these teens have only 7 days before a decision is made and the world might come to an end. Meanwhile, people around them are panicking, abandoning the law, or going into hiding and the world has become a much more dangerous place with disruption of systems for communication, electricity, and food delivery. It is quite dark and unsettling throughout much of the book, but a thread of hope is also pulled through. The characters are interesting and none of theme are really heroes in the traditional sense. They are very imperfect people who can be selfish, stupid, and hurtful, but also have a capacity for bravery and love. I don't often read such dark contemporary-feeling books because they are so emotionally heavy for me, whereas I find that dark fantasy or sci-fi gives me a little more emotional distance from the issues being addressed. And this was definitely heavier than I usually prefer to read (the feelings of pain are palpable!), but it was very well-executed with an ending that was both beautiful and uncomfortably open-ended. It thoughtfully unpacks the complexities of mental health, sexuality, faith, race, and loss, and the ways some of these things intersect in difficult ways. for instance, I appreciated the nuanced handling of Adeem's Muslim family coming to terms with his sister coming out as gay and the ways that inability to communicate openly led to so much pain for everyone, despite the love that they share. No one involved handled things very well (including his sister) and everyone made a lot of assumptions that were very detrimental to relationships. Ultimately, I'm really glad I read this and I loved the friendships and relationships that develop throughout. I definitely recommend taking a look at the content warnings and emotionally preparing yourself, but it is a beautiful book. I was send a copy of this book for review from the publisher. All opinions are my own.There are going to be lots of content warnings for this book including homophobia, violence, attempted suicide, mental illness, loss of a parent, a child with cancer, parental neglect, and stealing.
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  • The Nerd Daily
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Vinny MSIt’s seven days before the world ends due to an impending alien invasion and our three characters try their best to deal with it in their own ways. Adeem tries to seek out his runaway sister, Cate tries to find the shadow of a father she never met, and Jesse tries to find a way to get him and his mother out of debt. But maybe, these three strangers weren’t that different, as the three of them seek nothing but the truth for their u Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Vinny MSIt’s seven days before the world ends due to an impending alien invasion and our three characters try their best to deal with it in their own ways. Adeem tries to seek out his runaway sister, Cate tries to find the shadow of a father she never met, and Jesse tries to find a way to get him and his mother out of debt. But maybe, these three strangers weren’t that different, as the three of them seek nothing but the truth for their unanswered questions. And maybe, they weren’t a stranger to each other after all.I Hope You Get This Message is one of the most heartfelt books that I read this year, and I swear that I’m not being overdramatic when I’m stating this. What really piqued my interest at first to start reading this book is the urgency behind ‘the world is ending in seven days’ as the three characters tried to redeem whatever it is that they’ve been struggling with. It is really interesting when you’re thinking about it. What are you going to do if you know that you only have seven days left to be alive? What’s your deepest desire? What are your unanswered questions?Obviously, just from its short blurbs, this book is very heavily centered on its characters and their relationships. However, I’m not going to lie, the science-fiction parts of the alien invasion were also very well-written and detailed, and I really enjoyed that they did trial after trial to determine the faith of human being. I certainly didn’t expect the aliens to be highly considerate, but I was touched. If Rishi’s going to write sci-fi for her next book, then I can assure you that I’d be the first in line to pre-order it.Even days after I read this book, I’ve been thinking about it a lot. As I mentioned before, human interactions and relationships were the highlights of this story. I thoroughly enjoyed each quest that the characters went through in order to face the end of the world. Adeem is the character that I could relate to the most, as we’re both Muslims and we both have siblings. His back and forth intention for looking at his runaway sister was understandable, and I applaud Rishi for being able to convey the complexity of brother-sister relationships. As for Cate, I feel deeply upset about her struggles. One is too young to deal with a mother who suffered schizophrenia while also at a loss for a figure of a father. Her guilt for not doing enough, either for taking care of her mother during their last days on Earth or for not seeking her father, was heartbreaking. And as for Jesse, his daily struggles to simply stay alive with his mother while also dealing with anxiety and depression were too much to bear for a young man, or even for anyone, really.The message that really shined through this story that also has been sitting in the back of my mind for the past couple days, is how people going to fully lean on hope when they realised that they don’t have anything else to lean on. And that they are willing to give their everything to brings up their hope as high as possible. Although it might seem foolish at glance, but it’s the reality of human beings.I Hope You Get This Message is a sincere and powerful debut that will toy with your emotions. Among its intensity, Rishi also successfully served witty banter and words of wisdom among its characters that will be hard to forget.
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  • Stephanie Gillespie
    January 1, 1970
    Arc provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange of an honest review.
  • Glasstown Entertainment
    January 1, 1970
    This book is simply something else. Funny, sweet, heartfelt, delightful, and wonderfully sad. Farah Naz Rishi is an incredible debut - and a strong voice to watch.
  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)TW: a past of self harmI Hope You Get This Message is, unsurprisingly, a message of hope. But it's even more than that. Set in a SF setting, I Hope You Get This Message is quiet, introspective, character driven. It's about family and forgiveness in the shadow of the end of the world. I Hope You Get This Message begins with a trial. With deliberation and potentia (Disclaimer: I received this book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)TW: a past of self harmI Hope You Get This Message is, unsurprisingly, a message of hope. But it's even more than that. Set in a SF setting, I Hope You Get This Message is quiet, introspective, character driven. It's about family and forgiveness in the shadow of the end of the world. I Hope You Get This Message begins with a trial. With deliberation and potential. Throughout the book I was consistently impressed with Rishi's cleverness, the way the end of the world is woven into the story. When, at the end of the day, it's a book about wanting to be heard. To be forgiven for our mistakes, to voice our regrets, and to speak our truths. The characters propel this story which expertly balances quiet stakes with the impending end of the world. Whether it be Jesse's lack of attachment because of his fear of disappointment and getting hurt, or Cate's immense responsibility taking care of her mother, or Adeem's unanswered questions, I Hope You Get This Message is full of intricate characters. As each of the characters embark on a quest at the end of the world, without even knowing it, we are asked what would we say if we knew the world was going to end? I Hope You Get This Message also features some fabulous rep not only of queerness, Jesse is gay, but also Cate's experiences with her mother who has schizophrenia.full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
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  • The Artisan Geek
    January 1, 1970
    22/12/18Mentioned this book in one of my sketches :).9/12/18Oh my gosh, this is a scenario I have always thought about, us living in some sort of simulation and I am so happy that this book is coming out! I can't wait to read it!!!You can find me onYoutube | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Website
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Please, I beg all of you to put this book on your to read list. It is such a beautiful story. And you absolutely wont regret it. 👽🛸☄ Please, I beg all of you to put this book on your to read list. It is such a beautiful story. And you absolutely wont regret it. 👽🛸☄️
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  • Mariam
    January 1, 1970
    Nothing but love <3ARC provided by Edelweiss
  • Ivy
    January 1, 1970
    I WOULD DIE FOR THIS COVER.
  • London Shah
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVE EVERYTHING ABOUT THIS PREMISE AND CANNOT WAIT TO READ! <3
  • Neil (or bleed)
    January 1, 1970
    Can't wait to buy this book kahit hardcover lolI live for the radio antennas and communication tower on the cover!!
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