Oliver, Vol. 1
A startlingly original take on the Dickens classic, Oliver re-imagines Oliver Twist as a post-apocalyptic superhero who brings hope to the downtrodden people of a bleak near-future England as he seeks to uncover the truth behind his own mysterious origins.Collects OLIVER #1-4.

Oliver, Vol. 1 Details

TitleOliver, Vol. 1
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 12th, 2019
PublisherImage Comics
ISBN-139781534313040
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels

Oliver, Vol. 1 Review

  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Yet another retelling of Oliver. This one set in a post-apocalyptic future with a super-powered Oliver. Yet I quite liked it. The story is about a bunch of clones that have been abandoned in a nuclear ravaged London. They were created to fight a war and now that the war is over England has put them in a prison camp. One night a pregnant woman arrives and gives birth to Oliver. The story follows the very basics of the Dickens' novel from there. Darick Robertson's art is great. There's a lot of Yet another retelling of Oliver. This one set in a post-apocalyptic future with a super-powered Oliver. Yet I quite liked it. The story is about a bunch of clones that have been abandoned in a nuclear ravaged London. They were created to fight a war and now that the war is over England has put them in a prison camp. One night a pregnant woman arrives and gives birth to Oliver. The story follows the very basics of the Dickens' novel from there. Darick Robertson's art is great. There's a lot of acrobatic action in the panels. The colors are muted for the setting but spot on. Received a review copy from Image and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.
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  • Alexander Peterhans
    January 1, 1970
    Uninspired grim future Dickens pastiche that never really takes off.In the future, there is a war. The UK has the technology to clone people, so they people their armies with clones. The enemy (never becomes clear who they were) dumps a nuclear bomb on London and the war ends. Britain no longer wants anything to do with their clone army, so they're told to stay in irradiated London, and work in, well, workhouses.A pregnant woman wanders into the clone colony, and gives birth to our protagonist, Uninspired grim future Dickens pastiche that never really takes off.In the future, there is a war. The UK has the technology to clone people, so they people their armies with clones. The enemy (never becomes clear who they were) dumps a nuclear bomb on London and the war ends. Britain no longer wants anything to do with their clone army, so they're told to stay in irradiated London, and work in, well, workhouses.A pregnant woman wanders into the clone colony, and gives birth to our protagonist, Oliver. She dies, and Oliver grows up with the clones, with no idea who his parents were.This the start of the mystery at the core of the book, and as a mystery it doesn't make a lot of sense.There's some light world building, which quickly drowns in a whole lot of acrobatic fight scenes (and I mean a LOT), and then the whole thing ends on a tepid cliffhanger.The art looks like something from the 90s. In fact, the writing also feels quite 90s, trying to emulate 2000 AD and never really hitting it, never being transgressive or funny.(Received an ARC through Edelweiss)
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  • RG
    January 1, 1970
    A dystopian retelling of Oliver Twist. It starts off quite well, but I was kinda confused at his ageing process, although it does get touched on. Its got all the big scenes from pop culture but I'm still a little confused at why they needed to base it around this story. It could have really been a cool story if they had a little more freedom.
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  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    Well, this was a book that wavered quite noticeably in my appreciation. It starts out rather well, with a post-Apocalyptic, semi-steampunk London housing some left-over Rogue Trooper-types, and one hybrid of the bottle-born men born of natural mother. He witnesses how they exist in a workhouse, and, as his name suggests, asks for more food come break time. However, the gung-ho action that follows that just descends into Spiderman gymnastics with added rain your bog-standard athletic combat that Well, this was a book that wavered quite noticeably in my appreciation. It starts out rather well, with a post-Apocalyptic, semi-steampunk London housing some left-over Rogue Trooper-types, and one hybrid of the bottle-born men born of natural mother. He witnesses how they exist in a workhouse, and, as his name suggests, asks for more food come break time. However, the gung-ho action that follows that just descends into Spiderman gymnastics with added rain – your bog-standard athletic combat that just went too far to negate all the good we'd had early on. Some kind of whack-ass production problems meant the fourth issue was dated several months after the opening three, and shows the book diverging from both the clear Dickens parallel and the city-based combat actioner, so there's certainly some promise of intrigue in what's to come. I just found what we have so far a little too uneven – at one time it adds so much more to the Oliver Twist story than I would ever have expected, then swamps itself in derivative action directing. So not quite the real deal, but an interesting read all told. Three and a half stars.
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  • Ije the Devourer of Books
    January 1, 1970
    This is an exiting and gritty re-telling of Oliver Twist. Set in a post apocalyptic London, Oliver is a hybrid child. Half human half AI. Brought up by other AI he doesnt really know who he is until one day he goes up against the human oppressors and they in turn try to hunt him down, but Oliver resists and as he does so the other AI begin to fight back against their oppressors.Great to read and gripping. It is a very creative re-telling of Oliver Twist and I really enjoyed it. Definitely one This is an exiting and gritty re-telling of Oliver Twist. Set in a post apocalyptic London, Oliver is a hybrid child. Half human half AI. Brought up by other AI he doesnt really know who he is until one day he goes up against the human oppressors and they in turn try to hunt him down, but Oliver resists and as he does so the other AI begin to fight back against their oppressors.Great to read and gripping. It is a very creative re-telling of Oliver Twist and I really enjoyed it. Definitely one series to look out for.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    This is a dystopian retelling of Oliver Twist. For some reason, my copy was put together as issue 2, 1, 4, 3. Its weird but it works. The art is fantastic and suits the story very well. It kinda ends on a cliffhanger. I will be seeking out vol. 2.ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss+ in exchange for an honest review. This is a dystopian retelling of Oliver Twist. For some reason, my copy was put together as issue 2, 1, 4, 3. It’s weird but it works. The art is fantastic and suits the story very well. It kinda ends on a cliffhanger. I will be seeking out vol. 2.ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss+ in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Amanda K
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Edelweiss for the e-arc!Nice twist on a classic! Then again, the original was pretty grim so dystopian isn't much of a stretch, but it's done well. Can't wait to see where it will go next!
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