Beverly, Right Here
Revisiting once again the world of Raymie Nightingale, two-time Newbery Medalist Kate DiCamillo turns her focus to the tough-talking, inescapably tenderhearted Beverly. Beverly put her foot down on the gas. They went faster still.This was what Beverly wanted — what she always wanted. To get away. To get away as fast as she could. To stay away.Beverly Tapinski has run away from home plenty of times, but that was when she was just a kid. By now, she figures, it’s not running away. It’s leaving. Determined to make it on her own, Beverly finds a job and a place to live and tries to forget about her dog, Buddy, now buried underneath the orange trees back home; her friend Raymie, whom she left without a word; and her mom, Rhonda, who has never cared about anyone but herself. Beverly doesn’t want to depend on anyone, and she definitely doesn’t want anyone to depend on her. But despite her best efforts, she can’t help forming connections with the people around her — and gradually, she learns to see herself through their eyes. In a touching, funny, and fearless conclusion to her sequence of novels about the beloved Three Rancheros, #1 New York Times best-selling author Kate DiCamillo tells the story of a character who will break your heart and put it back together again.

Beverly, Right Here Details

TitleBeverly, Right Here
Author
ReleaseSep 24th, 2019
PublisherCandlewick Press
ISBN-139780763694647
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction, Fiction, Historical, Historical Fiction, Young Adult, Audiobook, Juvenile, Family, Chapter Books

Beverly, Right Here Review

  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Quite honestly, I am becoming a big Kate DiCamillo fan. Having enjoyed Lousiana's Way Home last year, I just couldn't resist reading her latest middle grade novel. Fourteen year old Beverly Tapinski is devastated after the death of her dog and so she decides to leave and head out for adventure. Eccentric characters and hilarious situations occur and I fell into this tale immediately. I would certainly recommend it to a classroom library. Goodreads review published 25/08/19 Publication Date 24/ Quite honestly, I am becoming a big Kate DiCamillo fan. Having enjoyed Lousiana's Way Home last year, I just couldn't resist reading her latest middle grade novel. Fourteen year old Beverly Tapinski is devastated after the death of her dog and so she decides to leave and head out for adventure. Eccentric characters and hilarious situations occur and I fell into this tale immediately. I would certainly recommend it to a classroom library. Goodreads review published 25/08/19 Publication Date 24/09/19 Thanks to Netgalley and Candlewick Press for a digital galley in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Schizanthus
    January 1, 1970
    I read the Three Rancheros series out of order. Louisiana’s Way Home was my first Kate DiCamillo read (ever) and it remains my favourite of the series. I absolutely adored Louisiana and every Burke Allen competed to become my favourite character. When I read Raymie’s story I was introduced to this wonderful spitfire of a young girl called Beverly. I suspected at the time that Beverly would wind up being my favourite character of the series and couldn’t wait to read more about her. A little over I read the Three Rancheros series out of order. Louisiana’s Way Home was my first Kate DiCamillo read (ever) and it remains my favourite of the series. I absolutely adored Louisiana and every Burke Allen competed to become my favourite character. When I read Raymie’s story I was introduced to this wonderful spitfire of a young girl called Beverly. I suspected at the time that Beverly would wind up being my favourite character of the series and couldn’t wait to read more about her. A little over three months ago I read her story and was shocked to discover that it was my least favourite book of the series at the time. I didn’t want to accept that so I decided a reread was in order. I’m so glad I tried again because I absolutely fell in love with Beverly’s story this time!Before I go any further I want to share with you what is quite possibly my favourite passage of the entire series. It’s an excerpt of the author’s letter to the reader at the beginning of this book. It’s so beautiful that I keep rereading it. It makes me want to be a better person every time I see it. Raymie Nightingale is about the saving grace of friendship. Louisiana’s Way Home is about deciding who you are. And Beverly, Right Here is about acting on that knowledge of who you are. They are all stories of becoming, I think. And all three of these books are about the power of community - the grace of someone opening a door and welcoming you in, and maybe most of all, having the courage to walk through that door once it’s open. I get a little misty eyed even thinking about it. Anyway, without further ado …It’s August 1979 and Beverly Tapinski is now 14 years old. Buddy, the one eyed “Dog of Our Hearts”, has died and Beverly has decided to leave home. She had run away from home plenty of times, but that was when she was just a kid. It wasn’t running away this time, she figured. It was leaving. She had left. Grieving the loss of her dog but determined not to cry, Beverly winds up at Seahorse Court. There she meets Iola Jenkins, an elderly lady who lives in a pink trailer with His Majesty, King Nod, an overweight grey cat. In a crooked little house by a crooked little sea. Pretty soon Beverly, who doesn’t like fish, is working in a seafood restaurant and eating tuna melts regularly. This child who believes she belongs to no one becomes important to some new friends and despite her best efforts not to let anyone into her heart, they find a way.With a horse that takes you on a ride to nowhere, a determined and hopeful seagull and Christmas in July in August, this story cracked my heart wide open during my reread. I wanted to adopt both rough around the edges Beverly and quirky but loveable Iola, but my favourite character was Elmer. He’s polite, smart, sensitive and willing to step outside of his comfort zone, and he’s the type of friend that you know will be there for you no matter what. I adore him and would love to read about what happens to him in the years after this book finishes. Or he can just be my friend. Whatever comes first.While I feel more satisfied after my reread and aren’t as desperate in my search for a nonexistent epilogue, I would love to one day learn that a fourth Rancheros book is being published, one that takes place 20 or 30 years later. It would be wonderful to catch up with this trio once they’re all grown up to find out what’s become of their lives and their friendship.I’ve already read two of the Ranchero books twice and I loved both more the second time. I get the feeling that no matter how many times I return to them in the future I’m going to enjoy them more with every reread.Content warnings include (view spoiler)[mention of the death of a beloved pet, inappropriate touching, bullying, abandonment and neglect (hide spoiler)].Thank you so much to NetGalley and Candlewick Press for the opportunity to read this book.Original Review 15 June 2019 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️Just finished reading and I have no idea what to write in my review so I’m going to ponder for a while. Oh, and while I’m at it, I’m going to frantically search for an epilogue because I don’t want to accept that the end is truly the end. I have too many question marks about everything that’s unresolved. I need closure!
    more
  • Susan's Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    My thanks to the author, publisher and NetGalley for a free ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.Magical writing and great character development. I was riveted, watching a closed-off Beverly slowly evolve into a fuller, happier young person. This book really highlights the damage people do to one another when we isolate or exclude anyone in a community, or fail to ensure that children are adequately cared for, emotionally and physically. Beverly had to leave town, get a job and lear My thanks to the author, publisher and NetGalley for a free ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.Magical writing and great character development. I was riveted, watching a closed-off Beverly slowly evolve into a fuller, happier young person. This book really highlights the damage people do to one another when we isolate or exclude anyone in a community, or fail to ensure that children are adequately cared for, emotionally and physically. Beverly had to leave town, get a job and learn to become a part of a community of her own choosing. Just a wonderful story with enough loose ends to keep you reading on in this series. Highly recommended.
    more
  • Laura Harrison
    January 1, 1970
    Beverly, Right Here is a work of art. I am in awe of its beauty, perfection and nuances. This is how a middle grade masterpiece is written. I loved Raymie Nightingale. The book was magical. I may love Beverly, Right Here just as much if not more. How I adore reading middle grade books written with actual middle grade children in mind. Too often children's literature is written to please adults. In content and maturity level. Today's kid's are bombarded with depressing news and images in various Beverly, Right Here is a work of art. I am in awe of its beauty, perfection and nuances. This is how a middle grade masterpiece is written. I loved Raymie Nightingale. The book was magical. I may love Beverly, Right Here just as much if not more. How I adore reading middle grade books written with actual middle grade children in mind. Too often children's literature is written to please adults. In content and maturity level. Today's kid's are bombarded with depressing news and images in various media formats. Author's should allow them to have some escapism through their stories.Every character in Beverly, Right Here is well developed and interesting. I think children will really "get" Beverly and come to care for her deeply as well as Iola, Elmer and Nod (the cat). I also love that the color Lapis Lazuli is mentioned frequently in the book. A favorite color of mine! It is easy to tell when a book is so good. The writing feels easy and personal. Almost like it was written just for you. A characteristic only the best children's classic titles possess. Books written by E.B. White, Beverly Clearly and Paula Danziger come to mind. There will be many accolades when Beverly, Right Here is officially released. It is truly a gem.
    more
  • Pallavi
    January 1, 1970
    ****5.0****Kate DiCamillo always amazes me. She can write perfectly well about imperfect things in life.Story of Beverly is connected to Louisiana's Way Home and Raymie Nightingale.Beverly has left her house, her alcoholic mother, her best friend Raymie and Her best friend Buddy's grave, a Dog. She doesn't have a reason to stay. She sets out into the world and tries to stay on her own. But she meets Iola, who takes her in into her Trailor, People in Mr. C's where she finds a job and Elmer, a gro ****5.0****Kate DiCamillo always amazes me. She can write perfectly well about imperfect things in life.Story of Beverly is connected to Louisiana's Way Home and Raymie Nightingale.Beverly has left her house, her alcoholic mother, her best friend Raymie and Her best friend Buddy's grave, a Dog. She doesn't have a reason to stay. She sets out into the world and tries to stay on her own. But she meets Iola, who takes her in into her Trailor, People in Mr. C's where she finds a job and Elmer, a grocery store clerk who likes Poetry and she again falls for them. Everyone she meets is broken in some or other way but she sees a spark of life in them which in turn helps her to find her own spark.“Just because you can’t stand to think about something doesn’t mean it ain’t happening, that it ain’t true. People wait on other people. People rely on other people.”I loved this book. It has the feel of Louisiana's Way Home and I am eager to read Raymie's story next :) DiCamillo is wonderful in narrating Friendship, Dreams, hope.... totally LIFE.ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an unbiased review. Thanks for making this available!Happy Reading!!!
    more
  • Afoma Umesi
    January 1, 1970
    Beverly, Right Here is the perfect finale to Kate DiCamillo’s wonderful series. This book is both heartwarming and heartbreaking. But above all, it highlights the importance of seeing the good in others, the need to trust and rely on other people, and the power of letting people in.If you’re looking for a book with complex, utterly lovable characters, and insightful dialogue, pick up Beverly, Right Here! Read my full review here. I received an e-ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest r Beverly, Right Here is the perfect finale to Kate DiCamillo’s wonderful series. This book is both heartwarming and heartbreaking. But above all, it highlights the importance of seeing the good in others, the need to trust and rely on other people, and the power of letting people in.If you’re looking for a book with complex, utterly lovable characters, and insightful dialogue, pick up Beverly, Right Here! Read my full review here. I received an e-ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review
    more
  • Clara
    January 1, 1970
    THIS ISN'T OUT FOR EIGHT MONTHS BUT IT GETS 5 STARS BECAUSE KATE DICAMILLO.Come quickly, September. O_O- September 2019 -*cries for a million years* GO READ IT.
  • Hizatul Akmah
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with the digital ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review actual rating: 4.6/5 ⭐ well, what do i expect from this amazing author??? she literally did it again!! reading this book makes me want to hug Beverly so badly.This is a story of Beverly Tapinski after the events of Raymie Nightingale and Louisiana's Way Home and after the death of his dog, Buddy. She lived with her alcoholic mother who barely acknowledged her existenc Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with the digital ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review actual rating: 4.6/5 ⭐️ well, what do i expect from this amazing author??? she literally did it again!! reading this book makes me want to hug Beverly so badly.This is a story of Beverly Tapinski after the events of Raymie Nightingale and Louisiana's Way Home and after the death of his dog, Buddy. She lived with her alcoholic mother who barely acknowledged her existence in their home so she decided to run away.I love her characterization and how she managed to pull everything off; she got herself a job and she met new people just to survive in an unfamiliar place. She was supposed to be a cold-hearted girl but something happened that turned her all soft and belonged again.If you love reading Kate's other books, this one should be in your anticipated list too because it has all the right mixture of tragedy, friendships, poetic and melodramatic rhythms!!
    more
  • Zoey
    January 1, 1970
    The story of three friends that began in Raymie Nightingale is concluded in this third book. Beverly's spunk and honesty has made her one of my favorite characters from the beginning. But it's in Beverly, Right Here that we really get that final picture of who she is and who she wants to be.Kate Dicamillo has created a masterful series. It's not packed with action or daring plot twists or subplots so don't approach it with those expectations! But rather it a straightforward look at the longings The story of three friends that began in Raymie Nightingale is concluded in this third book. Beverly's spunk and honesty has made her one of my favorite characters from the beginning. But it's in Beverly, Right Here that we really get that final picture of who she is and who she wants to be.Kate Dicamillo has created a masterful series. It's not packed with action or daring plot twists or subplots so don't approach it with those expectations! But rather it a straightforward look at the longings and intricacies of the heart. We watch as these lovable but hurting characters are handed hope through humor and friendship. Highly recommend!Thanks to NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for my honest review.
    more
  • Lana
    January 1, 1970
    Beverly, Right Here was a touching middle grade story that connected the characters from two of DiCamillo’s early books; Louisiana’s Way Home and Raymie Nightingale. The story starts off with a girl who feels lost after her dog dies, while living in a less than suitable home and she decides to runaway. I did enjoy reading this one, and loved all the characters surrounding Beverly. I think Louisiana’ way Home is still my favorite, but would recommend all three!Thank you to Candlewick Press and Ne Beverly, Right Here was a touching middle grade story that connected the characters from two of DiCamillo’s early books; Louisiana’s Way Home and Raymie Nightingale. The story starts off with a girl who feels lost after her dog dies, while living in a less than suitable home and she decides to runaway. I did enjoy reading this one, and loved all the characters surrounding Beverly. I think Louisiana’ way Home is still my favorite, but would recommend all three!Thank you to Candlewick Press and NetGalley for the opportunity to review this advanced copy.
    more
  • Queen Cronut
    January 1, 1970
    After the emotional rollercoaster of Louisiana's Way Home, I thought I was prepared for this one. Correction: I thought wrong because alas, I was not ready for this one. Beverly, Right Here finishes the series about the Three Rancheros. My rating system of the series looks something like this now:Louisiana's Way Home > Beverly, Right Here > Raymie NightengaleAlthough Beverly Tapinski wasn't my favorite... I adored her by the end of this. Following the aftermath of her beloved dog's death, After the emotional rollercoaster of Louisiana's Way Home, I thought I was prepared for this one. Correction: I thought wrong because alas, I was not ready for this one. Beverly, Right Here finishes the series about the Three Rancheros. My rating system of the series looks something like this now:Louisiana's Way Home > Beverly, Right Here > Raymie NightengaleAlthough Beverly Tapinski wasn't my favorite... I adored her by the end of this. Following the aftermath of her beloved dog's death, Beverly runs away to pursue a new life. What really made this book shine was the eccentric cast of characters and Beverly's character growth. As the title suggests, Beverly must learn who she wants to be right here, in the present as she comes to terms with her past. This book explores Beverly's journey of self-discovery and her character arc was absolutely phenomenal Loved this book- can't wait for more of Kate DiCamillo's works.*Thank you to NetGalley and Candlewick Press for providing a free ARC
    more
  • Donna Merritt
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a huge Kate DiCAmillo fan and I enjoyed this book. It's a quick read, but touches upon important issues. Who are we? Is it worth the risk to connect with others? What's the definition of real family? Beverly was a character in Raymie Nightingale and I liked learning more about her (same as the character Louisiana in Louisiana's Way Home). I'm a grade 4/5 school librarian and would happily add this to our collection except for one part. Beverly gets a job busing tables and a man grabs her but I'm a huge Kate DiCAmillo fan and I enjoyed this book. It's a quick read, but touches upon important issues. Who are we? Is it worth the risk to connect with others? What's the definition of real family? Beverly was a character in Raymie Nightingale and I liked learning more about her (same as the character Louisiana in Louisiana's Way Home). I'm a grade 4/5 school librarian and would happily add this to our collection except for one part. Beverly gets a job busing tables and a man grabs her butt. The waitress explains that if she doesn't complain, he'll tip more. While this story is set in the past (1970s?), I can't put this on our shelves. It's never okay for someone to touch you without your consent. I wish that small scene had been left out or revisited at some point. The end also left the reader hanging. Maybe it means there is another book on the way. Maybe it means we have to imagine what comes next. Either way, the end was not as satisfying as I'd hoped, but, yes, I did enjoy the story overall.
    more
  • Wendi Lee
    January 1, 1970
    Beverly, Right Here is the third book featuring characters from DiCamillo's beloved Raymie Nightingale. After Beverly's dog dies, she decides to escape her old life and make a new one. She ends up in a beach town, bunking with an elderly woman who lives in a trailer park, and busing tables at a fish restaurant. She has no intentions of making connections (and possibly breaking her heart - again), and indeed, brusque Beverly is sometimes hard to love. But an eccentric cast of characters surround Beverly, Right Here is the third book featuring characters from DiCamillo's beloved Raymie Nightingale. After Beverly's dog dies, she decides to escape her old life and make a new one. She ends up in a beach town, bunking with an elderly woman who lives in a trailer park, and busing tables at a fish restaurant. She has no intentions of making connections (and possibly breaking her heart - again), and indeed, brusque Beverly is sometimes hard to love. But an eccentric cast of characters surround her, giving her the push she needs to move forward. I'll be absolutely honest. Beverly was my least favorite of the Three Rancheros, so it's not surprising that I felt the least attached to her novel. That said, this was a very compelling read, and mature for a middle grade book. Beverly grapples with the bad relationship with her mother, feelings of abandonment (by her father and Louisiana), and a resigned suspicion that her life doesn't really matter. The book ends a bit awkwardly, but it reveals the evolution of her character, which is kind of a beautiful thing. I do hope more books are written about these characters. They are all deeply multi-dimensional and interesting to read about. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for an ARC.
    more
  • legenbooksdary
    January 1, 1970
    Beverly, Right Here is a story about a girl who is dealing with grief of the loss of a pet that was so dear to her and runs away to seek herself. She wanted a happier and a more normal life which her home and family cannot provide for her. So, she went away and it may just be the best decision she'll ever make in her life. Beverly is someone who is going through a lot, emotionally speaking. She lost her dear pet, a friend of hers moved far away (I was pleasantly surprised that is was Louisiana f Beverly, Right Here is a story about a girl who is dealing with grief of the loss of a pet that was so dear to her and runs away to seek herself. She wanted a happier and a more normal life which her home and family cannot provide for her. So, she went away and it may just be the best decision she'll ever make in her life. Beverly is someone who is going through a lot, emotionally speaking. She lost her dear pet, a friend of hers moved far away (I was pleasantly surprised that is was Louisiana from Louisiana's Way Home) and her mother is not exactly the best mother figure. She seeked for more than it could provide her—a life with more happiness, comfort and surrounded by people who cares for her. It is a basic necessity to want to feel cared for and loved so I completely understand what Beverly is going through. The character Iola that Beverly ends up staying with reminds me so much of another character from another book. The book that I'm talking about is Toffee and the character is Marla and they're both so similar that I'm constantly reminded of her. They share a pretty same personality trait and even the situation that they both deal with are similar. The ending was pretty inconclusive but I'm glad to see that she's happier now, surrounded by people who actually wants her to be by their side. It was all in all an uplifting story which makes me unable to put the book down that I read the whole story in one day.
    more
  • Mary Lee
    January 1, 1970
    Now I need to go back and read Raymie and Louisiana. But I'm pretty sure Beverly will still be my favorite. She and Iola and Elmer and Doris and Charles (and Nod, and the seagull at the back door of the restaurant) have found their way into my heart. Oh, Beverly. How much do I love that you saw into Elmer's heart and cared about what was there and not what you could see on the outside?This book is so full of all the hard parts about life -- age, loss, death, the amount of crap in convenience sto Now I need to go back and read Raymie and Louisiana. But I'm pretty sure Beverly will still be my favorite. She and Iola and Elmer and Doris and Charles (and Nod, and the seagull at the back door of the restaurant) have found their way into my heart. Oh, Beverly. How much do I love that you saw into Elmer's heart and cared about what was there and not what you could see on the outside?This book is so full of all the hard parts about life -- age, loss, death, the amount of crap in convenience stores -- but it is also full of all that makes life meaningful -- art, music, poetry, friendship, believing in/finding the goodness in others. Thank you, Candlewick. I can't wait for everyone else to read this so we can talk about our favorite parts!
    more
  • Anmiryam
    January 1, 1970
    Like all truly great middle grade books, this one can be read by anyone from 10 or 11 to 100. While it is nominally a realistic novel, it is spare, and Beverly's journey of building a place for herself is a happy fairytale. It's nice to read a book that reminds you that sometimes people can be good to each other.First book to make me cry this summer.
    more
  • Joey
    January 1, 1970
    I could read 100 more books about Raymie, Beverly, and Louisiana.
  • Lauren Grace Keen
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with a digital advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. Beverly, Right Here by Kate DiCamillo is the third book in the Raymie Nightingale trio. When we first meet Beverly in Raymie Nightingale, she is hardened by life, angsty, and cantankerous. Despite these things, we soon learn that underneath her tough exterior Beverly possesses a heart of compassion for others and a strong sense of loyalty to her friends.In Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with a digital advance reading copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. Beverly, Right Here by Kate DiCamillo is the third book in the Raymie Nightingale trio. When we first meet Beverly in Raymie Nightingale, she is hardened by life, angsty, and cantankerous. Despite these things, we soon learn that underneath her tough exterior Beverly possesses a heart of compassion for others and a strong sense of loyalty to her friends.In Beverly, Right Here, Beverly has run away from home. She is grieving the loss of a friend and feels abandoned and alone. Life has taught her that the only person she can rely on is herself. Regardless of her efforts to barricade her heart, Beverly meets several individuals that remind her of the value of friendship and that familial bonds are not always biological.Kate DiCamillo began a story of friendship, loyalty, and bravery in Raymie Nightingale. She gave us hope with Louisiana’s Way Home, and in Beverly, Right Here she explores the theme of trust and teaches us that it is possible to “slip the surly bonds” even if they are of our own making. Like her other books, Kate DiCamillo has written a story filled with eccentric but endearing characters and beautiful prose sprinkled with poetry.
    more
  • Julie Kirchner
    January 1, 1970
    I have been a huge Kate fan since meeting her the week she won the Newbery Honor for Because of Winn Dixie, so I admit am a bit biased when I read her books.I love the way her writing flows. It is lyrical in a way that feels like I am dancing through the storyline. I can sit down one moment and not even realize I have plowed through 50 pages. I think this makes her writing appealing to students of varying levels as well and brings joy to the reader.Beverly is no different. The third installment I have been a huge Kate fan since meeting her the week she won the Newbery Honor for Because of Winn Dixie, so I admit am a bit biased when I read her books.I love the way her writing flows. It is lyrical in a way that feels like I am dancing through the storyline. I can sit down one moment and not even realize I have plowed through 50 pages. I think this makes her writing appealing to students of varying levels as well and brings joy to the reader.Beverly is no different. The third installment in Raymie, Louisiana, and Beverly’s stories is a delightful adventure through Kate’s creative imagination. Her quirky characters and unique storyline had my heart aching to finish in order to see how she would resolve Beverly’s journey.I am happy these characters weren’t finished with their story and they convinced Kate to keep quiet and still to wait for Beverly’s story to unfold.
    more
  • Alex Baugh
    January 1, 1970
    It's 1979 and it's been four years since Raymie Nightingale, Louisiana Elefante, and Beverly Tapinski found each other and became the Three Rancheros, promising to rescue each other whenever they are needed. In 1975, it had been necessary rescue 10-year-old Raymie (Raymie Nightingale) in order for her to find to true home. And, in 1977, it was 12-year-old Louisiana's turn (Louisiana's Way Home) who needed to rely on her friends to find her true home. Now, it's 14-year-old, Beverly who needs resc It's 1979 and it's been four years since Raymie Nightingale, Louisiana Elefante, and Beverly Tapinski found each other and became the Three Rancheros, promising to rescue each other whenever they are needed. In 1975, it had been necessary rescue 10-year-old Raymie (Raymie Nightingale) in order for her to find to true home. And, in 1977, it was 12-year-old Louisiana's turn (Louisiana's Way Home) who needed to rely on her friends to find her true home. Now, it's 14-year-old, Beverly who needs rescuing.Beverly has always been known for running away from home, and being returned to a alcoholic mother who just wasn't very interested in her. Now, she's done with running away, and after burying her beloved dog Buddy, Beverly figures there's nothing to keep her at home anymore and so she decides to simply leave. Hitching a ride with Joe Travis, a cousin she doesn't much care for (and the feeling is mutual), Beverly makes it as far as Tamaray Beach, Florida.Walking down the A1A, she comes upon Mr. C's fish restaurant. There, she meets Freddie, the waitress with big, big unrealistic dreams, and owner Mr. Denby, disorganized and depressed now that his wife and three daughters have left him. Open only for lunch, Beverly gets an under-the-table job the busing tables.Beverly also finds a place to stay with lonely widow Iola Jenkins, who gives her a place to sleep and a flowered nightgown, feeds her a steady diet of tuna melts, and in return Beverly drives Iola's Pontiac to the VFW so she can play bingo.Beverly also meets cook Doris and dishwasher Charles at work, and Elmer, a bullied, sensitive Dartmouth-bound teen who loves art and is working in the local convenience store for the summer. As Beverly gets to know each of these people, as she begins to be a part of their lives, and they hers, she starts to realize some things about herself as well. They are an eccentric cast of characters as only Kate DiCamillo can put together, but the focus is always on Beverly. Raymie and Louisiana are present throughout the book, mostly in Beverly's thoughts, although only Raymie makes the briefest of appearances at the end of the book. Their presence. however, proves how strong their bond of friendship is and how important they are to Beverly. In fact, friendship is one of the dominant themes, along with loss, trust, hope, home and how we define it, and the importance of just being there for people who rely on Beverly and on whom Beverly rely. Beverly, Right Here unfolds as languidly as a hot summer day, as Beverly searches and finds her emotional truth. DiCamillo's sentences are simple enough, yet so powerful and there's not a single gratuitous word in any of them. Beverly's story is a wonderful coming of age tale, and like life, it doesn't come to a neat conclusion, but leaves lots of questions about Beverly's future.It does make me sad to think that this is probably the last time we will hear about the Three Rancheros, yet I know that one day, I will revisit each their narratives and I suspect it will yield a greater truth then do their individual stories.You can download a useful Discussion Guide for Beverly, Right Here courtesy of the publisher, Candlewick Press.This book is recommended for readers age 9+This book was an EARC received from NetGalley
    more
  • Josephine
    January 1, 1970
    I felt greatly privileged to Netgally and Candlewick press for the opportunity to read the ARC of one if our finest author’s Kate DiCamillo. Even though I knew Raymie and Louisiana through the first two books, Beverly Right Here works well as a stand alone. But, after getting to know Beverly so intimately, readers will most likely be compelled to seek out the two excellent prequels.Beverly is a 14-year-old runaway or since she’s now 14, maybe she’s a girl who just simply left home. She has good I felt greatly privileged to Netgally and Candlewick press for the opportunity to read the ARC of one if our finest author’s Kate DiCamillo. Even though I knew Raymie and Louisiana through the first two books, Beverly Right Here works well as a stand alone. But, after getting to know Beverly so intimately, readers will most likely be compelled to seek out the two excellent prequels.Beverly is a 14-year-old runaway or since she’s now 14, maybe she’s a girl who just simply left home. She has good reason to leave but also understands there are important connections to be found back at home.It is 1979, four years after the events that bound together the Three Rancheros, Raymie, Louisiana, and Beverly, in Raymie Nightingale (2016). Buddy, the dog they rescued, has died, and Beverly Tapinski has no allegiance to her alcoholic mother, so she hitches a ride to Tamaray Beach, Florida. Lying about her age, she finds a job in Mr. C’s fish restaurant and a place to stay with sweet, kind and trusting elderly Iola Jenkins. Iola lives in a pink trailer. In this third book you meet Beverly’s new and quirky friends or not friends. Elmer is acne-faced and college-bound teen who draws her picture and teaches her to dance. Freddie the waitress and her unsuitable boyfriend are a bit of trouble. Doris, Charlie, Mr. Denby, the seagull, and even the biggest turkey in the world all make for an endearing read. I do sincerely hope “Miss” DiCamillo is not done with our friends. I am eagerly waiting to learn more of the beloved Three Rancheros and the colorful folk who surround their lives.
    more
  • DaNae
    January 1, 1970
    In BEVERLY, RIGHT HERE DiCamillo proves again that she is the master of proving that small acts of generosity matter, as simple as a dime for a horse that goes nowhere. That looking out for each other matters, like teaching someone to dance or writing someone's name over and over again eighty times. And that even flawed people deserve happiness, acceptance and a place to call home. I was whining to myself the other day about how weary I was growing of reading books where children suffered from t In BEVERLY, RIGHT HERE DiCamillo proves again that she is the master of proving that small acts of generosity matter, as simple as a dime for a horse that goes nowhere. That looking out for each other matters, like teaching someone to dance or writing someone's name over and over again eighty times. And that even flawed people deserve happiness, acceptance and a place to call home. I was whining to myself the other day about how weary I was growing of reading books where children suffered from the bad choices and sins of their parents. And by sins, I mostly mean illnesses: alcoholism, depression and other mental illnesses. I understand, I really understand, that an important benefit of literature is allowing children to see the the hard parts of their own worlds reflected back, reinforcing that they are not alone. And to build empathy and compassion in readers who are on the outside of a particular issue. But in the case of 2019, my shoulders are sagging under the pure weight of the terrible issues children face. Makes a girl want to turn to reruns of the Penderwicks. Then along comes Beverly, a runway escaping her alcoholic mother, who flies straight into the caring hands of an older woman dealing with depression. At their first meeting, she moans to Beverly that she has, 'mislocated my capabilities.' Instead of feeling burdened with Beverly's problems, this book elevated my mood and sent it floating into the sky, (on the wings of angles, to steal a metaphor from the book at hand).
    more
  • Kaitlyn White
    January 1, 1970
    Beverly, Right Here is the third book in the “Three Rancheros” trio by Kate DiCamillo. Each book is about a different girl in the trio: Raymie Clark (Raymie Nightengale), Louisiana Elefante (Louisiana’s Way Home), and now Beverly Tapinski. I feel that they could be read as standalone books, but I don’t know why you wouldn’t read all of them after you experience the magic of any one of the three!When Beverly Tapinski’s dog (Buddy) dies, she decides it’s time to leave, not run away- she’s done tha Beverly, Right Here is the third book in the “Three Rancheros” trio by Kate DiCamillo. Each book is about a different girl in the trio: Raymie Clark (Raymie Nightengale), Louisiana Elefante (Louisiana’s Way Home), and now Beverly Tapinski. I feel that they could be read as standalone books, but I don’t know why you wouldn’t read all of them after you experience the magic of any one of the three!When Beverly Tapinski’s dog (Buddy) dies, she decides it’s time to leave, not run away- she’s done that plenty of times before. She finds herself in Tamaray Beach walking down the side of the A1A. In Tamaray, she finds a job at a fish restaurant even though she hates fish and a place to stay with Iola Jenkins at the Seaside Court RV Community. Beverly meets so many interesting people in her new little world and finally discovers who she is.I should have really started this by saying that Kate DiCamillo has been and will always be my favorite author. I couldn’t contain myself when I received notification that I was approved to read this ARC! As always, I was transported to a world that I wish I could just pack up and move in to. The characters (even the unlikable ones) are amazing. This could have been a quick read for me, but I found myself taking my time to get through the book just so I could enjoy it more. I look forward to reading it again and again in the future!*Thank you to Netgalley and Candlewick Press for the ARC of this book. This was a voluntary review.*
    more
  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Kate DiCamillo is my go-to author when recommending books to my students. Her books encompass so many different topics and appeal to a wide audience. She brings important life lessons to each book, but in an appropriate middle grade manner. I have loved this Raymie Nightingale series and I’m not quite ready to say goodbye to the Three Rancheros!In book three, and the conclusion to this trio of friends stories, we follow Beverly as she runs away from home. I adore this firecracker of a character Kate DiCamillo is my go-to author when recommending books to my students. Her books encompass so many different topics and appeal to a wide audience. She brings important life lessons to each book, but in an appropriate middle grade manner. I have loved this Raymie Nightingale series and I’m not quite ready to say goodbye to the Three Rancheros!⁣⁣In book three, and the conclusion to this trio of friends stories, we follow Beverly as she runs away from home. I adore this firecracker of a character and her antics in this book did not disappoint. The people she meets along her journey and the lessons they learn from each other are heartfelt and authentic. This was a great ending to a fantastic series BUT...I need more. I feel like there’s still some loose ends and I need some closure. If you have a middle grade reader or work with them in any capacity, I highly recommend these books! For me, Beverly Right Here was ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 stars. Thank you @candlewickpress for this advance reader in exchange for my honest review.
    more
  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    Oh - I just love this trilogy of Kate Dicamillo's. Each book stands on its own - there are references to each of the girls in each book, but no need to read them all or in order. DiCamillo has a reader's note at the beginning and she talks about themes in the three stories - she says all are about the power of community. I see that, and I love that about those books. Then, each book has a theme - Raymie Nightingale is about the saving grace of friendship, Louisiana's Way Home is about deciding w Oh - I just love this trilogy of Kate Dicamillo's. Each book stands on its own - there are references to each of the girls in each book, but no need to read them all or in order. DiCamillo has a reader's note at the beginning and she talks about themes in the three stories - she says all are about the power of community. I see that, and I love that about those books. Then, each book has a theme - Raymie Nightingale is about the saving grace of friendship, Louisiana's Way Home is about deciding who you are, and Beverly, right here is about actin on the knowledge of who you are. Beverly, like the other girls in the other books, has experienced some hard things and losses. Yet, she finds hope and community and a place with others. I love the underlying hope, the fact that there are good people out there looking out for each other. So many wisdoms and insights in these. I can just fall into these books - I love the atmosphere and the characters. I loved Louisiana's story best, but this was a good one!
    more
  • Brona's Books
    January 1, 1970
    Not as easy to classify as Louisiana's Way Home, as young Beverly is now well into her teen years when she decides she's had enough of her alcoholic mother and leaves home for good. So although DiCamillo has written this in her usual, heartfelt junior fiction style that we know and love, the themes are slowly moving into teen territory - young romance, work issues and the kind of adult you want to grow into.I occasionally felt a mismatch between the tone & style and the age of the character, Not as easy to classify as Louisiana's Way Home, as young Beverly is now well into her teen years when she decides she's had enough of her alcoholic mother and leaves home for good. So although DiCamillo has written this in her usual, heartfelt junior fiction style that we know and love, the themes are slowly moving into teen territory - young romance, work issues and the kind of adult you want to grow into.I occasionally felt a mismatch between the tone & style and the age of the character, but Beverly fits within the triptych of stories so perfectly, that I can forgive it this one little flaw.As the title suggests, Beverly's lesson is to learn to live, right here, in the now and embrace where she is and who she is.DiCamillo says in her letter to the reader that Raymie 'is about the saving grace of friendship', Louisiana 'is about deciding who you are' and Beverly 'is about acting on that knowledge of who you are.'I really must go back and read Raymie to complete my education about this wonderful trio of friends for life.
    more
  • Erica (storybookend)
    January 1, 1970
    This was a cute little children’s novel that left me smiling at the end. I’ve read two other books by DiCamillo, The Tale of Desperaux and The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane. Both super cute books. Beverly Right Here is about a 14-year-old girl who leaves home. Her beloved dog just died, and her mother wants no part in her daughter’s life. From the brief scene she’s in, I can understand why Beverly would want to get away. So, alone, without her best fur friend, she stops in a little town by This was a cute little children’s novel that left me smiling at the end. I’ve read two other books by DiCamillo, The Tale of Desperaux and The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane. Both super cute books. Beverly Right Here is about a 14-year-old girl who leaves home. Her beloved dog just died, and her mother wants no part in her daughter’s life. From the brief scene she’s in, I can understand why Beverly would want to get away. So, alone, without her best fur friend, she stops in a little town by the sea. She seems unwilling at first to let people help her or be her friend, but she eventually finds herself warming up to them. In the end, through interacting with the people by the crooked little sea, she finds her place and herself.This is a very quick read, so if you’re in the mood for a sweet children’s story to fill a couple hours, then let Beverly into your heart ❤️ Thank you to Netgalley and Candlewick Press for an e-arc to review.
    more
  • Marsha
    January 1, 1970
    There is no one like Kate DiCamillo for writing poignant novels about broken young people who transcend their circumstances through kindness and perception. I love Beverly's healing interactions with Iola, a lonely widow who lives in a trailer, and Elmer, a gifted and wonderful boy who was bullied in high school. Their appreciation and enactment of small kindnesses sets off a spiral of healing, not just for Beverly, who is mourning the death of her dog, but Iola who is facing the loss of her ind There is no one like Kate DiCamillo for writing poignant novels about broken young people who transcend their circumstances through kindness and perception. I love Beverly's healing interactions with Iola, a lonely widow who lives in a trailer, and Elmer, a gifted and wonderful boy who was bullied in high school. Their appreciation and enactment of small kindnesses sets off a spiral of healing, not just for Beverly, who is mourning the death of her dog, but Iola who is facing the loss of her independence, and Elmer, who with Beverly's friendship, is for the first time in his life not isolated and alone. Through their innate kindness, they buoy up each other and in doing so, heal themselves along the way. The fish restaurant, the tuna melts, the bingo, the bully -- what can I say? I love this novel. I was sorry to see it end but I loved the open nature of the ending.
    more
  • Darla
    January 1, 1970
    A fitting end to the Three Rancheros trilogy in "a crooked little house by a crooked little sea." Beverly Tapinski leaves the grave of her beloved dog Buddy and hitches a ride to Tamaray. Once she gets there she starts walking and experiencing what is right there. Beverly is a resilient young lady who is wise beyond her years. As she makes her way through town, she makes a difference in the lives of everyone she meets. Of course, even though Beverly's dear dog has died there are new animals to l A fitting end to the Three Rancheros trilogy in "a crooked little house by a crooked little sea." Beverly Tapinski leaves the grave of her beloved dog Buddy and hitches a ride to Tamaray. Once she gets there she starts walking and experiencing what is right there. Beverly is a resilient young lady who is wise beyond her years. As she makes her way through town, she makes a difference in the lives of everyone she meets. Of course, even though Beverly's dear dog has died there are new animals to liven up her stay in Tamaray in a persistent seagull and a cat named Nod. (Beverly does not like cats, but Nod falls in love with her.) DiCamillo has given us yet another classic story to cherish and I can envision it being picked up as a read aloud in classes all over the country. Thank you to Candlewick and NetGalley for a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Christie
    January 1, 1970
    Kate DiCamillo has such a way with words. From her facebook posts to her novels, she creates magic with her words all the time! Beverly, Right Here is no different! Magical, it is! After Raymie Nightingale, Louisiana's Way Home dragged me deeper into the world of these three girls, and I couldn't have been more excited to get my hands on Beverly, Right Here. The gorgeous cover allows Beverly Tapinski to quietly beckon to the readers, enticing them to hear her story. The author's note at the begi Kate DiCamillo has such a way with words. From her facebook posts to her novels, she creates magic with her words all the time! Beverly, Right Here is no different! Magical, it is! After Raymie Nightingale, Louisiana's Way Home dragged me deeper into the world of these three girls, and I couldn't have been more excited to get my hands on Beverly, Right Here. The gorgeous cover allows Beverly Tapinski to quietly beckon to the readers, enticing them to hear her story. The author's note at the beginning and the first chapter are nothing short of spectacular, and remind the reader that while these three girls are so different from one another, their stories are amazing and beautiful. Love, Love, Love!
    more
Write a review