The Bible Jesus Read
An 8-Session Exploration of the Old Testament hosted by author Philip Yancey--with video sessions based on his award-winning book. In The Bible Jesus Read, Yancey combined scholarship and insight to bring new light to old material and stimulate new thought and further study. This eight-session ZondervanGroupware uses video and group discussion to explore the sometimes shocking and cryptic writings of the Old Testament to help readers know God better. Yancey serves as guide and interpretive leader of each session and, in a series of in-depth interviews and explanations, he covers five crucial segments of the Old Testament: * Job: Seeing in the Dark* Deuteronomy: A Taste of Bittersweet* Psalms: Spirituality in Every Key* Ecclesiastes: The End of Wisdom* The Prophets: God Talks Back". Yancey approaches each of these major segments from a different point of view and adds additional interpretive material, extending the reach of his best-selling book. He teams with the Emmy Award-winning production team responsible for video production of the What's So Amazing About Grace? The complete kit includes: * 96-minute video in 8 12-minute sessions* Leader's Guide* Participant's Guide* Hardcover copy of The Bible Jesus Read.

The Bible Jesus Read Details

TitleThe Bible Jesus Read
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 1st, 2002
PublisherZondervan
ISBN-139780310241829
Rating
GenreChristian, Nonfiction, Religion, Christianity, Faith, Theology

The Bible Jesus Read Review

  • M Christopher
    January 1, 1970
    If you are one of those deprived Christians whose exposure to the Old Testament is severely limited, then this book is a must-read. Likewise if all of your OT knowledge involves an angry God looking for reasons to blast people or damn them for eternity. If, however, you grew up getting a healthy dose of Old Testament accompanied by interpretation that realized that "God So Loved the World" even back before Jesus, then... well, Yancey writes well.Yancey's book is readable and even entertaining. H If you are one of those deprived Christians whose exposure to the Old Testament is severely limited, then this book is a must-read. Likewise if all of your OT knowledge involves an angry God looking for reasons to blast people or damn them for eternity. If, however, you grew up getting a healthy dose of Old Testament accompanied by interpretation that realized that "God So Loved the World" even back before Jesus, then... well, Yancey writes well.Yancey's book is readable and even entertaining. His insights are nothing new to any of us NOT raised to see the OT God as a sort of vengeful boogie-man. Sadly, for many folks, this will not be the case. It seems that most Christians of my generation shun the OT, either because they've had bad teaching and preaching focused on that negative view of God or because they've heard that's all the OT has to offer. Yancey does a good job introducing the wonders of the OT to that cohort and, indeed, comes up with some nice common-sense approaches that almost any preacher can find use for.Glad I read it. May pick it up again to look for sermon illustrations but otherwise unlikely to turn to it in the future.
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  • Scott Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    Once in a while, I need to be reminded of things. Reminded that its time to do the taxes. Reminded that the oven is turned on. Reminded that I promised to take out the trash. You get the idea. This book is a reminder of the significance and relevance of Old Testament.The first chapter is entitled "Is the OT worth the effort?" A question I have related to, particular while slogging my way through sections of some of the histories. The OT is simply packed with information, and in many ways the sto Once in a while, I need to be reminded of things. Reminded that its time to do the taxes. Reminded that the oven is turned on. Reminded that I promised to take out the trash. You get the idea. This book is a reminder of the significance and relevance of Old Testament.The first chapter is entitled "Is the OT worth the effort?" A question I have related to, particular while slogging my way through sections of some of the histories. The OT is simply packed with information, and in many ways the stories seem very random. This book makes a goal of showing readers the value of the OT in their daily lives, using the logical argument that the people in the NT had basically just this book to study. Several gems here. I particularly enjoyed the chapter about Job, but thats because I have a big soft spot for the guy. The story raises more questions than it answers, in many ways. And thats the point. Yancey says the book offers insight into principles that "may shed light on misconceptions that are as widespread today as in Job's time."Other chapters tackle Deuteronomy, Ecclesiastes, Psalms, and the many prophetic books. The book is designed to give the reader a taste and encourage more study. In the final analysis, the book is worthwhile to anyone just for its insights into the various subjects and the OT as a whole. Thanks for reading.
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  • Laura (Book Scrounger)
    January 1, 1970
    I really appreciate Yancey's willingness to ask difficult questions about faith and the way we relate to God, without feeling the need to provide pat answers. In this book he talks and wrestles over Psalms, Job, Ecclesiastes, and a few other Old Testament books. I think Ecclesiastes was my favorite section (I seem to like that book even more as I get older), but I related to his approach to Psalms as well. As he noted, sometimes it's hard to know what to do with a book that instead of being writ I really appreciate Yancey's willingness to ask difficult questions about faith and the way we relate to God, without feeling the need to provide pat answers. In this book he talks and wrestles over Psalms, Job, Ecclesiastes, and a few other Old Testament books. I think Ecclesiastes was my favorite section (I seem to like that book even more as I get older), but I related to his approach to Psalms as well. As he noted, sometimes it's hard to know what to do with a book that instead of being written for us seems written for God instead -- going in the opposite direction than we're used to. Perhaps I'll also appreciate Psalms more when I'm not trying to force them to be something they're not.
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  • Nathan Albright
    January 1, 1970
    This book's title is a bit of a tease, but it's not necessarily a bad thing. Those who are interested in the complex relationship of early Christianity and Second Temple Judaism [1] will know that the Bible Jesus read was the Hebrew Tanakh. However, this book is far about the author's thoughts on the Old Testament than about the relationship between the early Church and the Hebrew scriptures. Fortunately for the reader, the author's thoughts on the Old Testament are generally very thoughtful and This book's title is a bit of a tease, but it's not necessarily a bad thing. Those who are interested in the complex relationship of early Christianity and Second Temple Judaism [1] will know that the Bible Jesus read was the Hebrew Tanakh. However, this book is far about the author's thoughts on the Old Testament than about the relationship between the early Church and the Hebrew scriptures. Fortunately for the reader, the author's thoughts on the Old Testament are generally very thoughtful and he has a good perspective and he discusses his own personal background to good effect and shows how he overcome initial misunderstanding and prejudice against certain parts of the Hebrew Bible and came to appreciate its worth. All of this is well and good, but it makes the book feel a bit more like a memoir of a recovering Evangelical than it does a one-volume OT commentary in the vein of R.K. Harrison or Longman or someone else of that kind, which is what many readers would likely expect from the book's title. So, readers of this book should be aware from the start that this book is a good book, but probably not the good book that they will expect from its misleading title.The book is organized straightforwardly with a frame structure that introduces the author's rather mercenarial reason for having paid attention to the Old Testament in the first place, closes with a thoughtful discussion on his view of the relational focus of the Old Testament and the reasons for the incarnation in the closing, and in between spends around 200 pages discussing four books and one section of scripture through the lenses of his own personal experience and reading: Job, Deuteronomy, Psalms, Ecclesiastes, and the Prophets. A lot of what he said resonated with me, like his comments on Job's covenant lawsuit and his stern desire to see God, a desire that was granted, or his comments about the prophetic speculation of many people, something I see and decry myself within my own religious context. Over and over again, Yancey brings the reader to the point of seeing the Bible for what it is rather than attempting to bring our own ideas of what it should be, and he also shows that God can handle our doubts, can handle our frustrations with the wickedness and injustice of the world, can handle our bitter cries of loneliness and despair in the dark nights of our tormented and troubled souls, our rivers of sorrow of the anguish and suffering of this fallen world.It is pretty clear what sort of audience is likely to appreciate this book and which sort of audience this book is aimed at given the approach the author has to scripture. As someone who pays close attention to the laws of Exodus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy myself [2], the author's approach towards granting the validity of the Old Testament to contemporary practice struck me as more than a little timid and partial in nature, but to the book's intended audience it would be revolutionary and perhaps a bit extreme. The book is written in such a way as to reframe books that have been as troubling or have been ignored because of the way that they are interpreted as being evidence of God's loving heart for humanity and his willingness to engage in the most difficult aspects of human existence. It is a book whose concessions to philosophy and genre criticism will likely offend many who consider themselves theological conservatism but whose maximilist approach seeks to appeal to those who would consider themselves more liberal and likely more intellectual as well. Since the author is popular and well-regarded, it is likely that the effort is at least partly successful in its aims to make the Bible relevant to those who dismiss without really knowing it but who might be persuaded to read it with generous eyes.[1] See, for example:https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2013...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2015...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2014...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2013...[2] See, for example:https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2012...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2012...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2011...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2011...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2011...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2011...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2011...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...
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  • Coyle
    January 1, 1970
    This book is an interesting meditation on the Old Testament (and it is a meditation, not a commentary or a scholarly analysis). Though I don't always agree with Yancey's conclusions, he tends to have an interesting way of stating long-familiar concepts. One of the most interesting parts of the book are his arguments for why we should read the OT. He argues that the OT is:1. Necessary to understanding the modern world;2. Necessary to understanding the New Testment;3. Necessary for apologetics;4. This book is an interesting meditation on the Old Testament (and it is a meditation, not a commentary or a scholarly analysis). Though I don't always agree with Yancey's conclusions, he tends to have an interesting way of stating long-familiar concepts. One of the most interesting parts of the book are his arguments for why we should read the OT. He argues that the OT is:1. Necessary to understanding the modern world;2. Necessary to understanding the New Testment;3. Necessary for apologetics;4. Necessary for understanding Jesus;5. Necessary for understanding God the Father.My major disagreements come when Yancey waters down some of the difficult Old Testament doctrines of wrath and election. For example, when trying to sum up the message of the Old Testament, Yancey writes: Think of a doting parent with a video camera, coaxing his year-old daughter to let go of the living room coffee table and take three steps toward him. "Come on, sweetie, you can do it! just let go. Daddy's here. Come on." Think of a love-struck teenager with her phone permanently attached to her ear, reviewing every second of her day with a boy who is himself infatuated enough to be interested. Think of those two scenes and then imagine God on one end and you on the other. That is the message of the Old Testament. This of course ignores passages like Ezekiel 16:30-34, where God says to Israel I am filled with fury against you, declares the Sovereign LORD, when you do all these things, acting like a brazen prostitute! When you built your mounds at every street corner and made your lofty shrines in every public square, you were unlike a prostitute, because you scorned payment. You adulterous wife! You prefer strangers to your own husband! All prostitutes receive gifts, but you give gifts to all your lovers, bribing them to come to you from everywhere for your illicit favors. So in your prostitution you are the opposite of others; no one runs after you for your favors. You are the very opposite, for you give payment and none is given to you. In other words, one of the messages of the Old Testament is that God is really angry at sin, not just generally, but personally angry. Understanding this is necessary to understanding Jesus. We can't know exactly what was accomplished on the cross unless we understand the anger of God at sin. Other than the occasional softening of OT language, the book is a worthwhile read. Yancey, being a journalist, is an excellent writer and the text flows well. Highly recommended.
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  • Taija
    January 1, 1970
    This is an incredibly underwhelming book. The only portion that I like is the chapter on Job. Yancey is one of the best teachers that I have come across on the book of Job so far. However, his writing style is frustrating, due mainly to the fact that he does not cite a majority of quotes from others. Nor does he mention the credentials of many people he does quote. For example, "Ernst Becker says..." Well who is Becker, and why is his opinion important? Are you quoting someone who has gone to sc This is an incredibly underwhelming book. The only portion that I like is the chapter on Job. Yancey is one of the best teachers that I have come across on the book of Job so far. However, his writing style is frustrating, due mainly to the fact that he does not cite a majority of quotes from others. Nor does he mention the credentials of many people he does quote. For example, "Ernst Becker says..." Well who is Becker, and why is his opinion important? Are you quoting someone who has gone to school or someone who just attends your church - there's a big difference there. Some people may not care about that, but considering that I can't write an essay, blog, or even devotional for my church without proper citation, I would expect more citations from a published author. Additionally, I believe the title of this book is very mis-leading. Yes, the Old Testament is the Bible Jesus read, but this book isn't so much about the O.T., but rather Yancey's personal experience while reading the O.T., and various personal stories from his life. I was expecting a more apologetic book, or at least linking a lot of the O.T. to Jesus life. In the section on the prophets, Yancey didn't even mention how often Jesus quoted from Isaiah, or that Jesus read Isaiah in the temple. Rather he wrote about how he (Yancey), believes the Prophets are important for today. I would expect him to talk about the importance Jesus placed on the Prophets, rather than the importance that Yancey placed on the Prophets - considering that the title of his book is the Bible Jesus read. This book reads more like the Bible that Yancey read.
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  • Bee Lubis
    January 1, 1970
    Wikipedia defies a Christian as "a person who adheres to Christianity, a monotheistic religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ as presented in the New Testament and interpreted by Christians to have been prophesied in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament".I admit my self as a follower of Jesus Christ, but refused to be called as a Christian since people mostly placed Christianity just a religion and sometimes put Christ Himself out of the concept and context.A friend of mine lent me Wikipedia defies a Christian as "a person who adheres to Christianity, a monotheistic religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ as presented in the New Testament and interpreted by Christians to have been prophesied in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament".I admit my self as a follower of Jesus Christ, but refused to be called as a Christian since people mostly placed Christianity just a religion and sometimes put Christ Himself out of the concept and context.A friend of mine lent me this book. Honestly, I read it to make him happy. But then I found some interesting things in this book. I'm becoming to know Christ deeper and I found some novel things and different point of views. I found some interesting issues. I agree to some points. Nevertheless, I didn't choose my stand yet about some other things.I have read this book twice and I'm still reading it all over again. Respecting one's ideas doesn't mean agreeing, right?
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  • Brad
    January 1, 1970
    This book draws you in. The title isn't discussed in the context of this being the Bible Jesus read and how He read it, but rather that this was the Bible that was available at the time of Jesus. We often neglect the Old Testament today to our own detriment. The title piqued my interest since I had never really thought about it like that---this being the Bible actually available for Jesus to read (The Old Testament). But this book is presented as maybe a different way of viewing the Old Testamen This book draws you in. The title isn't discussed in the context of this being the Bible Jesus read and how He read it, but rather that this was the Bible that was available at the time of Jesus. We often neglect the Old Testament today to our own detriment. The title piqued my interest since I had never really thought about it like that---this being the Bible actually available for Jesus to read (The Old Testament). But this book is presented as maybe a different way of viewing the Old Testament. I don't think much of what Yancey says is stated as a matter of fact, but is merely proprietary thought providing a different perspective on the matter. There's a richer experience to be had. The Old Testament and the New work very much in concert; understanding one helps in understanding the other. There is much gold to be found in the pages of the Old Testament; we just have to be committed in mining it.
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  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    Through this book, Philip Yancey gives a insightful and personal account of his experience exploring, struggling with and learning from the Old Testament. He selects 5 (types of) books which he delves into: Job, Deutoronomy, Psalms, Ecclesiastes, and the Prophets. By so doing, he shows the relevance and importance of the Old Testament for Christians today. I really enjoyed reading this book, and have been reflecting on some of its chapters still now, a couple of weeks after reading it. I think I Through this book, Philip Yancey gives a insightful and personal account of his experience exploring, struggling with and learning from the Old Testament. He selects 5 (types of) books which he delves into: Job, Deutoronomy, Psalms, Ecclesiastes, and the Prophets. By so doing, he shows the relevance and importance of the Old Testament for Christians today. I really enjoyed reading this book, and have been reflecting on some of its chapters still now, a couple of weeks after reading it. I think I will also be reading some of the chapters again, especially when going through the related Bible book in the future. In fact, there was a lot to take in all at once, so a more dissected read could prove useful.
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  • Leslie Ferguson
    January 1, 1970
    This was a thought provoking book. Philip Yancey does a good job encouraging readers who have never entered the conversation with the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Hebrew Scripture to not dread the hard books of the Bible.Yancey paints a picture of the humanity of the Torah, Writings, and Prophets and how those topics discussed in antiquity are not simply history but poignantly relevant in modern times.I encourage anyone with an interest in the entirety of the Bible who has misgivings of the Old Te This was a thought provoking book. Philip Yancey does a good job encouraging readers who have never entered the conversation with the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament/Hebrew Scripture to not dread the hard books of the Bible.Yancey paints a picture of the humanity of the Torah, Writings, and Prophets and how those topics discussed in antiquity are not simply history but poignantly relevant in modern times.I encourage anyone with an interest in the entirety of the Bible who has misgivings of the Old Testament to pick up and read this book.
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  • Cornelia
    January 1, 1970
    Yes yes, Philip Yancey is one of the first Christian authors I did not cringe while reading his books. Why? Because he didn't try to persuade me or something, he just exposed his faith and beliefs through stories, or things that have happened to him. And it made me think and reevaluate my perspective. This book provides a better understanding of Old Testament and its relation with New Testament.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    My rating isn't because this is a bad book. It was just different than I expected. I had hoped it would have more about how Jesus and his disciples looked at and used the O.T. Instead it is more of an "Old Testament survey".
  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    My favorite Philip Yancey book. He really brings the Old Testament to life for me. I enjoy having his insight, it'sn not a Bible study on the Old Testament. My favorite chapter is the one on Job's life, helping me to grasp what to do with suffering in the world.
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  • Mary A
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first Philip Yancey book but I certainly don't plan for it to be my last. He makes the Old Testament--The bible Jesus read--come alive! And I think I can actually enjoy and apply books like Deuteronomy, Job and Ecclesiastes.
  • Gary
    January 1, 1970
    Provides excellent insight into the relevance of the Old Testament writings; especially Job, Ecclesiastes, and Proverbs.
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    The Bible Jesus Read by Philip Yancey clarifies some things that I didn't even know needed clarifying for me.:) God's teaching me a lot about the Old Testament and Himself through it.A MUST READ.
  • Ron
    January 1, 1970
    Helpful look at a first century perspective on Old Testament scriptures.
  • Angel Sanchez
    January 1, 1970
    I wanna own one someday and read it again.
  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    The Old Testament is great except that it uses strange terms, names, and customs. It’s a confusing hodgepodge of stories, laws, poetry, history, and weird prophecies. God often comes off as powerful and sometimes caring, yes, but he also seems to want a lot of people dead. Even God’s “friends” were cheaters (Jacob), murderers (Moses), adulterers (David), and complainers (Jonah).At the same time our moral foundation as a culture comes from these texts, we can’t really understand the New Testament The Old Testament is great except that it uses strange terms, names, and customs. It’s a confusing hodgepodge of stories, laws, poetry, history, and weird prophecies. God often comes off as powerful and sometimes caring, yes, but he also seems to want a lot of people dead. Even God’s “friends” were cheaters (Jacob), murderers (Moses), adulterers (David), and complainers (Jonah).At the same time our moral foundation as a culture comes from these texts, we can’t really understand the New Testament without it, our hope that history is moving forward instead of being stuck in cycles of despair originated with it, and it was the Bible Jesus read. So what are we to think and do?Yancey masterfully articulates our conflicted experience with the problems and the promise of the Old Testament. To do so he picks out several of the most troublesome parts of the Old Testament for careful attention. Job seems to be punished by God not for wrongdoing but so God can win a bet with the devil. Ecclesiastes seems thoroughly cynical. The Psalms, though including wonderful passages of praise and thanksgiving, often display explosions of complaint, anger, and despair. And what are we to make of the wild imagery in the prophets.These difficulties, rather than repelling Yancey, actually draw him in. What he finds was not an ethereal collection of writings, but a gritty, tough-minded perspective.Ecclesiastes offers “a profound reminder of the limits of being human”—that technology doesn’t just solve problems but creates them, that we cannot deny death its due, that “under the sun” we cannot create meaning on our own. The Prophets “deal with the very same themes that hang like a cloud over our century: the silence of God, economic disparity, injustice, war, the seeming sovereignty of evil, the unrelieved suffering that afflicts our world” (p. 174). The Psalms show how willing God is to listen to our strongest emotions, positive and negative.The Old Testament is realistic, down to earth, and profoundly human. And when God seems far away, Jesus presents the face of God who speaks even when we think he is silent.
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  • Hannah Mead
    January 1, 1970
    This was a book I read as part of my school work this year, and (again :D) I was very pleasantly surprised by it! Yancy takes the reader on a journey as he delves into the Old Testament – shedding light on the Bible that Jesus would’ve read. The Old Testament is the prequel to the story of Jesus, but so often Christians are put off by the sheer size of it, the dense prophecies, or the depressing stories. But Yancy takes the Old Testament and shines a light on the beauty hidden behind those initi This was a book I read as part of my school work this year, and (again :D) I was very pleasantly surprised by it! Yancy takes the reader on a journey as he delves into the Old Testament – shedding light on the Bible that Jesus would’ve read. The Old Testament is the prequel to the story of Jesus, but so often Christians are put off by the sheer size of it, the dense prophecies, or the depressing stories. But Yancy takes the Old Testament and shines a light on the beauty hidden behind those initial barriers. Writing a chapter each on Job, Psalms, Ecclesiastes, Deuteronomy, and the Prophets, he gives clarity to the story that each book holds.The thing that I found so captivating about this book is the way that he points out how each book is part of a greater narrative, and how each story is woven into The Story. The Story of the world, and how Jesus has come to save it. This book wasn’t exactly light reading, as it had a lot of historical/theological information in it to process. But Yancy writes in a very clear, compelling and captivating way, and I didn’t find this book hard to get through at all. If you struggle with the Old Testament at all, or are just wanting to learn more about the backgrounds and meanings behind the OT books, then this book is for you!
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  • Gregory Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    There is much to admire about the book, except for when Yancy plainly contradicts what Scripture says. On Deuteronomy Yancy ignores what the book of Deut., tells us about Moses. Deut34.7 plainly disputes Yancy's stance that Moses was cloudy in eye and a weak figure. For mature Xians, we know Jesus & Apostles mainly used the Septuagint. But to lie about the facts of a Scripture book you're writing about shows bias, lack of integrity, and callousness about Truth.Shame, since I liked most of wh There is much to admire about the book, except for when Yancy plainly contradicts what Scripture says. On Deuteronomy Yancy ignores what the book of Deut., tells us about Moses. Deut34.7 plainly disputes Yancy's stance that Moses was cloudy in eye and a weak figure. For mature Xians, we know Jesus & Apostles mainly used the Septuagint. But to lie about the facts of a Scripture book you're writing about shows bias, lack of integrity, and callousness about Truth.Shame, since I liked most of what he writes in this book and others.However, falsehood cannot reoresent the Truth of God. That's why we each must be careful what we say that "thus saith The Lord".To so offend at the beginning of the book tells me to warn others. I loved the book when it first came out. I cannot recomnend it except for those who can distinguish between the truth and the lie.Btw, I am not an extremist except towards those who teach falsehood so blatently as Yancy does to make a point that has no bearing on the facts of our true faith in God through Jesus who is the Way, the Truth, and the Life.
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  • Bobbi Mullins
    January 1, 1970
    I have enjoyed all of Philip Yancey's books (that I've read), and this was no exception. He is so authentic and honest as he incorporates his questions, doubts, and revelations into all he writes. I can relate to him very well. I thought his chapters looking at Job and Ecclesiastes were especially interesting. He apparently never liked the Psalms, and I felt that was apparent even in this book. It was my least favorite chapter. I finished this book on Easter day, which was very appropriate as he I have enjoyed all of Philip Yancey's books (that I've read), and this was no exception. He is so authentic and honest as he incorporates his questions, doubts, and revelations into all he writes. I can relate to him very well. I thought his chapters looking at Job and Ecclesiastes were especially interesting. He apparently never liked the Psalms, and I felt that was apparent even in this book. It was my least favorite chapter. I finished this book on Easter day, which was very appropriate as he concluded with a discussion about Handel's Messiah (written for Easter, not Christmas) and what would be a fantastic Easter sermon! I highly recommend this book especially to those who have struggled with the Old Testament and in particular Job, Ecclesiastes, and the prophets, but also with those who have never understood Revelations in the New Testament or Handel's Messiah for that matter. Also recommended for skeptics and doubters who have some knowledge of the Bible and the Christian faith.
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  • Robert Collier
    January 1, 1970
    Harvey's Yes!Philip Yancey always bares his doubts as he explores profound answers to life questions. I love the way he presents truth without trying to arrive at grand cliches! But he brings us to heartfelt answers as he finds them, and where he finds them. He never fails to help me see old questions from a new perspective. He is never smug. He is almost always humble and self deprecating. I'm this book he makes the "Old Testament" come alive. I would recommend this book to any believer who has Harvey's Yes!Philip Yancey always bares his doubts as he explores profound answers to life questions. I love the way he presents truth without trying to arrive at grand cliches! But he brings us to heartfelt answers as he finds them, and where he finds them. He never fails to help me see old questions from a new perspective. He is never smug. He is almost always humble and self deprecating. I'm this book he makes the "Old Testament" come alive. I would recommend this book to any believer who has struggled with the old covenant. I would also recommend it to any skeptic who has struggled with even the idea of a personal God. Great book!
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  • Allan67
    January 1, 1970
    Another book that I read to Diana. We can't do much anymore after her stroke, so I read to her to spend time together. Diana has always loved to have someone to read to her - and I like to do just that.This book is a series of essays by Mr. Yancey giving his interpretation of several books of the Old Testament. He has some interesting observations. You may or may not agree with all of his observations, that is up to you, but reading this book may give the reader additional insight into the Old T Another book that I read to Diana. We can't do much anymore after her stroke, so I read to her to spend time together. Diana has always loved to have someone to read to her - and I like to do just that.This book is a series of essays by Mr. Yancey giving his interpretation of several books of the Old Testament. He has some interesting observations. You may or may not agree with all of his observations, that is up to you, but reading this book may give the reader additional insight into the Old Testament.
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  • Jane Fournier
    January 1, 1970
    I never had a good understanding of the Old Testament and the New Testament. Mr. Yancey chooses to use the books of Job, Deuteronomy, Psalms and Ecclesiastes to show us how the Old Testament tells the story of the life of Jesus and how the people at that saw Him. Amazing book.I have read his book The Jesus I Never Knew but that was a long time ago. I am no thinking I need to read "What's so Amazing About Grace.
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  • Lorna
    January 1, 1970
    This is the second Philip Yancy book I've read, and I appreciate him more with each one. He's obviously highly educated, well read, cultured, and yet is very relatable. His struggles and doubts are common to all of us. This book digs into his insights into the Old Testament. Each chapter made me want to grab my Bible and start reading. His view of the Prophets will forever shape the way I read those books. Made me wish he wrote a follow up book on the New Testament. Highly recommend.
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  • K T
    January 1, 1970
    My hardbound copy of this book is full of notations. Philip Yancey challenges and comforts me with his writings. As a believer in Christ this examination of the Old Testament writings confirms my HOPE in a God involved in my life.My hardbound copy of this book is full of notations. Philip Yancey challenges and comforts me with his writings. As a believer in Christ this examination of the Old Testament confirms my HOPE in a God involved in my life.
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  • Darwin Ross
    January 1, 1970
    Reinvigorates the case that Christians must pay more attention to the Old Testament. If you are one of those lazy believers who insists, "All I really need to know is Jesus," and can't be bothered with studying the Old Testament, you don't really know who Jesus is, nor the Church, either, for that matter.
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  • Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    I loved it. If the Old Testament seems daunting, Yancey does a great job trying to make sense of it. In depth looks at Job, Deuteronomy, Psalms, Ecclesiastes, and the minor prophets bring a lot of light to these Bible books. This is the second Philip Yancey book I've read and definitely won't be the last.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I really wanted to like this more, having been so intrigued by the concept of thinking about what Jesus would have read as a first century Jew. However it's more just a look at the Old Testament, potentially a great read for someone who is confused about the role the OT has in salvation story but for me I've had loads of great teaching on the OT so didn't need told how great it was.
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