Heaven, My Home (Highway 59 #2)
The thrilling follow-up to the award-winning Bluebird, Bluebird: Texas Ranger Darren Matthews is on the hunt for a boy who's gone missing - but it's the boy's family of white supremacists who are his real target 9-year-old Levi King knew he should have left for home sooner; now he's alone in the darkness of vast Caddo Lake, in a boat whose motor just died. A sudden noise distracts him - and all goes dark.Darren Matthews is trying to emerge from another kind of darkness; after the events of his previous investigation, his marriage is in a precarious state of re-building, and his career and reputation lie in the hands of his mother, who's never exactly had his best interests at heart. Now she holds the key to his freedom, and she's not above a little maternal blackmail to press her advantage. An unlikely possibility of rescue arrives in the form of a case down Highway 59, in a small lakeside town where the local economy thrives on nostalgia for ante-bellum Texas - and some of the era's racial attitudes still thrive as well. Levi's disappearance has links to Darren's last case, and to a wealthy businesswoman, the boy's grandmother, who seems more concerned about the fate of her business than that of her grandson. Darren has to battle centuries-old suspicions and prejudices, as well as threats that have been reignited in the current political climate, as he races to find the boy, and to save himself.Attica Locke proves that the acclaim and awards for Bluebird, Bluebird were justly deserved, in this thrilling new novel about crimes old and new.

Heaven, My Home (Highway 59 #2) Details

TitleHeaven, My Home (Highway 59 #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 17th, 2019
PublisherMulholland Books
ISBN-139780316363402
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Thriller, Mystery Thriller

Heaven, My Home (Highway 59 #2) Review

  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    Attica Locke's sequel to Bluebird, Bluebird is simply phenomenal, confirming her growing stature in the field of literary crime, although I do recommend reading the first in the series before reading this. Texas Ranger Darren Matthews is feeling the threats and pressures of his previous actions, as his manipulative mother, Bell, blackmails him, a mother he has ambivalent feelings towards, it was William and Clayton who had raised him, but he feels an inner need to connect with Bell, even though Attica Locke's sequel to Bluebird, Bluebird is simply phenomenal, confirming her growing stature in the field of literary crime, although I do recommend reading the first in the series before reading this. Texas Ranger Darren Matthews is feeling the threats and pressures of his previous actions, as his manipulative mother, Bell, blackmails him, a mother he has ambivalent feelings towards, it was William and Clayton who had raised him, but he feels an inner need to connect with Bell, even though she is taking him for a ride. His marriage to Lisa seems to have got on track again, at the price of counselling and his move to a desk bound role in the ABT (Aryan Brotherhood of Texas) taskforce run by Lieutenant Fred Wilson. In Jefferson, a 9 year old boy, Levi King, is out at night in a ramshackle craft on Lake Caddo, frightened that he will never make it home. Levi is far from being an angelic child, his father is the notorious Bill King, the head of the ABT, serving time in prison.An apparently reformed Bill is worried about Levi's disappearance, and that little effort has been made to find him. Wilson sees an opportunity to gain valuable intel on the ABT as he dispatches Darren to nearby Jefferson, with its main industry of a tourism reselling its antebellum glory days that hadn't gone down well with black people the first time round. Old Hopetown is a dying community of blacks and Native American Indians that have lived and supported each other on land owned by the elderly Leroy Page, a community facing constant harassment and abuse from white supremacists living in their trailers. Levi's mother seems convinced her son is with his rich and powerful grandmother, Rosemary King, a woman intent on freeing her son from prison but with little interest in Levi. On the assumption that Levi is now dead, Page is charged with his murder even though there is no body. In a Jefferson that is a snake pit of thieves and liars, Darren is made to feel less than welcome, the locals feel free to abuse and behave disgracefully towards him, but he is convinced Levi is alive and sets out to find him with the hope this will alleviate the problems he is facing. Locke sets the novel in the immediate aftermath of Trump's election and a Texas in which the repercussions are being keenly felt by a despairing Darren amidst the rising tide of homegrown terrorists, racial violence, intimidation, abuse and killings. He has little expectation that the situation can be dealt with, unlike his boss, prior to the new administration taking over, there are just too many of them, an ever growing tribe of emboldened racists crawling out from everywhere and anywhere, both overt and covert. In an atmospheric, richly detailed, and well researched narrative, Locke takes us into the troubling state of small town America and Texas on the cusp of a Trump presidency, presaging much of the horror we have since seen unfold in the nation. Amidst this background, the complex mystery of Levi, and Jefferson engages and absorbs, while the flawed Darren proves to be an excellent central protagonist struggling to keep hold of a firm sense of his own identity. Superb storytelling that I recommend highly. Many thanks to the publisher for an ARC.
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  • Dorie - Traveling Sister :)
    January 1, 1970
    ***NOW AVAILABLE***This is the second in the series about Texas Ranger Darren Matthews, the follow up to the hugely successful “Bluebird, Bluebird”, the Hwy 59 series.This book is every bit as good as the first. It combines mystery with some family drama and historical myth and facts about East Texas. Darren is back on the job as a Texas Ranger but he has been tied to his desk. He has been continuing his investigation into the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas, (often referred to as the ABT) trying to ***NOW AVAILABLE***This is the second in the series about Texas Ranger Darren Matthews, the follow up to the hugely successful “Bluebird, Bluebird”, the Hwy 59 series.This book is every bit as good as the first. It combines mystery with some family drama and historical myth and facts about East Texas. Darren is back on the job as a Texas Ranger but he has been tied to his desk. He has been continuing his investigation into the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas, (often referred to as the ABT) trying to find out the leaders (captains) and collect names of members and what they have been up to and are planning. He agreed to the desk job to appease his wife who didn’t want him on the road and gone from home for long periods of time. An incident in the east Texas town of Jefferson has his superior requesting that he go to investigate. There is a missing 9 year old boy, the son of a leading white supremacist, there is the feeling that there is a connection between the ABT and the child’s disappearance. Darren is an African American and again faces racism and prejudice in this small town. What makes this book extremely interesting is the complicated threads between a group of Native Texas Indians who live alongside a group of African Americans in land surrounding Caddo Lake, there are also a group of ABT families living close by on this extended stretch of land. I felt as if I could feel the racial tension and attitudes between them all.I had listened to the first book in this series but now reading the second I can appreciate even more the brilliance of Ms. Locke’s writing. Her descriptions of the town, the immense Lake and all of its hidden bayous had me completely immersed in the feel of the raw nature in this area and all of it’s hidden secrets. “Inside the forest they were floating through, there was no sound beyond the tinkle of lake water against the sides of the boat, no world beyond Caddo Lake, Darren had never seen anything like it.”Darren uses all of his resources and wits to try to find the missing child, “something had rooted his boots in place, some bits in this story that didn’t add up, that played like Russian nesting dolls---open one mystery and find another and another and another and another”. This is just what the reader will experience, so many mysteries, so many secrets, it was great!I would highly recommend that you read the first book as this is in many ways a continuation of Bluebird, Bluebird. We will continue to watch Darren as he struggles with his marital problems, drinking habit and whether he can rein in his natural instincts enough to work within the laws of the Texas Rangers. I felt that I learned so much about the history of the area and the people who live there. What a great mystery, masterfully written!I received an ARC of this novel from the publisher through NetGalley.This novel is set to publish September 17, 2019
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Talk about timely. Darren Matthews has been working on a Texas Ranger task force investigating the Aryan Brotherhood. But there’s about to be a changing of the guard in Washington. There’s a real concern that the incoming Trump Justice Department might “mistake the Aryan Brotherhood for some sort of honor guard”. What makes this interesting is that Darren’s new investigation has him looking for the missing son of the head of the ABT. The father is locked up in prison. Oh, did I mention that Wow! Talk about timely. Darren Matthews has been working on a Texas Ranger task force investigating the Aryan Brotherhood. But there’s about to be a changing of the guard in Washington. There’s a real concern that the incoming Trump Justice Department might “mistake the Aryan Brotherhood for some sort of honor guard”. What makes this interesting is that Darren’s new investigation has him looking for the missing son of the head of the ABT. The father is locked up in prison. Oh, did I mention that Darren is black? I really appreciated the first book in this series. I do think it helps to have read book 1, “Bluebird, Bluebird” because there are definitely plot points that carry over. I listened to Bluebird, Bluebird, so I don’t think I really appreciated the power of Locke’s writing. Reading this book, it really awed me. This is not your typical mystery. Darren is a wonderful character, but I also appreciated the depth of others, like Greg and Marcus. This story moves along at a good clip. There are multiple themes here, but underlying all of them is the tense race relations of East Texas. The history of the region is well researched and interwoven with the present day stories. The book ends with a bit of a cliffhanger, which hopefully means there will be a third in the series. My thanks to netgalley and Mulholland Books for an advance copy of this book.
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  • Krista
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 4 shining East Texas starsThis is the second book in Attica Locke’s ‘Highway 59’ series. Her first book in the series, Bluebird, Bluebird totally blew me away with the plotline and the elegance of the writing in a murder mystery. “Heaven, My Home” is a wonderful second addition to the series. While I liked it a tiny bit less than the first book, this outing was just as thrilling as the first book.Chronologically, this book starts just little after the conclusion of “Bluebird, Bluebird”. Rating: 4 shining East Texas starsThis is the second book in Attica Locke’s ‘Highway 59’ series. Her first book in the series, Bluebird, Bluebird totally blew me away with the plotline and the elegance of the writing in a murder mystery. “Heaven, My Home” is a wonderful second addition to the series. While I liked it a tiny bit less than the first book, this outing was just as thrilling as the first book.Chronologically, this book starts just little after the conclusion of “Bluebird, Bluebird”. African American Texas Ranger, Darren Mathews, is called away from his desk job to investigate the disappearance of a 9- year-old boy that might be connected to the Aryan Brotherhood. Darren’s mother is blackmailing hm. He has formed a tentative détente with his wife Lisa. His boss wants him to nail down more crimes tied to the Aryan Brotherhood (ABT). This needs to happen before the next President is sworn in. The consensus is that the new Administration’s Department of Justice pursuit of hate crimes will diminish. Under these conditions, Darren enters the town of Jefferson, Texas and the secluded lakeside settlement of Hopetown. Darren tries to track down Levi King, the missing 9-year-old. He also tries to figure out how to tie more crimes to the ABT. In Jefferson, that shouldn’t be too hard. He is conflicted about the state of his marriage, and he’s desperately trying to find the item that his mother is using to blackmail him. As in the first book, his life is a bit of a hot mess, but at his core Darren always wants to do the right thing. The right thing may not be the lawful thing, but it is always the just thing.There is plenty of action in this book. The continued race-relations issues encountered by the African American and Native American characters in this book were disturbing. It is hard to believe that these things still go on today. I do however believe it. I loved that Caddo Lake and its history was actually a large part of the story. I liked the time spent describing the lake and the cypress forests. It is now some place that I’d like to see for myself with the right guide.Occasionally it seemed that there was too much going on, and it took too long to get to the main core of the story. That is why I’m knocking off one star in my rating. I’d gladly recommend this to anyone who enjoys an intelligent police procedural mystery. This one has a flawed main character you can’t help but to root for. I am eagerly waiting the publication of the third book in this series. In order to get the fullest enjoyment of this series, I’d recommend starting with “Bluebird, Bluebird”. It's not absolutely necessary, but the nuances in this book will be better understood if you read the series in order. ‘Thank-You’ to NetGalley; the publisher, Mulholland Books; and the author, Attica Locke, for providing a free e-ARC copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    4 stars. Definitely an improvement (for me) from Bluebird, Bluebird.Update: I'm revising this review for the 90th time today. I decided the quote needs to go at the top of this because it is brilliant and so well captures the fragility and conflict of what is at the core of being alive today. "Darren pictured the blond boy in the photo, tried to quantify in his mind the amount of grace owed a child, one who was merely copying the grown men around him. And that's all it was, wasn't it? He hated t 4 stars. Definitely an improvement (for me) from Bluebird, Bluebird.Update: I'm revising this review for the 90th time today. I decided the quote needs to go at the top of this because it is brilliant and so well captures the fragility and conflict of what is at the core of being alive today. "Darren pictured the blond boy in the photo, tried to quantify in his mind the amount of grace owed a child, one who was merely copying the grown men around him. And that's all it was, wasn't it? He hated to think the country was growing racists like bumper crops, full of piss and venom, as bitter as the dirt from which they came. Surely Levi King deserved the benefit of the doubt. Didn't he? Did Darren really want to live in a world in which a nine-year-old wasn't worth his hope?" With her previous book in the series, I was disappointed because it was so hyped up (and was an Edgar Award Winner), but I gave it three stars (review here) because I knew it was more me than anything wrong with the book. I wasn't as engaged with the investigation, but I recognized the writing was superb.I was hoping the next in the series would improve on that and it definitely did.Highlights of what I liked:1) This book picks up right after the 2016 Presidential election. The setting is East Texas and law enforcement (the FBI, Texas Rangers and local sheriff offices) are trying to discern how to proceed with their investigation of the Arayan Brotherhood of Texas (ABT). There is a lot of political calculus needed, especially when the main crime being investigated is the disappearance (and suspected murder) of the 9 year old son of an infamous ABT member. 2) Darren Mathews is a great anti-hero. His character has so much complexity to it that you can't help yourself in rooting for him (and sweating it out when you're afraid he is in danger), which is written expertly by Ms. Locke.3) The length. At 267 pages, there is no fat that needs to be cut. I appreciate an author being able to write expertly without it being a tome. Also, I don't really know how to articulate it, but her writing is just so...smart. It's so on point with what's going on today and how complex everything is in this country. The quote above is a perfect example.This series isn't for everyone, but I found in reading the second installment that it definitely is for me. I am a political junkie and I love when that interest coincides with my #1 love of reading. What I also appreciate, is that you can jump right in the series without reading the previous book. Attica Locke does a great job of recapping just enough without making you feel like you need to start from the beginning. I can't wait to see what Ms. Locke comes up with next for Darren Mathews. Thank you to Netgalley, Mulholland Books and Attica Locke for the opportunity to read and provide an honest review of this book.Review Date: 09/30/2019Publication Date: 09/17/2019
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  • Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    Heaven, My Home picks up a short time after the conclusion of Bluebird, Bluebird with Texas Ranger Darren Mathews back to work after his suspension is lifted -- but this time behind a desk.  He's trying to make things right with his wife and has chosen to stay off the road while working to put together a federal case against the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas.  It's not just the desk job and his fragile marriage stressing Mathews out these days.  His own mother is now blackmailing him after finding Heaven, My Home picks up a short time after the conclusion of Bluebird, Bluebird with Texas Ranger Darren Mathews back to work after his suspension is lifted -- but this time behind a desk.  He's trying to make things right with his wife and has chosen to stay off the road while working to put together a federal case against the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas.  It's not just the desk job and his fragile marriage stressing Mathews out these days.  His own mother is now blackmailing him after finding a damning piece of evidence in the case that had him on suspension in Bluebird, Bluebird.  In the midst of his personal drama, Mathews is called to investigate the disapperance of nine-year-old Levi King in the small lakeside town of Jefferson.  Levi's father is a key player in the Aryan Brotherhood and he's currently serving hard time.  It's possible someone has taken his boy to get to him but when Mathews arrives in town, he finds more than a few complicated layers to peel back and local history that has impacted several generations on Caddo Lake.Locke has crafted yet another intricate and compelling crime novel in the Highway 59 series!  The country noir vibe is still strong, there are multiple plot points that are creating higher stakes, and I'm just as invested in Mathews' personal life as I am in his current case!  Locke skillfully describes racial tension and attitudes in Texas and how it drives Mathews personally and professionally.This is a series you definitely need to read from the beginning to understand the characters and ongoing plots.  I recommend it to readers who enjoy country noir, mystery, and crime.Huge thanks to Mulholland Books and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my honest review.  Heaven, My Home is scheduled for release on September 17, 2019.For more reviews, visit www.rootsandreads.wordpress.com
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  • Brown Girl Reading
    January 1, 1970
    Attica Locke has come back with a bang in Heaven My Home. The story is totally engrossing and you'll definitely have trouble putting this book down. I finished it off in é days. Following Darren and all his troubles is fascinating. There are excellent dialogues and character descriptions in small town life, along with history and mystery. I highly recommend the Highway 59 series. Read Bluebird, Bluebird first though.
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  • Cindy Burnett
    January 1, 1970
    Texas Ranger Darren Matthews is back and in more than a little trouble of his own making. Struggling personally with his relationships with his mother and his wife, Darren is unhappy with his job (to appease his wife he agreed to take a desk job) and his life generally. When a new case arises in East Texas, he happily heads back out into the field to attempt to gather evidence against a known White Supremist, a leader of the Texas branch of the Aryan Brotherhood. Darren is a tortured soul (occas Texas Ranger Darren Matthews is back and in more than a little trouble of his own making. Struggling personally with his relationships with his mother and his wife, Darren is unhappy with his job (to appease his wife he agreed to take a desk job) and his life generally. When a new case arises in East Texas, he happily heads back out into the field to attempt to gather evidence against a known White Supremist, a leader of the Texas branch of the Aryan Brotherhood. Darren is a tortured soul (occasionally a bit too tortured), but he makes a good protagonist. Heaven, My Home builds a lot on Bluebird, Bluebird and leaves more than a few unresolved issues when it ends. Locke is at her finest when describing the wilds of East Texas – Caddo Lake, the town of Jefferson, and the uneasiness in which whites, blacks and Native Americans cohabitate there. Her ability to place readers in Darren’s shoes as he experiences racism in East Texas and even from his boss in Houston following the 2016 election is masterfully and skillfully done. Race can be a tricky conversation in today’s world, and I felt Locke helped me understand some issues I may not have previously thought about. To me, that was the best takeaway from Heaven, My Home. A small caveat for me as a Houstonian was her descriptions of the city early on. I certainly live in a different city than she described.While Bluebird, Bluebird is still my favorite book of hers, Heaven, My Home is thought-provoking and uncomfortable in a good way.
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  • Jamie Canaves
    January 1, 1970
    And I Need To Shout About This Book NowAs promised I inhaled the followup toBluebird, Bluebird Bluebird, Bluebird—Heaven, My Home (September 17)–because I love Attica Locke and this is one of the best crime series being written. And since BB had left that very clever twist, which I haven’t been able to stop thinking about, I desperately needed the next book. Texas Ranger Darren Matthews is back, starting basically where the last book left off, and his decisions and lack of decisions have come ho And I Need To Shout About This Book NowAs promised I inhaled the followup toBluebird, Bluebird Bluebird, Bluebird—Heaven, My Home (September 17)–because I love Attica Locke and this is one of the best crime series being written. And since BB had left that very clever twist, which I haven’t been able to stop thinking about, I desperately needed the next book. Texas Ranger Darren Matthews is back, starting basically where the last book left off, and his decisions and lack of decisions have come home to roost. He also has a new case, a missing young boy, in a town brimming with racial tension. Locke is brilliant at creating tense mysteries where the setting is as alive, and important, as the characters without distracting–but rather enhancing–the mystery element. You get history, a great mystery, smart twists, rich characters, and a deep exploration of the justice–and injustice–system of our country. I can’t wait for the FX series adaptation of these books–there so much to explore! And in case it wasn’t obvious, if you’re a fan of Locke’s this is so worth the prebuy, or making sure your library is purchasing it so you can get first on that list. And if you’ve yet to read Locke, she’s one of the best crime writers so chop-chop.--from Book Riot's Unusual Suspects newsletter: https://link.bookriot.com/view/56a820...______________________Review to come BUT for now:Attica Locke is one of the best crime writers.This is one of the best crime series being written. If you loved Bluebird, Bluebird get thee on your library list or pre-order nooooooow!If you like mysteries that make the setting as important as the characters this is a must read.
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  • Esil
    January 1, 1970
    Heaven, My Home is the second in this excellent series by Attika Locke. This mystery is set in Texas and features Darren Matthews, an African American Texas Ranger. This one focuses on the disappearance of a 9 year old boy, who is the son of a convicted white supremacist. Darren gets involved in the investigation because this might be the opportunity to get more information about a white supremacist group. But his own emotions and sense of what’s right and wrong become complicated when the main Heaven, My Home is the second in this excellent series by Attika Locke. This mystery is set in Texas and features Darren Matthews, an African American Texas Ranger. This one focuses on the disappearance of a 9 year old boy, who is the son of a convicted white supremacist. Darren gets involved in the investigation because this might be the opportunity to get more information about a white supremacist group. But his own emotions and sense of what’s right and wrong become complicated when the main suspect is an older African American man. Locke doesn’t shy away from complex contemporary politics and issues, and she delves into the complexity without being pedantic or didactic – in other words, Locke assumes her readers are intelligent and interested in the world – one of my favourite kinds of mysteries. It’s worth reading #1 before reading this one, because Darren’s moral and emotional struggles carry through from book 1 to book 2. I sure hope there’s a #3 on the way.Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for giving me access to an advance copy.
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  • Jessica Woodbury
    January 1, 1970
    When I think of Attica Locke, I think of well-crafted thrillers, fully drawn settings, complex stories that tap into the world we live in. I usually race through her books but I was in a bit of a different mood as I read HEAVEN, MY HOME. I went slower, I took longer, and I realized that I have been selling Locke way short on her actual writing. Her prose is right up there with the best crime writers we have, and I am penitent. She is absolutely one of the best crime writers in America (I'd put h When I think of Attica Locke, I think of well-crafted thrillers, fully drawn settings, complex stories that tap into the world we live in. I usually race through her books but I was in a bit of a different mood as I read HEAVEN, MY HOME. I went slower, I took longer, and I realized that I have been selling Locke way short on her actual writing. Her prose is right up there with the best crime writers we have, and I am penitent. She is absolutely one of the best crime writers in America (I'd put her in the top 5, easy) and that was even clearer to me with this book than ever before.This book doesn't work as a standalone and you may want to do a quick refresh of BLUEBIRD, BLUEBIRD, because this book assumes you remember all of Darren's personal arcs from the last book. There were a couple things I was a little fuzzy on, and my memory got better as I went on, but I would've gotten adjusted earlier had I reminded myself of that. Especially since it takes a bit for Darren to get into the new mystery of this book and we have a lot of that remaining business front and center.HEAVEN, MY HOME looks straight into white supremacy and de facto segregation, just like the last book. It may look at it a little straighter, since it takes place right after the 2016 election. Set in the town of Jefferson, a small town relying on a dying tourism industry, it isn't just about the tensions between white and black residents, but a small group of Native American residents who managed to avoid getting relocated to Oklahoma but who have lost their original tribal lands. The plot is set in motion when a young boy disappears, whose father just happens to be a major figure in the Aryan Brotherhood. Darren and the Texas Rangers see an opportunity to use the situation to drive a wedge between members and push for information. But Darren gets much more than he bargained for and quickly realizes that there is more than meets the eye all over this town.If you haven't read Attica Locke yet, please rectify that immediately.
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  • Donna Davis
    January 1, 1970
    Attica Locke is a force to be reckoned with and the first mystery in the Highway 59 series, Bluebird, Bluebird was outstanding, so I jumped when I saw this, the second in the series available to review. My thanks go to Net Galley and Mulholland Books for the review copy. It will be available to the public Tuesday, September 17, 2019. Darren Mathews is a Black Texas Ranger, and his work is to unmask and prosecute members of the sinister Aryan Brotherhood of Texas. When the story opens we see that Attica Locke is a force to be reckoned with and the first mystery in the Highway 59 series, Bluebird, Bluebird was outstanding, so I jumped when I saw this, the second in the series available to review. My thanks go to Net Galley and Mulholland Books for the review copy. It will be available to the public Tuesday, September 17, 2019. Darren Mathews is a Black Texas Ranger, and his work is to unmask and prosecute members of the sinister Aryan Brotherhood of Texas. When the story opens we see that our protagonist is still drinking; he and his wife Lisa, who were estranged during the last book, have reached a détente of sorts. He will still drink, but it will be civilized consumption in front of his wife. A glass of beer. There. See, was that so bad? He has it handled. In exchange, he agrees to bring his work off the road, and so he is assigned to a supervisory position directing other officers in pursuit of the ABT. He doesn’t want to drive a desk, but it’s a concession he makes for her. But Darren has gotten himself into an awkward spot, a compromising one. His mother—a woman that did not raise him but with whom he has recently developed a relationship of sorts—says it’s a shame that nobody has found the .38 used to kill Ronnie Malvo. Mack, who is dear to Darren, is a suspect in that homicide, and his mother has the gun. He tells himself that his frequent contact with her is a sign that they have a closer relationship and that the money and gifts he brings her are a pleasure for him to provide. But it’s not true; actually, his mother is blackmailing him. And before you know it, he’s drinking hard, anywhere and everywhere that Lisa can’t see it. Everyone that reads a lot of fiction in general or mysteries in particular develops a mental list of things they are tired of seeing. I for one could die happy if I never saw another alcoholic protagonist; I am also weary of seeing mean mothers. Why does every author have to take a pot shot at motherhood? But for every item on my list, there’s an exceptional writer that gets a pass because their prose is so solid, their voice so clear and resonant, their pacing so flawless, their characters so credible. Locke is one of those writers. (And to be fair, there are other features on my no-no list that Locke avoids nicely.)So there’s the iffy marriage; there’s the bottle; there’s the blackmailing mama. But that’s not the half of it. Darren is sent into the field, despite his protests and his promise to Lisa, because there’s a missing child--the child of a member of the ABT-- who has last been seen in a historically Black community, and the Rangers need a Black lawman to ease the way of the investigation. The Rangers don’t have a lot of Black officers to call out. So next thing we know Darren is out in the boondocks, serving as a companion officer to a Caucasian sheriff that doesn’t really want much to do with Darren. In fact, the local power brokers, all of them white, are visibly uncomfortable in his presence, particularly when he enters private homes. And he knows that information is being withheld from him, not only by these people but also by Leroy Page, an elderly African-American man that was the last one to see Levi alive. Locke is noteworthy for the way she creates a sense of disorientation, a smoldering murk that starts with the setting—swampy, dark, wet—and extends into the characters that withhold information and make remarks that are both overly general but also sometimes loaded with double meaning that he can’t decode. And into all of this mess comes his best friend Greg, a Caucasian FBI man that has been sent in to explore the possibility of a hate crime here. Part of Locke’s magic is her perceptive nature and the way she segues political events into the storyline. And so the pages fairly vibrate with betrayal when Greg, who knows from Darren that Leroy has not been forthcoming and won’t permit a warrantless search of his home, says that Leroy is guilty of a hate crime. The current administration takes a low view of such matters, Greg points out, and after all, Leroy referred to him as the “HCIC; Head Cracker In Charge.” Darren takes exception: “Cracker and nigger are not the same, and you know it,” Darren said. “If we don’t prosecute hate crimes against whites—if that’s what this is,” Greg said, just to get Darren to hear him out, “if we don’t prosecute crimes against white lives to the degree that we do those against black lives—“ Darren laughed so hard the bourbon nearly choked him. “They need to see the FBI taking every hate crime seriously.”“So this is the Jackie Robinson of federal hate crime cases?”It’s preposterous, of course. For one thing, as Darren points out, there’s no body. The child may be alive. But he is shaken by his friend’s behavior, and when Lisa drives out to visit on her day off, Darren is further concerned by how intimately she and Greg regard one another. It’s one more thing he doesn’t need, and at this point he has nobody left, apart from his very elderly uncle, who tells him the truth and isn’t hiding anything. He does his best to help Leroy, but Leroy doesn’t trust him and is also not telling him everything, and he’s forced to recognize that this elderly man that reminds him of his uncles and Mack is, after all, another stranger. Meanwhile, Darren makes a decision that knocks up against the ethics that his upbringing and his profession demand.The tension builds and there’s no putting this book down. I stayed up late because I couldn’t sleep until I knew the outcome, which I did not see coming. Locke is brilliant and seems to me like a shoo-in for a Grand Masters Award. This book and the one before it are highly recommended.
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  • Monica **can't read fast enough**
    January 1, 1970
    Today is release day for Heaven, My Home by Attica Locke. Absolutely no one is going to be surprised by me saying that I loved this story. Locke writes stories featuring places I know and characters who feel like home for me. There is nothing better for me as a reader than experiencing a story where I recognize the wholeness of the kind of people the characters represent. Attica Locke has given me that gift in every book that she has written.In this installment the disappearance of a young boy w Today is release day for Heaven, My Home by Attica Locke. Absolutely no one is going to be surprised by me saying that I loved this story. Locke writes stories featuring places I know and characters who feel like home for me. There is nothing better for me as a reader than experiencing a story where I recognize the wholeness of the kind of people the characters represent. Attica Locke has given me that gift in every book that she has written.In this installment the disappearance of a young boy with ties to the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas is the dilemma that drives the story. However Locke, as always, makes this simple mystery much more expansive. Darren faces the rising brazenness of the ugliest and most base natures of people who feel that by being born white they are superior when their very way of moving through the world would say otherwise. As a Texas Ranger Darren has to walk a fine line while dealing with people emboldened to behave in abhorrent ways because of what they see is being accepted by what passes as leadership in America right now; which is more than timely. Expanding on Darren's desire to stay connected to his roots, his mother's betrayal of pretty much everything that a parent should be, a marriage that is being tested when the partners no longer seem to have the same values and goals, and familial relationships that are revered but are being strained by secrets are all woven in and around the central story and it was marvelous.Locke is one of my favorite authors and Heaven, My Home is added to my favorites list.***I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review.***Where you can find me:•(♥).•*Monlatable Book Reviews*•.(♥)•Twitter: @monicaisreadingInstagram: @readermonicaGoodreads Group: The Black Bookcase
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  • Roman Clodia
    January 1, 1970
    This follow-up to Bluebird, Bluebird brings back Texas Ranger Darren Matthews, a nicely complicated and flawed protagonist who is also a black man in racially-tense Texas. Pitching him against the Aryan Brotherhood make race absolutely central to this book with a mystery that goes back to America's troubled history, but with one eye on the incoming Trump administration.Locke is a passionate writer who uses fiction to explore history and the way it points forward to contemporary tensions. I did f This follow-up to Bluebird, Bluebird brings back Texas Ranger Darren Matthews, a nicely complicated and flawed protagonist who is also a black man in racially-tense Texas. Pitching him against the Aryan Brotherhood make race absolutely central to this book with a mystery that goes back to America's troubled history, but with one eye on the incoming Trump administration.Locke is a passionate writer who uses fiction to explore history and the way it points forward to contemporary tensions. I did feel that this story gets away from her at points: there are strong hangovers from the earlier book that don't make much progress, the mystery gets increasingly labyrinthine and not necessarily in a good way, characters have sudden changes of heart that are not convincing, Matthews' own emotional life takes a sudden swerve - and is left dangling for, presumably, another book. Still, Matthews is such a charismatic lead character that I can forgive a lot - just be aware there is exposure of utterly vile, vitriolic and violent racism in the story that makes this hard and disheartening, though no doubt realistic, reading at times. Locke writes crime with heart and acute social commentary - but I didn't find this book as satisfying as the last.
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    This was so good I may have to re-read this one!Wow! A thriller of a novel by Attica Locke that uses every tool at her disposal to keep you in suspense, make you question the motives of characters, delve deep within your mind to unlock the possibilities.Heaven, My Home is the 2nd book to Bluebird Bluebird which I've not read but I know Mr. Barack Obama loved and so I just ordered it on hold at our local library.There was so much that I loved about this one even after not having read the 1st as t This was so good I may have to re-read this one!Wow! A thriller of a novel by Attica Locke that uses every tool at her disposal to keep you in suspense, make you question the motives of characters, delve deep within your mind to unlock the possibilities.Heaven, My Home is the 2nd book to Bluebird Bluebird which I've not read but I know Mr. Barack Obama loved and so I just ordered it on hold at our local library.There was so much that I loved about this one even after not having read the 1st as the characters were so alive and well and the slang used made me feel as though I was there in 1865 and beyond.It's set with that down south deep feel for the bayous and the battles that occurred over the land ownership utilizing the Homestead Act during the black migration.This book is captivating beyond measure with snitches and biotches but also with characters that are vivid and strong.Rather than give the details away and spoil it I hope you have a chance to grab a copy and enjoy as the ending was equally as powerful as the start.Attica Locke is a young woman I admire and I can't wait to read her future work.
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  • jo
    January 1, 1970
    Attica Locke is phenomenal. Her mysteries braid to great effect a few tropes of the genre but she also puts anti-black racism front and center in a way that I haven't seen done a whole lot. Walter Mosley's mysteries also put black lives front and center, but he does not prominently pit black people against white people in his plot arcs. Attica Locke does just that, in a way that makes her mysteries complex, riveting and very human. The protagonist of this two-novel series is Darren Mathews, an e Attica Locke is phenomenal. Her mysteries braid to great effect a few tropes of the genre but she also puts anti-black racism front and center in a way that I haven't seen done a whole lot. Walter Mosley's mysteries also put black lives front and center, but he does not prominently pit black people against white people in his plot arcs. Attica Locke does just that, in a way that makes her mysteries complex, riveting and very human. The protagonist of this two-novel series is Darren Mathews, an embattled Texas ranger with a lucid understanding of the systemic injustices that affect black people and a much less lucid understanding of his place in all that. Mathews is also the product of a difficult childhood, so his personal issues get in the way quite a bit. I am entirely in love with the trope of the messed-up-but-right-hearted investigator, which I think is grounded in the idea that you can't really see other people's struggles unless you have struggles of your own.Mathews was abandoned by his mom and raised by two uncles. These two uncles instilled in him a great sense of rectitude: when it comes to the law you don't go greyzone, you don't bend the rules. The law is the law. Darren is at loggerheads with this attitude. It's fascinating to see Darren struggle with all this--with wanting to be a good cop and with wanting to be, hmm, a good cop. The latter is someone who needs to get into the muck of things and look at them from all angles. If the letter of the law doesn't fit, then maybe principled departures need to be taken.There is bitterness and risk in this, but this is the moral struggle of our protagonist, and we like being along for the ride.This novel also presents white supremacists. There are not two sides to white supremacy and neither Mathews nor Locke have any patience with it.Maybe I'm making this novel sound intellectual or difficult. It is neither. It's a page-turner with secrets, old loyalties, and scary turns of events, and I found it magnificent.
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  • Laurie Tell
    January 1, 1970
    What makes a good book? This book didn't make me feel good...in fact I feel kind of pissed off and disturbed. I don't think I liked the main characters. In fact I'm not sure I liked anyone. The atmosphere was dark, and the characters were dark. All that being said I'm giving it 5 stars. Why? For all the reasons I just listed. I read a lot of books that tend to blend together. This one won't blend in. It was dark, it was depressing and I was torn between liking and hating the main character. But What makes a good book? This book didn't make me feel good...in fact I feel kind of pissed off and disturbed. I don't think I liked the main characters. In fact I'm not sure I liked anyone. The atmosphere was dark, and the characters were dark. All that being said I'm giving it 5 stars. Why? For all the reasons I just listed. I read a lot of books that tend to blend together. This one won't blend in. It was dark, it was depressing and I was torn between liking and hating the main character. But I was sucked into the story. I NEEDED to know what happened next. And this book made me feel. Maybe they weren't all good feelings , but who says all books have to be happy. I will definitely read more by this author, especially if the story continues the story of the main character. I want to thank net galley for an advance copy of this book. It didn't affect my review. Read it for yourself and see if you agree with me.
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  • Janet Newport
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley and Mulholland Books for this arc.I'd read Bluebird, Bluebird and looked forward to reading this follow up book. This was not a comfortable read for me. I felt for Darren through out the book and his life was imploding all around him, his marriage, his relationships with his mother and uncle as well as with his best friend, troubles and dissatisfaction with his job as a Texas Ranger, etc. The pace of this book was fairly steady, action, revelation and reflection time for Darr Thank you NetGalley and Mulholland Books for this arc.I'd read Bluebird, Bluebird and looked forward to reading this follow up book. This was not a comfortable read for me. I felt for Darren through out the book and his life was imploding all around him, his marriage, his relationships with his mother and uncle as well as with his best friend, troubles and dissatisfaction with his job as a Texas Ranger, etc. The pace of this book was fairly steady, action, revelation and reflection time for Darren, followed by more action, more revelations and more reflection time. Darren seemed to prefer taking action before thought. Seemed to be a much younger man in that respect than he actually was. Racial prejudice was the underlying theme in this story and Darren's realization of his own prejudicial attitude was near heartbreaking. While he did manage to rescue the missing boy that had sent him deeper into East Texas, that resolution came at a very high cost for him.
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  • Tembi Locke
    January 1, 1970
    HEAVEN, MY HOME. 🎉 It's no surprise this woman is a huge inspiration as a writer, sister, and friend. Attica's new book is out this Fall! It's the second in a trilogy of mysteries set along a Texas highway. And if you haven’t read the thriller BLUEBIRD, BLUEBIRD get a copy now. Attica Locke, I couldn't be more proud or happy. ❤ HEAVEN, MY HOME. 🎉 It's no surprise this woman is a huge inspiration as a writer, sister, and friend. Attica's new book is out this Fall! It's the second in a trilogy of mysteries set along a Texas highway. And if you haven’t read the thriller BLUEBIRD, BLUEBIRD get a copy now. Attica Locke, I couldn't be more proud or happy. ❤️️
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    4,5 stars.Heaven, My Home by Attica Locke is a compelling mystery with a timely and topical storyline. This second installment in the fantastic Highway 59 series can be read as a standalone but I also highly recommend book one, Bluebird, Bluebird, as well.Texas Ranger Darren Mathews is back in the Houston office and his marriage to Lisa is back on track. Darren is currently stuck on desk duty reviewing data that will hopefully secure several arrests of the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas (ABT). With 4,5 stars.Heaven, My Home by Attica Locke is a compelling mystery with a timely and topical storyline. This second installment in the fantastic Highway 59 series can be read as a standalone but I also highly recommend book one, Bluebird, Bluebird, as well.Texas Ranger Darren Mathews is back in the Houston office and his marriage to Lisa is back on track. Darren is currently stuck on desk duty reviewing data that will hopefully secure several arrests of the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas (ABT). With the Trump inauguration just a couple of months away, there is a sense of urgency surrounding the ABT investigation due to political uncertainty.  So when the nine year old son of incarcerated ABT captain Bill King  goes missing, Darren's boss sees an opportunity to hopefully gain information that will secure arrests for the task force. Eager to get out of the office, Darren jumps at the chance to work in the field again.  Although not assigned to look into Levi King's disappearance, Darren is soon involved in questioning the individuals with ties to the case.  Is Levi just missing? Or has something far more sinister happened to him?Darren has cut way back on his drinking now he is back working. Counseling has helped him settle back into married life, but he cannot help but feel resentful for complying with Lisa's request he work in the office. Although his job and marriage are seemingly settled, Darren is becoming increasingly panicked over the situation with his mother, Bell Callis. She has him over a barrel as she threatens to tell everything she knows about the case that lead to his previous suspension.  Darren is hopeful a little distance will help him figure out  how to neutralize the situation with Bell.The search for Levi is complicated by the lack of co-operation with Levi's grandmother, Rosemary King, who does not seem overly concerned about her grandson.  Darren also finds himself in the crosshairs of the white supremacist who have moved in next to Levi's family.  Following the only viable lead the police have uncovered, Darren interviews Leroy Page, an elderly gentleman whose family history is closely intertwined with  the King family.  Will Darren discover the truth about what happened to Levi? Or will the Texas Ranger's close friend FBI Agent Great Heglund's ambition destroy Darren's shot at finding the missing child?Heaven, My Home is a multi-layered mystery with a substantive storyline that delves into race relations and racial tension in small town Texas. Darren is an extremely appealing character whose need to protect himself presents a moral quandary.  The investigation into Levi's disappearance is interwoven with fascinating facets of Texas history. With cunning twists and turns,  Attica Locke brings this clever mystery to a satisfying conclusion. Fans of the series are going to love this newest addition to the  Highway 59 series but a few loose threads will leave readers impatiently awaiting the next installment.
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  • Sid Nuncius
    January 1, 1970
    I thought Bluebird, Bluebird was excellent. This, the sequel, is just as good. (It can be read as a stand-alone book, but I would strongly recommend reading Bluebird, Bluebird first.)In Heaven My Home, Darren Matthews is still mired in the aftermath of his unethical but understandable behaviour previously. After a period of office work, he is sent to investigate the disappearance of the son of a convicted white supremacist killer because as a black Texas Ranger his boss thinks he may be able to I thought Bluebird, Bluebird was excellent. This, the sequel, is just as good. (It can be read as a stand-alone book, but I would strongly recommend reading Bluebird, Bluebird first.)In Heaven My Home, Darren Matthews is still mired in the aftermath of his unethical but understandable behaviour previously. After a period of office work, he is sent to investigate the disappearance of the son of a convicted white supremacist killer because as a black Texas Ranger his boss thinks he may be able to glean information about the racist organisation the boy’s father belongs to. Things don’t go as planned or expected and Darren’s flawed but fundamentally noble character continues to be pulled in different directions both professionally and personally.It’s a gripping, compelling story and again we get an unvarnished picture of the racism still rampant in some people in the USA and how it has been strengthened by recent political developments. Some of it is raw, ugly and abusive, some is more genteel but no less corrosive and repellent. There is also decency here and an excellent portrait of a (literally) backwater community and its attitudes.I may have made this sound worthy and a bit turgid, but it’s anything but. I found it completely engrossing and an excellent read; there is some real weight to both its current comment and historical research, but both are lightly worn. It’s an excellent book which I can recommend very warmly.(My thanks to Profile Books for an ARC via Netgalley.)
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    "For every story about a black mother, sister or wife crying over a man who was locked up for something he didn't do, there was a black mother, sister, wife, husband, father or brother crying over the murder of a loved one for which no one was locked up. For black folks injustice came from both sides of the law, a double-edged sword of heartache and pain."Attica Locke, Bluebird, BluebirdIn this the 2nd installment of the Highway 59 series Texas Ranger Darren Matthews is back and he is straddling "For every story about a black mother, sister or wife crying over a man who was locked up for something he didn't do, there was a black mother, sister, wife, husband, father or brother crying over the murder of a loved one for which no one was locked up. For black folks injustice came from both sides of the law, a double-edged sword of heartache and pain."Attica Locke, Bluebird, BluebirdIn this the 2nd installment of the Highway 59 series Texas Ranger Darren Matthews is back and he is straddling that double edged sword. As lawman it is his duty to uphold the law. But as a black man he knows the law wasn't written with men like him in mind and that the scales of justice aren't always equally balanced. Generally tough as nails, his weaknesses lie in his abiding hope for his mother's love and his allegiance to the disempowered. Once again Attica Locke delivers a 5 star read that is riveting, emotional and engaging.Special thanks to NetGalley, Mulholland Books and Attica Locke for access to this book.
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  • Liz Barnsley
    January 1, 1970
    Bluebird Bluebird was an intensely involving crime drama that I devoured so I was hoping that lightning would strike twice and indeed it has, Heaven, My Home is atmospheric, beautifully written and hugely thought provoking.Darren as a realistically flawed character anchors you into the tale, various threads from Bluebird Bluebird continue and there is also the case of a missing child drawing his attention. The plot is taut and relevant, entertaining yet emotionally resonant, never following the Bluebird Bluebird was an intensely involving crime drama that I devoured so I was hoping that lightning would strike twice and indeed it has, Heaven, My Home is atmospheric, beautifully written and hugely thought provoking.Darren as a realistically flawed character anchors you into the tale, various threads from Bluebird Bluebird continue and there is also the case of a missing child drawing his attention. The plot is taut and relevant, entertaining yet emotionally resonant, never following the path of least resistance and never once losing its grip.The character interactions are layered with nuance, the backdrop history playing into current events and as far as scene setting goes Attica Locke has an insightful descriptive eye that makes you feel the surroundings as you read.I loved it. This is top notch writing and storytelling, never missing a beat, I’ve seen the author described as America’s most interesting crime writer and I can’t say I disagree with that.This is what I look for in my reading. Depth, pace and pitch perfect, with characters and scenery that just pop from the page.Highly Recommended.
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  • Alan Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    HEAVEN, MY HOME is the second in Attica Locke’s Highway 59 series, the sequel to BLUEBIRD, BLUEBIRD continues the story of Texas Ranger Darren Mathews. Still tortured by the events in the first novel, and dealing with his strained relationships with his wife and his manipulating, blackmailing mother, Mathews investigates the disappearance of a 9-year old boy. The boy, the son of a white supremacist, has gone missing on Caddo Lake near the town of Jefferson but his family, especially his wealthy HEAVEN, MY HOME is the second in Attica Locke’s Highway 59 series, the sequel to BLUEBIRD, BLUEBIRD continues the story of Texas Ranger Darren Mathews. Still tortured by the events in the first novel, and dealing with his strained relationships with his wife and his manipulating, blackmailing mother, Mathews investigates the disappearance of a 9-year old boy. The boy, the son of a white supremacist, has gone missing on Caddo Lake near the town of Jefferson but his family, especially his wealthy grandmother, seem more concerned with the land owned by an old, black man, quickly a suspect in the boy’s presumed death, than in the fate of young Levi King. Darren is conflicted too, protective towards the accused Leroy Page, about whether finding the boy will lead to another extremist in later life, about whether he can exploit the situation to implicate the boy’s jailed father in the murder from the first book in which Darren himself is implicated.The story is full of racial tension and Attica Locke perfectly captures how the election of Donald Trump has made the Aryan Brotherhood more confident and how the ‘there are bad people on all sides’ rhetoric has impacted society, demonstrated in the FBI’s desire to portray the boy’s disappearance as a ‘hate crime’ against white people, conveniently ignoring the hatred of black, and native American, people openly displayed by the boy’s stepfather and his hangers-on. But the author is not afraid to show Darren Mathews’ own flaws and prejudices and this makes the story more authentic, the characters more fully rounded.Like the blues music that the book is steeped in, there is a lot of pain and not a lot of humour in the story but, like the blues, it is cathartic and real - HEAVEN, MY HOME really should come with a soundtrack - and the music is reflected in the lyrical prose -“Her voice was husky, like aged molasses that had crystallized and developed sharp edges.”“Cypress trees, their trunks skirted so that they appeared like the shy dancers at a church social, leaving enough space for God between them...”It’s gorgeous, rhythmical writing and, thankfully, the ending would suggest that there is more of Darren’s story to come.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Attica Locke's Heaven, My Home is the second in her Hwy 59 series. Although Highway 59 stretches from the border of Mexico to the border of Canada, Locke is concerned with the portions within her native Texas. I loved Blue Bird, Blue Bird and Texas Ranger Darren Matthews, and I would suggest beginning with Blue Bird as the second book (Heaven, My Home) resumes shortly thereafter. It isn't necessary, but the background of Darren Matthews as a black Texas Ranger raised by his uncles adds a great d Attica Locke's Heaven, My Home is the second in her Hwy 59 series. Although Highway 59 stretches from the border of Mexico to the border of Canada, Locke is concerned with the portions within her native Texas. I loved Blue Bird, Blue Bird and Texas Ranger Darren Matthews, and I would suggest beginning with Blue Bird as the second book (Heaven, My Home) resumes shortly thereafter. It isn't necessary, but the background of Darren Matthews as a black Texas Ranger raised by his uncles adds a great deal to the character. In Blue Bird, Darren hides a gun used by an old man to kill Ronnie Malvo, breaking the law and contravening the values his uncles have tried to instill in him. Ronnie Malvo, member of the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas, was a violent man and few people mourned his death. The reader can't help but think Darren was right in trying to protect the old man who killed Malvo, but it upsets his sense of duty and leaves him vulnerable to blackmail. Darren's new case involves a missing boy in an isolated community on Caddo Lake (25,400 acre lake and wetland on the border of Texas and Louisiana). Again, there is an association with the Aryan Brotherhood and a bunch of white supremacists. The uncomfortable fact of racial tension, distrust and betrayal is not limited to the white supremacists, it is also endemic to the culture of the area in a traditional way that is almost subconscious. Darren's character has been altered by his own actions in the previous book, and I found it harder to empathize with him in this book, but he is human and despite his failures, he still strives to understand himself and his relations with others. A complex plot with complex characters, Heaven, My Home addresses a number of issues society is dealing with currently; none of these issues are new, but they have certainly become more "acceptable" in the last few years. Darren, too, is having to consistently evaluate his feelings at overt and covert racism directed at him , including the unacknowledged, often unintended, racism of his boss. Recommended.Read in July. Blog review scheduled for Aug. 26, 2019.NetGalley/Mystery/Thriller. Sept. 12, 2019. Print length: 304 pages.
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  • Andre
    January 1, 1970
    Attica Locke has done it again. She has written a thrilling and engaging adventure with Texas Ranger Darren Mathews once again solving a twisted mystery of history and heritage. Ms. Locke did an excellent job of bringing readers up to speed-as this a sequel-with crafty sentences that serve as subtle reminders of what went on previously. That’s not always easy to do in sequels without damaging the present narrative, but Ms. Locke has proven to be a gifted storyteller.Darren is still chasing the A Attica Locke has done it again. She has written a thrilling and engaging adventure with Texas Ranger Darren Mathews once again solving a twisted mystery of history and heritage. Ms. Locke did an excellent job of bringing readers up to speed-as this a sequel-with crafty sentences that serve as subtle reminders of what went on previously. That’s not always easy to do in sequels without damaging the present narrative, but Ms. Locke has proven to be a gifted storyteller.Darren is still chasing the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas(ABT) when a child goes missing. That child’s father is none other than a big wig in the ABT Darren must find a way to use the missing child case for cover of his real mission, to keep the child’s father locked up for a very long time. We get some interesting East Texas history including the dynamic between some (Indians)Native Americans and African descendant Americans that goes back to the antebellum era.Ms. Locke always keeps the story moving with just enough twists and turns to have you in full cheerleader mode, hoping for Darren to tie it all together and save himself in the process. She has become a favorite writer for me in short order. I hope we see more of Darren Mathews in the future. I recommend this one.
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  • Heather Fineisen
    January 1, 1970
    A black Texas ranger investigates the Aryan Brotherhood when a little boy goes missing. A bumpy start for me which may be because I haven't read the first book in the series. But once things came together, the tension and mystery prevailed. Locke is especially talented at describing g place and food. This is a politically charged novel which takes place right before Trump takes office. He racial tension and small town MAGA mindset come to life. I will be reading the next book in the series.Copy A black Texas ranger investigates the Aryan Brotherhood when a little boy goes missing. A bumpy start for me which may be because I haven't read the first book in the series. But once things came together, the tension and mystery prevailed. Locke is especially talented at describing g place and food. This is a politically charged novel which takes place right before Trump takes office. He racial tension and small town MAGA mindset come to life. I will be reading the next book in the series.Copy provided by the Publisher and NetGalley
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  • The CurvyJones
    January 1, 1970
    I rarely like follow ups. Was ok!
  • Danni Faith
    January 1, 1970
    It took me FOREVER to finish this. It physically pained me to read this novel. Locke's second installment of the Highway 59 series is unrelenting; it doesn't simply lean into the layered meanings of justice and belonging in a place and time that is insistent on racial and political divisions, it plumbs the depths. Darren Matthew is called to solve the case of a missing child, Levi King, the son of an imprisoned leader of the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas. This case comes months after the case in La It took me FOREVER to finish this. It physically pained me to read this novel. Locke's second installment of the Highway 59 series is unrelenting; it doesn't simply lean into the layered meanings of justice and belonging in a place and time that is insistent on racial and political divisions, it plumbs the depths. Darren Matthew is called to solve the case of a missing child, Levi King, the son of an imprisoned leader of the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas. This case comes months after the case in Lark, leaving not much time between the events of the previous novel Bluebird, Bluebird and Heaven, My Home. Looming in the background is Darren's involvement in the death of Ronnie Malvo. Locke delivers a novel that is achingly truthful about the costs of loyalty—to one's career, family, home, and spouse—while treating us to a thrilling case in another small town in Texas, where the inhabitants are shady, distrusting, and motivated to do what they believe is the right thing for them and their loved ones. Darren is duplicitous and for that I hate him. Darren is a passionate man and for that I love him. I want him and Lisa to continue to rebuild their marriage. I want him to stop drinking. I want him to be cleared of Vaughn's suspicion. In other words, I want a world less complex and more joyful. Locke is not interested in meeting my wants, and for that, the mystery genre is richer and so are we as readers.
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  • Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller
    January 1, 1970
    Darren Matthews is caught between two worlds. Officially, this African-American lawman is tasked with upholding justice --- currently, he’s working to bring down a neo-Nazi group called the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas. But he’s also dealing with the fallout from his previous case, when he covered up an old family friend’s involvement in the murder of an ABT member, a move that’s still “wreaking havoc on his life and career.” When he’s sent to the faded east Texas town of Jefferson, once one of th Darren Matthews is caught between two worlds. Officially, this African-American lawman is tasked with upholding justice --- currently, he’s working to bring down a neo-Nazi group called the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas. But he’s also dealing with the fallout from his previous case, when he covered up an old family friend’s involvement in the murder of an ABT member, a move that’s still “wreaking havoc on his life and career.” When he’s sent to the faded east Texas town of Jefferson, once one of the largest port cities in the state and now a tourist spot steeped in nostalgia for its antebellum past, to investigate the disappearance of a nine-year-old boy with ties to the Brotherhood, the different parts of his life collide.Attica Locke follows up her Edgar Award-winning BLUEBIRD, BLUEBIRD with this adept sequel, which shines a light on America’s tense racial politics. Set in the months after Donald Trump’s 2016 election but before his inauguration, Darren is faced with a world where the country’s long-simmering racism is suddenly at full boil. He and his fellow Texas Rangers are “dealing with things they’d never seen in their lifetimes… church burnings; the defacement of a mosque in Bryan; black and brown kids shoved in lunchrooms…” Darren can’t understand it, and he “marveled with befuddled anger at what a handful of scared white people could do to a nation. He never again wanted to hear them…wonder why black folks would torch their own neighborhoods, because in an act of blind fury, white voters had just lit a match to the very country they claimed to love.”Given the larger picture, it’s hardly surprising that Darren can’t hide his grimace when his boss tells him that his next assignment is to help track down a kid named Levi King, who once spray-painted the n-word on a neighbor’s home. (Throughout, Darren has to remind himself that even though “the country was growing racists like bumper crops…Levi King deserved the benefit of the doubt.”) The hope is that the hunt for the missing boy --- who disappeared while boating on the vast, swampy Caddo Lake --- might uncover some secrets about the terrorist group of which his imprisoned father is a member. But as Darren digs into the case, he discovers a web of secrets that date back to the Civil War, when a group of former slaves established a free black settlement on the shores of Caddo Lake called Hopetown.As he tries to figure out what really happened to Levi, Darren confronts racism both subtle and overt. He also has to wrestle with his impulse to protect an elderly black man who might be involved in the boy’s disappearance while wrapping his head around the complicated history of Jefferson and Hopetown. Gradually, he discovers that his initial assumptions about the case don’t square with reality, as Locke reveals in this thoughtful mystery.In addition to novels, Locke writes for television (including for “When They See Us,” Netflix’s limited series about the Central Park Five case), and HEAVEN, MY HOME has the kind of vivid settings (a spooky bayou, an old hotel heavy on red velvet) and morally complicated characters that will be familiar to viewers of prestige television. If there’s a flaw, it’s that the book can feel overstuffed at times. Midway through the story, a second, barely seen character disappears, and the ultimate fate of this person is treated with a shrug by both the other characters and the author. A subplot involving Darren’s wife, Lisa, and his friend, Greg, never seems to connect with the larger plot, though perhaps it’s setting the stage for a future installment in the Highway 59 series.Those who dive into this timely mystery undoubtedly will want to find out what Locke has in store for readers next.Reviewed by Megan Elliott
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