Cry Pilot
A devastated Earth. Rogue bio-weapons. And a recruit with secrets. In this explosive new military science fiction novel, a tight-knit infantry squad is thrown into battle against a mysterious enemy that appears without warning and strikes without mercy.There's only one way for a man with Maseo Kaytu's secrets to join the military: by volunteering for a suicide mission as a 'cry pilot'. He cheats the system to survive, but you can't fake basic training. Assigned to a squad of misfits, Kaytu learns how to fight, how to obey, and how to trust. Yet the more he bonds with his fellow recruits, the more he risks exposure of his criminal past. Keeping his secret is about to become the least of his problems. Kaytu discovers that his platoon is being deployed against a new kind of rogue bio-weapon. One that has torn apart every military force it's ever faced . . . .

Cry Pilot Details

TitleCry Pilot
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 6th, 2019
PublisherAce
ISBN-139781984802521
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction

Cry Pilot Review

  • Sherwood Smith
    January 1, 1970
    I started reading this while stuck in an auto shop waiting room that was not designed for the comfort of human beings, let me put it that way. Cars, maybe.I mention that because I got sucked in so hard that when they called me two and a half hours later, I sat for an extra ten minutes because I had to find out how a certain scene ended. In spite of the blaring PA (which I didn't hear past about page three), the buzz and brrrr of pneumatic tools, and a plastic chair that had to have been designed I started reading this while stuck in an auto shop waiting room that was not designed for the comfort of human beings, let me put it that way. Cars, maybe.I mention that because I got sucked in so hard that when they called me two and a half hours later, I sat for an extra ten minutes because I had to find out how a certain scene ended. In spite of the blaring PA (which I didn't hear past about page three), the buzz and brrrr of pneumatic tools, and a plastic chair that had to have been designed by a torture chamber architect.Training sequences are my jam, especially when the characterization is as terrific as exemplified here. Maseo Kaytu enlists in a corporation-run army in an all-or-nothing manner, and ends up with a bunch of other misfits, some of whom we get to know quite well, but all of them are distinctive--so distinctive it hurts when . . .Put it this way. This is a high-octane military sf story, heavy on the weapons and action, which means an extremely high body count. Keeping it firmly this side of violence porn is how much Dane makes the reader care about the grunts around Maseo, and about the world, which is a weird but believable future in which the mess we've made of the planet is in the process of reverse--but the Terraforming, as it's called, has its own complex price.Which includes rogue bioweapons.How we humans are our own worst enemies doesn't escape exploration either on the personal level or the political. One of the most interesting questions asked in this book is "Are you a soldier or are you a patriot?" So much military SF assumes the two are one. There's resolution at the end of this book, while major threads are set up for a longer arc. I can't WAIT for the next. A funny, tense, vivid, hard-hitting but smart and thoughtful story, with cussing military-style that is entertainingly gender-blind at times. Terrific female characters made it just that much more awesome.I got this through NetGalley, but I'll be snagging a print copy as soon as it comes out, as this goes on the reread shelf.
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  • Dianne
    January 1, 1970
    In a high-tech, dystopian future, young soldiers will become fodder for certain death against the most dangerous foe the earth has ever faced. Where has it come from? How can it be stopped?Told through the eyes of Maseo Jaytu, a young recruit on the run from the secrets of his past, he finds a sense of belonging to the group of misfit soldiers, each longing to leave a mark on a world who doesn’t see them with any value.Tense, creative and raw, Joel Dane’s CRY PILOT the action is pure science fic In a high-tech, dystopian future, young soldiers will become fodder for certain death against the most dangerous foe the earth has ever faced. Where has it come from? How can it be stopped?Told through the eyes of Maseo Jaytu, a young recruit on the run from the secrets of his past, he finds a sense of belonging to the group of misfit soldiers, each longing to leave a mark on a world who doesn’t see them with any value.Tense, creative and raw, Joel Dane’s CRY PILOT the action is pure science fiction with a huge helping of humanity from the young soldiers facing certain death as they draw closer together and become their own special family. Heroes will die, corporate greed and the techno world will go on and still, only one man will discover the secret to defeating the enemy, but it could cost both him and his best friend their lives. Gritty, intriguing and mesmerizing, is this the world we are rushing forward to? A great read, a great escape, thanks to the talent of Joel Dane.I received a complimentary ARC edition from Ace! This is my honest and voluntary review.Series: Cry Pilot - Book 1Publisher: Ace (August 6, 2019)Publication Date: August 6, 2019Genre: Dystopian Science FictionPrint Length: 415 pagesAvailable from: Amazon | Barnes & NobleFor Reviews, Giveaways, Fabulous Book News, follow: http://tometender.blogspot.com
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  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    Cry Pilot is the first volume in a brand new new military science fiction series. Whether you are taking about training grunts for action in Southeast Asia, the deserts of Iraq, or in a future world, you always get the same sense of struggle to get through basic training, the camaraderie, and the triumphant battles. With a futuristic landscape like this, comparisons to Heinlein’s Starship Troopers and Card’s Ender’s Game certainly are not amiss. Nevertheless, the Cry Pilot universe is fresh, new Cry Pilot is the first volume in a brand new new military science fiction series. Whether you are taking about training grunts for action in Southeast Asia, the deserts of Iraq, or in a future world, you always get the same sense of struggle to get through basic training, the camaraderie, and the triumphant battles. With a futuristic landscape like this, comparisons to Heinlein’s Starship Troopers and Card’s Ender’s Game certainly are not amiss. Nevertheless, the Cry Pilot universe is fresh, new, and invigorating.The battle here is not in space, but on an earth destroyed by endless war. The human race is ensconced in small corporate enclaves and all around the earth and oceans are undergoing vast terraforming with the hope of bringing earth back to life. But, here’s where it gets crazy because the terraforming agents have awakened all manner of artificial intelligence war machines that were buried deep in the earth and the oceans over the centuries of war. And, these remotes have grown more sophisticated and more treacherous. And, now there’s rumour of even more bizarre things that appear genetic rather than mechanical awakening. Meet lampreys and you’ve never met anything like these.Katyu must put his past behind him as he volunteers the only way he can- by being a cry pilot for a CAV, a tentacled mechanical beast that craves human pilots to interface with and cannot do battle without that interface. But, there’s a minuscule chance of surviving in a CAV and graduating to basic training. Most CAV pilots are crushed within the structures when they do battle with remorts and are little more than sacrificial lambs being led to slaughter. This is a hard paced action-Packed battle novel that succceeds because it creates a believable world and interesting characters. Many thanks to the publishing house for providing an advanced copy for review.
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  • Mogsy (MMOGC)
    January 1, 1970
    2 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2019/08/08/...I wanted to like Cry Pilot, I really did. It’s been getting a ton of praise from other reviewers though, so I’m just going to be chalking this one up to another case of “it’s not the book, it’s me.” After all, military sci-fi can be such a tricky genre, and there were certain aspects of this one that that failed to make this one my cup of tea.The novel transports readers to a bleak, future Earth devastated by large-scale w 2 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2019/08/08/...I wanted to like Cry Pilot, I really did. It’s been getting a ton of praise from other reviewers though, so I’m just going to be chalking this one up to another case of “it’s not the book, it’s me.” After all, military sci-fi can be such a tricky genre, and there were certain aspects of this one that that failed to make this one my cup of tea.The novel transports readers to a bleak, future Earth devastated by large-scale war fought by dangerous, high-tech bioweapons. However, in order to terraform the planet in the wake of such appalling destruction, the clean-up process has also reawakened these biological horrors, now gone rogue. In response to this threat, the corporate military has turned to churning out legions of soldiers including a “cry pilots”, a specialized class of fighter trained to control AI-operated mecha-like machines designed to combat a new foe known as lampreys. It’s extremely dangerous, and casualty rates are high.Our protagonist Maseo Kaytu is a cry pilot. Due to his past status as a refugee he is barred from joining the military, but being resourceful, he manages to find a way. Assigned to Group Aleph for basic training, he joins a squad of other outsiders and misfits as they prepare to be deployed for the battle to come. Living, training, and fighting together, Kaytu starts to grow close to his teammates in spite of himself, finding it more and more difficult to hide the truth of his past from them. But if they don’t survive the coming storm, none of it is going to matter anyway.I’ll give the novel this—the story actually took a bunch of tired and overused futuristic dystopian tropes and turned it into something that had a fresh feel to it. I certainly loved the idea of ruined Earth littered with rogue bioweapons delaying the reconstructive efforts to save the planet. So, with such a cool and interesting premise, what went wrong? Well, I tend to be a “Characters First” kind of reader, so a lot comes down to the protagonist and whether or not I find them engaging. Maseo Kaytu was not, unfortunately. I was indifferent to his voice, which I found rather dry and depthless. Something also felt off about his relationships with his squad mates, but I can’t really put my finger on why. Although their interactions read fine on paper, often the relationships themselves felt lukewarm or forced and I was indifferent as to whether any of the characters will survive to the end of the book, which is always a bad sign.Maybe the author’s style has something to do with it. He clearly has the writing chops and experience, Joel Dane being a pseudonym for a full-time author of more than twenty books according to the publisher profile. Personally though, I found his prose challenging and clunky, bogged down by military jargon and repetition. Dane never passes on a chance to describe in great detail (and at great length) any time a new piece of high-tech weaponry is brought up, which I’m sure hardcore military sci-fi fans would probably appreciate but it just makes my eyes glaze over. I also have nothing against military academy stories and tropes, but I thought the basic training section dragged on for a little too long in this case. A good chunk of the book was over by the time we got to see any real action, and that was just a bit too much to take.So to break things down, the positives of Cry Pilot included the heart-pounding action sequences and the battle scenes, impressive world-building, and a truly fascinating conflict involving some of the most unique and terrifying foes I’ve ever seen. But the negatives included the mediocre character development and a repetitive, drawn-out plotline that often struggled to hold my full attention. Bottom line, the bad outweighed the good, so unfortunately this will have to be relegated to the “not for me” pile. That said, I have a strong feeling this one will work a whole lot better for voracious fans of military science fiction, so if the premise sounds appealing, I would definitely recommend taking a closer look.
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  • Dani ❤️ Perspective of a Writer
    January 1, 1970
    Check out more reviews @ Perspective of a Writer...The BuzzMost people who know me probably have no idea that I am a rabid Military Sci-Fi fan. I found them when I was a young reader and was immediately fascinated by the idea of men on incredible battlefields. I moved on to dystopian stories and find there is way more fantasy out there to fill my time. But I always have a soft place in my heart for the soldier story.One thing that concerned me was the cover... Cry Pilot is not dressed well. A mo Check out more reviews @ Perspective of a Writer...The BuzzMost people who know me probably have no idea that I am a rabid Military Sci-Fi fan. I found them when I was a young reader and was immediately fascinated by the idea of men on incredible battlefields. I moved on to dystopian stories and find there is way more fantasy out there to fill my time. But I always have a soft place in my heart for the soldier story.One thing that concerned me was the cover... Cry Pilot is not dressed well. A more nondescript cover I have not seen. Props to the vague skyscrapers because yeah even the poor live in them... but what is that wimpy robot thing?! I don't see how it relates to the story at all. But I love the title and was hooked in the first chapter when I learned what a Cry Pilot is and what they does... The PremiseFrom page one of Cry Pilot we know Maseo Kaytu has done something he regrets. And it isn't something that you can easily sweep under a rug and call a stupid mistake and move on. He's tried and it just doesn't work. This isn't a new concept. Kaytu is seeking redemption on the battlefield. So why is this one of the best books I've read in 2019?! Because of the incredible futuristic world!!!This is a very unique devastated earth. It's waaaaayyyyy in the future. We've had another massive world war. The earth did not fair well. But corporations came in and took over. It was for the best. They started a technologically fueled clean up to reclaim the earth from our mistakes... There's only one problem, the war tech used to fight that war? Yeah it's been abandoned all over the place and the cleanup tech is fixing it along with the earth. So we need soldiers. Soldiers to fight these rogue bio-weapons. And now they have a new recruit... Kaytu! Only they won't accept him. So he forces them to...I really, really enjoy the way Joel Dane writes. It's tight. It feels military. It feels like the future. I was captured from the first page... but that's because every page that followed built up my anticipation for the next page and the next page. It really helped that I liked Kaytu. His situation is unique but totally understandable. You feel for him even as you know he got himself into this tight spot on his own and because of family. And you applaud his desire to push through anyway and seize his redemption. And along the way... he finds family again... and its a beautiful messy battle every day!!My ExperienceI sat down with this paper copy of Cry Pilot and I couldn't stop reading... I only intended to get it started. Read the first chapter or two... I quickly found myself sweeping past page 100!! WHAT?! Yeah I was captured. It starts with Kaytu and his whole CAV experience so he can enter military training. But then we meet Ting! A nonstop chatty hacker who mysteriously seems to be able to hold it together while also beating the odds along with Kaytu... How is this possible?! There was something about Ting that I just loved and a mystery surrounding her that I was dying to uncover. As we start training and meet those on his team we come to understand why its so important they come together as a crew.But Dani, you are probably wondering... you aren't saying you loved every page of this book?! Okay I will admit there is a small span of about 7-10 pages a little past halfway that got a touch repetitive. These are where the team is trying to gather information and not getting anywhere fast. I wish they actually DID something concrete as a group and failed rather than individually... but yeah that's it. I literally was captured for every other page all the way to the end... And the end... is EXPLOSIVE!! So was there anything else I didn't enjoy in this shining jewel of futuristic military sci-fi?! Well in the future sexuality is very fluid and soldiers with their battle lust have many poly relationships. This is touched on briefly in a couple places but isn't explicit (thank goodness!) It made me skeptical as I doubt EVERY soldier would have sex with multiple partners of both sexes but its such a minor part of the book I'm fine with it. This is literally how detailed Joel Dane thought about the future. Why did I find Cry Pilot an Out of This World Read?-Ting!Okay, I just loved this girl... I loved her relationship with Kaytu (its not as a love interest!) and I just want to peer inside her mind for a bit. I need more of her!-Military Battles!Okay I admit this is a favorite part of any military sci-fi... I love the tactics and strategy involved and seeing how they beat the odds and survive.-The Future!This is one of the most well imagined futures that I've ever read. And it was shown to us in tiny chunks so that we could form a picture of it in our minds.-The Camaraderie!Each member of the team was good at different things. And Kaytu wasn't some super leader or anything. They bonded and learned to work together as a well oiled machine.-The Stakes!I was sucked in meeting Kaytu... but every time I felt like the story would plateau it got better and the stakes higher! It wasn't about twists at all, but about making me care.Cry Pilot is like a rocket ship and you are left breathless at the end!! I'm totally eager to dive right into the sequel (and I hope that I can totally get a copy). While we don't get all the answers about lampreys we do learn a lot about them and I'm eager to see Kaytu and his crew go up against more... This is futuristic military sci-fi at its absolute best!!⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ Authenticity⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ Writing Style⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ Plot & Pacing⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ World BuildingC+ Cover & Title gradeThank you, thank you, thank you to Berkley Publishing Group and Ace for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review. It has not influenced my opinions.______________________You can find this review and many others on my book blog @ Perspective of a Writer. Read my special perspective under the typewriter on my reviews...Please like this review if you enjoyed it! *bow* *bow* It helps me out a ton!!
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  • Beth Cato
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance copy of this book via NetGalley.By the description, I expected far-future sci-fi. Cry Pilot is that, and a whole lot more--like a cyberpunk and military scifi combination, all in an original take on post-climate apocalypse Earth.Kaytu is a complicated young man trying to do right. He's a gutter rat, a former refugee, and he has set his eye on military service with one of the major corporations that holds dominion over Earth. With his background--which only emerges in perfec I received an advance copy of this book via NetGalley.By the description, I expected far-future sci-fi. Cry Pilot is that, and a whole lot more--like a cyberpunk and military scifi combination, all in an original take on post-climate apocalypse Earth.Kaytu is a complicated young man trying to do right. He's a gutter rat, a former refugee, and he has set his eye on military service with one of the major corporations that holds dominion over Earth. With his background--which only emerges in perfectly-paced detail across the book--he's forced to take a more criminal route, which gets him assigned to be a cry pilot--essentially, a piece of meat dropped into an AI-driven mecha that does battle with other bio-machines that threaten to undo the resettlement and terraforming of the planet. Most cry pilots die. He does not--nor does the flighty drug addict with him. Together, they soon find themselves placed in different roles as they train to face a horrific threat unlike ever seen before.With some scifi books with a far-future setting, it feels like the emphasis is on the world and tech and the characters are outright tropes. Not so here. Everyone feels vivid and alive. Kaytu's peers are an eclectic bunch, and as he became attached to them, so did I (a dangerous thing when they are facing some pretty nasty threats). The world is incredibly immersive and detailed, and it builds in just the right way; I never felt overwhelmed. Not only is the tech advanced, but social constructs are radically different, too, but this is handled in a casual, natural way. Poly relationships are common (and make perfect sense, given the need for humanity to repopulate) and sexual preference is fluid.I found the book to be absolutely enthralling. Not only is the story fantastic, but as a writer, I can only admire the elegant pacing of the world's construction. This is a book to point to as an example of how to do scifi right.
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  • Minx
    January 1, 1970
    I can’t say that I read a lot of military science fiction but when I came across Cry Pilot I knew this was a book I just had to read. What truly made this story fascinating to me was the dystopian setting. There were important parts of the background that have to do with space, its occupation and colonization on worlds other than ours, but the true setting for this book is Earth. An Earth that has been ravaged by wars and neglect to the brink of utter devastation where almost everything short of I can’t say that I read a lot of military science fiction but when I came across Cry Pilot I knew this was a book I just had to read. What truly made this story fascinating to me was the dystopian setting. There were important parts of the background that have to do with space, its occupation and colonization on worlds other than ours, but the true setting for this book is Earth. An Earth that has been ravaged by wars and neglect to the brink of utter devastation where almost everything short of humankind had gone extinct.The remnant of human civilization on Earth were either living in Freeholds or corporate enclaves which were divided by territories and ruled by different corporations. These corporations acted independently of each other, had their own militaries, and were all taking part in the terrafixing of the planet. While humans were waiting for the terraformation of the land and ocean’s flora and fauna, hoping to bring about a world where they could once again live freely as their ancestors had, there were forces working against them…mainly the tech that was left over from the previous wars.In this time, the main enemy of humankind were artificially intelligent war machines, called remorts, which were regenerated bioweapons from the former age. Fixing the planet was being done autonomously and the protocol for what was “fixed” was anything ecological, which unfortunately included discarded war tech because it had biological components to it. Once resurrected, these remorts became autonomous killing machines with genetically engineered instincts to do what they were “born” to do, destroy.This was what the corporation’s military were tasked with, the taking down of the remorts that were waging their own personal war. It was into this world that Maseo Kaytu desperately wanted to involve himself. He was a man who was haunted by the choices he made in his youth and was willing to do whatever he could to atone for his choices, which made getting into the Shiyogrid Armed Forces his top priority.Unfortunately for him, the military didn’t recruit enlists from a warzone, especially not refugees like Maseo, it was against corporate policy. Desperation breeds desperate choices and Maseo was a man who was desperate to atone for the lives he cost as a child. He needed a chance to enter the military and he truly tried to go about enlisting the proper way but when all doors were shut to him, he had only the one avenue left.Before they ascended, the AI’s had created artificially intelligent war machines such as CAV’s (Combat Activated Machines). To function at all the CAV needed a human “passenger” and the CAV’s were essential to win against the larger remorts. The only issue was that the passenger, aka cry pilot, rarely ever made it out alive but it was truly a necessary evil. Knowing the odds, there was some incentive given for the lucky few who might manage to survive.If they, by some miracle, survived their time in a CAV, they were immediately granted a chance to train for the military, which came with its own benefits for those who were made to choose being a cry pilot in the first place. It was this chance that Kaytu was vying for, this opportunity to make it into the military. He needed to even the score that had dogged him for more years than he wished to count and he felt that this would be the way to balance the scales.Right from the beginning I was drawn into this story by seeing the lengths that Kaytu was willing to go to become a CAV pilot. It was slightly comical, but also very freaking crazy! I needed/wanted to understand his desperate need for redemption and why he chose the battlefield of all places?! I will also admit that there were parts in the beginning where I did zone out a little (sooo much information) but that feeling quickly passed as the story picked up.After my initial curiosity was satisfied, it was the supporting characters, the camaraderie, and the battles that kept my eyes glued to the pages. The characters were flawed, but flawed in the best of ways and to see their growth individually as well as a platoon really made this book memorable. There was also much in the way of action, violence, and military tactics which would appeal to any fan of military fiction. Overall, Cry Pilot just gives the reader a wild ride in every way possible and it is a story that I would highly recommend!This review is based on a complimentary book I received from Penguin Random House. It is an honest and voluntary review. The complimentary receipt of it in no way affected my review or rating.
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  • Roy
    January 1, 1970
    This is a book about the consequences of human beings destroying the Earth and the repercussions of trying to fix it. The writing was economical and to the point. It took a while for the characters to be fleshed out since there is a large cast of characters, however I think it was done remarkably well considering the length of the book. Especially the relationship between Ting and Kaytu, which we follow from the very beginning and see it evolve. Can’t wait for Burn Cycle.
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  • Adriana
    January 1, 1970
    June 12, 2019 - I have THOUGHTS, OPINIONS, and EXCITED RAMBLINGS in mind for how much I was pulled in by this book, but they'd make no sense whatsoever if I tried to put them down now. So, for now, I'll just say that this is a fantastic science fiction story that any fan of the genre should read.June 22, 2019 - Okay. So I've calmed down and thought it through enough to be able to write a coherent review. CRY PILOT is set is a dystopian future where humanity lives in walled skyrise-like cities wh June 12, 2019 - I have THOUGHTS, OPINIONS, and EXCITED RAMBLINGS in mind for how much I was pulled in by this book, but they'd make no sense whatsoever if I tried to put them down now. So, for now, I'll just say that this is a fantastic science fiction story that any fan of the genre should read.June 22, 2019 - Okay. So I've calmed down and thought it through enough to be able to write a coherent review. CRY PILOT is set is a dystopian future where humanity lives in walled skyrise-like cities while they wait for a terraforming miasma to regenerate the Earth. The main problem in this world run by corporations is that the terraforming is also reviving the terrifying bio-weaponry of the war that almost destroyed humanity. To combat that, an elite army led by each of the corporations is in place. Our main character wants to join that army to make up for the sins of his past but the only way for him to achieve it is by becoming a sacrificial lamb battery for a weapon. An experience that almost no one survives. We follow Kaytu through every step of his becoming a soldier and fighting the newest threat that humanity faces. Along the way, we meet incredibly interesting characters (that I'm still mad at Dane for making me like so much, because, War), learn more about the world, and how that shaped Kaytu's past and his present mission. It's all presented in a voice that reads true to the time and place and really pulls you in. The training scenarios and the battles are written in such a way that you actually feel the adrenaline right along with Kaytu and the rest of his unit. Even the bizarre science and made up technology makes perfect sense once the story starts gaining traction, and it does so pretty early on.So I'm going to repeat myself and say that this is a book that deserves to be read enthusiastically, heaped with praise, and will definitely be worth the hype.
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  • Realms & Robots
    January 1, 1970
    Cry Pilot features multifaceted worldbuilding in a future where corporations run things side-by-side with the military. The enemies are stronger and the stakes are higher as the world mends from human ineptitude. The book manages to combine military, high-tech, and dystopian science fiction in one compelling narrative, featuring well-drawn characters and central protagonist you want to root for.To start, I’m fascinated by the central enemies in this strange future Earth, the remorts. Imagine a f Cry Pilot features multifaceted worldbuilding in a future where corporations run things side-by-side with the military. The enemies are stronger and the stakes are higher as the world mends from human ineptitude. The book manages to combine military, high-tech, and dystopian science fiction in one compelling narrative, featuring well-drawn characters and central protagonist you want to root for.To start, I’m fascinated by the central enemies in this strange future Earth, the remorts. Imagine a future where we actually get it together enough as a planet to do something about climate change. Imagine that thing is to put everyone into these enormous, tall building cities and terraform the cleared Earth. Imagine the planet becomes this beautiful paradise outside of these sprawling cities, giving way to any number of formerly extinct species. Pretty cool, right? The real epicness lies in the malfunction of this terraforming tool. It wouldn’t be a fancy futuristic technology if there wasn’t something wrong with it. In this instance, mankind was obsessed with war and making terrifying advances in warfare. Imagine that. When things really started to go south, these machines were abandoned throughout the world, eventually decaying. Amazingly, this terraforming process found a way to create these monsters that are part machine, part animal by combining various DNA with the technical elements left in the Earth. It’s like something straight out of Godzilla, but more believable. The concept is staggering and makes for an exhilarating read. In fixing the world, humanity managed to create their greatest enemies. Poetic, isn’t it?I was equally impressed by the extensive worldbuilding that continues throughout the novel. There’s a history of artificial intelligence alongside mankind, birthing all of this technology that gave us the ability to move beyond our planet. There’s the class struggle that would inevitably come from a super cramped mega-city. We also see this juxtaposition of a military society and a corporate society melded into an unhealthy concoction. Overall, the elements work together well to create a compelling story.NOTE: I was provided a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for my honest, unbiased review.
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  • Rosemary
    January 1, 1970
    A dystopian future where a ruined Earth is "terrafixed" and creates AI monsters? SIGN ME UP. Maseo Kaytu is a young man with a past he wants to make up for, and sets his sights on the military to do it. But traditional military channels aren't open to a kid from a refugee camp, so Kaytu finds an alternate route: as a "cry pilot", the name given to pilots who take on suicide missions against some of the most horrifying monsters. He beats the odds, survives, and thrives in the infantry, where he f A dystopian future where a ruined Earth is "terrafixed" and creates AI monsters? SIGN ME UP. Maseo Kaytu is a young man with a past he wants to make up for, and sets his sights on the military to do it. But traditional military channels aren't open to a kid from a refugee camp, so Kaytu finds an alternate route: as a "cry pilot", the name given to pilots who take on suicide missions against some of the most horrifying monsters. He beats the odds, survives, and thrives in the infantry, where he forms close bonds with his fellow soldiers. But his platoon is sent up against a new, even worse monster - and the "patriots" that guard their homes against the military are just as much of a threat. Kaytu will have to re-evaluate everything he's gone into the military intending to carry out in order to stay alive.Cry Pilot is near-unputdownable. It's solid sci-fi with monsters and mechs, phenomenal world-building, and a diverse group of characters I immediately bonded to. It's a Starship Troopers kind camaraderie (minus the overt propaganda/anti-war message), and fans of corporate military sci fi - think Peter Tieryas' United States of Japan and Mecha Samurai Empire, with a liberal splash of Pacific Rim - will eat this up. The book is out today, and I've already been telling everyone I know about it for the last two weeks.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Do you like unapologetically violent military fiction? Good. Do you like rogue-bioweapons and the speculative fiction about the inevitable collapse of society due to humanity's dependency on AIs? Groovy. Do you like action packed sci fi whose world building includes LGBTA+ characters, poly-am relationships, multi-parent families, gender-neutral honorifics, and more POCs than you can shake a nutrient-tube at? WELL, AUNCLE JOEL HAS A BOOK FOR YOU!I'm subscribed to about eight different "YOU SHOULD Do you like unapologetically violent military fiction? Good. Do you like rogue-bioweapons and the speculative fiction about the inevitable collapse of society due to humanity's dependency on AIs? Groovy. Do you like action packed sci fi whose world building includes LGBTA+ characters, poly-am relationships, multi-parent families, gender-neutral honorifics, and more POCs than you can shake a nutrient-tube at? WELL, AUNCLE JOEL HAS A BOOK FOR YOU!I'm subscribed to about eight different "YOU SHOULD READ THESE" email lists and Cry Pilot popped up on approximately ten of them. I love military fiction, science fiction, and sci-fi pilots in general (anyone that knows me has seen my shrines to Wedge Antilles and Jeff Moreau), so I've had this novel earmarked for a few months. So imagine my face when I won a Goodreads ARC contest and the book arrived on my doorstep two months before the release date! I know it looks bad that it took me an entire month to read this but consider that I actually read it, cover to cover, in two sittings. I have dedicated two entire days to doing nothing but reading this novel. It's just that exciting.Honestly, I loved this book. Maseo was a great character with lovable flaws. I was rooting for him through the entire book, even when he wasn't at his best. I loved Ting from the moment she started asking questions. (I read all of her lines in Erika Ishii's voice. Please tell me she's doing the audiobook.) I also loved that everyone was queer and the book did not bat an eyelash about it -- I was absolutely charmed that Maseo was in love with Rana from the first time he saw her onyx features BUT ALSO never referred to Shakrabarti as anything other than sexy. When the book took a moment to describe the intricacies of the 'platoon being a sprawling plural marriage', I had to laugh -- I've read so many books and comics where queer relationships are subtext or, at best, secret, and this book's just throwing it out there in the open. Did it matter in the context of the story? Nope! Did it matter to me, an aspiring writer, with LGBTQ+ and poly-am friends? ABSOLUTELY. I also loved that, as near as I can tell, the only two white people in this entire novel are Cali-Du and Tech Specialist Gaaldine. I mean, this novel was a delight.My only regret was that I felt this book was kind of rushed. I wish it had more time to percolate. There were so many worldbuilding elements thrown at me within the first hundred pages that I kind of zoned out and prayed there would be another two books to remind me of all the terminology I zoomed past. About half way through the novel it occurred to me that I never read what MYRAGE was: was it explained? It was about this time that I realized Technopaths were being introduced wayyyy late in the game -- I wish they were introduced earlier.TL;DR: Did you love the Southern Reach Trilogy, with those crazy alien mushroom pod people? Great! Did you love Hunger Games, with all of those poor dystopian capitalist society children fighting each other to the death for entertainment? Great! Did you enjoy Starship Troopers, with all those adorable cadets and nasty bugs? GREAT! This novel is all of that tossed in a blender, just churned until it looks like lichen-potatoes and tastes like cyberpunk -- complete with gene-splicing and body-mods!Sweet biyo, check this one out!
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    When the odds of survival are slim to none, you can either give in or keep fighting like the squad does in Cry Pilot by Joel Dane.To read this, and other book reviews, visit my website: http://makinggoodstories.wordpress.com/.Earth is in a devastated state with bio-weapons going rogue and attacking citizens of all Classes. Maseo Katyu is a man filled with secrets and a haunted by his past, which leaves him with one avenue for joining the military: volunteering to be a cry pilot, which is essenti When the odds of survival are slim to none, you can either give in or keep fighting like the squad does in Cry Pilot by Joel Dane.To read this, and other book reviews, visit my website: http://makinggoodstories.wordpress.com/.Earth is in a devastated state with bio-weapons going rogue and attacking citizens of all Classes. Maseo Katyu is a man filled with secrets and a haunted by his past, which leaves him with one avenue for joining the military: volunteering to be a cry pilot, which is essentially a suicide mission. Cheating the system with some ingenious lock-picking bonespur tech, Katyu manages to survive the unlikely odds and is able to join the military, with all the joys of basic training. Assigned to a group of misfits, Katyu learns how to obey orders, train with precision, and gradually gets closer to his squadmates, which leaves his past vulnerable to being discovered. With an unidentifiable and seemingly undefeatable bio-weapon wreaking havoc on all forces it faces, Katyu's moderately tested and prepared squad goes up against this rogue entity, and most odds, in the hopes of being able to accomplish what other groups have not.Action-packed, this novel moves rapidly from event to event, carrying the reader through the developing story at a dizzying speed that mimics the squads' whirlwind and secret-infused experience. The technology used and world's state are depicted and built well to be a believable progression into a potential future state of society; the societal and familial structure is incredibly fascinating with multi-parent families and diversity in all possible attributes of the characters. Katyu is an intriguing character with some complexities that mark him as a flawed yet redeemable and likable human as he strives to clear his personal ledger of a past action that led to horrific loss; the other characters are also interesting in how they are presented and how they develop into more complex versions of their former selves through their trials.*I received an ARC of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    I won this ARC in a Goodreads giveaway. This is the first thing I've read by the author. I'm not sure how to describe the genre of this book, maybe optimistic dystopian cyberpunk? Great flow and an interesting story that felt new and innovative. The characters are well developed but they leave you interested in hearing their backstories. I hope there is a sequel or some prequels coming out.
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  • Pat
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of "Cry Pilot" by Joel Dane through the "Good Reads First Reads Giveaway."I avoid science fiction books in general and I am confused why I even tried for this one! This novel is about a future "Military World" which includes many insightful and imaginative episodes. Although it's characters may confuse some readers, others will like this future world described by the author.I personally find this a challenging book to read but this is more about me. I think the author is t I received a free copy of "Cry Pilot" by Joel Dane through the "Good Reads First Reads Giveaway."I avoid science fiction books in general and I am confused why I even tried for this one! This novel is about a future "Military World" which includes many insightful and imaginative episodes. Although it's characters may confuse some readers, others will like this future world described by the author.I personally find this a challenging book to read but this is more about me. I think the author is talented and it is a difficult story to tell.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    This was an excellent book and is in the same vein as Heinlein's Starship Troopers and John Scalzi's Old Man's War. While it is a space opera, it does deal with some very interesting topics. Most noteworthy it focuses on the role of preparing combat troops for battle and the balance between technological advancement and need for humanity. The overarching focus is repentance and what the role of repentance and impact of achieving it. If you liked sci fi, this is an excellent book that reads fast This was an excellent book and is in the same vein as Heinlein's Starship Troopers and John Scalzi's Old Man's War. While it is a space opera, it does deal with some very interesting topics. Most noteworthy it focuses on the role of preparing combat troops for battle and the balance between technological advancement and need for humanity. The overarching focus is repentance and what the role of repentance and impact of achieving it. If you liked sci fi, this is an excellent book that reads fast and really picks up the pacer after the first 50 pages or so
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  • Torrey Grennan
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as part of a Goodreads Giveaway.Good military scifi of the go through training and then fight variety. World building was excellent. A both believable and far fetched future earth. And the characters were not just one dimensional. Interested to see if there's a second book. Plenty of story left for there to be one, but also works if it's a stand alone.
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    Great story! Keeps your attention from beginning to end. Love the characters and their interactions. I highly recommend this book for a entertaining read. I won this book in a GoodReads Giveaway.
  • Sam
    January 1, 1970
    I got this as part of a giveaway. Honestly 4.5/5 stars. It's a book that you'll hate putting down, and will hope for a sequel of.I just have one suggestion...edit pg.55...there is some unnecessary nonsense needs to be gotten rid of, that comes across as creepy & poorly written. Not to mention that it makes me automatically assume, that character is going to be an unintelligent jackass. Literally. I read that shit and whatever love I have for the character, is instantly tanked. I held the cha I got this as part of a giveaway. Honestly 4.5/5 stars. It's a book that you'll hate putting down, and will hope for a sequel of.I just have one suggestion...edit pg.55...there is some unnecessary nonsense needs to be gotten rid of, that comes across as creepy & poorly written. Not to mention that it makes me automatically assume, that character is going to be an unintelligent jackass. Literally. I read that shit and whatever love I have for the character, is instantly tanked. I held the character at arms distance for a while, waiting to see if he would say more of the same. I was ready to put the book down if he did. So just remove it, it's just bad writing.Otherwise, this book is amazing! I love the characters, because none of them are annoying or stereotypical. You get to know them by picking up tidbits as you read along, instead of having it all feed to you. That's a welcome change, compared so many other books. If you do edit this book... please don't get rid of the half-page prologue at the beginning of the book. That was a PERFECT set up and back story! Not many people can do that with so few words! Gold star! Also, I love the handling of sex & sexuality throughout the book. It's treated as no big deal and I didn't have to read any phobic bullshit. Now, I'm also not one for heavily military stories, they usually get bogged down with too much jargon and whatnot, but this was well done. You made it flow smoothly, and kept away from so many overdone tropes.The final things that I want to mention are the bioweapons. This was an "okay-ish" sounding concept when I read the back cover, but by god did you deliver! After I found out what exactly you meant when you said bioweapons, I was hooked! I expected something with cyborgs, or bombs that attacked life on a cellular level. But nooooo! Oh ho, no. Nothing that mundane. Oh man, just reading about the millipedes and the suits. DAMN! I would love to see what a CAV or a lamprey truly looks like. Good job on giving just enough information to imagine them, but not quite enough, so that they stayed alien. ****Spoilers?*****So first off, for anyone reading this. Backstory: there was a war, war is over, machines are left to rust, the Earth is wrecked and they have a thing called New Growth that is rehabilitating earth. It goes around and finds extinct life and recreates it. Okay, well, it does this, but here is the thing...the machines were bio-mechanic. So yeah, it brings them back to life with their original directives, which were to kill. So there are these giant bio-machines going around, zombie like, killing people and it starts off another war. There are several types of these machines, but my personal favorite were these giant, heavily armored vehicles that look like millipedes. They open up and drop off these human like bio suits, and use them to attack. The whole thing is actually way more disturbing sounding, but it's so freaking cool. Everything that I've mentioned so far...is just from the beginning of the story, there are so many things in this book! You'll love it!
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  • Kristin Lunz Trujillo
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this was great world building with a strong plot. The very beginning of the book was compelling. Some of the ideas were pretty original, so 4 to 5 stars on the conceptualization. However, as someone with little military know-how I was often dragged down by the details and jargon. A lot of the other reviewers on here said that they had a hard time putting this book down, but I had the opposite experience - it took me forever to finish. Parts of the book were repetitive, such as the basi I thought this was great world building with a strong plot. The very beginning of the book was compelling. Some of the ideas were pretty original, so 4 to 5 stars on the conceptualization. However, as someone with little military know-how I was often dragged down by the details and jargon. A lot of the other reviewers on here said that they had a hard time putting this book down, but I had the opposite experience - it took me forever to finish. Parts of the book were repetitive, such as the basic training parts. I realize this was partially to develop the relationships between characters, but the situations didn't vary enough and even with this development portion of the book some of the characters were still fairly one-dimensional.Overall, I think this is a decent read.Thank you to Goodreads and the publisher for a free ARC.
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  • J Kochanski
    January 1, 1970
    The title "Cry Pilot" is what peaked my interest, I had no idea what it meant but I wanted to know. I ordered the book and dug in, currently about 75-80% done. I gotta say, it's not at all what I thought it would be, the first 1/3 kind of left me wondering if I want to continue and I felt somewhat disappointed at the premise of the book but that's because my expectations were totally elsewhere.However, the story redeems itself and now I can't seem to put it down. I was sold on this story. It's a The title "Cry Pilot" is what peaked my interest, I had no idea what it meant but I wanted to know. I ordered the book and dug in, currently about 75-80% done. I gotta say, it's not at all what I thought it would be, the first 1/3 kind of left me wondering if I want to continue and I felt somewhat disappointed at the premise of the book but that's because my expectations were totally elsewhere.However, the story redeems itself and now I can't seem to put it down. I was sold on this story. It's a high tech, futuristic military novel about a man seeking redemption in a platoon filled with misfits. The story is filled with imagination and jargon that takes time adjusting to, but it's not overbearing. For a while, you'll have lots of questions but Joel Dane does a good job of world-building and slowly revealing the details that matter. At a certain point in the story, everything sort of clicked and I understood these characters and this world. Though this isn't typically my genre of interest, I am totally captivated and look forward to the finish.|||||||||||||||||||ok, I finished the book and wow, what a ride. I am definitely onboard for book #2 [Burn Cycle]
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  • Yablon
    January 1, 1970
    WHY IS THE COVER SO GENERIC?This is immense fun and stands out from a lot of military scifi by heavily borrowing from manga and anime plots instead of the usual boring inspirations of starship troopers and "my time in the army".Great action, fantastic worldbuilding that really makes it stand out from the usual "earth is a mess now" settings we've seen of late and yet both the cover and the promotional material made it seem so generic to me until I started reading.
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  • Paul Sparks
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so good I received a reprimand from my wife for devoting more time to listening to it than to listen to her! this is easily in my top 3 books of the year, the narrator was very good but the story was even better and I look forward to the next book with true anticipation
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  • Stacy Blomquist
    January 1, 1970
    Orphaned by a rebellion, Maseo Kaytu builds a family, of sorts, out of his military platoon. The world-building is interesting, with government in the hands of corporations, but the descriptions of the remorts and lampreys (the enemy) lack details, leaving the battle scenes somewhat vague.
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  • Joy Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    Unique and interestingGood character development, great world building, and really intriguing plot. LOTS of action. Now, to see if there is a sequel yet.
  • Katie Stanley
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant story! Anticipating the sequel next year
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