Things We Say in the Dark
A shocking collection of dark stories, ranging from chilling contemporary fairytales to disturbing supernatural fiction, by a talented writer who has been compared to Angela Carter.So here we go, into the dark.Some things can’t be spoken about in the light of day. But we can visit our fears at night, in the dark. We can turn them over and weigh them in our hands and maybe that will protect us from them. But maybe not.The characters in this collection find their aspirations for happy homes, happy families and happy memories dissected and imbued with shimmering menace. Alone in a remote house in Iceland a woman is unnerved by her isolation; another can only find respite from the clinging ghost that follows her by submerging herself in an overgrown pool. Couples wrestle with a lack of connection to their children; a schoolgirl becomes obsessed with the female anatomical models in a museum; and a cheery account of child’s day out is undercut by chilling footnotes.These dark tales explore women’s fears with electrifying honesty and invention and speak to one another about female bodies, domestic claustrophobia, desire and violence. From a talented writer who has been compared to Angela Carter, Things We Say in the Dark is a powerful contemporary collection of feminist stories, ranging from vicious fairy tales to disturbing horror and tender ghost stories.KIRSTY LOGAN WAS SELECTED AS ONE OF BRITAIN'S TEN MOST OUTSTANDING LGBTQ WRITERS by Val McDermid for the International Literature Showcase in 2019

Things We Say in the Dark Details

TitleThings We Say in the Dark
Author
ReleaseOct 3rd, 2019
PublisherHarvill Secker
ISBN-139781787301535
Rating
GenreShort Stories, Horror, Fantasy, Fiction, LGBT, Feminism

Things We Say in the Dark Review

  • Kirsty
    January 1, 1970
    I wrote this!And some people have reviewed it!"Just in time for Halloween comes Kirsty Logan’s deeply, deeply unsettling and brilliant collection of short stories. Some feature horror, nearly all feature dread and, in the manner of Shirley Jackson, all will burrow their way into your brain and not let go." - Stylist"In a literary world seemingly saturated with gaudy horror that attempts to induce fear through the ill-treatment of women and the harmful othering of disabi I wrote this!And some people have reviewed it!"Just in time for Halloween comes Kirsty Logan’s deeply, deeply unsettling and brilliant collection of short stories. Some feature horror, nearly all feature dread and, in the manner of Shirley Jackson, all will burrow their way into your brain and not let go." - Stylist"In a literary world seemingly saturated with gaudy horror that attempts to induce fear through the ill-treatment of women and the harmful othering of disabilities, Kirsty Logan is here to shine a flickering light on what horror could and should be...Logan is truly one of the best contemporary horror writers. Inclusive, powerful and eerie, Things We Say in the Dark is a dark shimmering potion of both unease and nourishment." - The Skinny"Logan aims for the jugular – the things that unsettle us most. Her poetic, supernatural prose has lace edges of sticky, violent terror." - The Herald"In Logan’s quick-witted feminist realm, manipulative men will always get their comeuppance." - New Statesman"Feminist horror stories your inner goth will thank you for." - Cosmopolitan"Logan's prose shimmers with menace, and her tightly wrought nightmares feel intensely real." - i --If you've picked this book up - THANK YOU and I hope you enjoy it!
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  • Hannah Rials
    January 1, 1970
    Stunning. Horrifying. The fastest I've ever read a short story collection. I can't get enough of this writer!
  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Her best collection yet. Daring, challenging, dark and dreadful (in the most literal sense), this is a book about women's fears, human fears, the fears of being a person. This is a short story writer at the top of her game.
  • Arielle Walker
    January 1, 1970
    I almost (almost) wish this had been released in time for me to read during my own residency in Iceland - although I think that would have been too much for my poor, fragile, terrified heart to take. Especially in the first few days of the residency, when I had for some reason decided to go three days early, alone, very ill (having missed and postponed my first flight to Reyjkavik the day before), dragging too many kgs of canned food over the 1.5 kilometre walk from the bus-stop to the residency house o I almost (almost) wish this had been released in time for me to read during my own residency in Iceland - although I think that would have been too much for my poor, fragile, terrified heart to take. Especially in the first few days of the residency, when I had for some reason decided to go three days early, alone, very ill (having missed and postponed my first flight to Reyjkavik the day before), dragging too many kgs of canned food over the 1.5 kilometre walk from the bus-stop to the residency house on the very edge of where the River Blanda meets the ocean in the tiniest little town on the very edge of Iceland's North-West. Reading the pieces in between the stories in Things We Say in the Dark, written in the voice of a woman also alone, also on residency in Iceland, the kind of alone it was very easy to imagine alone at night on the third floor of the old woman's school in the middle of nowhere, with wooden floors that creaked and autumn ocean winds that tried to creep in all the cracks...I leave the lights on in my cabin but when I get back they're always off. I don't bother to lock the door anymore. as no one else is here - and if someone had come in, surely they couldn't still be hiding. Could they? On second thoughts, I'm very glad I read this curled up at home in my own bed on Halloween, instead of alone in Iceland. Kirsty Logan has for knack to getting to the heart of fears - both the alone-in-a-creaky-house kinds, and the far more terrifying everyday kind, the "am I enough in this relationship" and "can this home really hold me" and "is my body crumbling beneath me"and "is this all there is" and "am I enough full stop" kind.We are afraid that someone will come into our house when we don't want them to. We are afraid that the things we fear is already inside. We are afraid that we can't make it leave. We are afraid that the lock on the door will not hold. I didn't particular like the last story (too real, perhaps, and less real for it? or maybe it just made me queasier than the others did), but I adored the rest. Especially "Things My Wife and I Found Hidden in Our House", which I want to pin up forever on my studio wall and look at in the reminder that this story is what I want to be when I (and my thesis) grow up, and "We Can Make Something Grow Between the Mushrooms and the Snow" (I would happily live in the Island House right now), and "Sleep Long, Sleep Tight, it is Best to Wake Up Late". Also special mention to "The World's More Full of Weeping Than You Can Understand" for the most excellent (and deeply disturbing) use of footnotes. Logan really plays with form in this collection, and it's so rewarding. Real-estate listings and questionnaires and theme-park rides and stories-within-stories and tense-shits and POV shifts (and of course the aforementioned footnotes) are deployed effortlessly and I devoured it all and wanted more more more. Oh, and the titles themselves makes the contents page read like a decadent poem in its own right.(tl;dr - I will read anything Kirsty Logan writes, and I think you should too)NOTE: After the first couple of days of dream-haze solitude and not leaving my room once it got dark, my fellow artists-in-residence did in fact arrive and join me in Blönduós, Iceland, and I had the most wonderful month of making surrounded by lovely people. I probably could have survived the reading of this once they were all there with me. I'll have to trial it next time.NOTE TWO: I still can't tell if the pomegranate on the cover is a photograph or illustration, it seems to change every time I look at it, but either way it's both lovely and creepy. Maybe that statement in itself is actually a more perfect, simple but accurate review of this book?
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  • Caspian Reid
    January 1, 1970
    I adored this! I love horror but have found it hard to find horror books that capture a genuine unsettling feeling - this delivers in spades. I've loved Kirsty Logan's work for years, and reading this felt like a natural expansion of her previous works. The folklore, relationships, and smooth writing style are all familiar, but the depth of darkness and grossness are new. It felt real and present to see queer individuals and couples, not just as dying side characters but with their own plots and I adored this! I love horror but have found it hard to find horror books that capture a genuine unsettling feeling - this delivers in spades. I've loved Kirsty Logan's work for years, and reading this felt like a natural expansion of her previous works. The folklore, relationships, and smooth writing style are all familiar, but the depth of darkness and grossness are new. It felt real and present to see queer individuals and couples, not just as dying side characters but with their own plots and characters. I'd recommend this to anyone, but please do be careful if pregnancy is a trigger for you, as it is a large focus in the book.
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  • Callum McLaughlin
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes a book sounds so tailored towards your taste that it could never possibly live up to your sky-high hopes. I fear that was the case for me with Logan’s Things We Say in the Dark, a collection of feminist horror stories that was easily one of my most anticipated releases of the year.There are definitely lots of things to admire here. Logan’s prose is always readable, but it’s punctuated by moments of linguistic beauty, with vivid and evocative imagery peppered throughout. Some of Sometimes a book sounds so tailored towards your taste that it could never possibly live up to your sky-high hopes. I fear that was the case for me with Logan’s Things We Say in the Dark, a collection of feminist horror stories that was easily one of my most anticipated releases of the year.There are definitely lots of things to admire here. Logan’s prose is always readable, but it’s punctuated by moments of linguistic beauty, with vivid and evocative imagery peppered throughout. Some of these disturbing tableaus are sure to linger in the mind. The stories themselves are mostly contemporary, but there’s a timeless quality to the themes being explored. Namely, the domestic fears of everyday life – particularly those that haunt young women. Logan takes the things we’re told by society to aim for – the gorgeous home, the perfect family, the successful life – and spins our apprehensions about them into what reads like a series of fever dreams, as though she has literally documented her nightmares in the form of a dream diary. What if our houses aren’t the safe spaces we always imagined? What if you find the experience of pregnancy and childbirth horrifying rather than beautiful? How would you cope if your child wasn’t healthy or happy? What if you wished you’d never become a parent at all? What if you can never escape the horrors of your past? These fears and more are explored in claustrophobic, hypnotic ways by employing a dash of fairy tale, a twist of the supernatural, and a generous pinch of magical realism.With around 20 stories in all, this is a generous collection. Though I very much enjoyed the dark, ethereal tone employed throughout, there were comparatively few that stood out as individual highlights. Those that did were Birds Fell From the Sky and Each One Spoke in Your Voice, which follows a man haunted by the long-ago death of his brother, and Good Good Good, Nice Nice Nice, a semi sci-fi tale about a woman who works at a baby growing farm (it’s hard to explain), who is struggling with the care of her own sickly baby. Other stories I enjoyed included one about a woman who feels isolated after moving to a new country, one about a woman who has fallen in love with her friend, and one about a woman who discovers disturbing realities regarding her deceased grandmother when she inherits her house.Sadly, most of the other stories began to blend into one, making this a collection I’m far more likely to remember for its overall mood than I am for its specific plots and characters. Whilst I was consistently hooked by the fantastic concepts and themes at play, a few too many stories tipped into ‘weird for the sake of being weird’ territory for my personal taste. It’s a shame, as when this collection is good, it’s very, very good. I’m more than willing to accept that my own high expectations contributed to my slightly lukewarm response. Logan is still an author I very much admire, and I will continue to follow her career with excitement.
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  • Katarína Laurošková
    January 1, 1970
    The book starts with a short introduction from the “author” herself, where she is set in Iceland, in a remote village without any distractions. The collection carries many autobiographical features, as Logan was actually writing this book in Iceland. From short passages, we can observe how the book is being written, which gives us a bit of break between individual stories. She wanted to add this dimension into the story as it gives the reader the feeling of comfort and realisation, that the stor The book starts with a short introduction from the “author” herself, where she is set in Iceland, in a remote village without any distractions. The collection carries many autobiographical features, as Logan was actually writing this book in Iceland. From short passages, we can observe how the book is being written, which gives us a bit of break between individual stories. She wanted to add this dimension into the story as it gives the reader the feeling of comfort and realisation, that the stories are “only” stories, imaginary things that do not need to scare us in real life. However, as the book progresses, the narrative grows darker and the boundaries between the stories and author are slowly disappearing, leaving the reader in the dark. Even though this book is not very long, it took Logan almost two years to write and there is no wonder why. Constant thinking about your fears and watching horror movies as a part of “research” can be a bit too much at times. She even admitted, that all the characters in the stories are named after famous horror movie characters, but no one yet discovered all of them.The book is divided into three parts, each one connected to a specific fear. Firstly, we have a The House, stories about boundaries and limits. In Birds Fell From the Sky and Each One Spoke in Your Voice, we follow Sidney, owner of a shop full of nineties memorabilia. He hears mysterious telephone ringing at night, even though he realises it can’t be true. One day, the presence of an unsettling customer reminds him, that you can never fully forget your past.The second part is dealing with children, pregnancy and the fear of being a parent. My personal favourite was a short story called The Only Time I Think of You is All the Time. Probably the only story getting closer to ghosts, as we meet a woman, who is being constantly followed by the presence of “Brigitte” everywhere she goes. She feels that there is no immediate danger, but her mumbling, a touch of hands or moving of objects still gives her no space to live in peace. The only place where Brigitte cannot find her is in a dark pond at the end of the garden. But what happens if she discovers her hiding place?Last but not least, the third part deals with more primal fears, such as eating or sleep. Many of the stories of Things We Say in the Dark are written in an unusual way. There is one in the form of a questionnaire, just the absence of answers building the tension. Another interesting concept is a short story, that looks like a regular recollection of a day on the beach, yet the footnotes tell a different story. These playful forms are interesting not only for a reader but the author herself. As she claims: “I had to experiment with form to not get bored of myself. It is important to take your work seriously, but equally important is to know how to make fun of yourself”.So if you are still looking for the perfect book to read during Halloween, having enough of ghosts and haunted houses, try to read this great collection of “realistic” scary stories. You will not be disappointed.
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  • Geertje
    January 1, 1970
    A dark and feminist collection of short stories. As with most collections, there were stories I felt were really strong and some that I found weak, but overall a good collection. I don't think it will appeal to everyone (it is quite strange in places), but then again it is not meant to. My absolute favourite was "Girls are Always Hungry When all the Men are Bite-Size", which fired my imagination and has me itching to write something about mediums and spiritualism, albeit in a Victorian setting. A dark and feminist collection of short stories. As with most collections, there were stories I felt were really strong and some that I found weak, but overall a good collection. I don't think it will appeal to everyone (it is quite strange in places), but then again it is not meant to. My absolute favourite was "Girls are Always Hungry When all the Men are Bite-Size", which fired my imagination and has me itching to write something about mediums and spiritualism, albeit in a Victorian setting. I also felt that "Birds Fell From the Sky and Each One spoke in Your Voice" was a really good, more traditional ghost story that explores themes of guilt and culpability, and I loved "The Only Thing I Can't Tell You is Why" for its exploration into postnatal depression and alienation. Furthermore, I would like to thank this book for making me aware of the existence of such horrors as the Anatomical Venus, which will undoubtedly haunt many of my dreams to come.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    Read October 2019Kirsty Logan has done it again. I loved this one so much! It’s different, much darker, than her previous books, but at the same time still so recognisably her with the writing and story themes. Looking forward to see what she does next!
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  • Gabriela Pop
    January 1, 1970
    DNF'ed close-ish to the end. I will say that is absolutely more on me than it is the book; I rarely find short story collections that appeal to me as a whole and I feel like while I can objectively admit that the stories were really smart and haunting and I can see what the author was trying to achieve, not enough of them struck a chord with me so that they'd keep me engaged and wanting to read on. Quite a few of the ones in the first part of the book stood out to me and I think they were memora DNF'ed close-ish to the end. I will say that is absolutely more on me than it is the book; I rarely find short story collections that appeal to me as a whole and I feel like while I can objectively admit that the stories were really smart and haunting and I can see what the author was trying to achieve, not enough of them struck a chord with me so that they'd keep me engaged and wanting to read on. Quite a few of the ones in the first part of the book stood out to me and I think they were memorable enough, but I found myself more or less dreading the ones in the 2nd part. It could be because I think pregnancy/motherhood related horror is some of the most disturbing stuff there is, but it could also be that they didn't really click with me. I'd definitely say if you are a short story person and want something dark and haunting to pick up at Halloween this may end up being the book for you, so do give it a shot if it sounds like your thing
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  • Alexandra Pearson
    January 1, 1970
    Some of the stories here were worth 5 stars and some were worth 3 and some genuinely horrified me and made it hard to sleep, which is pretty hard to find. Kirsty Logan really managed to get into my head with this collection, and I loved the thread that was pulling it all together. I really enjoyed The Gloaming and this is a fabulous, incredibly dark follow-up.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Logan's best collection to date. Raw, scary, terrible and brutally honest. Horror stories for how we live now.
  • Chloe
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars rounded up simply because Kirsty's beautiful prose gets me in the gut every time. As with many short story collections, there were some really memorable, visceral stories that I'll definitely revisit and some less successful. I love the lyrical way Kirsty writes, her themes, ideas and flavour so I always look forward to reading her work.
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  • Chloe
    January 1, 1970
    There were some very good stories in this collection, but the quality was very uneven. There were a lot of stories that felt false and contrived - weird for the sake of being weird. There was also a lot of repetition and way too many stories about babies (my least favourite subject to read about).
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  • Eoin Mulligan
    January 1, 1970
    Mixing fairytales, feminism, body horror, domestic terror and sense of dread that grows page by page, Logan has threaded together a collection of stories unlike anything I’ve ever come across before. Perfect for fans of horror powerhouses like Shirley Jackson and Stephen King.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    I devoured this book, and savoured so many of its stories. Most of them, in some usually fantastical way, explore the dizzying gamut of what women experience - today and throughout history. Indeed, there is a definite emphasis on the legacy of pain and suffering women keep inheriting from our mothers/our lineage of female ancestors (The stories 'The Only Time I Think of You is All the Time', 'Things my Wife and I Found Hidden in Our House' come to mind). Many of the narratives feature same-sex-a I devoured this book, and savoured so many of its stories. Most of them, in some usually fantastical way, explore the dizzying gamut of what women experience - today and throughout history. Indeed, there is a definite emphasis on the legacy of pain and suffering women keep inheriting from our mothers/our lineage of female ancestors (The stories 'The Only Time I Think of You is All the Time', 'Things my Wife and I Found Hidden in Our House' come to mind). Many of the narratives feature same-sex-attracted women (sometimes in heartbreaking ways - 'Sleep, you Black-Eyed Pig, Fall into a Deep Pit of Ghosts' and 'Exquisite Corpse'), which I appreciated a lot. Some didn't work for me (I'm still not too sure about the interweaved narration of the writing of the book), but even those I could appreciate the imagination behind and enjoyed in some way. I was going to list my favourites but there were too many - and the titles too (delightfully) long. But I will say that the very last one - 'Watch the Wall, my Darling, While the Gentlemen go by' - hit me so, so hard, and was a terribly perfect note to end this deeply macabre little book on. I was chilled by many moments in these stories, and relished their many complexities. Logan draws from fairytales and legends in a really interesting way (the appropriation of the legend of Camelot in 'Half Sick of Shadows'! Oh my god!), and so I can see why she's been compared to Angela Carter - but she's doing something different here I think. As I noted, there's a complexity to Logan's voice that I have found to be somewhat missing in Carter's. And any way, there doesn't need to be a comparison at all - she's doing her own thing here. And it's great. I can't wait to read more by her!
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  • Daisy
    January 1, 1970
    Quality Rating: Four StarsEnjoyment Rating: Four Stars◆ Thank you Harvill Secker for the uncorrected proof! ◆A girl leaves her window open to the monster that calls to her, while a couple explores treetops, caves and icy landscapes looking for the right home, and a woman sleeps with a marble man to escape a ghost. My favourites followed a Kelpie's revenge, a woman isolated in the city, and parents taking their child to an amusement park where things are not what the Quality Rating: Four StarsEnjoyment Rating: Four Stars◆ Thank you Harvill Secker for the uncorrected proof! ◆A girl leaves her window open to the monster that calls to her, while a couple explores treetops, caves and icy landscapes looking for the right home, and a woman sleeps with a marble man to escape a ghost. My favourites followed a Kelpie's revenge, a woman isolated in the city, and parents taking their child to an amusement park where things are not what they seem.Kirsty's short story collection is a lot of things, but above all else it is a haunting commentary on female identity, blurred somewhere between the vengeance of Angela Carter and the unsettling mystery of Shirley Jackson. It's not horror in its gore, its creepy inferences, or prophetic warnings of death and depression - it's horror because in so many ways it's real. Girls are dressed like dolls even when they're corpses, we do fall into the hands of abusers because they feel safe, and disapproving family members do play on our minds even when they're long gone. But with that realism comes empowerment too; it's nice to have lesbians in practically every story without it being a 'thing', and it's damn satisfying for the woman to be the one to swallow the man whole for once (literally).
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Things We Say In The Dark is a collection of short stories on the dark side. There’s some disturbing ones that lean on the supernatural side, ones that blends in fairytales, and ones that twists common fears and anxieties in a way that essentially brings it to life. Pair these up with Logan’s signature ethereal writing and a dash of magical realism and you’ve got yourself a collection of stories that chills you right to your bones.While I do enjoy the claustrophobic and hypnotic unde Things We Say In The Dark is a collection of short stories on the dark side. There’s some disturbing ones that lean on the supernatural side, ones that blends in fairytales, and ones that twists common fears and anxieties in a way that essentially brings it to life. Pair these up with Logan’s signature ethereal writing and a dash of magical realism and you’ve got yourself a collection of stories that chills you right to your bones.While I do enjoy the claustrophobic and hypnotic undertones that these stories have, I have to also admit that I did struggle with some of the stories (e.g. Last One to Leave Please Turn Off The Lights, Strange Blood is Sweeter) that are on the weirder side and do kinda fly over my head. At the same time, I also have to admit that the stories can and do blur together. Some standouts for me personally include Things My Wife And I Found Hidden In Our House, The Only Thing I Can’t Tell You is Why, Good Good Good, Nice Nice Nice & Sleep, You Black-Eyed Pig, Fall Info a Deep Of Ghosts.Altogether, a dark, weird and disturbing collection of stories. Not too freaky or scary, but enough to leave you feeling a little unsettled.
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  • Victoria Catherine Wright
    January 1, 1970
    I am a fan of Kirsty Logan's work and was really looking forward to reading this collection of dark stories which, happily, did not disappoint.These tales are an exploration of fear, seen through a primarily female lens, and held together by the increasingly chilling narrative of a writer working in a remote location in Iceland.  Although surreal, there was a relatable quality to many of the stories and, in particular, the fears being examined. The stories of giving birth to somethin I am a fan of Kirsty Logan's work and was really looking forward to reading this collection of dark stories which, happily, did not disappoint.These tales are an exploration of fear, seen through a primarily female lens, and held together by the increasingly chilling narrative of a writer working in a remote location in Iceland.  Although surreal, there was a relatable quality to many of the stories and, in particular, the fears being examined. The stories of giving birth to something unexpectedly strange brought back my own nightmares from pregnancy.  For me, the most difficult story to read was 'The Only Thing I Can't Tell You Is Why', in which a woman is handed a child she believes to be dead but which everyone else can see is alive. I felt that story captured the fear and intense isolation of PND with surprising clarity. Overall, the stories were beautifully written and conjured some particularly eerie scenes that I struggled to shake off after I closed the book. I enjoyed the author's darker take on the supposedly aspirational aspects of modern life, and came away feeling pleasantly unsettled.
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  • Siobhán
    January 1, 1970
    If you liked Kirsty Logan's other novels / short stories and don't mind it getting even darker, you might this collection. This is about female fears mostly (that's what it says in the description even though I find ascribing genders to emotions highly dubious), about bodies, desire, children, motherhood, and the darkness within. Especially the stories about becoming or a being a mother were scary in parts. Things that are generally perceived as good and desirable are deconstructed and made wron If you liked Kirsty Logan's other novels / short stories and don't mind it getting even darker, you might this collection. This is about female fears mostly (that's what it says in the description even though I find ascribing genders to emotions highly dubious), about bodies, desire, children, motherhood, and the darkness within. Especially the stories about becoming or a being a mother were scary in parts. Things that are generally perceived as good and desirable are deconstructed and made wrong. These aren't really horror stories even though some stories have elements of it in them. As always it's really hard to describe the content of Kirsty Logan stories. Parts were like fairy tales gone wrong, nightmares or supernatural hauntings. I did enjoy reading them even though they were scary in parts and incredibly violent. 4 Stars because some stories felt as if a bit more would have given it more depth.
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  • Ross Jeffery
    January 1, 1970
    A very delicious slice of horror - a couple of the stories I've read before but they are so good they are worthy of the re-read and the new content... just wow! Logan is able to voice and convey the darkest of thoughts and emotions, giving life to those small utterances we say or think in the dark when no one is watching us. A fierce collection that deserves your time. Longer review coming to STORGY.
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  • vgl3
    January 1, 1970
    Sadly, I fear my high expectations of this book are partly to blame for my lack of enjoyment. On the surface, this seemed exactly my type of short story collection - horrific, feminist twists on home, relationships and one’s own body. Unfortunately, and despite some lyrical writing, they were all too similar, becoming increasingly repetitive and indistinguishable, both in regards to language and imagery. I tried to space out my reading of them, hoping that distance would allow me to appreciate t Sadly, I fear my high expectations of this book are partly to blame for my lack of enjoyment. On the surface, this seemed exactly my type of short story collection - horrific, feminist twists on home, relationships and one’s own body. Unfortunately, and despite some lyrical writing, they were all too similar, becoming increasingly repetitive and indistinguishable, both in regards to language and imagery. I tried to space out my reading of them, hoping that distance would allow me to appreciate their concepts more, but to no avail - after a short time, the particulars of each story became lost, reinforcing the sense that they were ultimately lacking in substance. These are not bad, or poorly written, stories, but they left me feeling nothing, and none stuck in my mind for very long.
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  • Matt Hunt
    January 1, 1970
    No idea what was going on with me to give this rating. It was at once five star writing and I also just couldn’t read it and I feel really guilty about not liking it, I’ve loved all her other work. Read the rental heart instead, heaven.
  • Brandon
    January 1, 1970
    A punchy little collection of some really great surrealist horror stories! I started off wanting to read one each night before bed, but accidentally read the last hundred or so pages in a single night. Whoops.
  • Angela
    January 1, 1970
    I could not put this down! This collection will make you think and reflect, and will horrify you all at once. And after the last story, I am scared to go to bed! I felt everything that the characters felt, and I will be reading everything I can get my hands on from this author.
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  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    Another wee belter of eery, enticing and unsettling delights. Not just a read for Autumn but for Life. One to savour in wee sips and return to. Unleashes brilliant reader imaginations like fireworks. Scary, sad, funny and true.
  • Lorin✨
    January 1, 1970
    Me, rating a Kirsty Logan book 5*? Shocking. Truly groundbreaking.
  • caitlín
    January 1, 1970
    i’m desperate to read this. UGH
  • Sinéad
    January 1, 1970
    4 1/2 ⭐’s. Genuinely creepy and plays on the very real fears and anxieties of every day life. 4 1/2 ⭐️’s. Genuinely creepy and plays on the very real fears and anxieties of every day life.
  • Susanne (Pages of Crime)
    January 1, 1970
    Strange. Creepy. Strong. Weird. Clever.
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