Murder at Kensington Palace (A Wrexford & Sloane Mystery Book 3)
Wrexford and Sloane must unravel secrets within secrets—including a few that entangle their own hearts—when they reunite to solve a string of shocking murders that have horrified Regency London... Though Charlotte Sloane’s secret identity as the controversial satirical cartoonist A.J. Quill is safe with the Earl of Wrexford, she’s ill prepared for the rippling effects sharing the truth about her background has cast over their relationship. She thought a bit of space might improve the situation. But when her cousin is murdered and his twin brother is accused of the gruesome crime, Charlotte immediately turns to Wrexford for help in proving the young man’s innocence. Though she finds the brooding scientist just as enigmatic and intense as ever, their partnership is now marked by an unfamiliar tension that seems to complicate every encounter. Despite this newfound complexity, Wrexford and Charlotte are determined to track down the real killer. Their investigation leads them on a dangerous chase through Mayfair’s glittering ballrooms and opulent drawing rooms, where gossip and rumors swirl to confuse the facts. Was her cousin murdered over a romantic rivalry . . . or staggering gambling debts? Or could the motive be far darker and involve the clandestine scientific society that claimed both brothers as members? The more Charlotte and Wrexford try to unknot the truth, the more tangled it becomes. But they must solve the case soon, before the killer’s madness seizes another victim...

Murder at Kensington Palace (A Wrexford & Sloane Mystery Book 3) Details

TitleMurder at Kensington Palace (A Wrexford & Sloane Mystery Book 3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 24th, 2019
PublisherKensington
ISBN-139781496722812
Rating
GenreMystery, Historical, Historical Fiction, Historical Mystery, Thriller, Mystery Thriller, Regency

Murder at Kensington Palace (A Wrexford & Sloane Mystery Book 3) Review

  • Gail C.
    January 1, 1970
    A thoroughly satisfying read on in so many ways, MURDER AT KENSINGTON PALACE by Andrea Penrose is a well-plotted mystery that takes place during the Regency period. It is filled with unconventional Regency characters crafted so well it is easy to picture them as you read and compels you to care about their success. These characters are complex, with a deep commitment to seeing justice done and caring for those people who become part of their world.The plot is complex and well constructed, pullin A thoroughly satisfying read on in so many ways, MURDER AT KENSINGTON PALACE by Andrea Penrose is a well-plotted mystery that takes place during the Regency period. It is filled with unconventional Regency characters crafted so well it is easy to picture them as you read and compels you to care about their success. These characters are complex, with a deep commitment to seeing justice done and caring for those people who become part of their world.The plot is complex and well constructed, pulling the reader through the book at a good pace and beckoning them to pick the book up and read “just one more chapter” regardless of other tasks at hand. It is well paced and builds to a thoroughly satisfying conclusion with just the right amount of ending tension.This is the third book in the Wrexford and Slone mystery series, and my first read. The characters are so well drawn I had no problem understanding the relationships between Slone and Wrexford as well as the secondary characters in the book. The secondary characters, including the two young boys Slone has taken in as wards and the unconventional gentlemen Wrexford calls on to help solve the mystery add wonderful color and depth to the story.While I was able to reason out the murderer prior to the denouement, this in no way lessened my enjoyment of the book. Instead, it was intriguing to pursue reading to verify my suspicions as well as helping to pull me through as I could anticipate the hurdles both Slone and Wrexford were bound to encounter on their way to the solution.The book alternates between Slone’s point of view and that of Wrexford. The author uses this as a way of increasing tension and helping pull the reader through the book at an even pace. These changes occur at well-placed intervals that serve to leave the reader wanting more with one character while at the same time being intrigued by what is happening with the other.I did find the prologue a little hard to follow and was initially concerned it’s (to me) slowness would be continued in the book itself. This was not the case and the prologue did serve to introduce some key characters and happenings. Once the book began in earnest, it moved at an excellent pace and engaged me all the way through.My thanks to Kensington Books and Netgalley for providing me an advanced digital read copy of the book in exchange for an honest review. It is an excellent choice for anyone who likes mysteries and a bonus if the reader likes the Regency period.
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  • Caz
    January 1, 1970
    I've given this a B+ at AAR, so that's 4.5 stars.In Murder at Kensington Palace, the third book in Andrea Penrose’s Wrexford and Sloane series, the author once again sets an intriguing, well-conceived mystery against the backdrop of the scientific discovery and innovation taking place during the Regency era while also continuing to explore the shifting relationship between Mrs. Charlotte Sloane (aka satirist A.J. Quill) and the darkly sardonic Earl of Wrexford.  As the pair work together to cl I've given this a B+ at AAR, so that's 4.5 stars.In Murder at Kensington Palace, the third book in Andrea Penrose’s Wrexford and Sloane series, the author once again sets an intriguing, well-conceived mystery against the backdrop of the scientific discovery and innovation taking place during the Regency era while also continuing to explore the shifting relationship between Mrs. Charlotte Sloane (aka satirist A.J. Quill) and the darkly sardonic Earl of Wrexford.  As the pair work together to clear the name of a young man accused of murdering his twin brother, Charlotte is forced to face the prospect of discarding her carefully guarded anonymity, while the Earl, a man who has always prided himself on his logical mind, finds himself in an unusual position of frustration and uncertainty.Charlotte is working on her latest project when she hears that the murderer nicknamed the ‘Bloody Butcher’ has struck again, this time killing a young aristocrat whose body was found that morning in the gardens of Kensington Palace.  When one of her young wards explains that the victim had been in attendance at a scientific gathering hosted by the Duke of Sussex the previous evening, Charlotte immediately wonders if Wrexford had been there and if he might know something about it.  But she feels strangely awkward about asking the Earl for information; in fact, she hasn’t seen him for a couple of weeks, since their investigation into another murder (Murder at Half Moon Gate) almost cost Wrexford his life and led to their expressing certain … sentiments that perhaps neither of them were ready to bring out into the open.“What a pair we are,” she muttered.  “Prickly, guarded, afraid of making ourselves vulnerable.”When Wrexford arrives some time later, it’s with news that will quickly distract Charlotte from any ponderings over the nature of her feelings for him.  The murder victim was Cedric, Lord Chittenden, a young man from the North of England who had only recently come into his title; and his twin brother, Nicholas, has been arrested for the crime on account of their having been overheard having a disagreement at some point during the course of the previous evening.  Charlotte is adamant in her belief that the wrong man has been accused and that Nicholas could never have harmed his brother – but she won’t explain further or tell Wrexford what makes her so sure.You can read the rest of this review at All About Romance .
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  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    I'm loving this series more and more with each new book.This one has a very intricate mystery. So much research must go into these books. I find myself writing down things and looking them up when I'm finished a reading session. I've learned so much from the stories.All our favorite characters are back. Raven and Hawk are growing up and into little gentlemen. They're starting to develop individual characters rather than just being two street urchins. Charlotte and Wrexford's relationship is prog I'm loving this series more and more with each new book.This one has a very intricate mystery. So much research must go into these books. I find myself writing down things and looking them up when I'm finished a reading session. I've learned so much from the stories.All our favorite characters are back. Raven and Hawk are growing up and into little gentlemen. They're starting to develop individual characters rather than just being two street urchins. Charlotte and Wrexford's relationship is progressing just as I thought it would. Charlotte's life takes a different turn and I do wonder how long it will take for people to realise she's AJ Quill and if she'll continue with this persona.There are a couple of new characters in this book. I love Lady Peake. I think she'll be a great addition and I'm hoping (view spoiler)[ Cordelia will stick around too as I think she's going to be a love interest for Sheffield (hide spoiler)]As usual I had an idea who the murderer was and as usual I was wrong. I like this. I hate it when I can guess too early on who's done the deed. The prose and picturesque writing is always a joy to me. If you enjoy 'cosyish' mysteries set in the Regency period then you'll love this series.
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  • OLT
    January 1, 1970
    This is the third in Andrea Penrose's Wrexford and Sloane Regency mystery series. It's not necessary to have read the first two to enjoy this one, because Penrose gives enough catch-up information that you'll understand the characters' arc well enough. That said, it's not a bad idea to read the first two. They are interesting and at the moment are even on sale.Our two main characters/sleuths are (1) widow Charlotte Sloane, who makes her living as anonymous cartoonist and political satirist A.J. This is the third in Andrea Penrose's Wrexford and Sloane Regency mystery series. It's not necessary to have read the first two to enjoy this one, because Penrose gives enough catch-up information that you'll understand the characters' arc well enough. That said, it's not a bad idea to read the first two. They are interesting and at the moment are even on sale.Our two main characters/sleuths are (1) widow Charlotte Sloane, who makes her living as anonymous cartoonist and political satirist A.J. Quill and (2) the Earl of Wrexford, peer of the aristocracy and amateur scientist. Charlotte's topical illustrations are extremely popular with the public and can even sway public opinion at times. And Charlotte has a secret. Although living a lower socioeconomic life, she is actually Lady Charlotte, a member of the peerage who was disowned by her family when, at seventeen, she ran off to Italy with her drawing instructor, whom she married.Now back in London, Charlotte lives a quiet life with two young street orphans she has taken under her wing, named Hawk and Raven. She and the boys know their way perfectly around the seedier streets of London, the boys, of course, because they grew up there. Charlotte herself will at times dress up as a street urchin named Phoenix when she needs the freedom to move around the streets that is not afforded to women in general.One of my favorite things about this series is those two street boys and their lovely interactions and relationship with Charlotte, and also with Lord Wrexford. Another favorite thing for me is Penrose's knowledge of the Regency period and her excellent use of this in the various mysteries and their development.This third installment deals with one of the scientific innovations of the times: That of electricity and the recent (1802) invention by Alexander Volta of the voltaic pile, an early battery to generate electricity through chemistry. Is this new scientific invention being used improperly by certain individuals? It is looking that way.When Charlotte's cousin and dear childhood friend Cedric, Lord Chittenden, is found brutally murdered and his twin brother Nicholas is suspected of the crime, it's up to Charlotte to prove the innocence of the one remaining twin, also dear to her. Wrexford, of course, is on hand to aid and abet her, as usual, and their investigations take them from the prison where Nicholas is being held to the streets of London, seedy and affluent, to the halls of science, to the Eos Society, whose upper-class members indulge in various scientific discussions and experimentation.Is there something not quite aboveboard about the Eos Society? And what is the explanation for the burns that were found on Cedric's body during his autopsy? They intrigue Wrexford, the amateur chemist, and he has his thoughts about what may be going on. So this all must be investigated, with lots of possible suspects, lots of red herrings, and even a bit of a Perils of Pauline happening at the end (with a very competent "Pauline"). All in all, it was an enjoyable read for me.I've enjoyed Penrose's writing for years. I began reading her Regency romances written under the pen name Andrea Pickens almost two decades ago and now am enjoying these Regency mysteries perhaps even more. She's a skillful author and makes her stories very readable. Her characters are well drawn, the dialogue is intelligent, and the plots are clever and well paced.If you are a romance lover, there's a hint of that developing between Sloane and Wrexford, but if you do not enjoy romance with your mysteries, this is low-key enough that it will not annoy you, I believe.
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  • Barbara Rogers
    January 1, 1970
    Series: A Wrexford & Sloane Mystery #3Publication Date: 9/24/19Number of Pages: 304Yet another book in the Wrexford & Soane series that I couldn’t put down once I’d started reading. I mean, really, when you have science, art, murder, and romance all in one lively, compelling, intricately woven story you just absolutely cannot put it down. You COULD read this as a stand-alone, but I wouldn’t recommend it simply because the first two books lay the groundwork for the relationship between th Series: A Wrexford & Sloane Mystery #3Publication Date: 9/24/19Number of Pages: 304Yet another book in the Wrexford & Soane series that I couldn’t put down once I’d started reading. I mean, really, when you have science, art, murder, and romance all in one lively, compelling, intricately woven story you just absolutely cannot put it down. You COULD read this as a stand-alone, but I wouldn’t recommend it simply because the first two books lay the groundwork for the relationship between the main characters and the secondary characters – besides, they are just darned good reads!Charlotte’s life is about to change – totally – not from her desire, but from a need to save the life of her closest childhood friend, her cousin Nicholas. Charlotte will sacrifice most anything, even her hard-won independence, to free her cousin, but the decision fills her with trepidations. Can she do it? What if she makes the sacrifice and she’s still not successful?The romance between Wrexford and Charlotte Sloane is a tenuous one. Well – perhaps tenuous isn’t the right word – they are each denying it to themselves, but it comes out in the actions they take, in their thoughts and their terror when the other is in danger. They are about to get on my last nerve! They need to get on with it already! I’m ready for them to be a real team – living and working together.The weasels (Hawk and Raven) are as entertaining as ever – and dressing them up in fancy clothes doesn’t change them one whit. They have been my favorite secondary characters (shux – they are almost primary characters) from the beginning. We also get to spend time with Kit Sheffield and Basil Henning and I love that. Maybe we have a love interest for Sheffield – I’d really like that. Aunt Alison, the Dowager Marchioness of Peake, was a delightful addition to the cast and I hope we see more of her in future books.Most of the villains get their just desserts, but one was left standing. Granted, he wasn’t hands-on, but he definitely knew what was going on and enabled its happening – so – I wanted to see him go down in some way or another.The gist of the story – and it is a really good one – is that Cedric and Nicholas were Charlotte’s best friends (and cousins) as they were growing up and she loved them like brothers. They encouraged her to be the independent, strong woman that she is. However, she hasn’t seen them for several years and when she finally hears something about them, it is to learn that Cedric has been murdered and Nicholas has been arrested for it. Charlotte knows, in her heart, that there is no way Nicholas would murder his twin brother. However, knowing something in your heart and being able to find evidence to prove it are two entirely different things. Charlotte and Wrexford are up against some very sly and devious murderers – with not a hint of who they might be or why they did it. Charlotte and the weasels engage their extensive network of informants, but information is still scarce. Time is running out. Can Charlotte and Wrexford save the day? Can Wrexford save Charlotte?I absolutely love how the author weaves details of the science of the times into these tales. That time was such an important one for the science and achievements we have today and all of that is seamlessly woven into the story.This author is a master storyteller and I highly recommend this story and this series in total.I voluntarily read and reviewed an Advanced Reader Copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Judy Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and Kensington Books for an e-galley of this novel.Although this is the third book in the Wrexford and Sloane series it is the first one I've read and I had no problems slotting all the background information into place to feel right up to the mark with the characters. A thumbs up to the author for accomplishing that feat seamlessly. The lesser characters in this series are really quite endearing and I enjoyed getting to know the Weasels, Raven and Hawk the wards of Charlo Thank you to NetGalley and Kensington Books for an e-galley of this novel.Although this is the third book in the Wrexford and Sloane series it is the first one I've read and I had no problems slotting all the background information into place to feel right up to the mark with the characters. A thumbs up to the author for accomplishing that feat seamlessly. The lesser characters in this series are really quite endearing and I enjoyed getting to know the Weasels, Raven and Hawk the wards of Charlotte Sloane, and McClellan who has so many jobs it's hard to keep track of them all, but who doesn't seem to have a first name. Wrexford and Charlotte have a go-slow romantic situation which is interesting but is kept to a minimum level so readers who don't want a romance/mystery novel can feel fine reading this series. I would be one of those who doesn't particularly like for romance to intrude overmuch into the mysteries I read but this was kept to an acceptable level.The mystery this story revolves around is the death of Cedric, Lord Chittenden and the arrest of his twin brother for the crime. The murder was bad enough but then the killer mutilated the body. Did this crime indicate the Bloody Butcher was at work? Before the crime was solved Charlotte and her team had to use all their strategies, skills and disguises to beat an appointment with the hangman.
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  • Barbara Senteney
    January 1, 1970
    Very enjoyable story of Lady Charlotte, whose cousin is accused of killing his twin brother for jealousy and financial gain, she can't imagine her sweet cousin being capable of such an act. Charlotte has been living incognito as A J Quille an artist , so she can have the life she wants instead of the one she was born to. Meanwhile her cousin is rotting in a cell grieving the loss of his brother and closest friend. This is filled with luxurious balls, and the elite rich, such as the Duke and Duch Very enjoyable story of Lady Charlotte, whose cousin is accused of killing his twin brother for jealousy and financial gain, she can't imagine her sweet cousin being capable of such an act. Charlotte has been living incognito as A J Quille an artist , so she can have the life she wants instead of the one she was born to. Meanwhile her cousin is rotting in a cell grieving the loss of his brother and closest friend. This is filled with luxurious balls, and the elite rich, such as the Duke and Duchess of Windsor Lord, Ladies, earls, and lots of mystery. I was given this book in exchange for a fair honest review, I recommend this to anyone who like a little thrill with a lot of mystery. All opinions are my own and have no ill intent towards author or publisher.
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  • The Lit Bitch
    January 1, 1970
    I stumbled on this series a couple of years ago and instantly fell in love. I loved how sassy and sardonic Wrexford is and even if Mrs Sloane is overly pig headed at times, she’s independent and sassy and I can’t get enough of them together!Reading these books is always such a delight. There is clearly this romantic tension between Wrexford and Charlotte Sloane, but it doesn’t overtake the prime focus of the books which is the murder mystery.Because of that I think it makes the romance so much m I stumbled on this series a couple of years ago and instantly fell in love. I loved how sassy and sardonic Wrexford is and even if Mrs Sloane is overly pig headed at times, she’s independent and sassy and I can’t get enough of them together!Reading these books is always such a delight. There is clearly this romantic tension between Wrexford and Charlotte Sloane, but it doesn’t overtake the prime focus of the books which is the murder mystery.Because of that I think it makes the romance so much more sweet. The little morsels of romance sprinkled in make the reader eager to see what happens between them, but ultimately it’s the well written mystery that holds their attention late into the night.So when I finally saw this one on Netgalley I begged to read it! I couldn’t wait and read it in a couple of fast sittings!This book definitely held my attention late late late into the night on more than one occasion. I read it in a couple of sittings but both of those sittings ran late into the evening. There was definitely a Jack the Ripper element to the story and I thought that made it so much more intriguing and shocking.There were a number of people with motive and like the characters I was wracking my brain trying to figure out how everything worked together and what pieces of evidence were relevant. I thought I had an idea who the killer was but then there would be a piece of evidence discovered that made me question if that person was really the culprit or not. Great use of red herrings! I especially loved how well the author incorporates science into the story too. It really adds to the mystery in my opinion!It’s been really fun to see how the characters in the book have grown since the first story. Both of the main characters, Wrexford and Charlotte have changed so much and their walls have come down to reveal genuinely beautiful and caring individuals. I love how their relationship has evolved into this wonderful friendship with the promise of something deeper to come and I love that the author is in no way eager to rush it into reality. At times it maddening because I desperately want them to declare their feelings but at the same time I savor the little bits that we get and am excited to see what the next book brings.These are characters that I have grown to care about and can’t wait to see what’s in store for their future! If you love historical mysteries, this is a team you don’t want to miss. The mystery is well done with wonderfully colorful characters and it easily kept me interested and reading late into the night! It can be read as a stand lone but why would you want to miss out on all the fun back story? The answer is, you don’t! Each book is fantastic and a quick read so go pick them up!See my full review here
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  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    Though Charlotte Sloane’s secret identity as the controversial satirical cartoonist A.J. Quill is safe with the Earl of Wrexford, she’s ill prepared for the rippling effects sharing the truth about her background has cast over their relationship. She thought a bit of space might improve the situation. But when her cousin is murdered and his twin brother is accused of the gruesome crime, Charlotte immediately turns to Wrexford for help in proving the young man’s innocence. Though she finds the br Though Charlotte Sloane’s secret identity as the controversial satirical cartoonist A.J. Quill is safe with the Earl of Wrexford, she’s ill prepared for the rippling effects sharing the truth about her background has cast over their relationship. She thought a bit of space might improve the situation. But when her cousin is murdered and his twin brother is accused of the gruesome crime, Charlotte immediately turns to Wrexford for help in proving the young man’s innocence. Though she finds the brooding scientist just as enigmatic and intense as ever, their partnership is now marked by an unfamiliar tension that seems to complicate every encounter.Despite this newfound complexity, Wrexford and Charlotte are determined to track down the real killer. Their investigation leads them on a dangerous chase through Mayfair’s glittering ballrooms and opulent drawing rooms, where gossip and rumors swirl to confuse the facts. Was her cousin murdered over a romantic rivalry . . . or staggering gambling debts? Or could the motive be far darker and involve the clandestine scientific society that claimed both brothers as members? The more Charlotte and Wrexford try to unknot the truth, the more tangled it becomes. But they must solve the case soon, before the killer’s madness seizes another victim..This was a good book and a good series. I did feel the story dragged in places but overall a very good read.
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  • Sarah-Hope
    January 1, 1970
    This summer has been one long binge of historical mysteries for me, and Murder at Kensington Palace has been a favorite. This is actually the third title in the Wrexford and Sloane (though I'd suggest calling it Sloane and Wrexford) series, but as a newcomer I didn't have any trouble getting to know the characters. Penrose is more apt than most authors are at filling in backstory in ways that don't feel heavy-handed.The characters include a growing and formidable group of women, Sloane being one This summer has been one long binge of historical mysteries for me, and Murder at Kensington Palace has been a favorite. This is actually the third title in the Wrexford and Sloane (though I'd suggest calling it Sloane and Wrexford) series, but as a newcomer I didn't have any trouble getting to know the characters. Penrose is more apt than most authors are at filling in backstory in ways that don't feel heavy-handed.The characters include a growing and formidable group of women, Sloane being one of them, who challenge the conventions of Regency society. Besides Sloane, there's the housekeeper McClellan whose skills with a knife are apparent outside, as well as within, the kitchen. Several new female characters are introduced in this volume, including Sloane's formidable Great Aunt, the sort of dowager dragon who has no time for nonsense of any sort and leaves the bravest of men quaking.I admit, I 'd figured out the mystery about 70% of the the way through the book, but at that point I was so committed to the characters that my (correct) guess didn't make the reading any less enjoyable. I highly recommend this book for anyone who appreciates mysteries combining historical settings with strong female characters.
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  • eyes.2c
    January 1, 1970
    Tense times with this engaging duo!It didn't take long for me to be up to my eyebrows in this the third Wrexford and Sloane mystery. A particularly gruesome murder has Charlotte reaching back into her past and going to a place she'd resolutely put behind her. Wrexford as always is an immense support in such a very Wrexford way that I've come to love.Just to recap, usually the Earl of Wrexford and Charlotte Sloane and their small circle of unlikely and very likeable characters are drawn into the Tense times with this engaging duo!It didn't take long for me to be up to my eyebrows in this the third Wrexford and Sloane mystery. A particularly gruesome murder has Charlotte reaching back into her past and going to a place she'd resolutely put behind her. Wrexford as always is an immense support in such a very Wrexford way that I've come to love.Just to recap, usually the Earl of Wrexford and Charlotte Sloane and their small circle of unlikely and very likeable characters are drawn into the depths of the rookeries and dark places of London when pursuing a crime. This time however the pursuit will lead into the tonnish limelight.Wrexford comes across to those outside his circle as the epitome a man of Science and logic. Charlotte entertains a double life as the leading satirical caricaturist A.J. Quill. She harbours her own deeply held secrets, always struggling for anonymity and keeping to the shadows. Then there's the weasels, Raven and Hawk, the unlikely guttersnipes that have captured my heart just like they've won Charlotte's, and dare I say Wrexford's if he'd own to having one. Let me not forget Wrexford's valet Turvel,and Charlotte's maid, McClellan. Both treasures in their own way. And there's more!The murder of a peer, Lord Chittenden, under disturbing circumstances in Kensington Palace Gardens after a Royal Society soirée ("which, along with the Royal Institution, was the leading bastion of London’s scientific minds.") occurs" Naturally Wrexford is a member!An arrest is quickly forthcoming. The culprit is Lord Chittenden's twin brother, Nicholas. He's carted of to Newgate. Charlotte has strong doubts about this, given her childhood acquaintance with the brothers. There have been a string of recent alike murders. Is Nicholas really the 'Bloody Butcher?'Of course Wrexford becomes involved as does Kit Sheffield and the weasels. I love the way the boys are developing their distinctive talents. Raven is mathematically inclined and Hawk is engaged by the study of natural history and drawing.Charlotte's in her role as Pheonix, an elusive underbelly inhabitant comes into play, but in this situation a new persona will be called for. One that gives Charlotte second and even third thoughts. One she doesn't want to adopt.But as her maid McClellan counsels, “You’ve undergone transformations before.""Perhaps you should stop thinking of this transformation as the death of your old self...the essence of who you are isn’t changing a whit. You’re merely taking on new plumage...After all, one of your street monikers is Phoenix, a bird who rises from the ashes with bold, beautiful new feathers with which to fly into the future."This new transformation will bring Charlotte out of the safety of the shadows and into contact with people she had firmly relegated to her past.The there's the unspoken side of the relationship between Charlotte and Wrexford. At times the air between them fairly burns the page up. It's so full of meaning, of promise, and unresolved tension. Then those poignant, illusive moments slide away and we're left wondering! Talk about leaving me breathless! Resolution is quite dramatically reached with several red herrings and some interesting twists.As always Penrose's research on emergent technology during the Regency days is solid and fascinating.A Kensington Books ARC via NetGalley
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  • Helen Howerton
    January 1, 1970
    Right off the bat I’ll say this is not a place to start if you’re new to this series. Because there’s a lot of history here, and it’s best if you know it before you begin. For in Andrea Penrose’s Murder at Kensington Palace the murder and the mystery is just an excuse for Charlotte Sloan and her cohort in crime Lord Wrexford to fight off their attraction to each other through the pages of this book, which they have done for some time now. And since Charlotte has decided to reenter society -- you Right off the bat I’ll say this is not a place to start if you’re new to this series. Because there’s a lot of history here, and it’s best if you know it before you begin. For in Andrea Penrose’s Murder at Kensington Palace the murder and the mystery is just an excuse for Charlotte Sloan and her cohort in crime Lord Wrexford to fight off their attraction to each other through the pages of this book, which they have done for some time now. And since Charlotte has decided to reenter society -- you’ll see how that’s done, after much (unnecessary, seems to me) soul-searching, it’s going to be easier for her to be with Wrexford. (Which will open up plot opportunities for future books, a good thing.) So, get on with it already, we readers know it’s coming. On to the story: a titled gentleman’s been done in in a particularly gruesome fashion in Kensington Palace grounds. Charlotte AKA A.J. Quill, the notorious satirical artist, sets out to find the killer, as the dead man is found to be a relative, a cousin – and his brother has been set up for the murder, so even more reason to find the real culprit. That forms the reason for her investigation. She has to act, so of course Wrexford has to help. Again we have our Latin proverbs carrying us along. And their translations, which seem unnecessary; readers could figure them out, thank you very much. I find them an unnecessary conceit. Andrea Penrose does have a knack for bringing her people to life. The “secondary” characters in this book, the boys, Raven and Hawk, Mrs. McClellan the cook, Tyler, Wrexford’s valet and fellow scientist, Sheffield, friend and confidant are especially finely rendered in the author’s capable hands.Secret societies, cheating at cards, blackmail, something called votilism, bodies keep turning up, rich young women with minds of their own that don’t fit the conventional mold, talk about mathematics and much else to make your head spin. Does get a big confusing! Lots of historical research in this one, perhaps a tad too much, unless you’re really into the history of electricity and what a voltaic pile is (or was). And what early inventors did with it. Strong stomachs might be involved. I’ll leave it at that. The investigation wraps up very nicely; did you have any doubts? But not before there’s some skullduggery and changing into men’s clothing and meeting some interesting new people -- Sheffield’s met his match! and a female in peril scene that once again I could do without. But that sets the stage for another reason to bring our two lovebirds together. Of course the main theme that prevails through this book is its romantic energy -- yeah, there’s a murder mystery, big deal. Do you really think that’s the author’s main intent? No, no, no. Okay, we have a body or two to stumble over in these books. But let’s cut to the chase here, folks. There’s only one theme going on -- when will Sloan and Wrexford finally throw aside their misgivings and declare for each other? Omnia vincit amor, indeed. And I’m not even going to translate it for you.Thanks to the publisher and to NetGalley for a copy of this book, in exchange for this review.
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  • Maureen Lubitz
    January 1, 1970
    Murder at Kensington Palace is the third book in Andrea Penrose’s Wrexford & Sloane series of Regency-era historical mystery novels. I’ve read the other books in the series, so I was interested to see how the unlikely duo was going to handle their newest investigation. This time, the victim is Cedric, a young man who recently inherited a barony. The prime suspect is Nicholas, the victim’s twin brother- the two were overheard arguing about the inheritance and the unfairness of Cedric receivin Murder at Kensington Palace is the third book in Andrea Penrose’s Wrexford & Sloane series of Regency-era historical mystery novels. I’ve read the other books in the series, so I was interested to see how the unlikely duo was going to handle their newest investigation. This time, the victim is Cedric, a young man who recently inherited a barony. The prime suspect is Nicholas, the victim’s twin brother- the two were overheard arguing about the inheritance and the unfairness of Cedric receiving everything simply because he had the good fortune to be born a few minutes earlier. The case seems fairly straightforward, but Charlotte knew the brothers when she was a little girl, and she knows that Nicky is innocent. Wrexford is skeptical, but he agrees to help Charlotte pursue the meager leads that they have. This was a fun book. Charlotte and Wrexford continue to build upon their strange friendship, and it’s clear that they both harbor feelings for each other, but neither of them does anything to act on these feelings, so hooray for unresolved sexual tension! Fans of the series will appreciate return appearances from secondary characters like Wrexford’s valet/right hand man Tyler, and the “weasels”, Charlotte’s two young wards. While the murder being investigated is quite grisly, the overall tone of the book is comparatively light. I would recommend Murder at Kensington Palace to fans of historical mystery. The book functions well enough as a standalone, but readers will enjoy the book more if they have been following the characters’ journey from the beginning. These books make for quick reads, with satisfying conclusions. As a longtime fan of the books, I like that each book builds upon the last, especially in regards to Charlotte’s backstory. The conclusion of this book leads to some very interesting possibilities, and I am looking forward to seeing how these will manifest in the next book. I received a copy of this book from Netgalley/the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Lorraine
    January 1, 1970
    Superb! Andrea Penrose’s Murder at Kensington Palace (A Wrexford & Sloane Mystery #3) continues with a another brilliant Regency mystery, but this one is extremely personal to Mrs. Sloane. Upon hearing whom the victim is, Charlotte faints. This reaction of Charlotte’s totally confuses Earl Wrexford! Charlotte’s feelings, questions, and actions actually concern and then frighten the Earl and the ‘Weasels’, Raven and Hawk. I love this series as I have seen realistic growth in the characters an Superb! Andrea Penrose’s Murder at Kensington Palace (A Wrexford & Sloane Mystery #3) continues with a another brilliant Regency mystery, but this one is extremely personal to Mrs. Sloane. Upon hearing whom the victim is, Charlotte faints. This reaction of Charlotte’s totally confuses Earl Wrexford! Charlotte’s feelings, questions, and actions actually concern and then frighten the Earl and the ‘Weasels’, Raven and Hawk. I love this series as I have seen realistic growth in the characters and their relationships. The author does not ‘pull any punches’ describing the murder victim at Kensington Palace. It made me flinch! The changes relating to Mrs. Sloane and the ‘Weasels’ living situation makes perfect sense to the reader. At least, it does to me. The setting of Regency London provides details that enable the reader to truly picture London when George III’s son was Regent for his father. And the topic to which the mystery is connected lets the reader understand exactly where and with what the scientific field is researching at this time period as well as how women handle their position (A+ here). I felt drawn into the story as though I was actually there. Beautifully written and executed. Highly recommended!!5 stars!
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  • Norah Gibbons
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book to read in exchange for a fair review. Murder at Kensington Palace is the third book in Andrea Penrose’s Wexford & Sloane Historical Mystery series. This is the first book I have read in the series so it can be read as a stand-alone but the first thing I did on finishing this one was purchase the other two. When her beloved cousin is murdered in a manner that looks to be the work of a serial killer nicknamed The Bloody Butcher and his twin is charged with the m I received an ARC of this book to read in exchange for a fair review. Murder at Kensington Palace is the third book in Andrea Penrose’s Wexford & Sloane Historical Mystery series. This is the first book I have read in the series so it can be read as a stand-alone but the first thing I did on finishing this one was purchase the other two. When her beloved cousin is murdered in a manner that looks to be the work of a serial killer nicknamed The Bloody Butcher and his twin is charged with the murder Charlotte Sloan who is also satirical cartoonist A.J. Quill knows that she must prove her cousin innocent and that to do so she will need all of the help that she can gather including that of Alexander the Earl of Wrexford. When the clues lead to the higher echelons of society Charlotte comes to the difficult realisation that she will have to leave the secure little world she has created for herself and reclaim her place in society as Lady Charlotte daughter of the Earl of Walcott. With lots of twists and turns and a truly evil villain this story will keep you avidly turning the pages to find out what happens next. Publishing Date September 24, 2019.#MurderAtKensingtonPalace #AndreaPenrose #WrexfordandSloaneHistoricalMysteries #NetGalley #Bookstagram #RegencyMurderMysteries #KensingtonBooks
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  • Kiki Z
    January 1, 1970
    I wish I liked this series more than I do. The mysteries are always multi-layered and interesting, if sometimes overwrought, but the characters aren't great. They are prone to apprehension and constant questioning of their lives and choices. Charlotte is staid and coldly logical until she's not all of a sudden. She'll do nothing terribly foolish until the end of the book for drama. Wrexford loses his temper way too easily. He's supposedly an intelligent man of science but he often jumps to concl I wish I liked this series more than I do. The mysteries are always multi-layered and interesting, if sometimes overwrought, but the characters aren't great. They are prone to apprehension and constant questioning of their lives and choices. Charlotte is staid and coldly logical until she's not all of a sudden. She'll do nothing terribly foolish until the end of the book for drama. Wrexford loses his temper way too easily. He's supposedly an intelligent man of science but he often jumps to conclusions. His misanthropic attitude is grating. They both also spend too much time philosophizing. Their maybe-romance is so awkward and unbelievable it's actually occasionally painful to read.Oh, and they use Latin aphorisms in every other conversation. This is honestly my biggest issue here. The amount of Latin sayings makes me want to throw the book against the wall--but I was reading an ebook.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    Historical mystery fans will enjoy Andrea Penrose's MURDER AT KENSINGTON PALACE. The amateur sleuths in this Victorian mystery are confronted with grisly murder within the privileged family of one and the scientific "family" of the other. Their foray into the membership of London's distinguished scientific community was both interesting and suspenseful, but the most compelling part of the book for me was its personal side. The character's struggle to distinguish between heart and mind and it giv Historical mystery fans will enjoy Andrea Penrose's MURDER AT KENSINGTON PALACE. The amateur sleuths in this Victorian mystery are confronted with grisly murder within the privileged family of one and the scientific "family" of the other. Their foray into the membership of London's distinguished scientific community was both interesting and suspenseful, but the most compelling part of the book for me was its personal side. The character's struggle to distinguish between heart and mind and it gives the book an interesting dimension as well as a lot of "heart" of its own.I thoroughly enjoyed this light mystery, and learned something about the dangerous search for "enlightenment" in the scientific community of that period. NetGalley provided me with a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for a candid review.
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  • Heatherinblack
    January 1, 1970
    brilliantly wovenwhile i have a hard time seeing the weasels accept life in the beau monde, it was a reasonable pivot. i imagine all societies have their dragon ladies who control so much. the mystery twist was clever.
  • Karen McKeown
    January 1, 1970
    A little too much, "Will he/she understand how I feel? Do I know how I feel? Oh my these passions are so distracting/confusing and he's so handsome/she's so perfect".
  • Katie Nunnery
    January 1, 1970
    Big thanks to Net Galley and to Kensington Books for early access to an e-galley of this novel.I need to preface my review of this book by admitting that I requested this book without realizing that it was the third in the series. I have never read the first two in the series. All the same, I read it and really enjoyed it so that offers its own perspective!Building on that, the first thing I will say about this book is that it can be read as a stand alone and it makes plenty of sense. Penrose fi Big thanks to Net Galley and to Kensington Books for early access to an e-galley of this novel.I need to preface my review of this book by admitting that I requested this book without realizing that it was the third in the series. I have never read the first two in the series. All the same, I read it and really enjoyed it so that offers its own perspective!Building on that, the first thing I will say about this book is that it can be read as a stand alone and it makes plenty of sense. Penrose fills in whatever you need to know. She also leaves a few facts tantalizingly blank so that if one goes back to books one and two after, there will still be surprises and gaps to fill in! But more importantly, even without prior experience with the characters, they were well developed and I quickly became invested in their personal stories and relationships.Wrexford is serious, scientific, a bit temperamental, and devoted to his friends, particularly Charlotte. Charlotte is tough and street-smart; she chaffs against the strictures placed upon women by high society. But all the same we see some emotional complexity and vulnerability developing in her in this novel. I get the sense that this is exploring a different side of her character than what is shown in prior novels.I would hate to spoil anything in this novel because its twists and turns delighted me, so I will be as vague as I can with my plot summary. A recent, grisly murder hits close to home for Charlotte but she is convinced that the man they have arrested is innocent. While Wrexford is skeptical, he trusts her and together they embark on a quest to find the true killer and exonerate her friend. The story moves from the scientific laboratories to the gambling halls of Rengecy London and even forays into the drawing rooms of high society. If you’re interested in the scientific experiments and intellectual societies of Regency England than this book will fascinate you. It’s also chock-full of smart, strong ladies who challenge the rules of the beau monde and develop their own talents and passions. Not just one strong female character but FOUR. Awesome.This book, and seemingly the series as a whole, is populated by interesting and endearing characters including the urchins of the streets, coming into their own as people, and the sassy and stalwart serving staff, respected as equal contributors. This story also further develops the budding romance between Wrexford and Sloane which was revealed in the preceding novel but that is a bit of a slow burn. Unfortunately, this story also gives Charlotte little to work with and little to do for the first half of the novel but her story does pick up.Finally, I want to mention the writing style of these novels. Penrose is an excellent writer in general but what particularly tickled me was her use of period-appropriate words which have since gone out of style. A short list: brangling. havey-cavey. squabs. bantling. ravening. argle-bargled. widgeon. She also includes a lot of phrases in Latin which the highly educated Wrexford and Sloane whip back and forth at one another with perfect understanding. A mark of a different age in education. Penrose always, of course, offers an immediate translation for us lay readers who never studied Latin.Overall, I really enjoyed this murder mystery and I am definitely interested in going back and reading the first two novels in the series! I think any fan of mystery or historical fiction would enjoy this book. But I would particularly recommend this book to people who loved Steven Price’s By Gaslight, those who read Sarah Perry’s The Essex Serpent and wanted it to have more science (and action) in it, and those who appreciated the Regency setting of A Darker Shade of Magic but are fine exploring “Grey London” without any magic involved. It’s a solid 4 stars for me!
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  • Susan in NC
    January 1, 1970
    I continue to enjoy this excellent historical mystery series, which casts fascinating light on the scientific developments of the Regency period of English history. There is also a very slowly developing romance in the background, but it does not interfere with the mystery.In this case, a serial killer called the Bloody Butcher is loose in London. Bow Street hasn’t a clue to the identity of the killer, but Wrexford and Sloane become involved when a young baron becomes a victim and his twin broth I continue to enjoy this excellent historical mystery series, which casts fascinating light on the scientific developments of the Regency period of English history. There is also a very slowly developing romance in the background, but it does not interfere with the mystery.In this case, a serial killer called the Bloody Butcher is loose in London. Bow Street hasn’t a clue to the identity of the killer, but Wrexford and Sloane become involved when a young baron becomes a victim and his twin brother arrested for the crime. Turns out both men are Charlotte Sloane’s cousins, and she is convinced Nicholas couldn’t have killed Cedric; the onus is on her and Wrexford and their group of friends to investigate.After a few visits to Newgate Prison with Wrexford (his wealth greases the wheels of graft needed to see the prisoner and get him decent food, blankets, etc.), Charlotte decides she must finally come out of the shadows and reclaim her place in the ton to prove her cousin innocent. This will also help her gain access to the highest level of society where a killer may be hiding.I got tired fast of Charlotte’s angst over returning to Society - once she took the plunge and reconnected with the delightful society dragon, her Great Aunt, Lady Peake, she soon found her footing. Indeed, there are intellectually gifted Bluestockings to socialize with at salons, and her newfound status affords her opportunities for the two young “Weasels”, Hawk and Raven, the young brothers she has taken in and come to care for. Raven has a gift for mathematics and science, and Hawk enjoys the natural world and art - both boys continue to take part in the mysteries, and add to my enjoyment of the books. Indeed, I hope also to see more of Kit Sheffield, Dr. Henning, Tyler and McClellan, and fascinating new characters Lady Peake and Lady Cordelia.There is a lot to like about this series, and I look forward to the next outing. I hope Charlotte can get over all of her internal musings over secrets, and she and Wrexford can move their relationship forward realistically. Charlotte is a widow, and she and Wrexford are not children, so I hope the series doesn’t get caught up in the “will they, won’t they” plot dragger that I have seen in other series with a male/female team of investigators. Rather than draw it out pointlessly or endlessly, I would prefer the obvious attraction be dealt with so our crime-fighting duo can move on. They have a wonderful, interesting group of recurring characters that can continue to develop and lead them into all kinds of interesting investigations and complications! I look forward to reading what comes next.
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  • Pj Ausdenmore
    January 1, 1970
    Andrea Penrose brings readers another Regency mystery with intriguing characters, fascinating scientific tidbits, a complex, well-crafted plot, and evolving relationships that keep me coming back for more. I'm enjoying the chemistry that's slowly growing between Wrexford and Charlotte as they work together to solve yet another mystery. I enjoy the individual strengths they each bring to the task and the respect, friendship, and caring that continues to deepen. I enjoyed the twists and turns of t Andrea Penrose brings readers another Regency mystery with intriguing characters, fascinating scientific tidbits, a complex, well-crafted plot, and evolving relationships that keep me coming back for more. I'm enjoying the chemistry that's slowly growing between Wrexford and Charlotte as they work together to solve yet another mystery. I enjoy the individual strengths they each bring to the task and the respect, friendship, and caring that continues to deepen. I enjoyed the twists and turns of the mystery that kept me guessing well into the book and the interweaving of both science and art that Penrose uses to help bring the villains to justice. Penrose has surrounded Wrexford and Charlotte with a secondary collection of vividly drawn characters who I find just as intriguing as the leads. Charlotte's street-smart, young wards have secured a place for themselves in my heart and I can't wait to see how they continue to evolve. I'm also hopeful that Penrose might deliver a secondary romance for Wrexford's friend, Sheffield in future books. There's a young woman in this book who would be a wonderful ongoing addition to the cast. There's also Wrexford's scientific valet, Charlotte's indispensable housekeeper/maid, a brilliant surgeon, and a feisty great-aunt whose dialog played out in my head with Dame Maggie Smith's voice. I do hope Penrose has more books planned for this series. I'm already eagerly anticipating the next Wrexford & Sloane adventure! This is the third book in the Wrexford & Sloane Mystery series. Penrose does a good job of bringing new readers up to date without the proverbial info dump, allowing this novel to stand on its own. However, in my opinion, readers will have a greater understanding of the characters and a deeper appreciation for their evolving relationships if the books are read in order. Those titles are: Murder on Black Swan Lane, Murder at Half Moon Gate, and Murder at Kensington Palace. *Advance review copy received from publisher. All opinions expressed are unbiased and my own.
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  • Charlie
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Kensington Books and NetGalley for an electronic advance review copy.Wrexford and Sloane are back in the third book of one of my favorite new historical mystery series I’ve read in a while. Penrose makes some of the established tropes of the genre feel fresh and has established a very enjoyable cast of characters. While you could read this book without picking up the first two, I would recommend reading in order so you can enjoy the character development throughout the series.The no Thank you to Kensington Books and NetGalley for an electronic advance review copy.Wrexford and Sloane are back in the third book of one of my favorite new historical mystery series I’ve read in a while. Penrose makes some of the established tropes of the genre feel fresh and has established a very enjoyable cast of characters. While you could read this book without picking up the first two, I would recommend reading in order so you can enjoy the character development throughout the series.The novel begins with both Wrexford and Charlotte both feeling somewhat unsettled after the end of their last case and unsure where they stand, both in terms of their relationship to each other and how. Their brooding is interrupted when news of a brutal murder shocks London. Charlotte, however, is particularly affected when she learns the victim is her estranged cousin, Lord Chittenden, and his twin brother has been arrested for his murder. She once again finds herself partnered with Wrexford as they attempt to clear her cousin’s name and bring the real killer to justice. In the attempt, Charlotte also finds herself contemplating a momentous change in her own life – that will help her catch the killer and provide new opportunities to her wards – but may cost her the livelihood and freedom she has worked so hard to protect.The mystery was reasonably satisfying, but the real highlight of this series for me is the outstanding cast of characters Penrose has created. The leads and the wide net of side characters are well-drawn and have grown over the course of the series, revealing new talents and motivations as they are challenged by new situations. A few new figures were introduced in this book and I’m hoping they’ll reappear in future novels. The slow-burn romance between Wrexford and Charlotte continues apace, but doesn’t overwhelm the rest of the plot and relationships in the book. Looking forward to the fourth book in this series!
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  • Linda Baker
    January 1, 1970
    The third book in this mystery series set in the Regency Period finds widow Charlotte Sloane settled into better surroundings with her two wards, Raven and Hawk. Charlotte's secret career as the political cartoonist A.J. Quill is still a closely held secret, as is her status as Lady Charlotte. Only a few people know that she is an Earl's daughter who was disowned by her family when she eloped with her drawing master. Her investigative partner in the two previous books, Lord Wrexford, knows her r The third book in this mystery series set in the Regency Period finds widow Charlotte Sloane settled into better surroundings with her two wards, Raven and Hawk. Charlotte's secret career as the political cartoonist A.J. Quill is still a closely held secret, as is her status as Lady Charlotte. Only a few people know that she is an Earl's daughter who was disowned by her family when she eloped with her drawing master. Her investigative partner in the two previous books, Lord Wrexford, knows her real identity, but Charlotte is leery of letting anyone else know. That may have to change; however, when her childhood playmate and cousin is murdered in a grisly way, and it appears that his twin brother may be the murderer. The investigation leads them into the highest circles of the "men of science" of the day. Wrexford, of course, has complete access to those groups. It appears that the two brothers had gotten involved with another scientific group, the Eos Society. The Eos Society is secretive and up to no good. Could they hold the answer to saving her cousin from the gallows?Once again, Penrose presents a well-researched look at the Regency Period. As the author points out, the era was the beginning of the modern world in its enthusiasm for science and exploration. Women also were just beginning to chafe at the restrictions placed on them by a patriarchal society. We meet several new characters that I hope to see more of in future books. Raven and Hawk are developing from the street urchins they were into distinct personalities. I am also enjoying the relationship between Wrexford and Sloane who are extremely well-matched. The growing romance is a nice addition but the intricately plotted mystery takes precedence. I highly recommend this series to fans of historical mysteries.Thanks to Kensington Books and NetGalley for an advance digital copy. The opinions are my own.RATING-4.5 Stars
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  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by the publisher via NetGalley.Due to the nature of the investigation, it is time for Charlotte to reveal she is the daughter of an earl (dead) and rejoin society in order to help clear her cousin's name. Wrexford makes sure she has papers that show Hawke and Raven are her and her late husband's wards. She struggles with giving up a life she has control over and the effects on those around her but she didn't think of that protection for the boys.They aren't talking about the kiss in ARC provided by the publisher via NetGalley.Due to the nature of the investigation, it is time for Charlotte to reveal she is the daughter of an earl (dead) and rejoin society in order to help clear her cousin's name. Wrexford makes sure she has papers that show Hawke and Raven are her and her late husband's wards. She struggles with giving up a life she has control over and the effects on those around her but she didn't think of that protection for the boys.They aren't talking about the kiss in the last book. The romance reader in me really wants them to talk about that kiss! And potential future kisses! But they're dealing with more urgent matters at the moment. They don't point out the obvious that now she is more of a social equal, their marriage wouldn't be blinked at, though Charlotte being back on the marriage mart is mentioned. I would love to see them as a married couple investigating crimes.There's a mess of suspects - fellow scientists, men he gambled with, his romantic rival, and the brother in jail who did curse his fate in being born a few minutes earlier than him. Science nerds will enjoy learning about the scientific experiments in botany and biology at the time.Charlotte's now moving with other bluestockings and we'll see more of that part of society than her time alone. She is building up connections with two potential suspects, both women who are known for their intelligence.There is much less of a royal presence than the title may imply. I prefer the book for it, to be honest, because everyday life is more interesting than the formality of court. I did enjoy the twists of this mystery and the slippery clues that present themselves. Perfect for historical mystery readers who would enjoy the scientific aspects of the time as well as the political.
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  • Barb in Maryland
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars for the third outing with widow Charlotte Sloane and the Earl of Wrexford.The blurb gives a nice idea of the basic plot, so I'll skip a recap of the action.What I liked:The mystery was clever, with a school of red herrings strewn about to befuddle the reader. The science element, which was essential to the plot, was the hot-topic of the era: electricity! The reader gets a nice refresher course on the early efforts to generate, in a laboratory setting, this force of nature. There is gro 3.5 stars for the third outing with widow Charlotte Sloane and the Earl of Wrexford.The blurb gives a nice idea of the basic plot, so I'll skip a recap of the action.What I liked:The mystery was clever, with a school of red herrings strewn about to befuddle the reader. The science element, which was essential to the plot, was the hot-topic of the era: electricity! The reader gets a nice refresher course on the early efforts to generate, in a laboratory setting, this force of nature. There is growth in the continuing characters, especially the two boys who Charlotte has unofficially adopted. Hawk and Raven are a delight and are developing their own interests: Hawk is becoming a naturalist and artist, while Raven has found a love for numbers and a fascination with Wrexford's laboratory. Their burgeoning talents play a part in solving the murders.Charlotte, while continuing her career as AJ Quill--political/social cartoonist, is grappling with her need to rejoin society if she is to truly help her cousin Nicky prove his innocence. Wrexford is showing cracks in his façade of emotionless man of science. His friend, Christopher Sheffield, is also revealing some depth of character.I liked several of the new characters, especially Cordelia and Charlotte’s aunt Lady Peake. I hope we see more of them in future books.What I didn’t like:I got really, really tired of Charlotte’s ‘gilded cage’ speeches. Really tired.I thought that Griffin (from Bow Street) was dumber than he needed to be. He is still very much a one-note character, IMO.Lastly, there’s a clanger of a typo as we head into the dramatic conclusion that jerked me right out of the story. How that one got by the author, editors and proof-readers is a mystery to me.All in all, I had a great time and I'm looking forward to the next book.
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  • BOOKLOVER10
    January 1, 1970
    Andrea Penrose sets "Murder at Kensington Palace" in England's Regency Period, an exciting time of experimentation and innovation. The Earl of Wrexford and Charlotte Sloane team up to solve a crime—the murder and mutilation of Cedric, Lord Chittenden. Charlotte has personal reasons for getting involved in this messy affair, but she fears that if she reveals them, she will sacrifice her privacy and freedom. Mrs. Sloane, who is widowed, makes a living as "London's most popular satirical artist," u Andrea Penrose sets "Murder at Kensington Palace" in England's Regency Period, an exciting time of experimentation and innovation. The Earl of Wrexford and Charlotte Sloane team up to solve a crime—the murder and mutilation of Cedric, Lord Chittenden. Charlotte has personal reasons for getting involved in this messy affair, but she fears that if she reveals them, she will sacrifice her privacy and freedom. Mrs. Sloane, who is widowed, makes a living as "London's most popular satirical artist," using the pseudonym A. J. Quill, whom everyone assumes is a man. In addition, she is the guardian of two formerly homeless siblings, Hawk and Raven. Although Charlotte and Wrexford have feelings for one another, neither is ready to take their relationship to the next level.Penrose portrays London as a place of sharp contrasts, with the privileged few living ostentatiously, while the impoverished masses struggle to survive. Charlotte and Wrexford make several forays into the hellish Newgate Prison, that "putrid, pestilent bastion of depravity," where Cedric's sibling, Nicholas Locke, is incarcerated for allegedly stabbing his brother in a rage. Charlotte is positive that Nicholas, a close childhood friend, is innocent, and she is determined to prove it.This is a gently humorous novel with colorful details about a fascinating era. The vivid cast of supporting characters includes Charlotte's Great-Aunt Alison, who is wealthy, saucy, and supportive of her niece’s unconventional activities. At times, Charlotte dresses like a street urchin when she wants to go undercover. In addition, Hawk and Raven do legwork and contribute useful ideas and information to the investigation. Unfortunately, "Murder at Kensington Palace" is weakened by its florid prose (an example: "When roused by injustice, she would charge headlong into hellhole conundrums…."), clichéd situations, and a predictable ending. Nevertheless, fans of British historical mysteries may enjoy this tale about the consequences of hubris and the limitations placed on spirited and talented women by a society that relegated females to strictly circumscribed roles.
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  • Moriah
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this title from the publisher for an honest review 4 1/3 stars rounded down to 4. This title is the third in the series featuring the Earl of Wexford and Charlotte Sloane; it can be read as a stand-alone, but I would recommend reading the first two books to see the relationship between Wexford and Charlotte develop.Charlotte and her household are still settling into their new neighborhood following the events of the second title in the series. Charlotte continues to produce I received a copy of this title from the publisher for an honest review 4 1/3 stars rounded down to 4. This title is the third in the series featuring the Earl of Wexford and Charlotte Sloane; it can be read as a stand-alone, but I would recommend reading the first two books to see the relationship between Wexford and Charlotte develop.Charlotte and her household are still settling into their new neighborhood following the events of the second title in the series. Charlotte continues to produce her drawings under the name AJ Quill; Raven and Hawk are attending lessons with a tutor recommended by Wexford, although the boys still maintain ties with their old friends. The boys bring home news of a death of a young gentleman by the name of Lord Chittenden (Cedric); the police are convinced that the killer is the young man's twin brother (Nicholas) who was his heir. It is apparently clear that Charlotte has a connection to the young men, but the exact nature of the relationship isn't immediately revealed. She is determined to help clear Nicholas's name and enlists Wexford's help in addition to some familiar characters from the previous books.The mystery is well done and kept me guessing until almost the end. I loved how Charlotte and Wexford's relationship grows during this book as they figure out just what the events at the end of the last book mean. The secondary characters including Raven, Hawk, and Wexford's valet, Tyler are very well written and add a lot to the story. The strength of this book as well as previous ones includes the scientific details; the author provides so many interesting details of what was happening during this period of great learning and development in all spheres. I loved this book and hope that there are many more featuring Wexford and Charlotte and we get to see their relationship continue to grow and develop.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsMurder at Kensington Palace is the third in the Wrexford & Sloan mysteries. I've had problems with the earlier two, but I like the characters and Charlotte Sloan's secret identity as the satirical artist A.J. Quill in the Regency Period so I've continued to read the books. I'm happy to say the third book seems to find Andrea Penrose becoming more skillful in her presentation (but that may be because I was reading ARCs that were probably edited). Murder at Kensington Palace made the 3.5 starsMurder at Kensington Palace is the third in the Wrexford & Sloan mysteries. I've had problems with the earlier two, but I like the characters and Charlotte Sloan's secret identity as the satirical artist A.J. Quill in the Regency Period so I've continued to read the books. I'm happy to say the third book seems to find Andrea Penrose becoming more skillful in her presentation (but that may be because I was reading ARCs that were probably edited). Murder at Kensington Palace made the most of previous characters and added some intriguing new ones.Charlotte's cousin Cedric is murdered and his twin brother Nicholas is arrested for the murder. Unable to believe Nicholas guilty, Charlotte determines to find out what happened. The plot (far-fetched, but exciting) requires Charlotte, Lord Wrexford, and the Weasels (two street boys, Hawk and Raven whom Charlotte has taken in and who have aided in previous investigations) to explore scientific experiments involving electricity. (view spoiler)[Is someone trying a Frankenstein experiment? (hide spoiler)]The role of Mrs. McClellan (the housekeeper) develops; Charlotte's great-aunt and the bluestocking Lady Cordelia are introduced. I like the addition of the two new strong female characters and giving Mrs. McClellan more time, and as always the lovable Weasels.I look forward to the next addition to this series. :)Read in Aug. Blog review scheduled for Sept. 11, 2019.NetGalley/Kensington BooksHistorical Mystery. Sept. 24, 2019. Print length: 304 pages.
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    I really love this series, and Murder at Kensington Palace is an excellent continuation of the storyline. Charlotte is forced to come out of the shadows and re-enter society after a cousin is murdered and another cousin (his twin) is falsely accused of the crime. Wrexford (naturally) wants to do everything in his power to help Charlotte find the real killer, especially when it turns out that the murder is tied up with a fringe group of scientists experimenting with newly discovered electricity. I really love this series, and Murder at Kensington Palace is an excellent continuation of the storyline. Charlotte is forced to come out of the shadows and re-enter society after a cousin is murdered and another cousin (his twin) is falsely accused of the crime. Wrexford (naturally) wants to do everything in his power to help Charlotte find the real killer, especially when it turns out that the murder is tied up with a fringe group of scientists experimenting with newly discovered electricity. As always, Andrea Penrose includes a fascinating look at the scientific developments of the time and how it is received by both the scientific community and the world at large. Her extensive research is evident, and it is woven in seamlessly to the overall mystery.Raven and Hawk get to play a more prominent role here and are adorable additions to the story. Charlotte's maid/bodyguard, McClellan, also features more prominently, along with Wrexford's friend, Kit Sheffield - who actually contributes to the investigation a bit more than usual. I like that Charlotte's "family" is slowly expanding, and having her forced to reclaim her true identity -- after we only just learned it in the last book -- will undoubtedly set up lots of intriguing drama. I can't wait for more adventures with Wrexford and Charlotte -- especially after the promising hint of what is to come at the end here!Thank you to Kensington and Netgalley for providing an ARC for review!
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