I'm Not Dying with You Tonight
Lena and Campbell aren't friends.Lena has her killer style, her awesome boyfriend, and a plan. She knows she's going to make it big. Campbell, on the other hand, is just trying to keep her head down and get through the year at her new school.When both girls attend the Friday-night football game, what neither expects is for everything to descend into sudden mass chaos. Chaos born from violence and hate. Chaos that unexpectedly throws them together.They aren't friends. They hardly understand the other's point of view. But none of that matters when the city is up in flames, and they only have each other to rely on if they're going to survive the night.

I'm Not Dying with You Tonight Details

TitleI'm Not Dying with You Tonight
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 6th, 2019
PublisherSourcebooks Fire
ISBN-139781492678892
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Fiction

I'm Not Dying with You Tonight Review

  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    this is what I think every time I drive with my dad
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley and Sourcebooks Fire for a digital galley in exchange for an honest review. A YA novel that follows two high school students- Lena and Campbell, over the course of one night where a high school football game sets off chaos all over their community. It reminded me of The Hate U Give in terms of characterization and discussion of relevant topics, but its ending lacked a bit of finality. I felt more of an interest in Lena's story, but struggled for the first little bit to get Thanks to Netgalley and Sourcebooks Fire for a digital galley in exchange for an honest review. A YA novel that follows two high school students- Lena and Campbell, over the course of one night where a high school football game sets off chaos all over their community. It reminded me of The Hate U Give in terms of characterization and discussion of relevant topics, but its ending lacked a bit of finality. I felt more of an interest in Lena's story, but struggled for the first little bit to get into the groove with Campbell. Lots of action and the chapters are short and storyline fast paced, and I enjoyed two authors tackling diverse topics. I do believe that this is going to catch the attention of my students.Goodreads Review 24/07/19Expected Publication 06/08/19
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  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    Even though I have some mixed feelings about the book, I'm still glad I read it. I do think it's a book worth reading if you enjoy YA fiction. It's one of those reads in which even though I had problems with it, I feel this compelling need to talk about the story. I think it would make a good book club selection as there's lots of interesting things to discuss here.When a massive fight breaks up at a high school football game, two teenagers are thrust into a situation in which it's probably best Even though I have some mixed feelings about the book, I'm still glad I read it. I do think it's a book worth reading if you enjoy YA fiction. It's one of those reads in which even though I had problems with it, I feel this compelling need to talk about the story. I think it would make a good book club selection as there's lots of interesting things to discuss here.When a massive fight breaks up at a high school football game, two teenagers are thrust into a situation in which it's probably best if they work together in order to survive. Lena is cool and confident and is obsessed with her boyfriend, Black. (yup, that's his name). Campbell has just moved to town to live with her father after her mother takes a job in a different country. The story alternates between the two girls over the course of a night in which danger is around every corner and they better figure out how to get to safety.So there's definitely a lot of action in this one which I guess you could say was both a positive and negative thing. The fast pace made this a quick read but I think that also led to underdeveloped characters, especially Lena, and moments that could have been expanded upon instead of glossed over. I don't think the story reached its' potential is probably the best way of putting it. I'm also conflicted about the ending. I'm okay with leaving some things up to the reader's imagination but in this case it feels so abrupt and not an entirely satisfying way to end a book. To sum it up, a decent YA read but I wanted more from the story. A good effort but it doesn't quite hit the mark as well some other fiction books dealing with the same themes and topics. Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me with an advance digital copy in exchange for an honest review!
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  • Danielle ❤️ Pretty Mess Reading ❤️
    January 1, 1970
    ****4 STARS****One of the best things about I’m Not Dying With You Tonight is that it was written by two women. One black American and one white American. That fact alone gives this book a very unique ability to focus on what not only divides us, but what brings us together.Campbell, who is white, starts her senior year of high school in a predominantly black school after attending a school with only a handful of black students. She’s so sweet. I just wanted to pick her up and put her in my pock ****4 STARS****One of the best things about I’m Not Dying With You Tonight is that it was written by two women. One black American and one white American. That fact alone gives this book a very unique ability to focus on what not only divides us, but what brings us together.Campbell, who is white, starts her senior year of high school in a predominantly black school after attending a school with only a handful of black students. She’s so sweet. I just wanted to pick her up and put her in my pocket. Cute little thing!Lena, who is black, has spent her years in an area where the majority of her community is black.Both Lena and Campbell live in their own world, like most teenager, unable to truly understand how the “other half” lives.The beauty is, Campbell and Lena now have to rely on each other. “This ’bout the longest amount of time you ever spent with a black girl, right?”“No!”“I ain’t judgin’. Not like I hang around with no white people. I was curious is all.”“Yah, I guess so. There weren’t that many African American kids at my old school, and they mostly hung around each other.” – Lena and Campbell Click below to READ MOREHERE It gets better! Trust me!Remember to follow all things messy. . . Subscribe/Listen to my podcast
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    The ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. 3.5/5 StarsFull review HEREThis book tells the story of Campbell and Lena and how they became allies in a time of need. The two girls don’t really know each other but when a big fight suddenly breaks out at the concession stand where Campbell was working they decide to stick together and try to escape. After someone gets shot the fight escalates to the close-by neighborhoods and it becomes an actu The ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. 3.5/5 StarsFull review HEREThis book tells the story of Campbell and Lena and how they became allies in a time of need. The two girls don’t really know each other but when a big fight suddenly breaks out at the concession stand where Campbell was working they decide to stick together and try to escape. After someone gets shot the fight escalates to the close-by neighborhoods and it becomes an actual riot, leaving the girls to fend for themselves and try to make it home. The story is very fast-paced and it all happens in a few hours of the night in question. Lena is an African-American girl who can definitely speak her mind and I admired the fact that she put Lena in her place when she said something racist. Lena is a white girl and a newcomer at school. I think this experience definitely made her realize some important things and brought her closer to Lena. In order to have a clear difference on the page the authors thought to give the girls two different voices. I’m all for that, I like understanding who I’m reading about because of a unique characteristic but I think that in this case it was all done in poor taste. Lena speaks with bad grammar and to me it truly felt like an unnecessary stereotype that should totally have been avoided.The aspect I appreciated the most in this novel was the realistic description of racial tension and how it was then developed. I think the authors did a good job in explaining what was going on and why we got to that point. Something that annoyed me throughout the whole book was (view spoiler)[ the fact that Lena necessarily wanted to get to her boyfriend Black. It just felt very out of character for her. She was presented to us as this badass girl who can be independent and then they have her running around the whole town just to get to a boyfriend that doesn’t even bother to answer her calls. The ending left a lot to the imagination and was resolved too quickly. We’re just told that Marcus is in the hospital and that Lena got home safe, and that’s it. We don’t know anything about what happens next in the riot, in the town in general and especially between the two main characters. I would have liked to know more, maybe with an epilogue or something. (hide spoiler)]
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  • PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps
    January 1, 1970
    ***Thanks to NetGalley for providing me a complimentary copy of I’M NOT DYING WITH YOU TONIGHT by Kimberly Jones and Gilly Segal in exchange for my honest review.***Two classmates, one black, the other white are caught up in a football game fight that turns into a riot.I’m a middle aged Caucasian woman and while not the target audience for I’M NOT DYING WITH YOU TONIGHT, I enjoyed this profound story. Initially, Lena’s raw, authentic voice was difficult for me to understand but after a few chapt ***Thanks to NetGalley for providing me a complimentary copy of I’M NOT DYING WITH YOU TONIGHT by Kimberly Jones and Gilly Segal in exchange for my honest review.***Two classmates, one black, the other white are caught up in a football game fight that turns into a riot.I’m a middle aged Caucasian woman and while not the target audience for I’M NOT DYING WITH YOU TONIGHT, I enjoyed this profound story. Initially, Lena’s raw, authentic voice was difficult for me to understand but after a few chapters, the rhythm flowed more smoothly.Lena was the more layered, multifaceted character, but I identified with Campbell, who was completely out of her element more. Jones and Segal brilliantly showed the differences in points of view between the girls, assumptions they made about each other based on race and how each grew as they fought together to stay safe.Before Trayvon Martin was murdered, I, like Campbell, never understood my white privilege. I made assumptions from my own experiences rather than empathizing with those who had other frames of reference. The #BlackLivesMatter movement taught me much of what Campbell learned from Lena. Lena also learned from her white counterparts, though her learning curve was much less steep.The end left me wanting more. What would happen Monday at school? Would they become friends after gaining the respect of each other? How would the community be changed. I would LOVE a sequel, but I think the writers wanted to leave us wondering.
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  • Kristy K
    January 1, 1970
    This is a powerful little novel, taking place over the course of a few hours. A fight breaks out during halftime of a high school football game and Lena (African-American) and Campbell (Caucasian) find themselves together trying to escape. As tensions rise throughout the city they end up in another part of town where a social justice protest turns violent and then into a full-fledged riot. It’s wild and chaotic and while I was annoyed by some of Lena’s and Campbell’s choices, who’s to say I woul This is a powerful little novel, taking place over the course of a few hours. A fight breaks out during halftime of a high school football game and Lena (African-American) and Campbell (Caucasian) find themselves together trying to escape. As tensions rise throughout the city they end up in another part of town where a social justice protest turns violent and then into a full-fledged riot. It’s wild and chaotic and while I was annoyed by some of Lena’s and Campbell’s choices, who’s to say I wouldn’t have made similar ones at 17 if I was in their shoes. I’m Not Dying With You Tonight brings racial tension and discord to the forefront and makes you take a hard look at current events and possibly even your own prejudices. At times it felt a little uncomfortable, but I think that’s the point. In the end Lena and Campbell are survive the night but are left with more questions than answers as seems to often be the case in these situations. I think this books will serve well as a discussion opener among teens and adults alike. I received an advanced copy through Netgalley in return for an honest review.
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  • Juli
    January 1, 1970
    Lena and Campbell are two high school students. They don't know each other. In fact, they have very little in common, other than the fact they are both young and come from the same city. One Friday night, a fight after a high school football game escalates into violence. What starts as an exchange of angry words at a concession stand grows into a dangerous violence in the crowd at the game and then area neighborhoods. The two girls find themselves having to work together to make it home safely. Lena and Campbell are two high school students. They don't know each other. In fact, they have very little in common, other than the fact they are both young and come from the same city. One Friday night, a fight after a high school football game escalates into violence. What starts as an exchange of angry words at a concession stand grows into a dangerous violence in the crowd at the game and then area neighborhoods. The two girls find themselves having to work together to make it home safely. This story is fast paced and the perspective alternates between the two girls. I had a hard time getting into the characters at first. I think it might have been because as I would just start getting into one girl's story, the chapter would end and it would switch to the other girl. But as the story ramped up, I found myself pulled in...and it didn't matter whose perspective it was....I wanted to know what was happening! Emergency situations can bring together people who would not normally mesh....and also uncover the true nature of people we thought were familiar. I enjoyed the story and the points this YA book strives to bring home. At the end, I found myself wanting to know what happens next! The ending was realistic and leaves the reader to think...imagine...hope. I hope that the events depicted in the book would lead the characters to change their lives, their opinions and their judgments of others. I wish our world was more about love and respect instead of hate and judgment. In the end, I left the story hoping at least the two main characters formed a bond and learned life lessons they won't forget.Very moving story. I enjoyed it. The fast pace glossed over a few things I wish had been more fully developed.....but, I understand why the action was fast. The situation the girls were in left no time for thinking about things....they had to pull together to get home. The writing style and development perfectly fit the plot. I'd definitely be interested in reading more from these two writers! **I voluntarily read an advanced readers copy of this book from Sourcebooks Fire via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.**
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    I read an ARC of this that I picked up at ALA. This is an important story about how two very different girls come together to survive through riots across their town. It is a story about the differences in race and how each girl reacts differently to the terrifying situations because of their race. I thought this was insightful while still being action packed and fun at times, despite mostly being a dark story. You can tell two different author's wrote this, because the voices are distinctly dif I read an ARC of this that I picked up at ALA. This is an important story about how two very different girls come together to survive through riots across their town. It is a story about the differences in race and how each girl reacts differently to the terrifying situations because of their race. I thought this was insightful while still being action packed and fun at times, despite mostly being a dark story. You can tell two different author's wrote this, because the voices are distinctly different. I will say, it took me out of the story to switch between the two. I also felt like the characters were so over the top cliches at times, that they didn't feel completely real. Those being my only issues with the story, it was a great read and an important one that I feel everyone should give a try.
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  • Adam Sockel
    January 1, 1970
    This will almost certainly be the next major YA book in a line of massively important conversation starters. Think The Hate U Give, This is Where it Ends, or Long Way Down. It shines a light for readers on two high schoolers who come from wildly different backgrounds and forces them to work together in order to survive. The characters are vulnerable and scared and, at times, selfish and self-centered but this all comes together to create realistic depictions of teenagers. Told through each of th This will almost certainly be the next major YA book in a line of massively important conversation starters. Think The Hate U Give, This is Where it Ends, or Long Way Down. It shines a light for readers on two high schoolers who come from wildly different backgrounds and forces them to work together in order to survive. The characters are vulnerable and scared and, at times, selfish and self-centered but this all comes together to create realistic depictions of teenagers. Told through each of their points of view that alternates chapter by chapter, the prose never lets you get comfortable in your reading, which only helps create a more jarring experience that mirrors what Lena and Campbell are going through. This book should and will spark important conversations in classrooms and homes around the country. It needs to be discussed and it needs to be read.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the publisher, via Edelweiss, for providing me with a copy of I'm Not Dying with You Tonight for review. This in no way influences my opinion.I'm not Dying with You Tonight is the story of Lena and Campbell, thrust together at the school concessions stand as a riot breaks out. They spend much of the rest of the book trying to get a drive home, exposing each other to their racial differences through conversation.I had a lot of problems with this book, not about the racial conversatio Thank you to the publisher, via Edelweiss, for providing me with a copy of I'm Not Dying with You Tonight for review. This in no way influences my opinion.I'm not Dying with You Tonight is the story of Lena and Campbell, thrust together at the school concessions stand as a riot breaks out. They spend much of the rest of the book trying to get a drive home, exposing each other to their racial differences through conversation.I had a lot of problems with this book, not about the racial conversation, but about the geographical area they were covering and some logic points.This book is set in the present day with Campbell moving to the neighbourhood to live with her dad because her mom's work got transferred to Venezuela - it doesn't explain what her work is, but I have a hard time thinking that any work is worth relocating to Venezuela now, with the instability and food shortages. It is never discussed, and I just couldn't let go of this bonkers relocation.Also, Campbell is beyond deeply distressed about her dad's shop getting trashed. I understand the sentiment, my father is also a small business owner, but the level of distress would've made sense if there was a one sentence bit about him missing an insurance payment and being without coverage. I know insurance can't buy a whole new life, but if it was in place (and we're given no reason to think it isn't) they should have had enough to rebuild.I couldn't understand the logic of continuing to try to reach Black, Lena's scrub of a boyfriend, as it became increasingly clear they were heading toward absolute anarchy. Additionally, it is painful to see such a self assured character not pick up any of the red flags in her relationship. Why didn't she Google maps an alternate route and send Black a text that she'll catch up with his inconsiderate self never?I wish there was a map at the beginning of the book to show the distance they were trying to cover/geographic points of reference - because a map would've made it more clear as far as necessity for being funneled through two riots. I believe we're supposed to sense a deep emotional connection forged between Lena and Campbell after the initial riot to keep the girls together; but from my view I'm not finding the level of loyalty to enter what amounts to a domestic war zone.This book is more plot than character driven - we don't expand enough on LaShunda, Campbell's dad, Black/his friend's motivations, or Marcus. They all have individual attributes, but we dip in an out of their lives without any growth. We also leave Lena and Campbell without getting the next steps. Like, the school and downtown are trashed and a tenuous friendship is forged, so I want to see what tomorrow looks like.I will say on the positive end of things, the story does move quickly - it is all plot driven, from one fraught situation onto the next - reminiscent of Nijkamp's "This is Where it Ends" as far as pacing goes. I also think it would be a good intro read to start a discussion about the different experience minorities have, in all interactions, as compared to white people. But, if you've read Jason Reynolds/Nic Stone/Angie Thomas etc, you've already done higher level discussions of race relations than what Lena and Campbell raise in this book.In conclusion, this is fine for a mature middle grade/young teen audience but unlikely to be able to cross the divide and enter into the adult book conversation.
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  • Tia
    January 1, 1970
    SOOOOOO GOOOOOD!!Lena and Campbell Soup are double trouble!Review to come
  • Never Without a Book™
    January 1, 1970
    I'm Not Dying with You Tonight by Gilly Segal and Kimberly Jones is no doubt a pager turner. This story centers on two girls that grew up on different sides of the track. Lena (black) and Campbell (white) are at their high school football game. New girl Campbell is working the concession while head strong Lena is watching a friend perform during halftime. As the story unfolds a massive fight breaks out near the concession and Campbell and Lena (an unlikely pair) must join forces to seek safety. I'm Not Dying with You Tonight by Gilly Segal and Kimberly Jones is no doubt a pager turner. This story centers on two girls that grew up on different sides of the track. Lena (black) and Campbell (white) are at their high school football game. New girl Campbell is working the concession while head strong Lena is watching a friend perform during halftime. As the story unfolds a massive fight breaks out near the concession and Campbell and Lena (an unlikely pair) must join forces to seek safety. As the girls escape the chaos of the field they end up on the main street, where a peaceful protest on racial inequality turns into a full-blown riot! This novel provides two interesting POV filled with biases and stereotypes from both sides. Much of the book I felt was underdeveloped and with all the cautious right in your face you would think it was Armageddon. I love the concept, but something was missing or too much, I’m not sure yet. My daughter is in the age group that would enjoy this. Overall, I enjoyed the book, it was a quick & easy read and you get a few laugh out loud moments. Thank you Netgalley and Sourcebooks for the copy in exchange for an honest review. 3.5 round up to 4 of 5.
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  • Marie -The Reading Otter
    January 1, 1970
    Review:3.5 StarsI received this book from NetGalley for reviewThis book is very different from most of the books I read. While I do and have read Contemporary, this book is different from those. This is the first book I've read that talks about racial tension. This book is fast-paced and had me on the edge of my seat the whole way through (once I actually had time to sit and read it). Both Lena and Campbell are smart characters who held it together far better than I ever could have if I were in Review:3.5 StarsI received this book from NetGalley for reviewThis book is very different from most of the books I read. While I do and have read Contemporary, this book is different from those. This is the first book I've read that talks about racial tension. This book is fast-paced and had me on the edge of my seat the whole way through (once I actually had time to sit and read it). Both Lena and Campbell are smart characters who held it together far better than I ever could have if I were in their position. This book does a good job talking about racial tension, but there are other things in this book that kind of don't fully add up.There is no sensible reason for Lena to try to get to her boyfriend, especially when he was giving her the runaround the whole night. Lena seems to be a very self-assured person and her boyfriend... who knows. He seems to have goals, and even though he's older than her, he acts very self-centered and uncaring that she was stuck in the middle of a riot. I also didn't really care for having her use poor grammar, I guess they were trying to give the two girls different voices, but it seems like a gross stereotype to have the black girl speak with bad grammar.Campbell seemed to be overly distraught over her father's store being broken into with no explanation for why she was that upset. Nothing to indicate whether her father had insurance, or if he had faulted on a payment for or not. It's possible that it was just the straw that broke the camels back for her, and she was overreacting. But it's unlikely that she just didn't know how business insurance works. Nothing was said about what happened between her father and the kid who was hired to work at the store, who just left when things started getting heated, who is basically at fault for it getting broken into in the first place. And the end of it all, there isn't even a discussion between Campbell and her father, how he basically abandons her every weekend, and if he had been there for her, she wouldn't have almost died, the store might not have gotten broken into. None of that was covered, it just ends with her getting a text from Lena.I don't know when exactly this book is supposed to be set. Clearly during a time when Cellphones and Urber exist. But Campbell's mother is transferred to work in Venezuela, and considering what is going on in that area right now, that seems odd. We are also never told what her mother does for a living that would require her to be transferred overseas, especially to a country that is going through political upheaval. There was also the ending to consider. It just kind of... ends. A one-off sentence to cover what happened to Lena's cousin, and even less with Campbell. There is nothing that covers the aftermath of the night they went through. I would have liked more wrapup. Lena and Campbell are supposed to be kind of friends now, and after everything they went through, I would expect they had a pretty strong bond. They survived a very violent night together and saved each other's lives more than once. That's not something that is ever forgotten.It was an enjoyable read. Fast-paced and pretty action-packed, but there are these things that once you think about them, kind of take away from things and poke tiny holes in the believability of some things.
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  • Nadine Keels
    January 1, 1970
    I was intrigued by the synopsis of this book. However, the emotional flow as well as the flow of events felt choppy, I didn't come to like or click with either of the main characters, and I could have done without some of the crude language. (Not language in relation to something serious happening, but when it seems crude for the sake of crudeness.) The story has an interesting basis, but the style/delivery didn't "pop" for me.The bold and virtually reversible book cover is great, though._______ I was intrigued by the synopsis of this book. However, the emotional flow as well as the flow of events felt choppy, I didn't come to like or click with either of the main characters, and I could have done without some of the crude language. (Not language in relation to something serious happening, but when it seems crude for the sake of crudeness.) The story has an interesting basis, but the style/delivery didn't "pop" for me.The bold and virtually reversible book cover is great, though._______I received a complimentary copy of this book via Netgalley for an honest review.
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  • Suzanne (The Bookish Libra)
    January 1, 1970
    I'm Not Dying with You Tonight is a gripping, fast-paced read that is a pure adrenaline rush. I flew through it in one sitting.. Even though it's a quick read, it's still a powerful one. The authors do a great job of portraying topics that are very relevant in society now - racial discrimination, white privilege, how tensions can escalate and get out of hand quickly, and so much more. I also liked both of the main characters, one white teen girl and one African American teen girl, and thought it I'm Not Dying with You Tonight is a gripping, fast-paced read that is a pure adrenaline rush. I flew through it in one sitting.. Even though it's a quick read, it's still a powerful one. The authors do a great job of portraying topics that are very relevant in society now - racial discrimination, white privilege, how tensions can escalate and get out of hand quickly, and so much more. I also liked both of the main characters, one white teen girl and one African American teen girl, and thought it was very effective to present this evening gone terribly wrong from each of their perspectives. As these two seemingly different girls try to escape what started out as a simple school brawl and escalated into a full-scale riot, they learn a lot about themselves and about each other. I think this is a riveting read that is going to be very popular with teens.3.5 starsI received this book for free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an eARC of this title for review. All opinions are my own.I came to know about I'm Not Dying with You Tonight after reading a blurb from Angie Thomas about the book. When I realized that it told a story from two different points of view (one white, one Black), I wanted to know more. Overall, this is a great book and a strong addition to the building canon of contemporary literature dealing with race relations and tensions within o Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an eARC of this title for review. All opinions are my own.I came to know about I'm Not Dying with You Tonight after reading a blurb from Angie Thomas about the book. When I realized that it told a story from two different points of view (one white, one Black), I wanted to know more. Overall, this is a great book and a strong addition to the building canon of contemporary literature dealing with race relations and tensions within our society. My one critique: there was no real sense of resolution at the end of the novel. Due to the natures of the storyline (the entire book covers the events of one evening starting at a local football game where a fight breaks out and traveling downtown across streets embroiled in a peaceful protest and the following riot) there CAN'T be a complete resolution. There is no sense of a "happily ever after." There is no sense that the reader can even accurately predict what will happen in the days after the plot's storyline has ended. BUT, that still feels authentic and real. Like I said, this is a strong addition and one that I would consider a first purchase for large collections and a second purchase for collections that are smaller.Lena and Campbell are not friends. They barely even know each other. But when the fight breaks out at the local high school football game they are thrown together for an evening where things quickly spin out of control and danger is around every corner. Told in alternating viewpoints, the reader follows these girls as they struggle to get home in the midst of turmoil. It is truly these alternating voices that allows this book to shine.
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  • Danielle (Life of a Literary Nerd)
    January 1, 1970
    I'm Not Dying with You Tonight is quick read that's raw, unflinching, and anxiety inducing. We follow Lena and Campbell as they're thrown together after a dangerous fight breaks out at a football game and the girls have to stick together if they want to stay safe. I could not put this down once I started it - it was just compulsively readable and filled with genuine character moments showcasing all the fear, anxiety, and hope that comes with not only being a teenager, but being in an unknown sit I'm Not Dying with You Tonight is quick read that's raw, unflinching, and anxiety inducing. We follow Lena and Campbell as they're thrown together after a dangerous fight breaks out at a football game and the girls have to stick together if they want to stay safe. I could not put this down once I started it - it was just compulsively readable and filled with genuine character moments showcasing all the fear, anxiety, and hope that comes with not only being a teenager, but being in an unknown situation. Even with the deeper discussions of race, gentrification, community, and prejudices, there were many moments that I couldn't help but laugh out loud at Lena's wonderful narration and gloriously fresh personality. Both girls felt real and honest, but I think I loved Lena a little more. And while this was so easy to read, it had my heart racing. I don't think a book has ever made me feel so anxious before. But it felt like I was with Lena and Campbell as they moved across the city searching for a safe space. I'm not sure if I could classify this as a new favorite read, but I definitely think it be one of the most unique and impactful books that stay with me that I've read so far this year.
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  • Lindsay♫SingerOfStories♫
    January 1, 1970
    Campbell moves to a new town for her senior year and is recruited to work the refreshment stand at the Friday night football game. She doesn't really have friends yet and she really doesn't have help in the stand. She's the outcast, the quiet one. Meanwhile, Lena is at the game to watch her friend dance in the halftime show and to show off her own hot new outfit and designer bag. Her boyfriend is older and in the studio laying down new tracks. On the outside, Lena has it all--friends, boyfriend, Campbell moves to a new town for her senior year and is recruited to work the refreshment stand at the Friday night football game. She doesn't really have friends yet and she really doesn't have help in the stand. She's the outcast, the quiet one. Meanwhile, Lena is at the game to watch her friend dance in the halftime show and to show off her own hot new outfit and designer bag. Her boyfriend is older and in the studio laying down new tracks. On the outside, Lena has it all--friends, boyfriend, clothes, bags, a future. But when halftime hits, chaos breaks out. It starts as team rivalry. A fight. Then gunshots. More and more people get involved. Honestly, from the beginning of the book, I didn't stop reading. I could clearly picture my own high school games and then the rowdiness of them and even picture the violence and chaos. I could really picture a journey through the rough neighborhoods of my city in the dark of night. I know those streets my own parents have told me to never even drive down, let alone walk down, and then Lena and Campbell are faced with that walk in the middle of a protest. No. Way.It was hard, at times, to imagine the night lasting as long as it did, and at a couple points, I did want it to just be over for these poor girls. Just hunker down and hide until morning. That being said, we really do live in an age of high levels of panic where it is so easy to become a victim and it can be so difficult to escape the crossfire. Campbell and Lena learned that I think that, and that is exactly what this book did a great job of showing in several other ways as well. Thank you to the publishers for letting me read this shocking and heart-wrenching book. It was quite an eye-opener and so well-written, and so many people would do well to read it with an open mind.
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  • Danielle Hammelef
    January 1, 1970
    The events of this book occur over a period of less than 24 hours, and the authors used the compressed time well and kept the pacing perfect to reflect the immediacy, danger, and tension. This book is a quick read and one you won't be able to put down if you're a fan of THUG, Long Way Down, Dear Martin, and American Street. The authors have given their readers sensory details that will make them feel as if they right there with Lena and Campbell.Told in alternating view points, the authors slowl The events of this book occur over a period of less than 24 hours, and the authors used the compressed time well and kept the pacing perfect to reflect the immediacy, danger, and tension. This book is a quick read and one you won't be able to put down if you're a fan of THUG, Long Way Down, Dear Martin, and American Street. The authors have given their readers sensory details that will make them feel as if they right there with Lena and Campbell.Told in alternating view points, the authors slowly peel back the stereotypes associated with black and white, giving the reader in-depth views of each character and what makes them who they are, their insecurities, their dreams, their own insights into growing up and discovering truths about the world they live in. The only issue I had was the improper grammar given to Lena's character which felt like an insult to this character. The ending to this quick read is done well and leaves plenty for open discussions.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful. Wish it was going to be released before Fall semester starts. Would love to use it in my We Need Diverse Seminar this fall but will go in the Spring YA class.Good to pair with The Hate U Give.
  • Lindsay Loson
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and Sourcebooks for this ARC, out 8/19!I've been wanting to get my hands on this one since I heard Angie Thomas gushing about it. This book is very closely related to topics that The Hate U Give and On the Come Up deal with, and I felt as though these characters could live in the same world, or neighboring cities. I really liked the split narrative and could see how both authors lent their voices to each chapter. I read this book in less than a day, and wished there had be Thank you to NetGalley and Sourcebooks for this ARC, out 8/19!I've been wanting to get my hands on this one since I heard Angie Thomas gushing about it. This book is very closely related to topics that The Hate U Give and On the Come Up deal with, and I felt as though these characters could live in the same world, or neighboring cities. I really liked the split narrative and could see how both authors lent their voices to each chapter. I read this book in less than a day, and wished there had been more to it. I feel like that was my only complaint; that there wasn't enough to this story. I wanted to know what happened after Lena got home, whether she and Campbell became friends through their shared trauma, what the fallout of the riots were. Because of this, I felt that it ended very abruptly, though I liked the last line of the book. Part of me hopes that maybe there will be a sequel, or that maybe the ending is a little longer in the finished copy. Besides that, this book is following in the footsteps of Angie Thomas' work and I think it will become just as important and talked about.
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions expressed in this review are my own.First just let me say, Wow! Just wow!Now, I'll get to the review.I'm Not Dying With You Tonight starts out as just a normal Friday for Campbell and Lena. They are just two ordinary girls who run in different social circles. They are not friends nor have they ever spoken to each other. Campbell attends a football game to help with the concession stand, I received a free copy of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions expressed in this review are my own.First just let me say, Wow! Just wow!Now, I'll get to the review.I'm Not Dying With You Tonight starts out as just a normal Friday for Campbell and Lena. They are just two ordinary girls who run in different social circles. They are not friends nor have they ever spoken to each other. Campbell attends a football game to help with the concession stand, Lena is there to watch her friends dance at halftime. When all hell breaks loose, the girls are thrown together in a terrifying situation where there seems to be nowhere safe. What starts as a fight at a football games turns into a city wide riot, the two must work together if they hope to figure out how to survive the night.I'm Not Dying With You Tonight was told from both Campbell's and Lena's point of views. The characters of Campbell and Lena themselves were done beautifully. Lena is beautiful and popular, Campbell is the shy new girl with no friends. I loved how their individual sections were told so differently, from the way they spoke to the way their fears and values were addressed. The way they are shown as similar beings and completely different at the same time is just wonderful.This is a book I'm going to be feeling for awhile. With both main characters being likeable and vulnerable in their individual ways I found myself in constant fear of what was going to happen next. I felt this book did an incredible job of spotlighting the gaps between race and class in a way that shines light on the problems many still struggle with today. The authors did an amazing job of portraying racial tension. I felt the ending was well done, as it left off with the girls arriving to their respective homes after escaping the riot leaving the focus more on the trauma of that night.This was just an amazing book and I loved it. Once I started reading I only put it down when it was absolutely necessary. I'd recommend this book to anyone over age 13.This and other reviews can be found at https://fourmoonreviews.blogspot.com/
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  • Noemi
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the publisher for a review copy. Out August 6th.This book doesn't sit right with me. If I was rating this on pure entertainment value, it'd be a 5 stars because this was un-put-downable. But, you know how it's good that some books will make you uncomfortable, because you need that to grow ? But what if it doesn't really make you grow and that the problematic stuff just remains that, problematic? It could have been a growing opportunity, but it wasn't for me. We didn't go enough in t Thank you to the publisher for a review copy. Out August 6th.This book doesn't sit right with me. If I was rating this on pure entertainment value, it'd be a 5 stars because this was un-put-downable. But, you know how it's good that some books will make you uncomfortable, because you need that to grow ? But what if it doesn't really make you grow and that the problematic stuff just remains that, problematic? It could have been a growing opportunity, but it wasn't for me. We didn't go enough in the subject and I feel like racial discussions were overshadowed by the main action. In my opinion, the authors missed out on having really deeper conversations.There's a lot of casual racism here emanating from the white MC. What is said out loud is generally called out for (but not always explained why what the character says his bad). But. The white MC sometimes thinks things that she should be called for and aren't, because the conversation is happening in her head. And this work in reinforcing this kind of thinking. Also, when she has these racist reflexions out loud, she's not regretting thinking that, she's regretting she got CAUGHT saying that out loud. No growth on that part.Finally, it also makes me uncomfortable to read a thriller about a riot. I feel like it's voyeurism to entertain myself with a book in which the action, violence and death are drawn from a real and just cause. It's important to have conversations on the subject. But while a book like THUG was meant to sent a message, this book is entertainment...I won't be giving this a star review because giving a good or a bad review both seems unfair.
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  • Heather Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    This book had me in suspense the entire ride. I found myself holding my breath at times. It’s a quick read, read in one sitting. I absolutely think everyone should read not just YA fans. Lena and Campbell are not friends, but the events of one evening put these two in a position to change their lives forever. My fave quote from this book “when you push people to their breaking point, and they ain’t got no power, they’ll find a way to take it. “ I can’t wait to read more by said author-
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  • Jenni
    January 1, 1970
    This book opens with a huge fight at a high school football game. When things go from bad to worse, high school students Lena and Campbell end up together, albeit reluctantly. Fighting, rioting, looting, you name it, it's covered here. The girls make one bad decision after another. A quick read that fans of The Hate U Give and All American Boys will love.
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  • Amanda Blocker
    January 1, 1970
    A sharp and timely story told from two POVs by two authors!
  • Vania
    January 1, 1970
    OMG JUST READ IT! It’s so good and you just need to get on this train!
  • Katherine Moore
    January 1, 1970
    ‘I’m Not Dying With You Tonight’ is a powerful, quick read destined for lots of conversation and many classrooms and library bookshelves. Following two young girls, thrown together by a high school football game that deteriorates into chaos and a night of city rioting, this YA novel addresses issues of race and class and reflects the fragile state of the domestic climate right now. Lena, a popular black student, and Campbell, a white teen new to town, who knows no one and is unsure of herself, l ‘I’m Not Dying With You Tonight’ is a powerful, quick read destined for lots of conversation and many classrooms and library bookshelves. Following two young girls, thrown together by a high school football game that deteriorates into chaos and a night of city rioting, this YA novel addresses issues of race and class and reflects the fragile state of the domestic climate right now. Lena, a popular black student, and Campbell, a white teen new to town, who knows no one and is unsure of herself, live in the same world, but seemingly come from different worlds. The book is set over one single night, really over several hours, and that’s what it took me to read this captivating book. Over those few hours, they rely on each other to survive unimaginable circumstances, facing down riot police, looters, vagrants, and gunfire. The perspective shifts back and forth between the two characters throughout and the chapters are short, keeping the action moving quickly and the pace fast. While it may seem as though there's no time to dig deeper into the enormous issues that come up in this book, all revolving around the race relations canon, debut authors Kimberly Jones and Gilly Segal have written a relatable novel that can serve as a great jumping-off point for conversation. When Lena and Campbell have awkward moments that remind them of their (often ill-conceived) preconceptions and assumptions of each other, the subtext taps into the dialogue we are having as a country and also serves to point out how easy and necessary it is for all the walls to come down. The two girls end up being emblematic of how we work through things better when we work together. I expect that others reading this will recognize how it reflects the racial divide in this country (and some shocking recent current events), yet feel the hope that I felt when I read it. I honestly raced through this, it placed me right in the action myself; it's a poignant read for teens or anyone who needs to have a quick reexamination of their thinking about how we are all judging each other.
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  • Kimberley
    January 1, 1970
    This story was tough to digest because it lacked believability in so many areas. While I understand how easily a race-infused confrontation can escalate into riotous violence, the very origin of the chaos was not only avoidable but controllable. Everything seemed--and I say "seemed" because the events it set off felt outside the range of plausible given its idiocy--to hinge on a tense exchange between two teenage boys. Said exchange happens in view of both Lena and Campbell--which is how they co This story was tough to digest because it lacked believability in so many areas. While I understand how easily a race-infused confrontation can escalate into riotous violence, the very origin of the chaos was not only avoidable but controllable. Everything seemed--and I say "seemed" because the events it set off felt outside the range of plausible given its idiocy--to hinge on a tense exchange between two teenage boys. Said exchange happens in view of both Lena and Campbell--which is how they come together--with, apparently, no reasonable adults, or even school security, present. By the time the school resource officers do arrive, there's a riot...then sirens ...then a gunshot ...then all hell breaks loose?Everywhere. In what universe does this happen without additional context? Even if I could get beyond all of that nonsense, I could not get beyond the idiocy of Lena or the cluelessness of Campbell. Lena continually tossed common sense and safety to the side in favor of hooking up with a boy. It didn't appear to matter that said boy was fine ditching, dismissing, and dissing her at every turn. She continued to have faith he would come through ...and I just ...no. I couldn't handle such willful stupidity in a girl who obviously had more than a little common sense. Then there's Campbell. Lena's desire to chase behind a boyfriend who, seemingly, didn't care about her, or her safety, for the better part of the story, was annoying; time and again she opted to call him instead of using any one of the options she had available to get out of a dangerous situation. Then there was Campbell. I know she's supposed to come across unversed in the ways of Black/white relations--and that's fine--but you'd have thought the girl never stepped out her front door, turned on a television, or read a news headline. She was always confused, or scared, or timid. The one time she shows any backbone was during a situation where her safety was definitely at-risk and sitting the heck down/shutting the heck up would've not only been prudent but wise. And yet ...whew. It's not a stretch to say Lena and Campbell would've avoided this situation altogether had either been smart enough to dial a responsible adult or reliable emergency contact.It had potential but the whole situation was too far-fetched to take seriously. Thank you to Edelweiss+ and Sourcebooks Fire for the Advanced eGalley of this work. Opinion is my own and was not influenced by its receipt.
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