The Liar's Daughter
Piper was raised in a cult. She just doesn't know it. Seventeen-year-old Piper knows that Father is a Prophet. Infallible. The chosen one.She would do anything for Father. That's why she takes care of all her little sisters. That's why she runs end-of-the-world drills. That's why she never asks questions. Because Father knows best.Until the day he doesn't. Until the day the government raids the compound and separates Piper from her siblings, from Mother, from the Aunts, from all of Father's followers--even from Caspian, the boy she loves.Now Piper is living Outside. Among Them.With a woman They claim is her real mother--a woman They say Father stole her from.But Piper knows better. And Piper is going to escape.

The Liar's Daughter Details

TitleThe Liar's Daughter
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 10th, 2019
PublisherHoliday House
ISBN-139780823444182
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Fiction, Religion, Cults

The Liar's Daughter Review

  • Nenia ☠️ Hecka Wicked ☠️ Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest There's a video on YouTube called "Mind Control Made Easy" which is about the psychology of cult leaders. It's clearly low budget, but very well done in spite of that. I have never been 100% sure whether it was intended to be satirical/comedic or not, because while it is funny at times, that humor is rooted in a very dark truth: no matter how ridiculous what they are saying is, these tactics have worked before by real cult leaders.I read Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest There's a video on YouTube called "Mind Control Made Easy" which is about the psychology of cult leaders. It's clearly low budget, but very well done in spite of that. I have never been 100% sure whether it was intended to be satirical/comedic or not, because while it is funny at times, that humor is rooted in a very dark truth: no matter how ridiculous what they are saying is, these tactics have worked before by real cult leaders.I read a lot of nonfiction books and memoirs about cults and extreme fundamentalist religions a few years ago because that's what I do: I get interested in a topic, obsess over it, only to lose interest and forget about it a few years later. I always found them both horrific and fascinating-- it chilled me that people could be so unquestioning, so blindly trusting; it felt like a grievous oversight in the hard-wiring of our brains to make us this "hackable." How can things like this happen? I wondered.THE LIAR'S DAUGHTER takes that concept and really races off with it. Piper is a teenager who has spent her whole life being raised in a cult. She loves her Mother and Father, and does not question them-- even when their asks are big and dangerous, and might involve abuse, drugs, or underage marriage. Her parents want only the best for her mind and body, and every unpleasant thing is a test to judge if she is ready for enlightenment. Told in BEFORE and AFTER, THE LIAR'S DAUGHTER explores what a cult upbringing would do to a child's psychology and how hard it might be for her to go back.Piper is a really difficult character to like. Her upbringing has made her cruel and insensitive, as the cult she's in rewards people for ratting each other out. She is quick to turn her back on those who are closest to her if she thinks it'll get her a pat on the head from an adult figure. In the AFTER portion of the book, she is suspicious, sly, and selfish, and the things she does to her real mother, Jeannie, are unspeakably cruel-- especially one thing she does towards the end that made me want to slap her. I had to keep reminding myself that to Piper, Jeannie was the interloper, the kidnapper, the bad person who had a hand in her being forcibly removed from an environment that felt comfortable and familiar, no matter how horrible and abusive it seemed to us, the reader. It was sickening.I think this is a good book, but I didn't really enjoy reading it. Piper was truly horrid and the content was very dark. I found it fascinating from that morbidly curious angle that motivated me to go out and buy all those books about cults in the first place, but I don't really think a book that made me as angry and upset as this one did can really be considered "enjoyable" or "fun." Kids will probably get a kick out of it though, as Cooley Peterson never talks down to her young adult audience or writes as if she thinks that they won't be able to handle it, and I really respect that in a YA author.Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!  3 stars
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  • JenacideByBibliophile
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: This book was sent to me by the publisher, Holiday House Publishing, Inc., via Edelweiss+ for an honest review. “The window is no more than two feet wide and maybe half a foot tall. I can't squeeze through it. It's meant to let in sunlight, not hope.” This is the story of a girls path to self-discovery.The weaving of lies into truth.The voices that are battered into ones brain so a person ceases to think for themselves.It is the story of a life lost, a life gained, and the art of cr Disclaimer: This book was sent to me by the publisher, Holiday House Publishing, Inc., via Edelweiss+ for an honest review. “The window is no more than two feet wide and maybe half a foot tall. I can't squeeze through it. It's meant to let in sunlight, not hope.” This is the story of a girls path to self-discovery.The weaving of lies into truth.The voices that are battered into ones brain so a person ceases to think for themselves.It is the story of a life lost, a life gained, and the art of creating a world of both.Piper has one dream: to make her Father proud and to finally be initiated into the community as an adult. She has spent her entire life breathing in his teachings and doing anything in her power to make him proud. She is the perfect sibling, ensuring all the littles are well cared for and that everyone acts their best. Because the outside world is toxic, and they are humanities only chance at survival. She knows the government seeks to control its people with pharmaceutical drugs and lies, pumping bodies full of toxins in order to keep them spending money. But Piper knows the truth. That all They do is lie, and that Father knows best. Because Father is a prophet, and Mother and Father would never lead her astray. They love her, and everything they do is to keep their family safe. The Community is Truth. The Community is Loyalty. The Community will keep you safe. The Liar's Daughter takes the reader to “before” and “after” Pipers time living at the community. The “before” portrays memories of what she calls home, a small house near a lake and an abandoned amusement park. Piper describes this place as if it's heaven on earth. The peacefulness, beauty and sense of freedom. She is a girl of great gratitude and happiness for what she has, and the family she is blessed with.But when we go to the “after”, it is Piper in present time after being taken out of the community. She is unable to discern delusions from reality, or memories from hallucinations. She is in a state of confusion, a haze of sadness and anger for being ripped from her parents and siblings. She believes she is being held against her will, kidnapped and held captive. She is fearful of what being on the Outside will do to her body and health. She refers to her new family as They and Them-those who mean her harm and feed her lies. “These people must've gotten into my head somehow, altered my memories. What else could explain what's happening?” My love for Piper goes deep, because I was on this ride of discovery with her. I felt her confusion, her pain, her anger for being ripped from those she loves. Every day in the present is a time of mourning for her, and a search to figure out how to escape and run back to Mother and Father. I couldn't help but share in the injustice of the situation with her. How dare these people rip her away from her siblings, her life of freedom. She was happy where she was, even if those on the Outside see it differently. “How does it feel? I want to ask. To have everything that's precious to you taken away?” It may seem strange to hear that I see any sort of an injustice for a girl to be returned to a home she was taken from first. To see her ripped from a family that brainwashed her, that gave her barely enough food. But that is where things get tricky, isn't it? Piper only remembered her life at the community, and she fiercely loved those around her. Is it the best thing for her to be ripped from those people, and thrust back into the arms of people who are now strangers to her? In the long run, maybe. But watching her try to piece her life together. Her own thoughts, her own emotions...it was hard to witness. “I want to be seen.” It takes true talent to write the leader of a cult in a way where the reader is able to understand JUST how alluring he is. He is sensible, his arguments have just cause, and he makes you want to leave your cellphone behind and live a life off the grid. This is one of the first fiction stories about a cult I have read that really captures the essence of how enticing and pragmatic a cult leader can be. They weave promises into lies masquerading as truths, and everything feels and sounds so real and possible, until you realize it isn't. “Monsters don't have empathy. They have sharp claws and teeth that thirst for blood.” This story turned out to be a delicate and sorrowful tale, but ultimately, one of hope and recovery. Piper is a gentle character who has so much love in her heart, and only wants to make people proud of her. She wants to be seen and acknowledged, to be loved and adored. I really appreciated the author shedding light on how Piper's time in the Community affected those around her. It twisted the knife that was already protruding from my stomach, and then gave it a little extra shake when you begin to see the truth of what happened to her and her family. This is an amazing book that I think everyone should read. If this topic is usually sensitive to you, I do want to express that it doesn't go into anything graphic and it isn't a dark and evil book. It is a truly beautiful and delicate tale, and I highly suggest it be devoured. “Last Warning. Do Not Stand Up.”
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  • Carlene Inspired
    January 1, 1970
    Piper knows her father is the Chosen One. He is a Prophet that is hoping to protect the people from the Government, from the poisonous food, from the radiation of cell phones. Living with the other children far from the community, Piper helps manage the other children and run end-of-the-world drills, preparing herself and the others for the day when they will be called upon. Only, that day doesn't come and Piper's father might not be telling the truth, because the Government has broken apart the Piper knows her father is the Chosen One. He is a Prophet that is hoping to protect the people from the Government, from the poisonous food, from the radiation of cell phones. Living with the other children far from the community, Piper helps manage the other children and run end-of-the-world drills, preparing herself and the others for the day when they will be called upon. Only, that day doesn't come and Piper's father might not be telling the truth, because the Government has broken apart the community and Piper finds herself in a strange house, with a strange woman they say is her real mother, and with no idea what has happened to her siblings or the boy she loves. Ripped from the life she knows, Piper grapples with what she believes is the truth and the story she is being told, that she had been kidnapped and that everything she once knew was a lie. Told from Piper's perspective, The Liar's Daughter alternates between past and present, giving readers a glimpse into life before and after the cult. Rather than focusing on the cult itself, something many authors do, Megan Cooley Peterson gives us only the perspective of one teen, Piper. We understand the beliefs as she understands them, we know her terror and concern about being separated from her family, and we feel just as she does when the kidnapping blow is delivered to her. Piper isn't the most likable character, her childhood upbringing and her family's manipulative beliefs have shaped her and she lacks the childlike, scared quality we expect of a kidnap victim. She instead plans, provokes, or dissociates, bringing a fierceness to her that felt realistic to me. She is a steadfast believer in her father, it is only through time that Piper begins to face the real truth. Jeannine, the woman who has taken her in for the Government as Piper believes, is really her mother and the interactions she has with Piper are so powerful. It is an incredible testament of the love and devotion a mother has for a child.Megan Cooley Peterson does an incredible job of telling the harrowing story of Piper as she transitions into a life post-cult. The conditioning, the adjustment to life outside the community, and the frightening moments of Piper grappling with what is real and what is not, all bring a touch of realism to this emotional story. A tad on the predictable side, at least for this cult-book fan, The Liar's Daughter is a suspenseful and fascinating young adult read.ARC provided.
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  • OutlawPoet
    January 1, 1970
    This is yet another book about a teen girl who suddenly discovers that she's been living in a cult and everything she thought she knew was wrong.I did like the way the author told the story - we have two timelines here: basically in cult and after cult.Unfortunately, there was nothing else really new about this. Don't go over the fence. The outside world is evil. Hey, kidnapping!Some what should have shocked our girl when she got out didn't, but hey everyone uses cell phones.I don't know. I just This is yet another book about a teen girl who suddenly discovers that she's been living in a cult and everything she thought she knew was wrong.I did like the way the author told the story - we have two timelines here: basically in cult and after cult.Unfortunately, there was nothing else really new about this. Don't go over the fence. The outside world is evil. Hey, kidnapping!Some what should have shocked our girl when she got out didn't, but hey everyone uses cell phones.I don't know. I just wanted something really different, but it's the same plot....again.
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  • Richelle Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    Reading the blurb of this book piqued my interest since I have always had an interest in cults and how people get brainwashed and sucked into that lifestyle. This book is told in before cult and after cult point of views which I really enjoyed. My heart broke for Piper because she was pretty much ripped from the only family and lifestyle she has known and is now being told her whole life was a lie. I don’t blame her for lashing out throughout this story at all. I did feel sorry for her mother an Reading the blurb of this book piqued my interest since I have always had an interest in cults and how people get brainwashed and sucked into that lifestyle. This book is told in before cult and after cult point of views which I really enjoyed. My heart broke for Piper because she was pretty much ripped from the only family and lifestyle she has known and is now being told her whole life was a lie. I don’t blame her for lashing out throughout this story at all. I did feel sorry for her mother and I couldn’t imagine being in her shoes either. You never give up hope, finally get your daughter back and she treats you like the sworn enemy. Whew. This was my first time reading this author and I really enjoyed this book. I really connected to the characters and my heart ached for them as I read. The story was well written, evenly paced and had my emotions all over the place. Make sure to read the author’s note as well. *ARC Review*
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  • Jordan
    January 1, 1970
    So. Freaking. Good
  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    I received an Advanced Readers Copy from the publisher. This book was hard to put down. I finished in two days, even though they were days filled with commitments. I have read several non-fiction books by people raised in cults (weird, I know), and this fiction book is a good complement. It does not focus much on the cult itself or its beliefs, but more on the experience of one girl in the community. Despite a few misgivings, she is very dedicated to the community and wants to return once she is I received an Advanced Readers Copy from the publisher. This book was hard to put down. I finished in two days, even though they were days filled with commitments. I have read several non-fiction books by people raised in cults (weird, I know), and this fiction book is a good complement. It does not focus much on the cult itself or its beliefs, but more on the experience of one girl in the community. Despite a few misgivings, she is very dedicated to the community and wants to return once she is removed. I thought it showed an interesting point of view - despite seeming horrible to us as outsiders, there were reasons why Piper felt dedicated to the community and safe there. For those wondering about this book's fitness for younger kids - there is no sexual abuse and very little physical abuse depicted. There is obviously mental and emotional manipulation, but this is unraveled over the course of the book (which also seems realistic - if people were obvious about this sort of manipulation, no one would ever join or stay in a cult). For that reason, i think this book would be fine for mature middle schoolers to read. We slowly learn more about the house Piper is taken to after her rescue, but still a few of the story lines don't quite mesh. I assume the house was so tightly sealed and there were officers there because people were afraid of cult members coming to the house, but wish that had been explained more, especially for younger readers. Also, the age of when Piper joined the cult and how long she had been away, and people from her past remembering her sometimes didn't seem to match up. But her early years are not integral to the story, so this is OK.
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  • Claire
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars, rounding up to 5Piper is the most lifelike character I've read about in quite a while. She has such layered emotions, doubts, and fears. It's hard to read about what she goes through, but that's what captivated me as a reader.I like how the book is divided into sections, Before and After, and alternates chapters from each. At the beginning, I found myself really wanting to read just the "before" chapters, but by the end I was looking forward to the "after" ones the most. It felt like 4.5 stars, rounding up to 5Piper is the most lifelike character I've read about in quite a while. She has such layered emotions, doubts, and fears. It's hard to read about what she goes through, but that's what captivated me as a reader.I like how the book is divided into sections, Before and After, and alternates chapters from each. At the beginning, I found myself really wanting to read just the "before" chapters, but by the end I was looking forward to the "after" ones the most. It felt like I was going on the emotional journey along with Piper. I was frustrated, angry, sad, and scared when she was.My favorite characters are Piper, Cas, and Amy because they feel the most lifelike. And Amy is such a sweetheart. I'm not going to spoil anything - so I'll just say that Piper and Jeannie's interactions are so hard to read about but so wonderful. The author did a truly amazing job.This book offers a great in-depth look about how somebody realizes they're in a cult, and the excruciating transition to life After.*I received a complimentary ARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Thank you so much, Edelweiss, I really enjoyed this book.*
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Many readers, especially teens, are fascinated by what draws humans to cults or religious sects. In this novel narrated by seventeen-year-old Piper, they might not find all the answers to those particular questions, but they will learn some of what makes them appealing to their members. The author does a fine job of describing the disorientation experienced by Piper once she is no longer living with the individuals she has known as Father and Mother as well as how hard it is for her to trust her Many readers, especially teens, are fascinated by what draws humans to cults or religious sects. In this novel narrated by seventeen-year-old Piper, they might not find all the answers to those particular questions, but they will learn some of what makes them appealing to their members. The author does a fine job of describing the disorientation experienced by Piper once she is no longer living with the individuals she has known as Father and Mother as well as how hard it is for her to trust her own parents as she pieces her life back together. I liked the use of the Before and After sections in the book since they allowed me to see what Piper was experiencing and how deeply she believed in her father's message about the end of the world and the need to remain sequestered from the rest of the world. But once she realizes the truth and how she came to live in this commune of sorts, she is devastated. I can only imagine how it would feel to have everything that you believed turn out to be false and to be unable to even recognize yourself. Although I would have liked to have known more about what made Curtis--Piper's father--so appealing to his followers, especially Angela, that isn't the story that's told here, and probably to meet the interests of its intended audience, that was a good choice. Certainly, the title fits the book's contents perfectly. I read this book, all the while thinking of some of the famous cults such as Charles Manson, David Koresh, and Jim Jones, and wondering which other ones are out there and how easy it is to fall under the sway of a charismatic person. Many teens will be riveted by this book, and maybe reading it will keep them safe from such a person or movement as well as encouraging them to ask questions and not just accept everything at face value. There were a couple of times when I wondered about the language the protagonist used, given how sheltered her life had been. These details aren't likely to mar readers' enjoyment of the story.
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  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    You’ll find books with characters in cults and characters who have left cults but this is a unique take on the leaving process. Loved it.
  • Kathryn C
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it! Stayed up way too late and read it in one sitting. It’s reminiscent of Room but without the annoying narrator voice.
  • Kerri
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve never read a book, fiction or otherwise, about someone escaping a cult, so as far as first experiences go, this one seemed pretty good. It’s amazing to see the level of devotion inspired by a leader of one of these types of societies. While it’s obvious to the reader from the get go that Piper has been kidnapped and brainwashed, Piper herself goes to great lengths to defend Father and Mother, or to explain away inconsistencies or red flags. It’s only when faced with the evidence—once Cas ta I’ve never read a book, fiction or otherwise, about someone escaping a cult, so as far as first experiences go, this one seemed pretty good. It’s amazing to see the level of devotion inspired by a leader of one of these types of societies. While it’s obvious to the reader from the get go that Piper has been kidnapped and brainwashed, Piper herself goes to great lengths to defend Father and Mother, or to explain away inconsistencies or red flags. It’s only when faced with the evidence—once Cas takes her back to the compound—that’s shes finally able to start truly seeing things for what they are. And yet, she still clings to her old life for awhile afterwards. Incredible to see how damaging the kind of fear-based teaching she’d received can be, how hard to leave behind. I’d imagine that one could never truly break away from it, no matter how many years pass from the time you left.It’s true that Piper’s actions are sometimes hurtful to others, but it’s also easy to see why she behaves the way she does, the sort of conditioning she’s gone through to make her so desperate to rebel against anything from the “Outside”. It would be immensely hard to leave those ingrained teachings behind, and to be able to meld the two parts of her life together. I can’t imagine being the parent of a child who’d gone through that, hating the people who took her, while understanding that’s all your child knew for years. It’s frightening, though provoking, and disturbing. I enjoyed the story, it’s an easy read, and if this sort of thing interests you, I’d definitely give it a shot.I received an advanced copy of this book through Amazon Vine. All opinions are my own.
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  • Jolene
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really interesting look at the lives inside a cult, and what it’s like when they get out. Piper doesn’t even realize she is in a cult, and it’s extremely confusing and emotional for her when she is removed from it. She wants her parents, her family, and her known way of life. This is an emotional story, and very hard to put down. Thank you to Edelweiss and Holiday House for the ARC of this book!
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  • Amber Sternitzke
    January 1, 1970
    This novel was unlike any YA book that I’ve ever read. The story line alternates between a “before” and “after” a rescue from a cult. The authors real life connection intensified the story even more. I’m hoping that this read will encourage teens to develop and form their own opinions and not to be influenced by an individual or group.
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  • Mari Johnston
    January 1, 1970
    This review and many others can also be found at Musings of a (Book) Girl.Content Warnings: kidnapping, child abuse, talk of nuclear warIf cults are something you’re interested in, even just slightly, then Megan Cooley Peterson’s young adult debut, The Liar’s Daughter, is one you need to pick up. Only a few short hours passed from the time I started reading to the last page. Piper’s story is so compelling that I had no choice but to read it all right there and then. The Community is truth.The Co This review and many others can also be found at Musings of a (Book) Girl.Content Warnings: kidnapping, child abuse, talk of nuclear warIf cults are something you’re interested in, even just slightly, then Megan Cooley Peterson’s young adult debut, The Liar’s Daughter, is one you need to pick up. Only a few short hours passed from the time I started reading to the last page. Piper’s story is so compelling that I had no choice but to read it all right there and then. The Community is truth.The Community is loyalty.The Community will keep you safe. Right off the bat, I was amazed by Megan’s ability to describe things in a way that made them feel completely real. Her voice was strong and consistent throughout the entire novel. She put so much detail and attention into every aspect and it took this from being a good book to one that is remarkable and memorable.This story is split into (mostly) alternating chapters of before and after. I loved the way Megan made things flow seamlessly between the two. There were bits sprinkled into the before parts that made things in the after make sense and I enjoyed fitting all of the clues together to figure out what was going on.It would be easy to write Piper off as an unlikable character because she does some pretty horrible things. When you remember, though, that her entire life has been a lie it makes her actions rational. Everything she grew up knowing to be true has been stripped away and she doesn’t understand how to process it. My whole world is gone, and I’m mad at the sun for still shining. A huge plus in this book was the positive therapy experience Piper had. Too often authors show characters rebelling against doctors and getting help which can make teens think that’s how they’re supposed to react. Piper may have started as being standoffish during the appointments, she was scared so who could blame her, but she eventually let the doctor in which was so refreshing to see.The Liar’s Daughter is truly a can’t-be-missed story. It’s a page-turner that will stick in your mind for days. Megan Cooley Peterson has quickly turned me into a huge fan of hers and I can’t wait to see what she shares with us next.If you read and enjoy The Liar’s Daughter, or if you just like cults in general, consider checking out Parcast’s podcast series – Cults!A physical ARC was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Additionally, all quotes should be checked for changes against the final copy.
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  • Nèngath
    January 1, 1970
    I love stories about cults. I have already read dozen of them but I am always looking for novels offering a new approach on the themes of isolation, strange rituals and questioning beliefs.I think there are mainly two types of successful novels about cults. The author can create an original and alternative social system questioning our own, and show how communities are built around sinister rites, particularly when it comes to women and puberty. Or the author can explore the psychology of faith I love stories about cults. I have already read dozen of them but I am always looking for novels offering a new approach on the themes of isolation, strange rituals and questioning beliefs.I think there are mainly two types of successful novels about cults. The author can create an original and alternative social system questioning our own, and show how communities are built around sinister rites, particularly when it comes to women and puberty. Or the author can explore the psychology of faith and the mechanism of indoctrination, for example the role of family, loss or trauma.The Liar's Daughter belongs to the second category. Devised between before and after, the novel follows the difficult journey of a young teen kidnapped as a child, raised in a cult, and finally returned to her true parents. But it is not the happy ever after one expects. In fact, Pepper is so changed that she doesn't even recognize her family and is convinced they are the enemy. She might be out of the cult, but she is still under the influence of the guru. I have been waiting for a book like this one for a long time. Most authors only focus on the cult part; generally the story ends when the kids leave the commune and then they are supposed to be magically okay, because the outside world is so easy to live in. The truth is that it takes years for victims to recover and sometimes they never do, or are never equipped to fit in the real world. Megan Cooley Peterson does justice to this very complex and difficult healing process. She also has a very important message to pass to teens about the importance of critical thinking.Yet, I found the end too positive and almost naive. The author glosses over a lot of issues linked to cults, like sexual abuse. I know it is a young adult novel but it doesn't mean you have to sugarcoat the reality. Pepper is also extremely lucky to have a loving and rich family which is able to provide her the medical care she needs. Most kids out of cults end up in the foster care system, where they are sometimes more abused still. Because, here is the thing, the outside world is not necessary better than the cult.For readers who want to try other great novels about cults, you may try Gather the daughter, Seed, or Clover Blue, my favorite.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Honestly I haven’t met a contemporary I’ve liked this much in quite a bit. I found this book when I saw the release day blitz over on the author’s Instagram. Which was literally three days ago. I bought the book the second I found out about it, I was that interested. Thank goodness for Amazon Prime shipping 🙂What really drew me to this book was the premise. I’ve never read a book that featured a character escaping from a cult, and it looked quite unique. There’s probably others out there with a Honestly I haven’t met a contemporary I’ve liked this much in quite a bit. I found this book when I saw the release day blitz over on the author’s Instagram. Which was literally three days ago. I bought the book the second I found out about it, I was that interested. Thank goodness for Amazon Prime shipping 🙂What really drew me to this book was the premise. I’ve never read a book that featured a character escaping from a cult, and it looked quite unique. There’s probably others out there with a similar situation, but I saw this one and immediately needed to read it. Peterson’s voice is really well done in the book, and the way the chapters are laid out goes back and forth between settings before Piper is removed by CPS and after. The before scenes are really creepy as a reader knowing that she’s in the cult, and seeing how she thinks it’s completely normal.It’s also a bit sad, how deep Piper’s faith in the cult goes. Peterson really did well in the characterization, which is in part due to her own experience with a cult. When people tell you ‘write what you know’, this is a beautiful interpretation of that advice. The author draws on her own emotional experiences and everything that happened to her to successfully draw you in and keep you connected to the story.Honestly, the only thing that kept me from giving this book five stars was the fact that there wasn’t a huge conflict. The down side of already knowing from the beginning that she gets out is that it’s inevitable. Maybe there was more of a conflict that I didn’t see, but otherwise this was a super good book, I highly recommend it!Check out more reviews on my site, https://caffeineandcomposition.wordpr...
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  • Kavanand (Reading for Two)
    January 1, 1970
    I'm fascinated by stories about cults. How people get into them, what happens when they get out of them. Why people join them in the first place. The Liar's Daughter is the story of a teen girl named Piper who escapes a cult. The twist here is that she didn't want to leave.The story is told in alternating "Before" and "After." We know that Piper is no longer in the cult, but how she got out and what's really going on aren't fully apparent until well into the story. In the Before chapters, we see I'm fascinated by stories about cults. How people get into them, what happens when they get out of them. Why people join them in the first place. The Liar's Daughter is the story of a teen girl named Piper who escapes a cult. The twist here is that she didn't want to leave.The story is told in alternating "Before" and "After." We know that Piper is no longer in the cult, but how she got out and what's really going on aren't fully apparent until well into the story. In the Before chapters, we see Piper living in a house in the woods with her brothers and sisters. They're visited occasionally by their Father and Mother, the cult leader and his wife. It's a weird, isolate life. The cult is your typical doomsday cult: the end is coming, the world outside is full of poison, women belong in the home, and the government is out to get us.I found the Before Piper hard to take at first. She's so naive and trusting, even in the face of so much bizarre cult nonsense. But her naivete makes sense in the context of the story (she's grown up in the cult and doesn't know any better), and it makes a good contrast to the Piper we see in the After chapters, who is paranoid and unmoored from her old life.I really enjoyed this book. The Before and After structure of the story worked really well, and it ratcheted up the tension, as we see the buildup to Piper leaving the cult and how it happened. In a note at the end of the book, the author discusses her childhood in a cult-like religious group, and I feel like her experiences give this book an extra dose of reality. I received an ARC from the publisher through Amazon Vine.
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  • Just A Ravenclaw Reading
    January 1, 1970
    I RECEIVED AN E ARC FROM EDELWEISS PLUS FOR AN HONESH REVIEW I really enjoy cult fiction. This was a completely different version of other cult fiction I’ve read before. Piper believes in the cult, she believes in her Father. She doesn’t know this is a cult to her it’s just family. She helps raise the younger children while her parents live at a compound and only visit a couple times. This was a lot less cult than I normally read. It was brutal. Didn’t actually say anything about bad abuse, the I RECEIVED AN E ARC FROM EDELWEISS PLUS FOR AN HONESH REVIEW I really enjoy cult fiction. This was a completely different version of other cult fiction I’ve read before. Piper believes in the cult, she believes in her Father. She doesn’t know this is a cult to her it’s just family. She helps raise the younger children while her parents live at a compound and only visit a couple times. This was a lot less cult than I normally read. It was brutal. Didn’t actually say anything about bad abuse, there wasn’t anything about the multiple wives or anything like normal cults. Curtis preached the end of the world and had them to drills to be prepared for the end of the world. He allowed them old movies and snacks. He did brainwash them though. All of the children were stole , but none know it. It also takes place at an old amusement park which is really cool.I liked going back and forth between before Piper was removed from the compound and after when she’s with a lady she doesn’t know. Piper trying to figure out everything and who she is. She keeps faith in her Father the whole time until she finally sees what it all was. The only reason it was a 4 star and not a 5 is because I usually enjoy more of the cult information. I like to learn about actual cults so I like to see the reality of living in cults, this was more just about Pipers life. I also really wanted to see the other kids once before the book ended. Overall though this was a really good story, definitely and introduction into cult fiction for sure and a fast read!
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  • Gmr
    January 1, 1970
    The story itself is FASCINATING. The author really puts you in Piper's shoes, giving you a look at life through the eyes of a "believer", while also allowing us to experience the utter shattering that comes from everything we think we know to be a truth becoming a lie. As absurd as it was to see her way of life as the right way, you could see the argument for the other side, and yet you could also see what it felt like to be the "Them" introduced to her little world, trying to understand what ha The story itself is FASCINATING. The author really puts you in Piper's shoes, giving you a look at life through the eyes of a "believer", while also allowing us to experience the utter shattering that comes from everything we think we know to be a truth becoming a lie. As absurd as it was to see her way of life as the right way, you could see the argument for the other side, and yet you could also see what it felt like to be the "Them" introduced to her little world, trying to understand what had happened, trying to help them come back to a version of themselves they don't even remember existing. Her relationship with Cas was something normally written in the stars, and her heartfelt care for the "littles" was truly touching. It felt right in the end when her new ID was revealed because she wasn't truly the former her or the current her, but a new her trying to reconcile all the pieces she'd been left with. High recommendation for older teens through adult readers.**ARC received for review; opinions are my own
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  • Harry (2-Minute Reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5The Liar’s Daughter by Megan Cooley Peterson is a novel entailing the life of cult member Piper, told before and after her departure from a cult. PROS: 🍊 Interesting premise, with the cult being a strong influence on the novel throughout. The cult itself is portrayed both positively and negatively, allowing for the reader to understand how these groups draw in members in the first place. 🍊 Distinct characters, each having unique personalities within either storyline. Piper especially is com 3.5/5The Liar’s Daughter by Megan Cooley Peterson is a novel entailing the life of cult member Piper, told before and after her departure from a cult. PROS: 🍊 Interesting premise, with the cult being a strong influence on the novel throughout. The cult itself is portrayed both positively and negatively, allowing for the reader to understand how these groups draw in members in the first place. 🍊 Distinct characters, each having unique personalities within either storyline. Piper especially is complex: hard to like at times due to her naivety and selfishness, she is a girl defined by her faith in the cult and its leaders.CONS:🍋 The YA nature of this story actively fights against its premise. Scenes that should’ve been horrific are softened to be less threatening, leaving the cult itself lacking as a true threat in the novel, and leaving the story without a true antagonist. 🍋 Several times the book falls upon unrealistic plot points so as to keep the story moving. This weakens the realism of the novel, which further weakens the threat the cult has towards Piper and her family. The Liar’s Daughter is a fast, engaging read with an interesting premise, perhaps drawn short by its YA nature. Thus, it is the perfect read for younger teens, tense without becoming traumatic.
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  • Bev Koop
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to this YA novel on Audible yesterday and finished it on my commute today. It was recommended by a friend. It's the engaging story of a young teen's escape from a cult told in flashback,and mystery. The heartbreak of The main character Piper's PTSD and resulting mental illness is handled without stigma. Because he main character's journey through her breakdown is handled in a very authentic way; reading it could be incredibly helpful to a young person traveling through their own depre I listened to this YA novel on Audible yesterday and finished it on my commute today. It was recommended by a friend. It's the engaging story of a young teen's escape from a cult told in flashback,and mystery. The heartbreak of The main character Piper's PTSD and resulting mental illness is handled without stigma. Because he main character's journey through her breakdown is handled in a very authentic way; reading it could be incredibly helpful to a young person traveling through their own depression, anxiety, or angst. I found the author's descriptions of Piper's memory loss and disassociation to be so very accurate, and described poignantly. The book is good storytelling, but I recommend for two more important reasons- firstly, understanding mental illness and childhood trauma in a non-judgmental way; and secondly, encouraging free thought with self awareness.
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  • Abby Hargreaves
    January 1, 1970
    With thanks to Holiday House Books for the advance reader’s copy! Available September 10, 2019, The Liar's Daughter by Megan Cooley Peterson brings Peterson's own experience to the fictional page with Piper, a girl caught between the world she's always trusted and the world she believes to be full of danger. Raised in a cult by her mother and father, in the "before" Piper looks forward to her official initiation into the Community. With a woman named Jeannie and living in a strange house in the With thanks to Holiday House Books for the advance reader’s copy! Available September 10, 2019, The Liar's Daughter by Megan Cooley Peterson brings Peterson's own experience to the fictional page with Piper, a girl caught between the world she's always trusted and the world she believes to be full of danger. Raised in a cult by her mother and father, in the "before" Piper looks forward to her official initiation into the Community. With a woman named Jeannie and living in a strange house in the "after," Piper tries to piece together who she is and what happened to her. Unsure of who to trust and where to turn, Piper must rely on herself and her instincts to show her the truth in this captivating and fresh take on cults in young adult fiction. Where many young adult novels about cults, such as Amy Christine Parker's Gated and Elizabeth Fixmer's Down from the Mountain focus on a young woman's doubt in her isolated community, The Liar's Daughter instead shares the perspective of a teen completely sold on the life she knows. Even as others bring evidence to her, Piper resists and remains steadfast to her father's will and teachings, creating a fresh look at the cult conflict. With dual timelines, the reveal of what Piper doesn't know and eventually learns is satisfying and surprisingly rational with influence from a psychologist, new potential friends, and introspection. Peterson displays an effective use of prose to bring emotion and drama into Piper's story while Peterson's personal background makes for the addition of compelling details. This book is not one that you'll want to put down once you start it as the two timelines converge and inform each other and you race through Peterson's fantastic pacing to piece together what happened to Piper. All of this is wrapped up in a striking cover that will no doubt be another bookstagram darling. Also for fans of Christina Meldrum's Madapple. Get The Liar's Daughter on your TBR now!
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    The Liar's Daughter is MUST READ for thriller fans! I especially loved how it was broken into 'before' chapters that show the MCs life in the cult, and 'after' chapters that show her after she's been taken out--this offered a deep dive into both parts of her life, and also created a discombobulated feeling that totally mirrored the state Piper was in. I could feel her anger, her confusion, and her grit. The pacing was excellent, and as far as writing goes, I felt like this novel was a masterclas The Liar's Daughter is MUST READ for thriller fans! I especially loved how it was broken into 'before' chapters that show the MCs life in the cult, and 'after' chapters that show her after she's been taken out--this offered a deep dive into both parts of her life, and also created a discombobulated feeling that totally mirrored the state Piper was in. I could feel her anger, her confusion, and her grit. The pacing was excellent, and as far as writing goes, I felt like this novel was a masterclass in how to weave together some very tricky puzzle pieces!
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  • Sofia
    January 1, 1970
    This book was quite good. It was written in a little bit of a confusing way with the before and after chapters but I still got most of the details and the whole picture at the end. The main character was kind of a close-minded and annoying at the beginning but her being this way was important for the story and I got used to it. The only thing I really didn’t like about this book was Piper and Caspian’s relationship. I’m not sure why, it just seemed a little forced and unnecessary for me but othe This book was quite good. It was written in a little bit of a confusing way with the before and after chapters but I still got most of the details and the whole picture at the end. The main character was kind of a close-minded and annoying at the beginning but her being this way was important for the story and I got used to it. The only thing I really didn’t like about this book was Piper and Caspian’s relationship. I’m not sure why, it just seemed a little forced and unnecessary for me but other than that I would recommend reading it.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    I have a soft spot for cult stories, and The Liar's Daughter delivered in a very satisfying way.Piper is a well developed and intensely sympathetic character. Even when I knew she was behaving irrationally, I could still understand why she would believe the things she did. The timeline of the story jumps back and forth between "before" and "after," and the breaks feel very well timed and do a great job of amping up the tension. If you're a fan of teen suspense, this one's for you.
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  • Alexis Stankewitz
    January 1, 1970
    Theoretical question: is it an issue if this is the fifth or sixth book about fictional cults that I've read? Does it count as a reading subject preference? I dk but this was definitely an interesting book with so many emotions packed into just under 300 pages. I usually don't like books that flip back and forth between the present and the past, but The Liars Daughter makes it work to it's advantage.
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  • Abby
    January 1, 1970
    This book was absolutely amazing! It was beautifully written, it kept me on the edge of my seat throughout the book. the overall story was just amazing. It makes you feel how the characters were feeling, and with all the action happening I couldn't tear my eyes away from the book itself. I think almost anyone would like this book!
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  • • s t a r k i s s e d ☆
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 but leaning towards a 4?
  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 ish?? Cults, done before but entertaining ish
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