Every Tool's a Hammer
“An imperative how-to for creativity.” —Nick OffermanAdam Savage—star of Discovery Channel’s Mythbusters and one of the most beloved figures in science and tech—shares his golden rules of creativity, from finding inspiration to following through and successfully making your idea a reality.Every Tool’s a Hammer is a chronicle of my life as a maker. It’s an exploration of making and of my own productive obsessions, but it’s also a permission slip of sorts from me to you. Permission to grab hold of the things you’re interested in, that fascinate you, and to dive deeper into them to see where they lead you.Through stories from forty-plus years of making and molding, building and break­ing, along with the lessons I learned along the way, this book is meant to be a toolbox of problem solving, complete with a shop’s worth of notes on the tools, techniques, and materials that I use most often. Things like: In Every Tool There Is a Hammer—don’t wait until everything is perfect to begin a project, and if you don’t have the exact right tool for a task, just use whatever’s handy; Increase Your Loose Tolerance—making is messy and filled with screwups, but that’s okay, as creativity is a path with twists and turns and not a straight line to be found; Use More Cooling Fluid—it prolongs the life of blades and bits, and it prevents tool failure, but beyond that it’s a reminder to slow down and reduce the fric­tion in your work and relationships; Screw Before You Glue—mechanical fasteners allow you to change and modify a project while glue is forever but sometimes you just need the right glue, so I dig into which ones will do the job with the least harm and best effects.This toolbox also includes lessons from many other incredible makers and creators, including: Jamie Hyneman, Nick Offerman, Pixar director Andrew Stanton, Oscar-winner Guillermo del Toro, artist Tom Sachs, and chef Traci Des Jardins. And if everything goes well, we will hopefully save you a few mistakes (and maybe fingers) as well as help you turn your curiosities into creations.I hope this book inspires you to build, make, invent, explore, and—most of all—enjoy the thrills of being a creator.

Every Tool's a Hammer Details

TitleEvery Tool's a Hammer
Author
ReleaseMay 7th, 2019
PublisherAtria Books
ISBN-139781982113490
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Biography, Autobiography, Memoir

Every Tool's a Hammer Review

  • Dianna Elkmann
    January 1, 1970
    If you're looking for a complete autobiography, this isn't the book for you. There are some personal stories, but they aren't really the main focus. If you're looking for a glimpse into a makers creative process and progress, and possibly a little motivation of your own, I highly recommend this book.
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  • Lisa Swope
    January 1, 1970
    So many books on success principles are rooted in the business world; it's refreshing to have one built around the joys of makerspace.  Adam Savage's unbridled enthusiasm and his willingness to share both his triumphs and “this is what you should not do/let that be a lesson to you” experiences make this a fun read for dreamers, builders, artists, crafters, writers, cosplayers, and of course, Mythbusters and Tested fans.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Like many people, I loved watching Mythbusters not only for the busted myths but also to see what contraptions they built each week to test them.Every Tool's a Hammer is an insight into Adam Savage's mind and creative process - one that I found fascinating as a maker myself. In fact, it was quite cathartic to be told by a professional maker of things that my thoughts, obsessions, projects, tests, and even failures are a good thing and that I should keep going. We all need that reassurance someti Like many people, I loved watching Mythbusters not only for the busted myths but also to see what contraptions they built each week to test them.Every Tool's a Hammer is an insight into Adam Savage's mind and creative process - one that I found fascinating as a maker myself. In fact, it was quite cathartic to be told by a professional maker of things that my thoughts, obsessions, projects, tests, and even failures are a good thing and that I should keep going. We all need that reassurance sometimes.With advice that easily translates from making to living life, I think this is a fantastic book for creatives who can sometimes get lost in their own heads (me) as well as anyone who would like a glimpse into the world of making.
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  • Michelle Morrell
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this book! So much encouragement to embrace our eccentricities and obsessions, and that through our differences we find greatness. (Plus practical tips) Proclaim loudly: I am a crafter, I am a maker!
  • Garrett
    January 1, 1970
    An organized and meditative dissertation of Adam Savage's career life and his philosophy of making, no matter what you make. Savage's bombastic energy and optimism come through on the page, and the act of reading this is pure enjoyment as a consequence. Extremely useful advice (a scale-balancer for Adam) is imparted throughout, and drawings, photographs and illustrations abound. I keep hoping Adam Savage will write something that lays out his personal philosophy (glances are available on Tested, An organized and meditative dissertation of Adam Savage's career life and his philosophy of making, no matter what you make. Savage's bombastic energy and optimism come through on the page, and the act of reading this is pure enjoyment as a consequence. Extremely useful advice (a scale-balancer for Adam) is imparted throughout, and drawings, photographs and illustrations abound. I keep hoping Adam Savage will write something that lays out his personal philosophy (glances are available on Tested, MythBusters, and his TED Talks), but this is more a manual one coats with something water and dust resistant and parks in the shop, ready for reference where you can see it, whenever you need a reminder, a pick-me-up, or just a fun read.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    Umm..... I'll start by saying I've always been in awe of people who cosplay. In fact, I've spent a lot of my own life wondering why I couldn't achieve that level of detail. Having read Adam Savage's memoir, I now understand why. I will never, ever, ever have that kind of brain. I have achieved quite a lot in my own making but I think I might kill myself before spending four (or much more) years on a project. That said, though, this book will be catnip for a certain kind of maker and, as a book t Umm..... I'll start by saying I've always been in awe of people who cosplay. In fact, I've spent a lot of my own life wondering why I couldn't achieve that level of detail. Having read Adam Savage's memoir, I now understand why. I will never, ever, ever have that kind of brain. I have achieved quite a lot in my own making but I think I might kill myself before spending four (or much more) years on a project. That said, though, this book will be catnip for a certain kind of maker and, as a book to encourage people to follow their dreams no matter how detailed, Every Tool's a Hammer succeeds beautifully.As for me, I have to admit that this book suceeded, in a sort of backhanded way, in freeing me from any desire to do cosplay. Now I can go back to my own projects with a lighter heart!
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  • Brian's Book Blog
    January 1, 1970
    The Audiobook Is Definitely Better4.5 out of 5 starsBefore reading this I wouldn’t have considered myself a “maker”. I’m not really good with tools or making things with my hands, but I do create things online. I blog, I write, and I do design work as well. It was interesting that early in this book Savage covers this (“I don’t make, I code”) where he is telling someone if they are making something then they are a maker even if it’s on a computer. I liked that a lot.The whole book was a “how to” The Audiobook Is Definitely Better4.5 out of 5 starsBefore reading this I wouldn’t have considered myself a “maker”. I’m not really good with tools or making things with my hands, but I do create things online. I blog, I write, and I do design work as well. It was interesting that early in this book Savage covers this (“I don’t make, I code”) where he is telling someone if they are making something then they are a maker even if it’s on a computer. I liked that a lot.The whole book was a “how to” but more of a how to not screw up like he did. He admittedly rushed things and did things differently than a lot of makers and took a different path. Sometimes it worked out and sometimes it didn’t. He went into detail on the how and why and it was a fascinating look behind the curtain.I was a huge fan of Mythbusters and I follow Adam’s Tested platform as well from time to time. I’ve listened to some of his podcasts (the first one I remember listening to reminded me of this book a lot). He’s just a fascinating and interesting person. He’s a “celebrity” but also just a real person. He’s down-to-earth and interacts with his fans at Cons and other events.Overall, I thought that listening to this book really gave it an extra edge. He included anything I might have missed from the book but listening to him tell the stories, events, and mishaps first hand really makes a book like this.
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  • Susan Paxton
    January 1, 1970
    Anyone who expects a biography or "tell all" MythBusters dirt will be disappointed, I imagine, but this is a wonderful book. From a very early age, Adam Savage understood that he is a "maker." His own particular skill is making objects - costumes, props, models - but as he ably points out, "maker" covers a very wide span, and people who write, craft, paint, work in business (pretty much everyone, in fact) will find a lot of useful advice and ideas here, because much of what Adam talks about has Anyone who expects a biography or "tell all" MythBusters dirt will be disappointed, I imagine, but this is a wonderful book. From a very early age, Adam Savage understood that he is a "maker." His own particular skill is making objects - costumes, props, models - but as he ably points out, "maker" covers a very wide span, and people who write, craft, paint, work in business (pretty much everyone, in fact) will find a lot of useful advice and ideas here, because much of what Adam talks about has multiple applicability (OK, maybe not so much his chapter on glue!). There are three or four sentences that needed the attention of an editor, but all in all this is fluidly written, well organized, and full of intelligent commentary and advice. This would be the perfect book in particular to give to a young person who has a lot of talent but needs encouragement, but it's also a perfect book, I suspect, to hand out to one's business colleagues.
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  • Enso
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this was a great book. I'm a fan of Adam Savage and his work, as well as a regular listener to his podcast, but I also started and ran a hackerspace in Oakland from 2010 to 2014, so I've seen a lot of making of various sorts and done my own. I think Adam has a lot of great advice, tells an interesting story, and most of what he said is applicable at many levels of our lives. I heartily recommend this book!
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  • Janatee (Jaclyn B)
    January 1, 1970
    While Savage isn't a writer, he's definitely a maker, and he brings all of the philosophy of making - passion, dedication, and creativity - to this work. It gives a fascinating look at the process of making that is accessible to everyone - writers, crafters, bakers, or anyone who has ever looked at a finished product and said "hey, I could probably figure out how to do that!"
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  • Giselle Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    DNF'd 25%
  • C. A.
    January 1, 1970
    This is not an autobiography. You will learn a bit about Adam's childhood and early life, a little bit about his early career, and hear a few stories about Mythbusters, but it is not an autobiography.This is a book about being a Maker, and every story in it either illustrates his journey, points out a triumph he experienced, or demonstrates something he royally screwed up. And it's wonderful.Adam Savage is enthusiastic about practically everything, and it comes through on every page. He loves to This is not an autobiography. You will learn a bit about Adam's childhood and early life, a little bit about his early career, and hear a few stories about Mythbusters, but it is not an autobiography.This is a book about being a Maker, and every story in it either illustrates his journey, points out a triumph he experienced, or demonstrates something he royally screwed up. And it's wonderful.Adam Savage is enthusiastic about practically everything, and it comes through on every page. He loves to learn new things, he loves to apply that to new projects, and he loves to create things. I'd go so far to say he can't help creating things. It's who he is.But that part can't really be taught, so instead he tells you about his process. How he comes up with ideas, how he plans, how he designs, how he builds, how he arranges his shop, how he manages his tools. And, because no one way is the only one, he also tells you how other people do things the exact opposite way from how he does, and that works, too.Of course, along the way he also tells funny stories, talks about his various obsessions and praises the many talented creators he has met in his life.If you like Adam Savage, or if you like creating things big or small, you will enjoy this book.
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  • Jason Braatz
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't very familiar with the MythBusters show; I'd only perhaps had seen bits and pieces of it throughout the time it was running. I was simply intrigued to read about this new(er) term of upstart crafters ("makers") and to find out who they really are, what they do - and why they do it. The author breaks it down simply in the first few chapters; essentially, from the javascript programmer to the steampunk cosplay costume artist, anyone - taking a raw material or idea, adding value to it for I wasn't very familiar with the MythBusters show; I'd only perhaps had seen bits and pieces of it throughout the time it was running. I was simply intrigued to read about this new(er) term of upstart crafters ("makers") and to find out who they really are, what they do - and why they do it. The author breaks it down simply in the first few chapters; essentially, from the javascript programmer to the steampunk cosplay costume artist, anyone - taking a raw material or idea, adding value to it for an end-result more valuable than the sum of it's parts - is essentially considered a "maker." While that's not a novel literal definition, in reading this book, I was hoping to get a glimpse into the sub-culture of being a "maker." To that end, Mr. Savage delivers perfectly.The author articulates well that being largesse with your knowledge as well as continuing to grab onto new ideas or skills is consistent with being a maker. The remarkable idea here is that the sub-culture not really a sub-culture in the strict anthropological sense at all; it's simply a self-identifying trait for those who are trying new things and are willing to tinker. While he doesn't necessarily call it out by name, culturally the US has come full circle from having the tinkerer generation in the 1920s-1940s (agrarian economics hinge success on having skills required to get it done on a farm) - cycling past the Second World War/Korean War/Vietnam into the age of arbitrage [1980s-2000s] - into now the information age which allows us to become tinkerers again.There are some novel takeaways from this book, even for non-makers. Perhaps my favorite is this answer when dealing with trying to tackle a problem seemingly out of reach (either from cost or experience experience): "..we can often substitute knowledge with time. This is the great secret sauce for tackling the unfamiliar." In essence, if you are trying to make something in which you don't believe you have the resources to make (either the knowledge on how to do it or money to have it done for you), spending time taking things slowly is often a way to do it. Thomas Edison, Steve Jobs, Maya Angelou and Albert Einstein would have agreed with this wholeheartedly.While this is written for the self-identified maker, the author has splendid examples of how these maker ideas can transcend to a non-maker. From tool optimization to thinking on paper, this is a must-read for anyone, maker or not.
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  • Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book immensely. If you enjoy doing anything moderately creative, from amateur hobbyist to laser-focused builder, you'll find yourself in this book. Have dreams of doing something crafty but lack the confidence to start? This book is for you too. I love that he explains his processes, how they've adapted over time and experience, but doesn't say "this is the right way". In fact, I think the key point he makes is that everyone is different, and what works for some may be a creative I enjoyed this book immensely. If you enjoy doing anything moderately creative, from amateur hobbyist to laser-focused builder, you'll find yourself in this book. Have dreams of doing something crafty but lack the confidence to start? This book is for you too. I love that he explains his processes, how they've adapted over time and experience, but doesn't say "this is the right way". In fact, I think the key point he makes is that everyone is different, and what works for some may be a creative hindrance to others. He gives you permission to try and fail and question and rework. To find the joy in the process. I love that he promotes sharing. Don't hoard the knowledge. I love that he talks about how everything you do, successfully or not, is just another brick in the wall that is your knowledge base. So even that screw up you had to rescue 5 years ago might have triggered just the solution to the thing you're doing right now. I even loved the chapter on glue. A final anecdote, and I am not even exaggerating: He talked about setting a meaningful deadline to get personal projects done, otherwise they tend to languish as you pick at them for weeks. I felt so seen! I checked in on a personal project I've been meaning to finish. I realized I was actually a lot farther along than I thought, maybe 90% complete. So I just parked my butt in the chair, made the hard decisions I'd been avoiding, and sent it off. What a weight off my shoulders.
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  • Lynette
    January 1, 1970
    This book is precisely what I would expect a book by Adam Savage to be--a frenetic flurry of information, some obvious, some insightful, but all delivered with an undeniable enthusiasm. I appreciate that he acknowledges the massive privilege he's had in his life, but it's still just a wee bit annoying that he says things like, "I called up Guillermo del Toro..." Sure, great, let's all just call up our heroes in Hollywood and get some inside information. While the occasional acknowledgement is ap This book is precisely what I would expect a book by Adam Savage to be--a frenetic flurry of information, some obvious, some insightful, but all delivered with an undeniable enthusiasm. I appreciate that he acknowledges the massive privilege he's had in his life, but it's still just a wee bit annoying that he says things like, "I called up Guillermo del Toro..." Sure, great, let's all just call up our heroes in Hollywood and get some inside information. While the occasional acknowledgement is appreciated, it might help mitigate the privilege a bit to have maybe a list of other resources that could be useful for those of us who don't have del Toro, employees of ILM, Jamie Hyneman, or R̶o̶n̶ ̶S̶w̶a̶n̶s̶o̶n̶ Nick Offerman in our back pockets. All in all, I got a couple tidbits out of it, and it was a pretty fast read. I definitely appreciate the chapter on lists and drawings since I'm prone to list making but always felt like it was taking up precious time so often force myself to skip it. Savage seems like a pretty down-to-earth guy, and that's got value too. I would suggest that this book is aimed at younger, newer makers though, and that anyone who is a little further along in their maker journey may find less value in his discussions (unless, of course, you just want to read about Adam Savage and get a good idea of his personal journey--there's certainly value in that too!).
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  • Andrew Schlaepfer
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't really consider myself a 'maker' in any sense of the word before reading this book. Adam is very explicit in saying it's a broad word encompassing not just actual physical building of things, but also writing, baking, cooking, coding, etc. I now see that I do incorporate parts of the making ethos into my life, particularly in baking and coding.This book offers a great range of specific advice (which glues to use to join certain materials) and advice that has a much broader scope that ca I didn't really consider myself a 'maker' in any sense of the word before reading this book. Adam is very explicit in saying it's a broad word encompassing not just actual physical building of things, but also writing, baking, cooking, coding, etc. I now see that I do incorporate parts of the making ethos into my life, particularly in baking and coding.This book offers a great range of specific advice (which glues to use to join certain materials) and advice that has a much broader scope that can be applied to any sort of making, not just his preferred flavor of prop building and set design. A lot of his thoughts are applicable to life in general. He makes a great case for why it's important to keep your shop (desk, kitchen, home) clean. His advice for nurturing your passions really resonated with me, as I tend to flit between whatever fancies enter my mind, get stuck on them for a few weeks, and then move on to something else. I now see I need to do a better job of catching and holding onto these nuggets of inspiration and nurturing them into something deeper.Whatever your preferred flavor of making, or even if you don't consider yourself a maker at all, this is a book worth reading.
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  • Jay Kiros
    January 1, 1970
    From cover to cover this book contains some of the most practical advice for makers, and non-makers alike. For the makers amongst us, this book is a celebration of what we do and who we are. It's a call to action to wave our nerd banner and declare to the world that the maker movement is a thing to be embraced. For one, I ended the book with a renewed sense of purpose and a desire to make something awesome. For the non-makers, or the readers that recognize the face and wonder if there is anythin From cover to cover this book contains some of the most practical advice for makers, and non-makers alike. For the makers amongst us, this book is a celebration of what we do and who we are. It's a call to action to wave our nerd banner and declare to the world that the maker movement is a thing to be embraced. For one, I ended the book with a renewed sense of purpose and a desire to make something awesome. For the non-makers, or the readers that recognize the face and wonder if there is anything for you - Adam Savage offers some great advice on delegation of tasks, of servant leadership, and about passing it forward with skills. I am a maker, but I am also a leader of creative people. I learned so much in this book about working, no, about collaborating. From the section on checklists to the chapter on organization, this book is brimming with practical tips delivered in the context of Savages' life experience so this is one part biography and another part roadmap to success. Excellent read, I'd give this six stars if I could.
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  • Bakertyl
    January 1, 1970
    While not for everyone, this story is for everyone who works with their hands and doesn't know where their life will end up.I liked the stories of building things for Mythbusters, I liked the bits about the importance of tools, I liked most of this book... but I LOVED the story of how this book came to be.I am a Physics teacher with a degree in Social Studies.  I've worked landscaping, food service, warehouse, private investigating/process serving, retail, and got to where I am now through a maz While not for everyone, this story is for everyone who works with their hands and doesn't know where their life will end up.I liked the stories of building things for Mythbusters, I liked the bits about the importance of tools, I liked most of this book... but I LOVED the story of how this book came to be.I am a Physics teacher with a degree in Social Studies.  I've worked landscaping, food service, warehouse, private investigating/process serving, retail, and got to where I am now through a maze of bullshit, luck, and good decisions.  Seeing Savage get to his place in the same way was encouraging, that maybe I'm not the only one to stumble into their life the long way.The actionable advice is sprinkled throughout the book, so if you want real-world advice, its there, but not the focus of the story.  I appreciate that, thank you Adam.Highly recommend to anyone looking to create things to better the world.
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  • Uge Saurio
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a great inspiration and is certainly moving in a sense: while reading it, I was compelled to start making things, to list my projects, to re-organize my shop, to try again. I like how Adam's personal experience as a maker can easily relate to other people that like to make things from baking and cooking, to coding, writing and painting. The titles of each chapter can be read as very specific to making and building and, then again, can feel like life lessons too. I beliebve this book This book is a great inspiration and is certainly moving in a sense: while reading it, I was compelled to start making things, to list my projects, to re-organize my shop, to try again. I like how Adam's personal experience as a maker can easily relate to other people that like to make things from baking and cooking, to coding, writing and painting. The titles of each chapter can be read as very specific to making and building and, then again, can feel like life lessons too. I beliebve this book is a great way to gain momentum and go ahead and start making something. The book switches between being a general, universal book about making and being both creative and a creator, and being an extremely specific technical guide about things like glues and power tools. I believe it still works both ways and you never know when you might need to know about glues.
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  • JDK1962
    January 1, 1970
    A book on making. While probably 50% or more of the book deals with issues around creating physical items (as opposed the areas that I'm interested in, which would be coding, writing, and music), I thought this was a really excellent book for its perspective on projects and on life.I think part of the reason I responded to this book so positively is that it struck me as a work of passion. It's not a couple of tips, padded with a bunch of biography and celebrity stories. It's a pretty meaty book, A book on making. While probably 50% or more of the book deals with issues around creating physical items (as opposed the areas that I'm interested in, which would be coding, writing, and music), I thought this was a really excellent book for its perspective on projects and on life.I think part of the reason I responded to this book so positively is that it struck me as a work of passion. It's not a couple of tips, padded with a bunch of biography and celebrity stories. It's a pretty meaty book, and the stories that are there are specifically to illustrate how he came to the lessons he's (sometimes painfully) learned and is trying to convey. The joy of creating things--and creating a life that's built around creating things--comes through loud and clear. And as Adam might say on the "Still Untitled" podcast, I respect the spit out of that.
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  • Jason Pyrz
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved the first 1/3 of this book. That's the bit that seems to deal most with the idea of creating. The middle 1/3 was interesting too, because that's the bit that goes through a lot of Adam's background and reads like an autobiography. I found the final 1/3 a bit difficult to get through, as that seems geared towards an very specific audience - one that would appreciate tips on which glue to use in certain situations, or how to store tape in a way that made the most of your availab I absolutely loved the first 1/3 of this book. That's the bit that seems to deal most with the idea of creating. The middle 1/3 was interesting too, because that's the bit that goes through a lot of Adam's background and reads like an autobiography. I found the final 1/3 a bit difficult to get through, as that seems geared towards an very specific audience - one that would appreciate tips on which glue to use in certain situations, or how to store tape in a way that made the most of your available space. If you're a creative type looking for inspiration and/or validation, definitely read the first few chapters. If you're a fan of Adam and the Mythbusters days, read the middle, and if you are a serious "maker," read the final 1/3. That last third just wasn't very applicable or interesting to me.
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  • Matthew
    January 1, 1970
    First, I absolutely love that Adam read this himself. I think some of the tone and cadence of the book might've been lost, without his delivery.The mix of both practical and philosophical advice was, in my view, in perfect balance. I found it very educational, and gave me some great new things to think about. In particular: how I organize my "shop", whether that's my home kitchen, my computer, or whatever. That was groundbreaking for me, and I appreciate how open he is with his stumbles, not to First, I absolutely love that Adam read this himself. I think some of the tone and cadence of the book might've been lost, without his delivery.The mix of both practical and philosophical advice was, in my view, in perfect balance. I found it very educational, and gave me some great new things to think about. In particular: how I organize my "shop", whether that's my home kitchen, my computer, or whatever. That was groundbreaking for me, and I appreciate how open he is with his stumbles, not to mention how much his current state is owed to the help and encouragement of others.My only complaint was that I want more! It's not a short book, but I just enjoyed it so much that I was a little sad when it finished.
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  • Jon
    January 1, 1970
    I, of course, know Adam from his years on Mythbusters. On the show, his antics were some of my favorite parts of the show, especially his passion for making things. I've continued to follow him through the years on social media and YouTube and enjoy his builds of various and sundry things. I've been looking forward to this book for months and got it from the library the day it came out. I was not disappointed. The book is a lovely mixture of the aspirational and the practical. Adam's doing his b I, of course, know Adam from his years on Mythbusters. On the show, his antics were some of my favorite parts of the show, especially his passion for making things. I've continued to follow him through the years on social media and YouTube and enjoy his builds of various and sundry things. I've been looking forward to this book for months and got it from the library the day it came out. I was not disappointed. The book is a lovely mixture of the aspirational and the practical. Adam's doing his best to push people to create and this book is an extension of that effort. I can't recommend it enough if you're at all interested in creating things. I have a feeling I'll come back to it again at some point.
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  • Artem Gordinsky
    January 1, 1970
    Thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, or rather listening to Adam's narration.I don't consider myself much of a maker. Yet, I was surprised by just how much I can relate to and learn from some of the experiences and advice shared in the book. From making lists and deconstructing big projects into individual tasks to keeping your workplace tidy and picking good tools, there were quite a few things any maker, craftsman or a software developer like myself can take away from this book.Combine this w Thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, or rather listening to Adam's narration.I don't consider myself much of a maker. Yet, I was surprised by just how much I can relate to and learn from some of the experiences and advice shared in the book. From making lists and deconstructing big projects into individual tasks to keeping your workplace tidy and picking good tools, there were quite a few things any maker, craftsman or a software developer like myself can take away from this book.Combine this with the book being just plain fun to read and this is a definitive 5 out of 5. And I do recommend checking out the audio version.
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  • Garrett
    January 1, 1970
    Adam explains how he got where he is and some of his processes and ideology for life and making. Read by the author, which is always a nice touch. I have decided I do not like biographies, let alone autobiographies. Maybe it is just where I am in my life and such but I will steer away from them for a bit. I watch most of the stuff Adam and his team put up on youtube and enjoy it. Thinking about it maybe this was more for people who remember him from Mythbusters and were wondering what he has bee Adam explains how he got where he is and some of his processes and ideology for life and making. Read by the author, which is always a nice touch. I have decided I do not like biographies, let alone autobiographies. Maybe it is just where I am in my life and such but I will steer away from them for a bit. I watch most of the stuff Adam and his team put up on youtube and enjoy it. Thinking about it maybe this was more for people who remember him from Mythbusters and were wondering what he has been up too.
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  • Paul Gardner
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic look into Adam's, and by extension, other Makers' thought process. Adam takes time to show how Making is individual, showing other people's setups.While not an autobiography, he does go into some of his past - family, jobs, etc. There's some Mythbusters in there, some other jobs and some personal projects. It was fun to read, and I learned quite a bit.If you like to make things, or (as in my case) you really like Mythbusters and you want a peek into that world, this book is highly reco Fantastic look into Adam's, and by extension, other Makers' thought process. Adam takes time to show how Making is individual, showing other people's setups.While not an autobiography, he does go into some of his past - family, jobs, etc. There's some Mythbusters in there, some other jobs and some personal projects. It was fun to read, and I learned quite a bit.If you like to make things, or (as in my case) you really like Mythbusters and you want a peek into that world, this book is highly recommended.
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  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    Adams book was nothing short of amazing. Delving deep into the mind of such an imaginative creator was a thrilling experience that I did not want to end. This isn’t a biography, it’s more of a guide with personal anecdotes. Whether you are a budding creator or experienced works-man, Adam’s philosophy on approaching situations are extremely brilliant, his character shining through in each chapter.
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  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    This is my 15th book of the year but Goodreads is showing it as #14. Very Weird, anyway it was a fun read. If you are a builder of any sort or you like Adam Savage and The MythBusters this is a must read book. This was such a fun read. I wasn't sure what to expect but the more I read it the more I enjoyed it. It definitely kept me entertained. This is my 15th book of the year but Goodreads is showing it as #14. Very Weird, anyway it was a fun read. If you are a builder of any sort or you like Adam Savage and The MythBusters​ this is a must read book. This was such a fun read. I wasn't sure what to expect but the more I read it the more I enjoyed it. It definitely kept me entertained.
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  • Alina
    January 1, 1970
    This was amazing. I went to one of the tour events for this book and i heard Adam speak about making it and making things. I basically read the whole thing in his voice because it just comes through that strongly. Every time I put it down, I was filled with the desire to make something, anything just because I could. This book is inspiring for the best reasons.
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  • Aurora Leigh
    January 1, 1970
    Savage's first book is both insightful and really fun. Highly recommended for aspiring and accomplished makers, and for anyone who supports others who make. I found a lot here that ties in as well with my own work using design thinking and especially appreciated his discussion of the importance of space and, as he puts it, sweeping up at the end of the day.
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