Sunny Rolls the Dice
Too cool for school . . . or the least groovy girl in the grade?Sunny's just made it to middle school . . . and it's making her life very confusing. All her best friend Deb wants to talk about is fashion, boys, makeup, boys, and being cool. Sunny's not against any of these things, but she also doesn't understand why suddenly everything revolves around them. She's much more comfortable when she's in her basement, playing Dungeons & Dragons with a bunch of new friends. Because when you're swordfighting and spider-slaying, it's hard to worry about whether you look cool or not. Especially when it's your turn to roll the 20-sided die. Trying hard to be cool can make you feel really uncool . . . and it's much more fun to just have fun.

Sunny Rolls the Dice Details

TitleSunny Rolls the Dice
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 1st, 2019
PublisherGraphix
ISBN-139781338233155
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Childrens, Middle Grade, Historical, Historical Fiction, Realistic Fiction

Sunny Rolls the Dice Review

  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to Scholastic Books for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest reviewAs expected, I loved it. Sunny and her friends have always been close to my heart. Especially because I came across the graphic novel series when I was going through an especially rough time. (I mean when am I not but you know what I mean). This book delivered the humor and love that every previous book has. I loved the topic of "Grooviness" and seeing Sunny explore her idea of being cool and what that meant fo Many thanks to Scholastic Books for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest reviewAs expected, I loved it. Sunny and her friends have always been close to my heart. Especially because I came across the graphic novel series when I was going through an especially rough time. (I mean when am I not but you know what I mean). This book delivered the humor and love that every previous book has. I loved the topic of "Grooviness" and seeing Sunny explore her idea of being cool and what that meant for her. Four strong stars! Highly recommended!| Goodreads | Blog | Twitch | Pinterest | Buy
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  • laura (bookies & cookies)
    January 1, 1970
    I finished and reviewed an arc before it's published???? What a concept.I can see why the kiddos love this and other realistic series (even though this is set FIFTY years in the past, weren't the 70s like 30 years ago? right?). Sunny rates herself on the "groovy meter" throughout the book, but really she's rating herself by her friends' standards and not her own. She begins to play D&D, while she had already begun comics back in book #1. Fun. Also, Dale is doing better in this book, so good I finished and reviewed an arc before it's published???? What a concept.I can see why the kiddos love this and other realistic series (even though this is set FIFTY years in the past, weren't the 70s like 30 years ago? right?). Sunny rates herself on the "groovy meter" throughout the book, but really she's rating herself by her friends' standards and not her own. She begins to play D&D, while she had already begun comics back in book #1. Fun. Also, Dale is doing better in this book, so good news all around.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    Copy provided by the publisherSunny is still struggling with middle school in the 1970s. She reads all of the teen magazines with her best friend Deb and attempts to be "groovy", but feels she falls short in all areas, and doesn't understand why Deb is so interested in boys. When she meets a group of boys from the neighborhood who invite the two to play Dungeons and Dragons, Sunny really gets into the game, even though it is confusing at first. However, the more interested in the game Sunny gets Copy provided by the publisherSunny is still struggling with middle school in the 1970s. She reads all of the teen magazines with her best friend Deb and attempts to be "groovy", but feels she falls short in all areas, and doesn't understand why Deb is so interested in boys. When she meets a group of boys from the neighborhood who invite the two to play Dungeons and Dragons, Sunny really gets into the game, even though it is confusing at first. However, the more interested in the game Sunny gets, the less interested Deb gets, and soon the girls drop out. They are involved in carnation delivery to classrooms, "liking" different boys, and preparing for school dances. Deb really wants to save up for a pair of Gloria Vanderbilt jeans and get her ears pierced, but Sunny realizes that she would rather spend her money on a D&D character figurine. Eventually, Sunny returns to the game, but is able to stay friends with Deb as well. Strengths: The Sunny graphic novels are my absolute favorite; they have the perfect mix of pictures and decently large text, they cover serious issues with a light touch, and have great characters. I have a group of students who are absolutely sure I can teach them to play D&D (Picky Reader did pick up this skill in college), but my essential fandom in middle school was Little House on the Prairie. This will be a popular choice with everyone!Weaknesses: I could have used more of the grandfather in this story-- he's my favorite!What I really think: I am pretty sure that Ms. Holm would have been my friend in middle school; I, too, read the magazines but was never successful at replicating the outfits. I love that the 1970s details are all over this story, but it is still an absolutely timeless tale of fitting in and standing out in middle school. Five disco balls!
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  • Margaret
    January 1, 1970
    This is a cute story, about a middle schooler in the 70s who doesn't fit in with her childhood girlfriends anymore. Instead, she finds a group of nerdy guys and finds she LOVES playing D&D. I didn't much like how some of the characters were drawn.
  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    So lovely to have another Sunny book. She is now navigating the mysteries of middle school, the issue of friendships changing and finding one's own group of people. Loved the references to the 70's and D&D! Funny how enduring that game is. My own sons played for hours and hours in our basement in the early 90's and my grandsons play now ;-)A total delight!
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  • Lupe
    January 1, 1970
    I read this ARC yesterday and loved it on the first page. Holm checks all my boxes, 70s groove, feminist, breaking gender stereotypes, learning how to find your tribe. Etc. I can already think of some readers who will love this one!
  • Steph
    January 1, 1970
    Really enjoyed it - and love that she follows her nerdy heart in the end - but what in the world about Deb?! Can’t Sunny love D&D and still find a way to be close to Deb? Sad about that, though maybe it’s realistic?
  • Suzanne Dix
    January 1, 1970
    I just love this series but book #1 will forever remain in my heart (Gramps!). Kids will enjoy this historical look at middle school in the 70s.
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I got this ARC at BookCon.Sunny just started seventh grade, and she's struggling to be "groovy" like all the girls in the teen magazines. Obviously, Sunny lives in the 70s/early 80s (can you tell I haven't read any of the Sunny books before?). When a group of her guy friends start playing Dungeons and Dragons, Sunny is excited for it, even though her best friend Deb is a little less than enthused. Sunny struggles to both be groovy (as rated by a groovy meter throughout) and to do the things she I got this ARC at BookCon.Sunny just started seventh grade, and she's struggling to be "groovy" like all the girls in the teen magazines. Obviously, Sunny lives in the 70s/early 80s (can you tell I haven't read any of the Sunny books before?). When a group of her guy friends start playing Dungeons and Dragons, Sunny is excited for it, even though her best friend Deb is a little less than enthused. Sunny struggles to both be groovy (as rated by a groovy meter throughout) and to do the things she likes doing, even if they're babyish. The vintage fashions and trends were fun to read about, although I'm not sure how a middle-grade audience would perceived them. That struggle of growing up and growing out of "little kid" stuff is eternal, however, and readers will be able to relate to Sunny not being ready to give up her childhood. The resolution doesn't wrap up the tension between Deb and Sunny, though - I liked that Sunny (view spoiler)[chooses to follow her interests and keep playing D&D (hide spoiler)], but I wanted her to clear the air with Deb a bit more. Given that this is a series, that might be an ongoing issue that will be resolved in a later book. Readers of Raina Telgemeier would enjoy this book; it might skew a little younger, too.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    spare, but any book where a kid learns about dnd and loves it is up my alley!
  • Aud
    January 1, 1970
    My favorite in this series to date, and that's saying something. The general message is: follow your own joy, do what you like, and don't worry too much about someone else's opinions (even if they're your friends). I also like how Sunny navigates being her own person without necessarily falling out / severing ties with her old friends, and how Sunny is friends with boys without over thinking it. I'm ace, and it was great to see a girl protagonist who isn't into the hormone stuff and who is just My favorite in this series to date, and that's saying something. The general message is: follow your own joy, do what you like, and don't worry too much about someone else's opinions (even if they're your friends). I also like how Sunny navigates being her own person without necessarily falling out / severing ties with her old friends, and how Sunny is friends with boys without over thinking it. I'm ace, and it was great to see a girl protagonist who isn't into the hormone stuff and who is just being herself and figuring her own life out.And I appreciate that Sunny might get into the hormone stuff later, but I feel like she'll have a strong hold of herself in the process. I don't think the process of "growing up" is going to make her drop the activities she loves. So many people seem to think, "Oh, girls only like that sort of thing (D&D, certain sports, being a "tomboy," etc.) until they 'discover boys' and 'outgrow' it." Why should girls be expected to change just because there's another gender that they're interested in? Why should girls be expected to change to try to make themselves more attractive? Outgrowing interests is one thing. Dropping activities you like because you don't think they're "cool" or "feminine" or "grown-up" enough is another, and girls are pressured to do that by our society and it's reinforced by a lot of our media. It's really annoying. For one thing, not all girls are into boys. For another, any individual who doesn't like you as you are isn't worth your time. I feel like Sunny will get that, after reading this book, and it's a breath of fresh air.
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  • Rich Izzo
    January 1, 1970
    It's 1977 and 12-year old Sunny is struggling to be a "groovy" girl. Her friends are turning their interests towards clothes and boys, while Sunny herself has become enraptured with a brand new game: Dungeons & Dragons. Can Sunny be groovy and still be true to herself? The book itself feels more stale than Ms. Holm's previous Sunny titles. The story of the middle-grade girl becoming a fan of an "uncool" activity while struggling to maintain her old friendships has been trod upon many times ( It's 1977 and 12-year old Sunny is struggling to be a "groovy" girl. Her friends are turning their interests towards clothes and boys, while Sunny herself has become enraptured with a brand new game: Dungeons & Dragons. Can Sunny be groovy and still be true to herself? The book itself feels more stale than Ms. Holm's previous Sunny titles. The story of the middle-grade girl becoming a fan of an "uncool" activity while struggling to maintain her old friendships has been trod upon many times (Victoria Jamieson's Roller Girl immediately comes to mind), and the latter is the better story. Moreover, Dale's near-absence from the book feels like a missed opportunity, as Sunny's older brother has had his own struggles with finding his true self. Overall, however, the story shines largely because of Sunny (no pun intended). She has always been well-written by the Holm siblings, and I genuinely felt Sunny's conflicting affiliations to old friends and new. The story is true to the middle-grade experience, and I'd recommend the book despite its flaws.From an ARC.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Goodness, how did I not know this was coming out? Last year my students and I had lots of hype and anticipation for Swing It Sunny, so I feel kind of bad that I had to see this in a bookstore to know it was out! (bad librarian!oops!) In this follow up to the other two books Sunny is now in middle school where she's trying to navigate what's cool and what's not. She is excited to discover D&D and start playing with some of her boy friends in the neighborhood. Not surprisingly, the other girls Goodness, how did I not know this was coming out? Last year my students and I had lots of hype and anticipation for Swing It Sunny, so I feel kind of bad that I had to see this in a bookstore to know it was out! (bad librarian!oops!) In this follow up to the other two books Sunny is now in middle school where she's trying to navigate what's cool and what's not. She is excited to discover D&D and start playing with some of her boy friends in the neighborhood. Not surprisingly, the other girls tell her it's not cool and she has conflict.Although I enjoyed this it felt like such a slimmer story than Sunny Side Up or Swing It Sunny. The panels even seemed larger and fewer to a page, so it was overall much shorter (or at least felt that way.) To be honest, for a graphic novel exploring the angst of fitting it and changing friendships I'd recommend Real Friends or Best Friends instead. But still, it was a good story and I did like seeing how Dungeons & Dragons was woven into it.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    The way Jennifer and Matthew Holm along with their colorist, Lark Pien, have grounded these Sunny narratives in a time and place is what makes this graphic novel series stand out among others. Not only do the fashions and decor of the 1970s come alive in these books, but everything also manages to feel trendy and fashionable, like you're living in that time with the characters rather than reading it from a distance. In this third installment of the Sunny series, our protagonist navigates the fru The way Jennifer and Matthew Holm along with their colorist, Lark Pien, have grounded these Sunny narratives in a time and place is what makes this graphic novel series stand out among others. Not only do the fashions and decor of the 1970s come alive in these books, but everything also manages to feel trendy and fashionable, like you're living in that time with the characters rather than reading it from a distance. In this third installment of the Sunny series, our protagonist navigates the frustrating world of middle school through the lens of playing Dungeons & Dragons with her friends in her newly finished, wood-paneled basement (very 70s chic). While I personally am not a fan or player of D&D, that doesn't mean I didn't thoroughly enjoy every minute of this heartwarming narrative because the Holm duo always manage to make their characters central to the story rather than the plot.
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  • Arminzerella
    January 1, 1970
    Sunny is settling into middle school and discovering that she and her best friend Deb are starting to develop different interests. Deb is super into fashion, boys, and being cool (or rather, "groovy"). Sunny, on the other hand, wants to play D&D (Dungeons and Dragons) with some other friends. For awhile, Sunny is keen to increase her grooviness score, but when it means she has to give up the things she likes to do (and follow a bunch of unwritten rules that don't make any sense to her), Sunn Sunny is settling into middle school and discovering that she and her best friend Deb are starting to develop different interests. Deb is super into fashion, boys, and being cool (or rather, "groovy"). Sunny, on the other hand, wants to play D&D (Dungeons and Dragons) with some other friends. For awhile, Sunny is keen to increase her grooviness score, but when it means she has to give up the things she likes to do (and follow a bunch of unwritten rules that don't make any sense to her), Sunny takes a stand. Being true to herself and following her own interests are more important than being cool or popular. Sunny's confusion and enthusiasm are realistic, as are her friendship quandaries. It's refreshing to see her overcome her struggles and embrace her passions. The D&D gaming sessions are particularly fun and interesting.
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  • RedPoppyReading
    January 1, 1970
    We are big fans of “Sunny Side Up” so we were so excited to read “Sunny Rolls the Dice” @jenniferholm and illustrated by Matthew Holm. In this second book, Sunny is trying to make it through middle school and is trying to “be groovy” and be true to herself – two things that sometimes don’t seem to go together. Her best friend is a little boy-crazy, and into fashion and make-up, but Sunny would rather play Dungeons and Dragons in her basement with her new friends. Can Sunny quit worrying about be We are big fans of “Sunny Side Up” so we were so excited to read “Sunny Rolls the Dice” @jenniferholm and illustrated by Matthew Holm. In this second book, Sunny is trying to make it through middle school and is trying to “be groovy” and be true to herself – two things that sometimes don’t seem to go together. Her best friend is a little boy-crazy, and into fashion and make-up, but Sunny would rather play Dungeons and Dragons in her basement with her new friends. Can Sunny quit worrying about being cool and just be herself? My 8-year-old and I love this book and will be buying our own copy when it is released on October 1, 2019. For ages 8-12.Thanks to @scholasticinc for sharing a review copy with #kidlitexchange andthanks to the @kidlitexchange network for the review copy of this book – all opinions are my own.
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  • Melanie Dulaney
    January 1, 1970
    Jennifer Holm’s latest installment in her Sunny series places readers in 1977 when Sunny is trying to be one of the groovy girls in middle school. Problem is, unlike her friends Deb and Regina, she just doesn’t care about getting Vanderbilt jeans or her ears pierced. Readers will connect with all her efforts to fit in and will hopefully pick up on the theme of being comfortable with what makes you happy and not worrying about what others want to do. The artwork in this graphic novel is terrific Jennifer Holm’s latest installment in her Sunny series places readers in 1977 when Sunny is trying to be one of the groovy girls in middle school. Problem is, unlike her friends Deb and Regina, she just doesn’t care about getting Vanderbilt jeans or her ears pierced. Readers will connect with all her efforts to fit in and will hopefully pick up on the theme of being comfortable with what makes you happy and not worrying about what others want to do. The artwork in this graphic novel is terrific and readers in grades 4 and up will keep this one checked out. Librarians and caregivers of the target audience can feel good about the lack of profanity, violence or mature content. I remain hopeful that my fans of Holm’s graphic novels will also try her wonderful novels! Thanks for the dARC, Edelweiss.
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  • Denise
    January 1, 1970
    This series is so cute! Jenni and Matt have a great knack for tapping into the universal childhood anxieties that plague us all, whether you grew up in the 70s or are a kid growing up today. The leap into middle school, the fear of losing friends as your interests diverge, and finding out what you're really passionate about along the way...all of it still holds up! This series manages to feel both universal and very much of a particular time and place. The call-outs to the 70s memorabilia are hi This series is so cute! Jenni and Matt have a great knack for tapping into the universal childhood anxieties that plague us all, whether you grew up in the 70s or are a kid growing up today. The leap into middle school, the fear of losing friends as your interests diverge, and finding out what you're really passionate about along the way...all of it still holds up! This series manages to feel both universal and very much of a particular time and place. The call-outs to the 70s memorabilia are hilarious and really help young readers insert themselves into an era way before their time, and consider how their parents or other adults in their lives grew up. A simple story with lots of heart, which will naturally appeal to fans of Raina Telgemeier and Shannon Hale's Real Friends.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    Sunny is back! The family drama is on hold for a while - her brother has joined the Navy, but now, it's friend drama! Sunny has started middle school, and her best friend is full of "we're too old for that now." But Sunny has started playing Dungeons and Dragons with a group of boys and really enjoys it. She's torn between being groovy and doing the things she likes. I really enjoyed this Sunny story. A great look at navigating middle school friends, and growing up. Full color illustrations and Sunny is back! The family drama is on hold for a while - her brother has joined the Navy, but now, it's friend drama! Sunny has started middle school, and her best friend is full of "we're too old for that now." But Sunny has started playing Dungeons and Dragons with a group of boys and really enjoys it. She's torn between being groovy and doing the things she likes. I really enjoyed this Sunny story. A great look at navigating middle school friends, and growing up. Full color illustrations and a fun look back at the 70s - so nostalgic, I'm pretty sure Sunny and I are the exact same age. For this and more of my reviews, visit Kiss the Book at https://kissthebookjr.blogspot.com/20...
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  • Bkrieth
    January 1, 1970
    Another great addition to the Sunny series, the Holm's new title brings us back in conversation with both sweet Sunny and the 1970's. Sunny's quest to increase her groovy factor sometimes conflicts with her internal interests and desires and we see the age-old struggle with peer pressure play out against a back drop where D&D culture clashes with designer jeans. While not packing the same emotional punch as earlier Sunny books, this volume allows a Sunny who is focusing on her own growth and Another great addition to the Sunny series, the Holm's new title brings us back in conversation with both sweet Sunny and the 1970's. Sunny's quest to increase her groovy factor sometimes conflicts with her internal interests and desires and we see the age-old struggle with peer pressure play out against a back drop where D&D culture clashes with designer jeans. While not packing the same emotional punch as earlier Sunny books, this volume allows a Sunny who is focusing on her own growth and development rather than reacting to family disfunction and dynamics. I am hopeful that the saga will continue, as Sunny is a girl who accurately embodies so many of the feelings that middle grade students experience. Uncorrected proof reviewed.
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  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    As a child of the 70s and 80s, I enjoyed the pop culture references tied to into this story as it is based on the authors' real experiences. The craft of Sunny navigating changing friendships through the world of Dungeons & Dragons was very creative. I just wonder though if that will be lost on middle-grade readers since D&D is not at the level of popularity it was back then? The Holms did a great job explaining the ins and outs of the game (as well as other elements from that time perio As a child of the 70s and 80s, I enjoyed the pop culture references tied to into this story as it is based on the authors' real experiences. The craft of Sunny navigating changing friendships through the world of Dungeons & Dragons was very creative. I just wonder though if that will be lost on middle-grade readers since D&D is not at the level of popularity it was back then? The Holms did a great job explaining the ins and outs of the game (as well as other elements from that time period - i.e. galoshes, Gloria Vanderbilt jeans, Dusty dolls), but this graphic novel felt like it was written more for nostalgic adults in their 40s and 50s than for today's kids.
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  • Lena
    January 1, 1970
    Sunny is absolutely golden. I adore all 3 of these books so much. In this one, our heroine grapples with growing up, peer pressure, and... D&D. What's not to love? As always, these are period pieces that give nostalgic glimpses of the 70s while remaining 100% relevant to kids today. Whether struggling with being "groovy" enough, figuring out if a boy likes you, when to get your ears pierced, when to put the dolls away, stop playing with boys, or get a flower for a classmate, Sunny always dea Sunny is absolutely golden. I adore all 3 of these books so much. In this one, our heroine grapples with growing up, peer pressure, and... D&D. What's not to love? As always, these are period pieces that give nostalgic glimpses of the 70s while remaining 100% relevant to kids today. Whether struggling with being "groovy" enough, figuring out if a boy likes you, when to get your ears pierced, when to put the dolls away, stop playing with boys, or get a flower for a classmate, Sunny always deals with the issues like a real girl would. The author deals with real issues with delicacy, humor, and compassion. I can't recommend this series enough! For readers of all ages.
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  • Shelley
    January 1, 1970
    This was a super cute story! I loved that Sunny plays Dungeons and Dragons. Dungeons and Dragons is so imaginative and is good for teaching kids strategy and problem solving skills. I love that they promoted the game in this book. The book appears to take place in the 70’s so it’s also appropriate to the time period in the story. But it’s also making a come back in today’s times as well thanks to “Critical Role” and it’s appearance on “Stranger Things.” This is a great story for kids or teens wh This was a super cute story! I loved that Sunny plays Dungeons and Dragons. Dungeons and Dragons is so imaginative and is good for teaching kids strategy and problem solving skills. I love that they promoted the game in this book. The book appears to take place in the 70’s so it’s also appropriate to the time period in the story. But it’s also making a come back in today’s times as well thanks to “Critical Role” and it’s appearance on “Stranger Things.” This is a great story for kids or teens who don’t care about being popular and just want to enjoy life and be themselves.
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  • Katie Reilley
    January 1, 1970
    My students will be super excited when I bring the third book in the Sunny series to school tomorrow.Sunny is determined to make it through middle school while trying too hard to be groovy. Her best friend Deb is now all about magazines, fashion, makeup and boys, and Sunny would rather play D & D with the neighborhood boys. Definitely loved the 70s references. With the theme of being true to yourself, my 5th graders will most likely devour this in one sitting as I did.
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  • Katie Chase
    January 1, 1970
    Cements the "Sunny" series--not as the middle school social drama it's marketed as--but as a spot-on fictionalized memoir of 70s childhood. In this volume, Sunny wears a striped top that is 100% identical to one in my keepsake box: I'm pretty sure it's the same one! The interiors, especially, are museum-quality recreations. The family dynamics are also so true to the time. I can't wait for more.Review based on an ARC snagged at BookExpo!
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    Great next chapter to Sunny. Fans of All's Faire in Middle School and The Cardboard Kingdomwill love Sunny's latest adventure.
  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    A cute middle grade graphic novel about what it’s like when your friends start to change and you’re not quite ready for the “teen” experience. I remember friends saying that something was too baby-ish for our age and being super bummed about it. I appreciated that it was more about sticking to what you enjoy, rather than giving it up just bc your friends don’t think it’s cool. I love that Sunny plays D&D!
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    What truly amazes me about Jennifer Holm’s Sunny series is how well she remembers and captures life as a kid of the 70s. As one myself, I really appreciate it. And it was good to see for a brief moment that Sunny’s brother is doing better in this book. I wish she had focused on that just a tad bit more for those students of mine who can relate to having a family member who struggles.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    Super quick graphic novel that will appeal to both boys and girls. I like that Sunny found a way to do what she wanted, but the idea of "are we still friends" was addressed with people she was growing apart from with a positive spin. Between this and Stranger Things it definitely makes me want to learn to play Dungeons and Dragons :)
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    A good quick read that gives us another glimpse of Sunny's life and back in history into life as a teen in the 70s. Nice change of pace reading this. Probably took about 30 minutes give or take. Sunny is dealing with the fact that she is not as boy crazy as her best friend and how she would rather enjoy a "boy game".
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