Last Bus to Everland
Brody Fair feels like nobody gets him: not his overworked parents, not his genius older brother, and definitely not the girls in the projects set on making his life miserable. Then he meets Nico, an art student who takes Brody to Everland, a “knock-off Narnia" that opens its door at 11:21pm each Thursday for Nico and his band of present-day misfits and miscreants.Here Brody finds his tribe and a weekly respite from a world where he feels out of place. But when the doors to Everland begin to disappear, Brody is forced to make a decision: He can say goodbye to Everland and to Nico, or stay there and risk never seeing his family again.

Last Bus to Everland Details

TitleLast Bus to Everland
Author
ReleaseMay 16th, 2019
PublisherMacmillan Children's Books
ISBN-139781509853182
Rating
GenreLGBT, Fantasy, Young Adult, Contemporary

Last Bus to Everland Review

  • Kate (GirlReading)
    January 1, 1970
    A quietly magic, truly lovely story.Despite it’s fantasy elements, this wonderful book felt so incredibly real. It brilliantly explores an array of topics, from sexuality to mental illness to poverty to academic pressures and features a wonderfully diverse cast (the MC is gay and poor with a father who is living with PTSD and agoraphobia. The love interest is Spanish and gay. There’s also a Polish lesbian side character, a hijabi SC, a Japanese SC, a latinx bi SC, a SC with an eating disorder, a A quietly magic, truly lovely story.Despite it’s fantasy elements, this wonderful book felt so incredibly real. It brilliantly explores an array of topics, from sexuality to mental illness to poverty to academic pressures and features a wonderfully diverse cast (the MC is gay and poor with a father who is living with PTSD and agoraphobia. The love interest is Spanish and gay. There’s also a Polish lesbian side character, a hijabi SC, a Japanese SC, a latinx bi SC, a SC with an eating disorder, a gay SC with anxiety and a pansexual SC who uses a wheelchair.) I loved that each character had their own story and were allowed to, not only have flaws, but to grow and learn from their own mistakes and those of others, whilst having their growth received with compassion, rather than irreconcilable fall outs. Whether it be familial, romantic or platonic, I thought the various relationship dynamics explored were also really interesting to follow.As someone who adores fairy tale retellings (especially those of the Disney variety) but is regularly let down but them, I’m so happy to be able to say I loved this contemporary spin on Peter Pan. I thought the plot was perfectly balanced between the two settings and the twist on Neverland (with a little Narnia thrown in for good measure) was a fun and unique take on the original story. From the lovable characters and easy following writing style, to the casual Studio Ghibli, Disney and Yuri on Ice references (I saw them and loved them) and a plot that brilliantly encapsulated the escape so many teens (and adults) dream of, this was a thoroughly enjoyable read from start to finish. TW: Homophobia, ableism, eating disorder, agoraphobia, panic attacks, discussion of suicide.
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  • anna (readingpeaches)
    January 1, 1970
    there's a side character who's a polish lesbian(chanting) polish lesbian! polish lesbian! polish lesbian! Blog | Twitter | Instagram | Bloglovin | Reads Rainbow
  • c,
    January 1, 1970
    I’m starting to feel like I could disappear, and they wouldn’t even notice. On my blog. Rep: gay mc, gay li, gay/pan/lesbian side characters, hijabi side character, side character in wheelchair, side character with agoraphobiaGalley provided by publisherI sat down to write this review of Last Bus to Everland, but then I realised that I had no words to offer, only tears. So, I went away for a bit, thought it over, came back and I… still have no words, only tears. But we’re gonna give writing I’m starting to feel like I could disappear, and they wouldn’t even notice. On my blog. Rep: gay mc, gay li, gay/pan/lesbian side characters, hijabi side character, side character in wheelchair, side character with agoraphobiaGalley provided by publisherI sat down to write this review of Last Bus to Everland, but then I realised that I had no words to offer, only tears. So, I went away for a bit, thought it over, came back and I… still have no words, only tears. But we’re gonna give writing this a go anyhow.Last Bus to Everland is the story of Brody Fair, a gay teen in Edinburgh, the middle child of three, who feels out of place in the world. He’s bullied at school, feels like no one cares at home, but then he meets Nico. Nico takes him to Everland, a magical place that opens up every Thursday at 11:21pm. There, Brody finds a place for himself, but soon things start going wrong in Everland, and he has to make a decision to stay there forever or go and never come back.The thing I loved most about this book was the family relationships. There’s a found family relationship, yes, but also the most lovely biological family relationship. Even when Brody thinks no one cares for him, you as the reader know that his family would stand behind him whatever. I think my favourite part of that was the relationship between Brody and his brother Jake. It was perfectly angsty and I probably almost cried multiple times reading the scenes they had together. Particularly the big heart-to-heart at the end.I also loved that the romance was kind of incidental to this family relationship. The plot wasn’t that Nico saved Brody or vice versa, but more that meeting Nico and everyone in Everland helped Brody become comfortable with himself. Because the most beautiful thing in LGBT books is the characters getting to be happy and content with themselves and finding their place in the world, and that will never not make me cry.And even if the ending did make me sad (though hopeful? In a way), there was nothing I didn’t like about this book. It was so soft and just… healing I guess would be the word. It’s just got that rawness and authenticity that comes with an LGBT author.So, really, I don’t know what else to say to convince you to read this. Just that it’s one you’re not going to want to miss.
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  • Dylan
    January 1, 1970
    I just sent a request for this arc in an email titled "ARCS i would die for"so.
  • Sarah Mc
    January 1, 1970
    It has been a very long time since I’ve gobbled a book up so greedily. As I close the cover I can’t help but muse that, once again, a book that I so desperately needed to read fell into my lap at the exact point in my life that I needed to read it.Sophie Cameron tells the story of a boy who, like the rest of us, is struggling to find his place in the world. Lost in feelings of inadequacy, fear of the future, and stressors of his complicated life, Brody is searching for what all of us have and co It has been a very long time since I’ve gobbled a book up so greedily. As I close the cover I can’t help but muse that, once again, a book that I so desperately needed to read fell into my lap at the exact point in my life that I needed to read it.Sophie Cameron tells the story of a boy who, like the rest of us, is struggling to find his place in the world. Lost in feelings of inadequacy, fear of the future, and stressors of his complicated life, Brody is searching for what all of us have and continue to: himself, his tribe, and a grip on the never ending monkey wrenches that the world tries to beat him down with. But when he finds relief and a piece of himself in the fantastical realm of Everland, his grip on the real world starts to slip away.I cannot praise the character development enough. I walked right along side Brody and his friends. I know his pains, his confusion, and the hope he lost and reclaimed over the course of his story. And I know you will too. We all have a version of Everland that helps us put one foot in front of the other and find ourselves at some point in our lives. When you read the closing sentence and set this amazing book down, I hope you can remember that moment, that person, or that place too, and smile. (Received an ARC from Goodreads Giveaway Contest, and thank gosh I did!)
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    "I found Everland. I found my people." He smiles and gives my shoulder a little push. "And now you have, too." When I started reading Last Bus to Everland I wasn't sure what I expected, maybe a light read about a boy who discovers a secret world where he can escape all of his real-life problems, and while at its heart that's what Last Bus to Everland was there were a lot of deeper parts to this book as well. Brody had a lot he was struggling with, but so did his family and his friends. We see t "I found Everland. I found my people." He smiles and gives my shoulder a little push. "And now you have, too." When I started reading Last Bus to Everland I wasn't sure what I expected, maybe a light read about a boy who discovers a secret world where he can escape all of his real-life problems, and while at its heart that's what Last Bus to Everland was there were a lot of deeper parts to this book as well. Brody had a lot he was struggling with, but so did his family and his friends. We see them all grow in this books and the representation and character development were all incredible.Full review available on my blog Reading Every Night
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  • Lea (drumsofautumn)
    January 1, 1970
    ♦ Video Review ♦Last Bus to Everland is a novel that, while it includes a portal fantasy world, is much more Contemporary than Fantasy and deals with a lot of friendship and family dynamics, that are all incredibly complex and well done. “There's bravery in surviving this world when your mind can only focus on the bad in it.” Everland, the portal fantasy world, is something that the characters consciously decide to go back to every week, mostly to escape the real world. The existence in this ♦ Video Review ♦Last Bus to Everland is a novel that, while it includes a portal fantasy world, is much more Contemporary than Fantasy and deals with a lot of friendship and family dynamics, that are all incredibly complex and well done. “There's bravery in surviving this world when your mind can only focus on the bad in it.” Everland, the portal fantasy world, is something that the characters consciously decide to go back to every week, mostly to escape the real world. The existence in this story is mostly a tool for story telling and character development. Through their time in Everland, the characters learn a lot about themselves and their life and that is a huge theme throughout the book.It also deals with escapism in general and looks at it from all kinds of different angles. Is it good or bad, when does it become a problem and can it be addicting? This is all reflected in different character's decisions and shows the nuance of it.Sadly, because this book focuses so heavily on the real world effects of Everland, I thought that this book did not have enough world building. I didn't need an explanation for this world but I wanted it to be much more described, to have some lush writing, so that I as a reader felt more like I was in this place and never wanted to leave too, but I didn't get that at all. Everland itself fell completely flat for me.The family dynamics were super well done and tackled a lot of issues all at the same time. I loved seeing a family with three kids, as I feel like this is rather rare in YA and it was great to see the two very different relationships that Brody has with his brother and his sister and especially how much those relationships are influenced by their parents and the way they treat them too. Brody's brother is the "smart kid" and gets favoured by their parents in a lot of ways, which obviously leads to tension. But there was great development and seeing them both figure their relationship out, basically seperate from how their parents treat them, was so nice.There is also the very complex relationships that Brody has with his dad. He served in the army and has developed PTSD from it and after an attack on the streets eventually became agoraphobic. I can't speak for the representation of that itself but I thought that the relationship between Brody and his dad was handled with care. It was very clearly stated that this is a disability like any other and nothing that you should tell people to just "get over".At the same time, it doesn't ignore the fact that it can be hard to have a parent with a mental illness. I liked that we saw Brody being angry or upset at his dad but always knowing that it is totally irrational. Basically Brody called himself out whenever he had those thoughts and I liked this balanced portrayal.Very much connected to that, this also brought up the topic of children having to carry the burden of the parents going through financial struggles and how that can affect the relationship between all members of the family because of how different activities get treated as "more important".I also enjoyed the different friendship dynamics. I liked all the characters that Brody would hang out with in Everland, although I definitely wish that we had gotten to know them a little bit better. A lot of them felt like they were purely there to help Brody develop as a character, instead of being really fleshed out characters. It fit with the theme of Everland though, so I didn't mind too much.We also saw Brody's relationship to his best friend from school change because of the time he spends in Everland. It was interesting to see their dynamic change and I liked the emphasis on not liking every single aspect of someone just because you're friends with them. “The shakiness wears off, but it takes a while for the nervous feeling to fade. Nothing about tonight has been quite right. I feel like I've seen something I shouldn't have seen. A monster baring its teeth.” This book also had a wonderful theme of finding your identity, especially as a queer teen, in the way you represent your sexuality or gender and to not be afraid of the stereotypes or feeling like you need to subvert them.And I loved showing how coming out can be vastly different for everyone, even when they are in the same societal environment.The main character himself identifies as gay and there is lesbian, bi and pan rep on page! We also have several people of colour and a side character that uses a wheelchair.Finally, another one of my gripes with this novel was the romantic relationship, that was sadly not very well done and therefore seemed kinda unnecessary. I think with all of the themes in this book, there was just not enough time to develop the romantic feelings between the main character and the love interest and while you could tell who would be Brody's love interest immediately, it still seemed liked the romantic feelings came out of nowhere because it happens from 0 to 100!A friendship between the two would've been much more believable and still could've had the same effect on the character's decisions and actions.I will say there was a theme of how romantic relationships might influence what you decide to do with your future and making potentially irreversible decisions because of your romantic partner. This definitely would not have stood out as much without it being a romantic relationship but at the end of the day, I just still don't think the romance was necessary.Overall, even with its flaws, this book is a really interesting look at portal fantasy worlds and something I would definitely recommend, if you are not too particular about your lush world building.Trigger and content warnings for agoraphobia, PTSD (after being in the army), love ones being in a coma, panic attacks, bullying, eating disorder, drug dealing and death by overdosing, suicidal thoughts.♦ Booktube Channel ♦ Twitter ♦ Instagram ♦I received an ARC through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review!
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    Full review to come, but here are some quick reasons why you should read this book: 1) It's a beautifully melancholic portal fantasy that can be compared with The Light Between Worlds and the Wayward Children books. 2) It's a YA contemporary-ish book that's NOT set in the U.S. (Scotland is where it's at) 3) The narrative voice is quiet and sweet and just so damn readable.4) It deals with a whole spectrum of mental health issues--from agoraphobia and anxiety to eating disorders. And just...genera Full review to come, but here are some quick reasons why you should read this book: 1) It's a beautifully melancholic portal fantasy that can be compared with The Light Between Worlds and the Wayward Children books. 2) It's a YA contemporary-ish book that's NOT set in the U.S. (Scotland is where it's at) 3) The narrative voice is quiet and sweet and just so damn readable.4) It deals with a whole spectrum of mental health issues--from agoraphobia and anxiety to eating disorders. And just...general insecurities about your place in the world. 5) The overall message that life is fucking hard and people hurt in different ways. Ways that aren't often visible to others. Your rich and successful neighbour might be dealing with panic attacks on a regular basis. Your friend who smiles constantly and seems happy 24/7 might be wrestling with suicidal thoughts. Sometimes you just don't know. Your demons don't negate the existence of other people's demons. And conversely, other people's demons don't make yours worth any less. We're all in this together. And that's a sentiment I could bottle up and hang around my walls forever. ~Review copy provided by the publisher. All opinions are my own.
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  • Nikki
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from the publisher via Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. I really loved the feel of this book - it’s sort of gently whimsical but still dealing with teenage life. Brody doesn’t feel like he fits in really, but finds Nico and Everland and begins to drift from his real life into the wonderful fantasy that is Everland. Much like Cameron’s previous book, this is a perfect blend of contemporary and fantastical. Everland is the perfect foil to the reality of Brody’s rea I received this book from the publisher via Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. I really loved the feel of this book - it’s sort of gently whimsical but still dealing with teenage life. Brody doesn’t feel like he fits in really, but finds Nico and Everland and begins to drift from his real life into the wonderful fantasy that is Everland. Much like Cameron’s previous book, this is a perfect blend of contemporary and fantastical. Everland is the perfect foil to the reality of Brody’s real life, and feeling like he doesn’t know where he’s heading. In some ways that doesn’t change in the book, he just becomes more comfortable with it, which I really like. The book is also casually inclusive - lots of different races and sexualities, which is awesome. Really lovely and enjoyable read.
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  • Hannah Witscher
    January 1, 1970
    I really did not like this book at the start, but I’m glad I kept reading. I expected more of the story to be about everland, so I was initially disappointed by the brief descriptions and poor world building, but I am so glad about the direction the book actually took. Everland was cast as an alternative to real life and the question of which world to chose was a really interesting one to watch play out for each of the characters. The questions of who would miss you, what you would leave behind I really did not like this book at the start, but I’m glad I kept reading. I expected more of the story to be about everland, so I was initially disappointed by the brief descriptions and poor world building, but I am so glad about the direction the book actually took. Everland was cast as an alternative to real life and the question of which world to chose was a really interesting one to watch play out for each of the characters. The questions of who would miss you, what you would leave behind and what you would gain are all super important and interesting to watch huge characters realize. I also was happy with the ending, even if it felt a little two neat, but sometimes all I want is a sweet, or at least bittersweet end.
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  • Caren
    January 1, 1970
    I received an arc of this book from the publisher in exchange for a review. All opinions are my own. Let me start by saying, I really loved this book! I’m a big fan of a portal fantasy trope to begin with, but I was not expecting the complex cast of diverse characters I would find in these pages. While this book deals with a “knockoff Narnia”, the themes are much more mature. The author deftly explores a range of issues that so many deal with today. From LGBT characters coming into their own, a I received an arc of this book from the publisher in exchange for a review. All opinions are my own. Let me start by saying, I really loved this book! I’m a big fan of a portal fantasy trope to begin with, but I was not expecting the complex cast of diverse characters I would find in these pages. While this book deals with a “knockoff Narnia”, the themes are much more mature. The author deftly explores a range of issues that so many deal with today. From LGBT characters coming into their own, a true picture of mental illness, realistic family dynamics, and dealing with bullying, the author isn’t afraid to tackle hard subjects and does so beautifully. I highly recommend this book!
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  • Emma Ferrier
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsI adored this book.I love Sophie Cameron's writing, I love her characters and stories and the fact her books are set in Edinburgh and practically mention my doorstep! This filled me with so many emotions and maybe I'm just depressed af but this made me want to cry so many times and JUST UGH I LOVE BRODY AND TINK AND NICO AND KASIA AND JETT AND EVERYONE ELSE OK
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  • ♠️ TABI ♠️
    January 1, 1970
    I'm already in love with this cover and would like to know the concept/blurb of this A S A P please
  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    If you’ve not yet read Sophie Cameron’s debut novel, Out of the Blue, then you won’t know what a magical treat you’re in for. With her second novel, Last Bus to Everland, Sophie has once again delivered an emotional, realistic, contemporary novel, full of love, hope, and magic.The novel is set in Scotland as well as a magical Narnia-esque place, and delivers its story with such a light touch, while still reaching deep into some serious issues. The way the story deals with bullying is exemplary, If you’ve not yet read Sophie Cameron’s debut novel, Out of the Blue, then you won’t know what a magical treat you’re in for. With her second novel, Last Bus to Everland, Sophie has once again delivered an emotional, realistic, contemporary novel, full of love, hope, and magic.The novel is set in Scotland as well as a magical Narnia-esque place, and delivers its story with such a light touch, while still reaching deep into some serious issues. The way the story deals with bullying is exemplary, and allows us to follow Brody through a full arc of emotions in how he deals with (or doesn’t deal with) bullies. I really appreciated how Brody doesn’t just suddenly find an inner strength out of nothing in order to cope with his bullies, but slowly builds up to a place where he can confront them and start to push back.One of the things that is explored superbly in Last Bus to Everland is poverty. Brody is part of a working-class family, and Sophie Cameron approaches that head on, never shying away from the hardships his family faces, and providing no magical cures. We definitely need more books that deal with parents working shifts, cutting back on food, and struggling to pay bills – and discussing this with their children. How this is portrayed, and Brody’s reactions to this, are carefully weaved into the magical storyline, allowing the reader to feel a part of the family and the struggles they are going through.Brody is not a perfect character, he has flaws and complexity. This was exhibited fantastically in how he responds to his father’s mental illness. Brody tries to sympathise, but often times doesn’t quite know how to keep being understanding when faced with all the difficulties the family faces. This realistic response is portrayed with subtle understanding and compassion by Sophie.As with her debut, in Last Bus to Everland Sophie Cameron delivers a novel of quietly built tension, low-key passion, and believable love and friendship between a diverse cast of LGBTQ teens. A brilliant novel that will appeal to fans of contemporary or fantasy YA.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Brody is a misfit, a victim of bullying who will never live up to the standards set by his older brother, Jake. Still, he plods along, trying avoid the bullies and pass his classes with the help of his best friend Megan. When his cat Tinker Bell is taken by a couple of bullies, Brody chases them into an unfamiliar neighborhood where he and Tink are rescued by Nico. Brody is immediately taken with Nico and when Nico invites him to a place called Everland, Brody can't refuse. It turns out that Eve Brody is a misfit, a victim of bullying who will never live up to the standards set by his older brother, Jake. Still, he plods along, trying avoid the bullies and pass his classes with the help of his best friend Megan. When his cat Tinker Bell is taken by a couple of bullies, Brody chases them into an unfamiliar neighborhood where he and Tink are rescued by Nico. Brody is immediately taken with Nico and when Nico invites him to a place called Everland, Brody can't refuse. It turns out that Everland is a magical place that can only be accessed through magical doors that appear in specific places around the world every Thursday at 11:21pm. In Everland, Brody finally finds a place where he feels like he can be his true self, not a victim, not a shadow, not an afterthought. In the real world Brody's family lives on the brink of poverty, his Mam picks up as many shifts as work will let her and his dad is on disability because of his crippling agoraphobia. When Dad's benefits run out and the family is forced to cut off more and more (first sell the family car, then stop his sister's drama lessons, then get rid of the cat, then cut off the internet, etc. etc.). As life crumbles around him, Brody escapes into Everland in his daily dreams as well as on Thursday nights.Then, the doors that access Everland throughout the world begin to disappear and Brody if forced to choose whether he wants to stay in Everland where things are always good but never change and you never grow up, or stay in Edinburgh with his family and figure out how to make life better.This book deals with themes of loneliness and abandonment, poverty, family pressures, bullying, lgbtqia struggles, depression, and mental illness. I found the way the author treated the dad's struggles with agoraphobia to be raw and painful and authentic. While the family understands it intellectually, that doesn't keep them from being hurt emotionally. But, that doesn't mean they give up on each other, either. The portrayal of issues related to bullying was also spot on authentic (including the responses of adults at school and at home, as well as the responses of other teens).The one thing that struck me as forced, as opposed to authentic, was the inclusion of so many LGBTQ characters in Brody's small circle of friends. Despite not yet being "out", the only one of Brody's friends who was not gay (or pan or bi) was his best friend Megan. The deeper Brody went into Everland, the more LGBTQ characters there were. Then, when he started to make more friends in the real world, oh, surprise, they're bi, too. To top it all off (view spoiler)[his final reconciliation with his brother is only facilitated because we find out his brother is also gay. (hide spoiler)] That was just too much for me. It made the casual introduction of diverse characters, which felt natural until everyone turned out to be gay, begin to feel like it was being forced down the reader's throat. Not what I look for in my leisure reading.The resolution with his brother was just unbelievable (and not in a good way). I'll leave it at that so this review remains spoiler free. I will say that that part of the book brought it down a star for me. I don't like endings that are too tied up with pretty bows. Other than with his brother, the rest of the ending felt real and I enjoyed it. If you enjoy magical realism, YA lit, LGBTQIA stories, or Peter Pan, I recommend this book.Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book from Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Leah
    January 1, 1970
    I'm absolutely a lover of fantasy. So when I saw Last Bus to Everland by Sophie Cameron on Netgalley, I knew that I had to give it a read.When I first started reading it, actually, I was reading it out loud to my husband in the car. I read the first paragraph of this and another book and asked him which one sounded more interesting. We both agreed that Last Bus to Everland had a better hook!Brody Fair seems to be your run-of-the-mill teenager. He feels overlooked, bullied, has low self-esteem, a I'm absolutely a lover of fantasy. So when I saw Last Bus to Everland by Sophie Cameron on Netgalley, I knew that I had to give it a read.When I first started reading it, actually, I was reading it out loud to my husband in the car. I read the first paragraph of this and another book and asked him which one sounded more interesting. We both agreed that Last Bus to Everland had a better hook!Brody Fair seems to be your run-of-the-mill teenager. He feels overlooked, bullied, has low self-esteem, and just overall struggles to enjoy his life. One day while being teased by the neighborhood girls who call him "Fairy," he meets Nico, who is definitely not your run-of-the-mill teenager. He is a handsome art student who stands up for Brody and to top it all off, he is wearing wings. Nico invites Brody to join him and his friends at a party.Turns out this isn't really a party, but an adventure of a lifetime. Every Thursday night at 11:21 pm, a portal opens to another world, something like a "knock-off Narnia" that Nico and his friends like to call "Everland." But no matter what they do there or how long they stay, when they go back through the portal to their normal lives, only a few minutes have passed.Brody finally feels like he is "seen." He makes new friends, he gets to enjoy his hobbies and talents and best of all, it's an escape from his perfect older brother and his family's money problems. But suddenly, Brody finds himself facing the possibility of either losing "Everland" or losing his life and his family. Will he get on the "last bus to Everland?"This is Sophie Cameron's 2nd book (Her first is Out of the Blue). While Last Bus to Everland is already out in the UK, it will be released in the US on June 18th! You can pre-order your own copy here! Sophie is from Scotland (guess that's why the book is set in Edinburgh) but she lives with her wife in Barcelona! She is a lover of cats, banjos, and learning new languages.Similar to my review of The Disasters, I really liked that this book had such a diverse group of characters all facing different problems and life situations without it feeling all just mashed together for diversity sake. Brody is gay, there are other side characters of varying sexualities and ethnicities, his best friend deals with an eating disorder, and his dad is agoraphobic. The characters felt natural and well-written! It really draws you into reading the book.There were a TON of references to Peter Pan, Neverland, Tinkerbell, etc. as should be expected in a book called "Everland." Brody reminisces about his childhood memories of these things and it reminded me of watching the Disney movie and all its characters.I liked this book and I zoomed through it thanks to its quick pacing, deep characters, and strong motivations. I think Cameron did a fantastic job of making sure that this was a fun, playful book while also tackling struggles that many teens face at school, at home, with their friends. Is it worth losing our grip on reality in order to escape the harsh things we face on a day to day basis?I recommend this book for lovers of fantasy, Peter Pan, Queer and diverse characters, and well-written YA books. I hope you'll give it a chance.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Last Bus to Everland by Sophie Cameron should be required reading for every high schooler in Scotland. Brody, the main character, is having a rough time of it for various reasons and needs a way to escape from it. A chance meeting introduces him to the magical place 'Everland' which can offer him this. But is there a price attached to the respite it offers from everyday life?I really enjoyed Sophie Cameron's previous book 'Out of the Blue' and actually received a NetGalley copy of Last Bus to Ev Last Bus to Everland by Sophie Cameron should be required reading for every high schooler in Scotland. Brody, the main character, is having a rough time of it for various reasons and needs a way to escape from it. A chance meeting introduces him to the magical place 'Everland' which can offer him this. But is there a price attached to the respite it offers from everyday life?I really enjoyed Sophie Cameron's previous book 'Out of the Blue' and actually received a NetGalley copy of Last Bus to Everland many months ago. However, it wasn't until I picked up the paperback in Waterstones Aviemore that I actually started reading it, and then I found that I couldn't put it down.The descriptive writing in this book is outstanding and transports you to the otherworld realm that Brody finds so much peace in. Familiarity with the immersive online gaming world (and how damaging gaming addiction can be) made me feel that this was an accurate portrayal of the solace that those who find life hard can find in environments such as WOW. (The author may also be making comparisons to drugs or other addictions?) It accurately examines the person's withdrawal from friends and family and external activities as they find themselves more and more drawn to the addictive activity.You are introduced to an array of characters from the flamboyant, and supposedly confident, Nicco, to Brody's Dad, suffering from an invisible illness that is ridiculed by society. Everyone has something that is hard to deal with. But it's how they each deal with it that will ultimately surprise you in this book. Family interactions are both heart-warming and heart-breaking and the ending of the book left me in tears.An outstanding book that had me making notes in the margins all the way through, Last Bus to Everland is one that I will be recommending to many. It genuinely made me think about my relationship and communication with my own teenage/young adult sons, and what kind of challenges they might be facing that I am not aware of being wrapped up in my own day to day minutia.This book reminds/teaches the reader that no matter how bad it seems, or how much you feel like you don't fit in, there is always someone that you can talk to, and that problems can always be tackled together.
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  • Charlotte
    January 1, 1970
    [Ad - Gifted]I adored Sophie Cameron's debut Out Of The Blue and so when Macmillan sent me an advanced copy of her new book, I was over the moon.Everland is a secret world beyond a door that appears at 11:21pm every Thursday and the protagonist, Brody, happens upon it after a chance meeting with wing-wearing Nico. This new location has everything you can possibly think of and is full of people from all around the world. It's a place that will surely appeal to fans of readers who dream of abandon [Ad - Gifted]I adored Sophie Cameron's debut Out Of The Blue and so when Macmillan sent me an advanced copy of her new book, I was over the moon.Everland is a secret world beyond a door that appears at 11:21pm every Thursday and the protagonist, Brody, happens upon it after a chance meeting with wing-wearing Nico. This new location has everything you can possibly think of and is full of people from all around the world. It's a place that will surely appeal to fans of readers who dream of abandoning the every day for a bit of magic just within their grasp. While Everland was what initially drew me to this book, it's not what ended up holding my interest. The mantle goes to Brody himself.Brody is a gay - not out yet- boy who is bullied at his school, under-performing and always second to his intelligent "soon to be a Cambridge student" brother, with a dad suffering from agoraphobia and a mother working all hours to make ends meet. If anything, the discovery of Everland becomes a lifeline for him. But for six days a week he is forced to live this version of his life.Last Bus To Everland tackles dealing with a relative who has a mental illness, the pressures of under-achieving as well as over-achieving, and poverty. I expected this book to be heavily set in Everland and that was not the case. Everland is almost that physical manifestation of wanting to get away: its inhabitants are all facing issues in their lives and Everland provides that place to escape everything, while also proving that you can leave your problems behind, but they'll always be waiting when you get back. I love that this aspect gave the platform to round out why all the characters came to this magical place and what led them to discover it in the first place.Brody is a character that I just felt so much for. I wanted to climb into the pages and give him a hug along with having a stern word with the bullies. He struggles a lot with the weight of the future and feels very much alone: something I'm sure we've all dealt with.Sophie Cameron is a gem of an author. While her story concepts have brought me to both of her books now, it is ultimately the characters I leave thinking about for weeks after.
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  • Jodi
    January 1, 1970
    Sophie Cameron's second novel, Last Bus to Everland, takes a page from J. M. Barrie and C.S. Lewis, in creating a magical place for a group of Scottish misfits.The main character, Brody Fair, is sixteen. He feels inferior to his genius brother Jake, and his home life consists of a father who suffers from agorophobia, a harried mother trying desperately to support her children and take care of her husband, and another sibling, younger sister Keira. Brody is gay, but closeted, and is often bullied Sophie Cameron's second novel, Last Bus to Everland, takes a page from J. M. Barrie and C.S. Lewis, in creating a magical place for a group of Scottish misfits.The main character, Brody Fair, is sixteen. He feels inferior to his genius brother Jake, and his home life consists of a father who suffers from agorophobia, a harried mother trying desperately to support her children and take care of her husband, and another sibling, younger sister Keira. Brody is gay, but closeted, and is often bullied by some of his classmates who live in his same complex.It is on a day when these female bullies kidnap Brody's cat when he first meets his own Peter Pan, in the form of a young winged chap named Nico. Nico tells Brody to meet him at a specific location at 11:21 pm SHARP on Thursday evening.Brody sneaks out, and discovers, to his amazement, a green door admitting him, Nico, and Nico's friends to a place they call Everland - a magical place where time seems suspended and people from all walks of life meet to hang out, play music, party, read books . . . whatever their hearts desire. Every Thursday, Brody escapes the reality he hates to spend time in Everland, where he feels he truly belongs.But then the doors start closing - trapping people permanently in Everland or locking them out. Nico decides he will stay in Everland and asks Brody to stay with him. As much as he loves Nico, Brody is torn between the allure of spending forever in Everland with Nico, or losing him forever to stay with his family in his real world. It is a tough, tough choice that Brody must face.I thought Cameron did a great job with this story - by the end I was in tears for Brody. When an author draws you far enough into the story that you cry for the characters, it's well done. It takes a bit to acclimate to the fact that it takes place in Scotland and some of the language is "off" for American readers, but it wasn't long before I was right there with Brody.A good read for sure.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I received this as an eARC through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.Brody is worthless, or atleast that is how he feels. He isn't as smart as his genius older brother and two girl bullies are constantly getting on him. After the bullies kidnap his cat, Tink, and she is saved by Nico, Brody's world completely changes. This beautiful boy wearing fairy wings takes on the bullies, saves Brody's cat, and shows him a way to Everland, a magical alternate world that you can only access every T I received this as an eARC through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.Brody is worthless, or atleast that is how he feels. He isn't as smart as his genius older brother and two girl bullies are constantly getting on him. After the bullies kidnap his cat, Tink, and she is saved by Nico, Brody's world completely changes. This beautiful boy wearing fairy wings takes on the bullies, saves Brody's cat, and shows him a way to Everland, a magical alternate world that you can only access every Thursday night at 11:21pm. All the crap with his family not having money, his father's untreated agoraphobia, and his feelings of inferiority are irrelevant because now Brody has Everland. However, when the doors to Everland disappear, Brody must make the difficult decision about which world he is going to choose to live in. I needed some time to get into the vibe of this novel. At first, it felt like a knock-off of many other alternate universe novels, but as it progressed it began asking some important questions, especially as they related to mental health. I am still in a weird place with the ending of this book, simply because the choice between Everland and our world, felt similar to the choice between living and suicide. This could be something only in my brain, but the resolution with this choice doesn't sit well. I thought this was an interesting novel that explores the world in a unique way.
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  • Kalyn Delillo
    January 1, 1970
    *E-ARC PROVIDED IN EXCHANGE FOR AN HONEST REVIEW. Brody Fair’s life is everything but what he imagined for himself. His family is extremely poor, he thinks his brother gets all the attention, he’s picked on, and all around just doesn’t fit into the cookie cutter mold that the world expects of him. Then one day, he meets a boy named Nico who invites him to meet him at 11:21 exactly at a specific place in Edinburgh. At that time, a portal opens and allows Brody to experience a world where time jus *E-ARC PROVIDED IN EXCHANGE FOR AN HONEST REVIEW. Brody Fair’s life is everything but what he imagined for himself. His family is extremely poor, he thinks his brother gets all the attention, he’s picked on, and all around just doesn’t fit into the cookie cutter mold that the world expects of him. Then one day, he meets a boy named Nico who invites him to meet him at 11:21 exactly at a specific place in Edinburgh. At that time, a portal opens and allows Brody to experience a world where time just stops. A place where he can decompress and fit in for a little while. A place called Everland. Everland is everything Brody had been hoping for and more, but can he stay there? This was magical!! This magical little world comes in softly and teaches you more about Brody’s journey to acceptance than Everland itself. I was so invested in Brody’s character development the whole time, just wanting him to be able to figure it all out so he could be happy. If you’re coming into this hoping for a sweeping magical story, this isn’t it, but if you’re hoping for a contemporary with some magical elements, this is the perfect marriage of the two.
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  • Jess Crafts
    January 1, 1970
    (Free review copy)An engrossing contemporary take on Peter Pan set in Edinburgh with a diverse cast and a teen struggling to find his place in a hard world.Brody hates his life, how he's always compared to his smart older brother. How they never have enough money. How the other kids on the estate tease him and call him fairy. But then Nico invites him to Everland and brody finds a place he prefers to the real world.Brody is such a strong but vulnerable character. He's angry at his situation but (Free review copy)An engrossing contemporary take on Peter Pan set in Edinburgh with a diverse cast and a teen struggling to find his place in a hard world.Brody hates his life, how he's always compared to his smart older brother. How they never have enough money. How the other kids on the estate tease him and call him fairy. But then Nico invites him to Everland and brody finds a place he prefers to the real world.Brody is such a strong but vulnerable character. He's angry at his situation but at the same time he knows it's not his families fault and he struggles with it so much. Trying to be a good kid and do his best but feeling like he doesn't belong and isn't allowed to be his true self. I loved the fact that Everland became a place to go for so many people like him just like Wendy and the lost boys in the original. The cast of characters and friends that Brody meets is diverse - Everland has doors all over the world - but it was the people around him in the real world that really made this book for me.I loved the disability rep of Brody's dad and how Brody thinks about him. It's obvious that the author has either done her homework or has first hand experience with the benefits system in the UK. The second Brody;s mum is mentioned as having a brown envelope (Also known as the brown envelope of doom to us fellow disabled) my heart sunk. I think so much of the strength of this story is in the little things. There's so many moments that are subtly mentioned that make the story feel true. From the hints about Brody's brother, or Brody's best friend or that envelope I mentioned.I loved how the idea of Everland was placed on such a modern contemporary setting. But more than that, in a run down, struggling part of Edinburgh that felt gritty and real and from the authors own experiences of the city.For me this is a heartbreaking and yet hopeful book at the same time in exactly the same way as Peter Pan (which is one of my favourite books) and I love how the setting brought a new twist to the tale.Rep: gay MC, m/m, disability rep (agoraphobia, panic attacks and a wheelchair user), lots of the side characters are poc and queer.Trigger warnings: homophobia, ableism, eating disorder
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    Brady is a loner, isolated, feeling down upon himself and is looking for salvation in the most unlikely of places.Meet Nico his art friend who takes him on a journey through the doors to Everland.A magical, mystical, wonderful new land similar to Narnia but with a twist.Doors at 11:21pm every Thursday for Nico and his band of misfits.Reminds me of Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer with geers and sneers for being different but hey so goes...The feeling of being with like minded individuals is certai Brady is a loner, isolated, feeling down upon himself and is looking for salvation in the most unlikely of places.Meet Nico his art friend who takes him on a journey through the doors to Everland.A magical, mystical, wonderful new land similar to Narnia but with a twist.Doors at 11:21pm every Thursday for Nico and his band of misfits.Reminds me of Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer with geers and sneers for being different but hey so goes...The feeling of being with like minded individuals is certainly enticing and welcoming but Brady isn't so sure he wants to stay forever risking never seeing his family.The stakes are high, the drama mounts, the story takes off...A great read by Sophie Cameron.Thank you to Sophie, the publisher, Goodreads Giveaways for this ARC in exchange for this honest review.
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe 4.5 stars for the ending being just a bit too pat, but this really is one of the best books that I have read in a long time. It brought tears to my eyes in a few places - mostly concerning the cat...Brody feels out of place all the time. He is constantly being teased, his older brother is seriously a genius, his dad has agoraphobia and hasn't left the house for years, his little sister is a theater /drama queen, and his mom is always working. Nobody understands him and his troubles - until Maybe 4.5 stars for the ending being just a bit too pat, but this really is one of the best books that I have read in a long time. It brought tears to my eyes in a few places - mostly concerning the cat...Brody feels out of place all the time. He is constantly being teased, his older brother is seriously a genius, his dad has agoraphobia and hasn't left the house for years, his little sister is a theater /drama queen, and his mom is always working. Nobody understands him and his troubles - until he meets Nico who takes him to the magical world of Everland where he makes friends and fits in. However, he is going to have to make a choice between the two worlds.Fabulous writing and character development. Ending a bit too pat even if there were sad bits.No sex. Some swearing. And yes, I really did almost cry several times. Nico is amazing.
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  • Ross
    January 1, 1970
    Second book syndrome? What second book syndrome?? With 'Last Bus to Everland', Sophie Cameron proves she is here to stay! Personally, I thought this was ever better than her first book. Over the course of the book, I really felt myself more and more emotionally attached to Brody and by the end I could feel a lump in my throat. I loved the way Everland was described; a sort of dream-like world that you can't really put your finger on as everything's constantly changing. The real heat of the novel Second book syndrome? What second book syndrome?? With 'Last Bus to Everland', Sophie Cameron proves she is here to stay! Personally, I thought this was ever better than her first book. Over the course of the book, I really felt myself more and more emotionally attached to Brody and by the end I could feel a lump in my throat. I loved the way Everland was described; a sort of dream-like world that you can't really put your finger on as everything's constantly changing. The real heat of the novel lies with Brody's family of course, and while there are constant battles being fought, there's always a real sense of love there. One of my highlights was getting to hear about some of the dark backstories of Everland, where everything maybe isn't so perfect after all? Highly recommended!
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    For a more in-depth review watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L01bG...Brody Fair's life isn't great. His father has agoraphobia, his mother has to work all the time, his brother is perfect, and his little sister doesn't care about him. Brody spends his days with his head down trying to avoid bullies. Then one night Brody meets Nico and goes through a magic door into Everland a place where every one belongs. Brody continues to visit Everland and feels more at home there then he ever did with For a more in-depth review watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L01bG...Brody Fair's life isn't great. His father has agoraphobia, his mother has to work all the time, his brother is perfect, and his little sister doesn't care about him. Brody spends his days with his head down trying to avoid bullies. Then one night Brody meets Nico and goes through a magic door into Everland a place where every one belongs. Brody continues to visit Everland and feels more at home there then he ever did with his family but when the threat of never being able to return home appears Brody must decide what he can give up.I enjoyed Cameron's story about Brody trying to find where he belongs and him learning about his family. However, the story felt more like a novella than a novel. The characters never really became real and the world around Everland never felt fully built. This is a good story for what it was but it just didn't feel like quite enough story to be a complete book.I received an eARC of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Angie Gaule
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of those books that rips your soul out and then puts it back, bruised but better for the experience. I received an arc of this book in return for an honest review. Never before have I felt that an author really conveyed what it is like to be seen and yet invisible. That is the problem for most of the characters in this book. They feel that they are only seen on the surface and that no one knows who they really are until they find each other in Everland. No matter where they are from, This is one of those books that rips your soul out and then puts it back, bruised but better for the experience. I received an arc of this book in return for an honest review. Never before have I felt that an author really conveyed what it is like to be seen and yet invisible. That is the problem for most of the characters in this book. They feel that they are only seen on the surface and that no one knows who they really are until they find each other in Everland. No matter where they are from, in Everland they are seen, known, and validated. I am so glad that I read this book, even if I did cry through most of it. Everland is a magical place, and one that I would have liked to visit myself.
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  • Martyn Sanderson
    January 1, 1970
    goodbye no one need write another YA book ever again because this is perfection and i might have finished it half an hour ago but you bet your ass im still sobbing like a mad person. sophie cameron, keep doing what ya doin girl, i will read anything you ever publish from now until the end of time because if this magnificent bookhonestly no words can do justice so i’m not gonna try, just read this because it’s so special and magical and AHHH i’m crying again
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  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Edelweiss and Macmillan for the E-arc copy of this novel.#LastBustoEverlandA wonderful book for tweens and teens that are trying to find their place in a world. The main character finds a world where he is accepted for himself, but when he risks losing it does he sacrifice his family to stay. A fantasy novel with a realistic plot. How do we move forward when we are afraid to let go of the past problems.
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  • Darren Grainger
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this book who doesn't want to escape to another realm that is exciting, magical and where you feel you belong. Such a strong pull for readers who have ever felt left out, unwelcomed and a stranger in their own lives. Lots of great issues faced by yiung people today explored within the book giving a fresh take. The ending tugged at my heart strings. Enjoyed the read.
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