A Girl Called Justice
Missing maids, suspicious teachers and a snow storm to die for... For a fearless girl called Justice Jones, super-smart super-sleuth, it's just the start of a spine-tingling first term at Highbury House Boarding School for the Daughters of Gentlefolk. For fans of Robin Stevens, Katherine Woodfine and Enid Blyton. When Justice's mother dies, her father packs her off to Highbury House Boarding School for the Daughters of Gentlefolk. He's a barrister - specialising in murder trials - and he's just too busy to look after her alone. Having previously been home-schooled, the transition is a shock. Can it really be the case that blondes rule the corridors? Are all uniforms such a charming shade of brown? And do schools normally hide dangerous secrets about the murder of a chamber maid? Justice takes it upon herself to uncover the truth. (Mainly about the murder, but perhaps she can figure out her new nemesis - the angelic Rose - at the same time.) But when a storm cuts the school off from the real world, the body count starts to rise and Justice realises she'll need help from her new friends if she's going to find the killer before it's too late ...

A Girl Called Justice Details

TitleA Girl Called Justice
Author
ReleaseMay 2nd, 2019
PublisherQuercus Children's Books
ISBN-139781786540591
Rating
GenreMystery, Crime, Childrens, Fiction

A Girl Called Justice Review

  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Author Elly Griffiths is, of course, an extremely successful crime writer for adults, so I was interested to read her first mystery aimed at children and my twelve year old daughter was happy to read and review this one with me. Set in 1936, our main character is twelve year old Justice Jones, the daughter of Herbert Jones QC. Her mother, a mystery writer, had home schooled her, but is now dead, necessitating Justice’s going to school. Indeed, we first meet Justice on her way to Highbury House B Author Elly Griffiths is, of course, an extremely successful crime writer for adults, so I was interested to read her first mystery aimed at children and my twelve year old daughter was happy to read and review this one with me. Set in 1936, our main character is twelve year old Justice Jones, the daughter of Herbert Jones QC. Her mother, a mystery writer, had home schooled her, but is now dead, necessitating Justice’s going to school. Indeed, we first meet Justice on her way to Highbury House Boarding School for the Daughters of Gentlefolk, which is set on the Romney Marshes. Justice is always on the look-out for a mystery and Highbury House seems to have lots that need investigating. Both me, and my daughter, loved this book. My daughter is a huge fan of school books, from Malory Towers to Harry Potter, so the boarding school setting really appealed to her. This is a fun, crime novel, with a great sense of period and place. Neither of us can wait for the next in the series and I think Elly Griffiths will be as successful with this series, as she is with her adult mysteries – indeed, I think just as many adults, as younger readers, will enjoy this.
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  • Sherrie
    January 1, 1970
    A very good first junior novel by Elly Griffiths. Its Enid Blyton but darker and bang up to date! Sure she's onto a winner.
  • Latkins
    January 1, 1970
    Elly Griffiths, author of the popular Norfolk-based crime series featuring Dr Ruth Galloway, tries her hand at children’s fiction in this first book in a new series about young sleuth Justice Jones. Set in the 1930s, it sees 12-year-old Justice, the daughter of a mystery writer and a QC, packed off to the unwelcoming Highbury House boarding school for girls, on the Romney Marshes, in the wake of her mother’s death. Having been previously home-schooled, at first Justice just wants to return home, Elly Griffiths, author of the popular Norfolk-based crime series featuring Dr Ruth Galloway, tries her hand at children’s fiction in this first book in a new series about young sleuth Justice Jones. Set in the 1930s, it sees 12-year-old Justice, the daughter of a mystery writer and a QC, packed off to the unwelcoming Highbury House boarding school for girls, on the Romney Marshes, in the wake of her mother’s death. Having been previously home-schooled, at first Justice just wants to return home, but she soon finds herself investigating a series of suspicious deaths at the school, emulating Leslie Light, the hero of her late mother’s books. And, despite herself, she makes friends with some of the other pupils and one of the maids at Highbury. As with Griffiths’s adult novels, the story is an entertaining mystery with strong characters, shot through with humour and wry observations. Looking forward to the next in the series!
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  • Nikki
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. For some reason, I didn’t expect this to be set in the 1930s! The hints are all there, especially in the comparisons to other series, but i was still surprised. Once I got used to that (I have to admit to being a little excited for a modern day mg sleuthing book...), I really enjoyed it!Justice is fab - her notes about the mysteries and naturally suspicious and analytical mind were just wonderful. As with the nature of it I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. For some reason, I didn’t expect this to be set in the 1930s! The hints are all there, especially in the comparisons to other series, but i was still surprised. Once I got used to that (I have to admit to being a little excited for a modern day mg sleuthing book...), I really enjoyed it!Justice is fab - her notes about the mysteries and naturally suspicious and analytical mind were just wonderful. As with the nature of it being middle grade and the time setting, I feel the why of the mystery was a little simplified, but I really liked the whodunnit element. And it played out well - the suspense was definitely high! I wanted a little more backstory for justice and her mum, just cause I loved what we saw of their relationship! And I sort of want to read her mums books hehe. All in all really good fun and an enjoyable mystery!
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  • Mary Rees
    January 1, 1970
    Take a handful of hidden notes, a dash of secret meetings, a light dusting of deaths and kidnappings, and a sprinkling of clues at just the right moments and you have the perfect ingredients for this arresting mystery.I really enjoyed this action-packed story which has a perfect blend of tension and intrigue throughout. Justice Jones has been sent to Highbury House Boarding School for the Daughters of Gentlefolk, where she soon suspects a crime has been committed. Not surprising as she is the da Take a handful of hidden notes, a dash of secret meetings, a light dusting of deaths and kidnappings, and a sprinkling of clues at just the right moments and you have the perfect ingredients for this arresting mystery.I really enjoyed this action-packed story which has a perfect blend of tension and intrigue throughout. Justice Jones has been sent to Highbury House Boarding School for the Daughters of Gentlefolk, where she soon suspects a crime has been committed. Not surprising as she is the daughter of a criminal barrister, and her recently deceased mother was a crime writer. Justice is a curious, clever, determined super-sleuth who is intent on solving the mystery of the murdered maid which leads to her tenaciously following her suspicions … and uncovering hidden secrets.As Justice, who has been home-schooled, settles in to boarding school life, she forms some wonderful friendships, and comes to rely on these friends to help catch the criminal which, of course, leads to dangerous situations for them all.The setting for this story is perfect: an isolated Gothic mansion on the edge of a marsh with its own haunted tower, basements, attics and creaky staircases. This really helps with tension-building, especially when they are cut off by a snowstorm with no apparent form of communication with the outside world.I would highly recommend this to any 9+ fans of detective stories.Thanks to NetGalley and Quercus Children's Books for an e-ARC of this book.
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  • David Gilchrist
    January 1, 1970
    My 5* review of Elly Griffiths aka Domenica De Rosa YA book 'A Girl Called Justice'This took me back many years to the height of young adult books, so many people will have memories stirred from reading Justice Jones schoolgirl detective. A brilliant story set on the Romney Marshes. A great read and I hope we have more to come.
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  • Caroline
    January 1, 1970
    Elly Griffiths does it again, seamlessly transitioning to children’s books with a fabulous new character in the form of justice jones. Set in a boarding school this hits all the notes of a crime novel and will please young and old alike. Fans of wells and Wong will discover a new series to love here and dare I say it Elly does it better. A massive 5* read for me
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  • Vegas
    January 1, 1970
    i love this book. its full of mystery and fun. It gets your mind thinking and you will probably not want to put the down! it also leaves you in suspense if you stop at a certain chapter. so read this great mystery of a book and join justice and her friends to uncover the mystery. who do you think the murderer is?
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  • Kayleigh Cyphus
    January 1, 1970
    I knew, as soon as I read the synopsis for this book, that it would be right up my street and a book that I'd love. I've always been a massive fan of Enid Blyton, and in recent years it's been all about Robin Stevens and Katherine Woodfine, so as soon as you mention a middle grade mystery set in a boarding school I'm in!Luckily, A Girl Called Justice did not disappoint!From the very first page I was hooked and wanting to know more. Highbury House makes for a very atmospheric setting; it's clear I knew, as soon as I read the synopsis for this book, that it would be right up my street and a book that I'd love. I've always been a massive fan of Enid Blyton, and in recent years it's been all about Robin Stevens and Katherine Woodfine, so as soon as you mention a middle grade mystery set in a boarding school I'm in!Luckily, A Girl Called Justice did not disappoint!From the very first page I was hooked and wanting to know more. Highbury House makes for a very atmospheric setting; it's clear from the beginning that something is amiss and you're really sucked into Justice's world. I was very much reminded of the Murder Most Unladylike series in the way that the story was set out and how you never quite knew who to trust and where the next page would take you.I'm very excited for more people to get their hands on this book so I have people that I can rave about it with; whilst it was a fairly quick read, it was packed with mystery and intrigue and a host of fascinating characters! I've heard wonderful things about Elly's adult fiction books, and she's proven with this one that she's also a dab hand at children's fiction!
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  • Rhyllis Bignell
    January 1, 1970
    Adult crime writer Elly Griffiths presents a 1930s mystery with twelve-year-old Justice Jones as an amateur detective, who’s been lovingly home-schooled by her mystery writer mother. When her mother passes away, her father Herbert Jones QC sends Justice off to Highbury House Boarding School for the Daughters of Gentlefolk, set amidst the bleak landscape of the Romney Marshes. What an ideal setting for a little mystery, mayhem and murder, an isolated Gothic school, with creaky stairs, hidden room Adult crime writer Elly Griffiths presents a 1930s mystery with twelve-year-old Justice Jones as an amateur detective, who’s been lovingly home-schooled by her mystery writer mother. When her mother passes away, her father Herbert Jones QC sends Justice off to Highbury House Boarding School for the Daughters of Gentlefolk, set amidst the bleak landscape of the Romney Marshes. What an ideal setting for a little mystery, mayhem and murder, an isolated Gothic school, with creaky stairs, hidden rooms, turrets, attics and a creepy basement! Of course, Griffiths sets the scene with an icy winter snowstorm cutting communication off to the outside world, the students and staff are locked in and tensions rise.Justice’s analytical mind, keen sense of observation and her meticulous journal writing assist with her crime-solving, even when overwhelmed with feelings of grief and loneliness. The austere school environment is dominated by a slightly terrifying headmistress Miss de Vere. Everything seems strange to the young girl who’s been very close to her mother, from the limited food choices, the strict rules, the icy-cold bathrooms and the grim dormitories. With the help of new friend Stella, a scholarship student, Justice navigates school life and seeks answers to the mystery of the disappearing maid.Surreptitious notes passed inside books, leads to midnight forays on the way to the haunted tower and secret meetings in the maid’s room. The tension builds as the feisty young detective delves into the backgrounds of the staff, takes risks and keeps up with her schoolwork. Through coded messages she keeps her father informed about the dangerous environment.Elly Griffiths’ A Girl called Justice combines a dramatically tense action-packed plot, quirky characters and a resilient protagonist. Her setting of an isolated school on the icy marshes is reminiscent of an Agatha Christie or Enid Blyton novel. An entertaining mystery suited to readers from ten plus who enjoy a dramatic school story in an English period setting, with a dash of mystery and adventure.
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  • Katy Noyes
    January 1, 1970
    Junior sleuth at a period boarding school. Good 'whodunnit' for pre-teens.Justice Jones - already a name fit for the genre - has been sent to boarding school, Highbury House Boarding School for the Daughters of Gentlefolk, following the death of her mother. Unsure of how she'll fit in, and missing her busy barrister father, the home-schooled Justice doesn't take long to spot suspicious goings-on that would fit right into one of her mother's murder mystery novels...A maid has already died in doub Junior sleuth at a period boarding school. Good 'whodunnit' for pre-teens.Justice Jones - already a name fit for the genre - has been sent to boarding school, Highbury House Boarding School for the Daughters of Gentlefolk, following the death of her mother. Unsure of how she'll fit in, and missing her busy barrister father, the home-schooled Justice doesn't take long to spot suspicious goings-on that would fit right into one of her mother's murder mystery novels...A maid has already died in doubtful circumstances. And she may not be the only one... As Justice tries to puzzle out what might be going on, she still has the perennial problem of making friends, succeeding in lessons, and keeping warm and fed in a cold school where snow might prevent supplies from getting through...With a feel of Christie, Blyton and Doyle, Justice makes an appealing and smart heroine. Missing her mother and father alike, the excitement that "she had wandered into her very own crime novel" is helping her cope with her anxiety about her unfamiliar new surroundings.It's got a good feel for the period, with late-night tuck, stern teachers, linguistic features that set it in its era, and a nice little mystery that will inevitably wrap itself up in a familiar way.From the pen of an experienced adult crime writer, this is tailored well to a younger audience, who hopefully will keep up with the plot (exposition given at the end to explain it all, of course). A genre that doesn't often get covered for a young readership, but 10-13 year olds in particular should enjoy the boarding school story and its plucky heroine.With thanks to Netgalley for the advance reading copy.
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  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    With a mother who wrote detective novels and a father who's a QC, what else was Justice Jones going to be interested in other than murder? When - after the death of her mother, who home-schooled her - she's sent to a spooky boarding school on the Romney Marshes (Highbury House Boarding School For The Daughters of Gentlefolk, first impressions: "Dracula's castle crossed with a lunatic asylum"), the death of maid that everyone's being suspiciously tight-lipped about presents Justice with the possi With a mother who wrote detective novels and a father who's a QC, what else was Justice Jones going to be interested in other than murder? When - after the death of her mother, who home-schooled her - she's sent to a spooky boarding school on the Romney Marshes (Highbury House Boarding School For The Daughters of Gentlefolk, first impressions: "Dracula's castle crossed with a lunatic asylum"), the death of maid that everyone's being suspiciously tight-lipped about presents Justice with the possibility of a murder mystery of her own to solveA delightful start to what looks to be a delightful series, full of great characters. Justice herself can be wonderfully dry; a headmistress who's of the opinion that Jane Austen teaches us about life? My kind of headteacher! The title she gives Justice is also wonderfully apt - Northanger Abbey. Although, unlike Catherine Morland, Justice isn't entirely imagining things - she might not have the first clue about being a normal schoolgirl but she does have some more insight into human nature than her classmates. And a long-standing belief was confirmed: that, whilst not all P.E. teachers are evil, necessarily, they certainly can't be trusted. XDlooking forward to Justice's next case!
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  • Rebecca Minnock
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful middle grade novel, Justice Jones just became my favourite new amateur sleuth!Sent to boarding school for the first time after her mother died, Justice isn't exactly enthralled with her new surroundings.Intrigued by rumours of someone have died at the school recently, and finding no one willing to talk about it or answer her questions, Justice is on a mission to get to the bottom of things.Atmospheric, great storyline, fabulous characters, my daughter and I can't wait for the next in A wonderful middle grade novel, Justice Jones just became my favourite new amateur sleuth!Sent to boarding school for the first time after her mother died, Justice isn't exactly enthralled with her new surroundings.Intrigued by rumours of someone have died at the school recently, and finding no one willing to talk about it or answer her questions, Justice is on a mission to get to the bottom of things.Atmospheric, great storyline, fabulous characters, my daughter and I can't wait for the next installment of Justice!
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  • Bronwyn Mcloughlin
    January 1, 1970
    A long time since I have read a book for juvenile girls, and this one read well enough. I guess it isn't unusual in these novels for people to drop like flies - adds to the mystery that the amateur sleuths have to investigate. But disappointingly I didn't enjoy it the way I once enjoyed Nancy Drew or the Chalet Girls. I expect it says more about my age than anything else. There is more than just the mystery here : friendship, grief, families, values. And written in an exemplary fashion by the re A long time since I have read a book for juvenile girls, and this one read well enough. I guess it isn't unusual in these novels for people to drop like flies - adds to the mystery that the amateur sleuths have to investigate. But disappointingly I didn't enjoy it the way I once enjoyed Nancy Drew or the Chalet Girls. I expect it says more about my age than anything else. There is more than just the mystery here : friendship, grief, families, values. And written in an exemplary fashion by the redoubtable Ms Griffiths, capturing adolescent characters in a succinct few words of description.
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  • Polly Sinclair
    January 1, 1970
    Got this on the slight pretence that I would read with my ten year old and then read myself. Enjoyed it and could definitely pick out some traits from Elly Griffith’s writing, particularly the use of landscape. Was very similar in theme to something else we had read recently - Beswitched by Kate Saunders and I’m not sure if this meant it didn’t seem quite as novel as it should , but just a bad coincidence. We (I!) will definitely read the next in the series!
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  • I Read, Therefore I Blog
    January 1, 1970
    Acclaimed crime novelist Elly Griffiths’s first mystery for children aged 9+ (the first in a series) is an entertaining addition to the trend for boarding school detectives but includes characters from less privileged backgrounds and although I thought that the mystery lacked cohesion and pace in parts, Griffiths creates a good sense of menace and anxiety as the girls are snowed in while winking at the conventions of the boarding school genre.
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  • Bev
    January 1, 1970
    Justice Jones had always been home educated by her late mother, but now she is going to boarding school, Highbury House because her barrister father thinks it will be good for her. Justice is not at all sure she agrees! Her mum was a writer of detective stories and Justice loves a mystery, so when mysterious deaths start to happen she is straight on the case. I've always loved boarding school stories , probably because they are so different to my own school experiences, and this one definitely r Justice Jones had always been home educated by her late mother, but now she is going to boarding school, Highbury House because her barrister father thinks it will be good for her. Justice is not at all sure she agrees! Her mum was a writer of detective stories and Justice loves a mystery, so when mysterious deaths start to happen she is straight on the case. I've always loved boarding school stories , probably because they are so different to my own school experiences, and this one definitely reminded me of Enid Blyton's Malory Towers. Justice is a great character, spirited and with a dry sense of humour and there are plenty of clues along the way to help readers solve the case with her.
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  • Bee
    January 1, 1970
    This was really fun and I'm looking forward to the next instalment! The ending featured a ludicrously comprehensive villain monologue and wrapped up conveniently neat and tidy, but, I mean, it's a children's book. I was positively impressed by the writing and Justice is such an entertaining protagonist.
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  • Jill Stirling
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this. I grew up on English boarding school stories(the Abbey series-Elsie J Oxenham) and found this little story charming and interesting. A well told story with memorable characters.
  • Lesley Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it, I bought it for my Granddaughter but read it first to make sure it was ok. She will love it, glad there are going to be more. Elly Griffiths is one of my favorite authors just love all her books 💜
  • Machteld
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely book for young ones, light reading snack for groen ups
  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    Justice Jones is a welcome addition to the pre-teen detective ranks, think Malory Towers with additional mayhem and murder! If you have readers who already love the Murder Most Unladylike stories then they will love this book too. Will look forward to solving further mysteries with Justice and the girls from Highbury House.** Recieved a free Digital copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review**
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  • Pauline
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsIntroducing Justice Jones, the plucky new hero of a new series that will appeal to readers of Friday Barnes, Nancy Drew and Enid Blyton. Elly Griffiths is an established writer of crime for adults and she has successfully transferred her skills to writing crime for children. There is such a nostalgic feel to this novel with its exceptional language and traditional boarding school drama and mystery but Justice is a fresh and vibrant character. Readers will identify some classic boarding 4.5 starsIntroducing Justice Jones, the plucky new hero of a new series that will appeal to readers of Friday Barnes, Nancy Drew and Enid Blyton. Elly Griffiths is an established writer of crime for adults and she has successfully transferred her skills to writing crime for children. There is such a nostalgic feel to this novel with its exceptional language and traditional boarding school drama and mystery but Justice is a fresh and vibrant character. Readers will identify some classic boarding school characters in both students and staff and the setting of a Gothic school on the isolated Romney marshes, Highbury House Boarding School for the Daughters of Gentlefolk, brings to mind some of the techniques of Agatha Christie. It is a cracking read with lots of humour and will appeal to both adults and children. I couldn’t put it down.Suitable for 9+ murder, mystery, humour, detective work
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