The Future of Another Timeline
From Annalee Newitz, founding editor of io9, comes a story of time travel, murder, and the lengths we'll go to protect the ones we love.1992: After a confrontation at a riot grrl concert, seventeen-year-old Beth finds herself in a car with her friend's abusive boyfriend dead in the backseat, agreeing to help her friends hide the body. This murder sets Beth and her friends on a path of escalating violence and vengeance as they realize many other young women in the world need protecting too.2022: Determined to use time travel to create a safer future, Tess has dedicated her life to visiting key moments in history and fighting for change. But rewriting the timeline isn’t as simple as editing one person or event. And just when Tess believes she's found a way to make an edit that actually sticks, she encounters a group of dangerous travelers bent on stopping her at any cost.Tess and Beth’s lives intertwine as war breaks out across the timeline--a war that threatens to destroy time travel and leave only a small group of elites with the power to shape the past, present, and future. Against the vast and intricate forces of history and humanity, is it possible for a single person’s actions to echo throughout the timeline?

The Future of Another Timeline Details

TitleThe Future of Another Timeline
Author
ReleaseSep 24th, 2019
PublisherTor Books
ISBN-139780765392121
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Time Travel, Fiction, Fantasy

The Future of Another Timeline Review

  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    this sounds INCREDIBLE.
  • K
    January 1, 1970
    FULL DISCLOSURE: I beta read for this book at the end of 2018 to offer some insights into the musical material that forms a key part of the plot. I initially beta read this novel to lend my expertise as a popular music historian and, yet, I found myself completely caught up in the narrative structure and overall message of this novel – that we ultimately have the power to change our timeline. I don't usually enjoy time travel stories, but I am huge fan of alternate histories. This one worked for FULL DISCLOSURE: I beta read for this book at the end of 2018 to offer some insights into the musical material that forms a key part of the plot. I initially beta read this novel to lend my expertise as a popular music historian and, yet, I found myself completely caught up in the narrative structure and overall message of this novel – that we ultimately have the power to change our timeline. I don't usually enjoy time travel stories, but I am huge fan of alternate histories. This one worked for me because it combined those two sub-genres and there was just enough familiar material for me to latch onto. Like the author, I am a Gen-Xer who grew up in Orange County, CA. Many of the details relating the the teenagers in Irvine, Newport Beach, and Los Angeles felt immediately close to what surrounded me as a teenager, from how kids south of LA understood that metropolitan area to what it's like to grow up with so many entertainment industry folks flirting (inappropriately) with high school girls. There's also a lot of music in this novel, from references to riot grrrl to the revolutionary role of some songs from the music hall era. Beyond all of those delicious details, it was that story in the late 20th century that kept me the most emotionally invested even as some of the leaps around the timeline got a bit dizzying, including such stops as the Chicago World's Fair and the near future where the characters are trying to figure out how to stop misogynists tampering with the timeline. Ultimately, the hopeful message really won out and made me feel far more optimistic about the present moment than I otherwise would have imagined. That, I think, is ultimately what made reading this novel so pleasurable.This book is unabashedly feminist in the most inclusive meaning of the word. It helps if you have some sense of the history of the women's rights movement as well as the major challenges to it. Because it's a book about fighting against relentless misogyny, there are some seriously violent and even triggering moments having to do with death and abuse. The violence and threats are there from the beginning, so there's no real hiding from it. IMO, those elements heightened the emotional stakes and made reading this incredibly satisfying. Highly recommended.
    more
  • Jessica Woodbury
    January 1, 1970
    This is a feminist punk queer time travel novel, which will probably be enough to sell it for many readers. A group of time traveling cis and trans women and nonbinary folks suspect a competing set of cis male time travelers are trying to create a version of history where women are never allowed to vote. Tess, our protagonist, is determined not only to stop them but to make a world with strong reproductive rights. But she gets a little sidetracked when she decides to try to change part of her ow This is a feminist punk queer time travel novel, which will probably be enough to sell it for many readers. A group of time traveling cis and trans women and nonbinary folks suspect a competing set of cis male time travelers are trying to create a version of history where women are never allowed to vote. Tess, our protagonist, is determined not only to stop them but to make a world with strong reproductive rights. But she gets a little sidetracked when she decides to try to change part of her own past.In a time travel novel, there is a whole system of time travel which must be imagined, explained, and then accepted for it to work. For me, the book didn't wholly succeed in its effort. I appreciated how different Newitz's system was, it doesn't feel like one you've seen before. But when you get into a story where the whole premise is changing the past, it can dig you into a muck of explanations that aren't always worth the trouble. You can get a little stuck here, the time travel mechanism and the repercussions never really gel into something that is easy to explain or understand. I actually find the parallel story of teenage Beth. Her story intersects with Tess's attempts to fix her own past, and the simpler story of Beth and what happens to her was much more emotionally satisfying for me. While I like the overall aesthetic Newitz is going for, I don't think this book played to her strengths quite the way her previous novel did. She's great at complicated, twisty, sci-fi plots. Here there isn't much hard science at all, and with just philosophical questions and character development the pacing can feel off. Sometimes I wasn't sure if I would finish it at all, though eventually I was pulled along by Beth's story, even though it was sometimes rather stilted.
    more
  • Sana
    January 1, 1970
    DAAAAAMN, THIS COVER :HEART EYES: Will Staehle designs some of the best covers, man------------I haven't even read Autonomous yet but I'm hoping this will be better and not just because there will be time-traveling geologists and the fact that mind-bending really means mindfuckery
    more
  • Jodi
    January 1, 1970
    The Future of Another Timeline begins with three quotes. One is attributed to Senator Harriet Tubman, R-MS, in 1893. If your immediate reaction is to understand why this is inaccurate, but sincerely wish that Harriet Tubman had attained the rank of Senator, this novel is for you. Annalee Newitz combines feminism, punk rock, time travel, history, alternative history, and the small and large ways that a human being can affect others' lives into a heady yet accessible brew. While other women and no The Future of Another Timeline begins with three quotes. One is attributed to Senator Harriet Tubman, R-MS, in 1893. If your immediate reaction is to understand why this is inaccurate, but sincerely wish that Harriet Tubman had attained the rank of Senator, this novel is for you. Annalee Newitz combines feminism, punk rock, time travel, history, alternative history, and the small and large ways that a human being can affect others' lives into a heady yet accessible brew. While other women and non-binary people are very much involved, the novel focuses on Beth, a teenage Riot Grrrl punk living in an abusive household in the early 1990s, and Tess, a scientist and time traveler. Time travel is possible in this world through The Machines, which are scattered throughout the world, and always has been. However, it is only accessible to people who have sufficient money and/or education and are willing to put in years of hard work. Essentially, Tess and the feminist Daughters of Harriet are at war with the Comstockers, bitter misogynist disciples of Anthony Comstock. American History students will remember Comstock as an anti-obscenity crusader in the late 1800s who hated women, sexuality, fun, and most especially women who controlled their own sexuality and had fun. Time travelers are able to "edit" timelines, including "editing" people out through violence or other means. The Comstockers want to edit out influential women and advances in womens' rights, then render it impossible for anyone else to make a change.The characters of Beth and Tess contrast micro and macro effects of time travel and women's rights. Annalee Newitz knows her history, and there is an appendix in which she explains historical references in her novel. Newitz manages to keep several balls and a couple chainsaws flying in the air, and to make it all make sense to the reader. The Future of Another Timeline will not be for everyone. Some people will be confused. Some will be offended, or quite simply pissed off. But for others, this novel will be an absolute delight. I am a Generation X feminist who grew up with Riot Grrrls. I always chose female historical figures for my reports because my teachers always harped on men and wars (and Harriet Tubman was a recurring favorite). I adore alternative histories. I for one could not have loved this novel more if there had been a crisp new $100 bill tucked in between every chapter. Many thanks to BookishFirst.com for providing an ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review.
    more
  • deep
    January 1, 1970
    PW Starred: Newitz’s mind-rattling second novel (after Autonomous) is a multilayered tale of “editing” history, human rights, and the ripple effect. Geologist and time traveler Tess (2022 CE) is fighting a misogynist group set on subjugating women across the present and future, then destroy the time machines to lock in their dominance permanently. Punk rock–loving high schooler Beth (1992 CE) just wants her own life, and normalcy after witnessing a murder. Their lives intertwine in ways neither PW Starred: Newitz’s mind-rattling second novel (after Autonomous) is a multilayered tale of “editing” history, human rights, and the ripple effect. Geologist and time traveler Tess (2022 CE) is fighting a misogynist group set on subjugating women across the present and future, then destroy the time machines to lock in their dominance permanently. Punk rock–loving high schooler Beth (1992 CE) just wants her own life, and normalcy after witnessing a murder. Their lives intertwine in ways neither quite understands, and the effects of their connection extend for centuries in both directions. Newitz’s fascinating extrapolation is an intelligent, gut-wrenching glimpse of how tiny actions, both courageous and venal, can have large consequences. The sidelong looks at prejudice-born horrors are frequent but not overwhelming, and the examinations of how much darkness one might be willing to endure in order to stop a vaster terror are heartbreaking. Smart and profound on every level, this is a deeply satisfying novel. Agent: Laurie Fox, Linda Chester Literary. (Sept.)
    more
  • Monica
    January 1, 1970
    I am very conflicted about this book. At times I wanted to keep reading and was fully engaged in the story. At other times I was utterly confused and had no idea what the book was talking about. Other times I was grossed out and kind of done with the story. The book however makes an incredible political statement about women's rights and I think it is very important. I don't agree with everything the author discusses or obviously feels but it definitely makes you think. This book has several ch I am very conflicted about this book. At times I wanted to keep reading and was fully engaged in the story. At other times I was utterly confused and had no idea what the book was talking about. Other times I was grossed out and kind of done with the story. The book however makes an incredible political statement about women's rights and I think it is very important. I don't agree with everything the author discusses or obviously feels but it definitely makes you think. This book has several characters that you follow. Tess is a time traveler from 2022. She travels to the early 1990s to help edit her own timeline. She also travels to the late 1890s to stop John Comstock (a real historical person) from invading women's rights. We also follow Beth who lives in 1993. Her story is intertwined with Tess. There are several other characters who are an important part of the book as well but come from various time periods, hence where the book gets a little confusing. What is I do really like about this book is that the author does an incredible job weaving in real history. It's incredibly eye opening to read about some of the things that happened and really happened in real life. The author adds a historical sources chapter at the end. I always appreciate that. Although this was not a must read for me I feel like this book brought up some great points and definitely makes one think.
    more
  • Jillian
    January 1, 1970
    I really loved the premise of this book- that women are written out of history and women’s rights are taken away, and a group of feminists must go back and edit the timeline. What got me was that it got too bogged down in the story of the time travel and the logistics of it. I just was getting bored with that. What I did enjoy was the alternating story of the teenager, Beth, and what she has to deal with. It would’ve been great to somehow have more of that story and less of the time travel expla I really loved the premise of this book- that women are written out of history and women’s rights are taken away, and a group of feminists must go back and edit the timeline. What got me was that it got too bogged down in the story of the time travel and the logistics of it. I just was getting bored with that. What I did enjoy was the alternating story of the teenager, Beth, and what she has to deal with. It would’ve been great to somehow have more of that story and less of the time travel explaining. I’m not a big fan of sci fi either so that may be why it wasn’t quite my cup of tea. Overall a great story idea and I enjoyed a lot of this book. I got confused at times with the time travel stuff also.
    more
  • Ryn Baginski
    January 1, 1970
    I just found myself vaguely confused during this whole story. It was hard to follow and, though there were attempts at explaining the rules of time travel, they ended up making me more confused. I also thought there were a lot of moments that focused on things that had nothing to do with the plot. That being said, this book is certainly one of a kind. It offers lots of accurate historical context, a perfect amount of 1990s punk, and even some murder to spice things up. It was not at all what I e I just found myself vaguely confused during this whole story. It was hard to follow and, though there were attempts at explaining the rules of time travel, they ended up making me more confused. I also thought there were a lot of moments that focused on things that had nothing to do with the plot. That being said, this book is certainly one of a kind. It offers lots of accurate historical context, a perfect amount of 1990s punk, and even some murder to spice things up. It was not at all what I expected, which in this case wasn’t a bad thing.
    more
  • Libertie
    January 1, 1970
    Hell yes! I was lucky enough to grab an advance reader copy from this year's BookExpo, and while I loved Annalee Newitz's previous novel, Autonomous , they have really outdone themself with this wickedly smart story about the battle for humanity's future (and past). I tend to drag books out, but I tore through The Future of Another Timeline in a few rapt sessions, setting the book down only to shout delightedly about it to my partner or shake the chills out of my body when the story hit close t Hell yes! I was lucky enough to grab an advance reader copy from this year's BookExpo, and while I loved Annalee Newitz's previous novel, Autonomous , they have really outdone themself with this wickedly smart story about the battle for humanity's future (and past). I tend to drag books out, but I tore through The Future of Another Timeline in a few rapt sessions, setting the book down only to shout delightedly about it to my partner or shake the chills out of my body when the story hit close to home."I'm part of a ... working group. We're trying to edit the timeline, to get more rights for women and nonbinary people. Unfortunately, we've caught the attention of some men who are reverting our edits. We think one of their goals is to edit trans women out of history."The book follows two protagonists, one a riot grrrl navigating the trauma of familial abuse and a toxic friendship in the early nineties, the other a member of the Daughters of Harriet, a secret society working to legalize abortion by changing history. Both are white, cis women but the story is peppered with Black, Latinx, immigrant, and transgender folks. I loved the complex, conflicted, and ferocious characters Newitz has written! (Which was a surprise because all the characters in "Autonomous" seemed deliberately unlikable.) The plot moves across hundreds of millions of years but focuses on two critical periods: the end of the 19th century and the early 1990s. This allows Newitz to weave together a spectacular cast that includes punk rockers, spiritualists, anarchist revolutionaries, and burlesque performers – many of whom were either real persons or patterned after historical figures. As a lover of history and biography, I was elated at the inclusion of radicals Lucy Parsons and Emma Goldman as nuanced supporting characters, along with Anthony Comstock, a real life villain who fits perfectly into an epic story about the fight for reproductive freedom.The book succeeds both as a gripping scifi narrative—packing some fantastic plot twists that don't rely on overly convoluted time travel mechanics—and a thoughtful exploration of profound questions; most notably, "what causes social change?". Would-be timeline editors debate and test the merits of interventions informed by both the "Great Man" and "Collective Action" theories of history. And while all of the action takes place in the past, the underlying political struggle feels terrifyingly relevant to our present. Throughout, Newitz's social commentary manages to stay sharp rather than heavy handed and the story is dark but hopeful. That tone combined with thoroughly original world building keeps the book from being reducible to a mashup of The Handmaid's Tale and Terminator 2: Judgment Day (though it would certainly appeal to fans of either).My only disappointment is that Newitz leans heavily into a thread about transmisogyny (i.e. hatred of trans women) and then seems to abandon it half way through the book. One of my favorite chapters revolves around a transgender character named Bernice who gets rescued and then never really shows up again. And although a persistent character may be nonbinary, trans people (and their liberation) sort of unceremoniously disappears from the plot.I seriously loved this book and can't wait to see what Annalee Newitz writes next! No doubt it will be fucking brilliant.
    more
  • Olav
    January 1, 1970
    Torn between four and five stars, so a solid 4.5/5. Future Of Another Timeline is built around one great big idea: a covert war between time travelling factions battling over women's rights. This takes the form of legislation to enfranchise women with the vote, and access to abortion and contraception, as well as shifting subtler cultural attitudes. The book pivots between two main points of view: a teenager in Irvine California in the 1990s facing the effects of a world in which women have fe Torn between four and five stars, so a solid 4.5/5. Future Of Another Timeline is built around one great big idea: a covert war between time travelling factions battling over women's rights. This takes the form of legislation to enfranchise women with the vote, and access to abortion and contraception, as well as shifting subtler cultural attitudes. The book pivots between two main points of view: a teenager in Irvine California in the 1990s facing the effects of a world in which women have fewer rights, and a time-travelling academic (and covert agent) trying to improve those rights. The level of research (and just plain background knowledge) Newitz brings to the table enriches this story. Obscure historical figures, cultural movements and legal battles make the conflict more viscerally real. Time and again, I was forcibly reminded that the villains of The Future Of Another Timeline exist in our world, and we don't need time travel to draw a straight line between Anthony Comstock and Jordan Peterson.[Full disclosure: Received an ARC from the publisher. Working on a more complete review with other readers for our blog hugoclub.blogspot.ca]
    more
  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    Stay with me for a moment. I will get to Annalee Newitz’s The Future of Another Timeline; I promise. It wasn’t long before Wikipedia launched that it became ubiquitous. In spite of the best efforts of many educators, Wikipedia has built a reputation for being (more or less) reliable. And yet, I regularly blow students’ minds by telling them about Wikipedia shenanigans, like edit wars. An edit war can break out for a lot of reasons, but the end result is the same: a page with content that is cons Stay with me for a moment. I will get to Annalee Newitz’s The Future of Another Timeline; I promise. It wasn’t long before Wikipedia launched that it became ubiquitous. In spite of the best efforts of many educators, Wikipedia has built a reputation for being (more or less) reliable. And yet, I regularly blow students’ minds by telling them about Wikipedia shenanigans, like edit wars. An edit war can break out for a lot of reasons, but the end result is the same: a page with content that is constantly shifting until an outside force locks it down. I bring up edit wars because they are at the heart of The Future of Another Timeline…but with time travel...Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, for review consideration.
    more
  • Drew
    January 1, 1970
    5+ out of 5. A cracking good sci-fi punk-rock feminist roar. Imagine the incels and MRAs of today were able to weaponize time travel: what do you think they'd do? And then imagine that a group of women covertly attempted to battle back their edits to the timeline? And imagine the war that might ensue in-between -- what might change, what might be lost, how it might all go down. Newitz does this in spectacular fashion, crafting a sci-fi concept up there with the best of the classic sci-fi I grew 5+ out of 5. A cracking good sci-fi punk-rock feminist roar. Imagine the incels and MRAs of today were able to weaponize time travel: what do you think they'd do? And then imagine that a group of women covertly attempted to battle back their edits to the timeline? And imagine the war that might ensue in-between -- what might change, what might be lost, how it might all go down. Newitz does this in spectacular fashion, crafting a sci-fi concept up there with the best of the classic sci-fi I grew up with and meshing it with a viciously necessary commentary on our horrific present. This is extremely my shit and I loved it. (It also helped, for sure, that I was reading it on a week where I felt like I'd been shunted into a different timeline and was still faintly remembering a previous one...)
    more
  • Lux Alptraum
    January 1, 1970
    Time travel. Girl gangs. Literal revisionist history, where men's rights activists battle it out with feminists to see who will control the future of the timeline. Murder! I love this book so so much, and am so grateful to Annalee for writing it.
  • Anmiryam
    January 1, 1970
    Too much confusion on how time travel works, with too much stilted writing made this heavy-handed, though skillfully plotted novel, somewhat disappointing. I will say it was interesting enough for me to finish!
  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    Lesbian and trans time travelers uncover a group of men trying to edit women’s rights out of history. Read it.
  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    In a world where time machines have always existed as part of human history, used by researchers, there are always some who covertly edit the timeline. Big events can't really be altered, but small ones can, and enough small ones can add up to a huge change. Tess is currently involved in a secret edit war against a group of men who want history to continually subjugate women, and worse, they want to destroy time travel so the change persists forever... and also wants to make some changes in her In a world where time machines have always existed as part of human history, used by researchers, there are always some who covertly edit the timeline. Big events can't really be altered, but small ones can, and enough small ones can add up to a huge change. Tess is currently involved in a secret edit war against a group of men who want history to continually subjugate women, and worse, they want to destroy time travel so the change persists forever... and also wants to make some changes in her past which involves an angry punk rock phase and murder. Disclaimer: I won an advanced reader's copy of this book through a Twitter giveaway. I don't this it affected my review. Also, theoretically the book might differ in small ways from how it actually winds up being published (although I'm not sure I've ever heard a recent example where that's been anything more dramatic than fixed typoes or minor phrasing changes that don't affect the plot).The initial setup of the book, where ancient, possibly alien devices have allowed time travel since the dawn of humanity (under certain strict conditions to keep it rare and mostly restricted to academics, yet not secret from the wider world), and everybody's minor edits to history tending to reach (but not guaranteeing) an equilibrium that prevents major changes, was really quite interesting, something I've never quite seen before. I'm not sure it entirely works smoothly without contradiction, but that's something you can say about a great number of time travel stories (maybe even the vast majority) and it being at least novel more than makes up for any possible weirdness in it. The format also does a good job keeping the attention up, alternating between the story of the time traveller's efforts to sway history towards more human rights and events from the time traveller's past... events which might be subtly shifting along with her own interference. Although there are a few weird things along the way which caused confusion, there are also some surprising twists I liked. I'm not sure which of the two storylines I was more interested in, which is also a generally good thing, both the time traveling adventures and the story of punk rock teens falling into murder of people they felt 'deserved it' were both compelling for different reasons. It's also an unabashedly feminist work, and, there will inevitably be some people who don't like it because of that. I can practically see some of the complaints, not all of which are technically without a seed of merit. For example, it's not actually wrong that this is a book where almost every male character who's getting any development is either outrageously misogynistic or some variety of creepy scumbag... sometimes just to a tiny degree, sometimes almost to what I'd almost describe as a caricature if I hadn't encountered too many idiots who thought exactly like that. The rare exceptions aren't even heroes actively fighting against the bad guys, but just a character's potential romantic interest or employer who doesn't take as much advantage as most people would. So, all in all, not really fundamentally worse than plenty of books in previous decades of science fiction that often went unremarked. I can see people reacting badly because of it, but I also feel it should be looked at in the context of a world where people are working to take women's rights away. I mean that both within the story (for, that being the central plot, there's obviously going to be far more 'bad men' characters, particularly in variations of the timeline that have already gotten more institutionalized misogyny) and in a real world where there are far too many men out there making efforts towards that in a present-day context. If you're a man offended there aren't more good men fighting the good fight, be one, or continue to be one, in the real world.More of a problem, for me, at least, was that the antagonists too often seemed to be 'easy targets' of a sort? Both in a sense of 'easily defeated' and in many cases 'so obviously bad guys where a more nuanced portrayal might have been more interesting.' Even the major threat people are fighting comes down to a confrontation that doesn't really feel like the culmination of a battle between two factions as a small group confronting a small group of idiots. I think that's my biggest complaint with the book, really, the ending just sort of fizzles out for me, both the major threat and the more emotional core of the plot with the character's personal timeline shift. One comes to a head and is 'resolved' (to the extent they can be) too easily, the other just doesn't feel like the story satisfied. It's hard to describe exactly what went wrong with it, I just wanted more, but instead it felt like the author just stopped telling the story of one character and threw on a dramatic ending for another (partly relying on vague and convenient 'how time travel works in this universe' rules) when I wanted the two branches to intersect more.Still, ending are just one element, and often even when they're not what you wanted, they still don't always sour what came before... getting there, exploring the variations in the timeline, the interesting bits of history and historical figures (some actually real with alternate history details thrown in, some pastiches of real people) the characters and the general plot made up for it. I'd probably put it in that tragic '3.5 stars' range where I'm forced by Goodreads to decide which way to go when neither 3 or 4 feels quite right. However in this case the novel premise (which still gets me thinking of how it might be used in other stories set in the same 'world') alone probably pushes it to the 'closer to 4 stars' range.
    more
  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance ebook through NetGalley.Punk rock, feminism, LQBTQ+ rights, time travel. A stellar combination in theory, but the execution really disappointed me.The Future of Another Timeline tells the story of Tess and Beth in mostly alternating chapters. Tess is a time traveler from the near future desperately trying to counter a misogynistic cult that wants to destroy women's autonomy. Beth is a teen in the early 90s California punk scene navigating unhealthy relationships with friend I received an advance ebook through NetGalley.Punk rock, feminism, LQBTQ+ rights, time travel. A stellar combination in theory, but the execution really disappointed me.The Future of Another Timeline tells the story of Tess and Beth in mostly alternating chapters. Tess is a time traveler from the near future desperately trying to counter a misogynistic cult that wants to destroy women's autonomy. Beth is a teen in the early 90s California punk scene navigating unhealthy relationships with friends and family in addition to normal teenage stuff. First, the good.This book is validation for the fear and anger many women, people of color, and members of the LQBTQ+ community have experienced, particularly in the last few years. For me, it was during the Supreme Court Justice confirmation hearings when I realized how fragile my autonomy and safety really were. Women have only had the right to vote for 100 years. We've only been able to legally obtain birth control since 1972, to have credit cards in our own names since 1974, to serve on juries in all 50 US states since 1975, or not get fired from work for being pregnant since 1978. The spectre of that world casts a long shadow, and this book recognizes that there are people out there who are actively trying to take away key elements of our right to self-determination.Where does time travel come in? In many ways, history is constantly being reinvented and perverted for a variety of ends. This book speaks to that paradoxical nature of history as both immutable and yet always changing-- in this case, because people are literally going back in time to try to change the course of history. I am excited that these powerful things are being discussed in mainstream sci-fi. However, I really wish the story was stronger. There are some big issues:• As much as I agree with the politics of this book, I would have really preferred a strategy where the politics are subordinate to a compelling story and fully-fleshed characters who show us rather than tell us. Autonomous, the author's other novel, is an excellent example of this. It becomes very clear that patent law and the pharmaceutical industry are bad, and we learn this by seeing the characters engage with their world and each other rather than primarily from exposition dumps (see below). I think it's a more effective strategy for exploring these ideas and attracting readers who aren't automatically on board with the politics of the book.• Extensive exposition dumps early in the book rather than strategically sharing information with the reader. After a really stellar introduction, I instantly felt alienated and bored because the main character had to brain dump so much on me about her secret society, how time travel works, etc. There is so much telling instead of showing, and it somehow managed to make time travel and secret societies yawn-inducing.• Cardboard villains. The opposition are mostly nameless caricatures with no apparent goals besides enslavement and subjugation of women. I suspect it would be very hard to humanize villains like this, and maybe that should have been an indicator that these aren't compelling villains.• So much seemingly unnecessary and violent murder here. Perhaps a satire of how misogynists see feminists? • The extremely specific and yet handwavy nature of time travel. In this world, there are several time travel bases around the world that have existed for thousands of years and researchers make regular use of these to study the past. There are human laws and seemingly technological restrictions dictating the use of the portals, but most of these are broken throughout the book without consequence but are still brought up repeatedly. • Calling time travel researchers geoscientists. This seemed like a poor choice in terminology--other geoscientists like geologists, geochemists, and biostratigraphers still appear have distinct fields of study in this world, so it was just confusing and it was unclear why another word (chronographer? chronoscientist?) wasn't used. It also kind of seemed like there was a distinction between people who studied human events (sort of like anthropologists or ethnographers) and people who were more invested in the technicalities of time travel. Not fleshing this out seemed like a curious oversight and an indicator of tenuous world-building.
    more
  • Britt
    January 1, 1970
    Tess is a time traveling member of the Daughters of Harriet, a group that does it's best to make their present time, 2022, a safe place for women, whether cis or trans. There's a men's right's activist group from further in the future trying to undermine their efforts by erasing the Daughters of Harriet and women's rights folks from the timeline. Meanwhile, in 1992, teenager Beth, a friend from Tess' past, finds herself in a bit of a pickle. She and her friends kill a boy who was in the process Tess is a time traveling member of the Daughters of Harriet, a group that does it's best to make their present time, 2022, a safe place for women, whether cis or trans. There's a men's right's activist group from further in the future trying to undermine their efforts by erasing the Daughters of Harriet and women's rights folks from the timeline. Meanwhile, in 1992, teenager Beth, a friend from Tess' past, finds herself in a bit of a pickle. She and her friends kill a boy who was in the process of sexually assaulting their friend. This starts the girls down a murderous path that Tess will do her best to stop.For the most part, I enjoyed this book. I usually enjoy time travel, unless its being used as a cheap plot device which was definitely not the case here. Newitz did a lot of homework for this one - the historical notes at the end were really interesting and trips to the past often include historical figures. The story alternates between Tess and Beth with a few other perspectives thrown in on occasion. Tess mainly splits her time between the late 1800s (easily my favorite parts), the early 1990s and her present in 2022, while Beth's story is firmly situated in 1992. While I enjoyed both stories, I never really felt compelled to read the book. Both perspectives were interesting, but not captivating or thought-provoking (though I suspect the book will provide plenty of thinking material for some readers). As a result, certain plot points felt unnecessary and the book felt overlong. I really hated the way Tess' story ended. Nonetheless, its an enjoyable read that makes a great point (women are people too, who knew?) that I would recommend to science fiction readers that are interested in women, women's and LGBT rights. There's also quite a bit of 90's punk rock that readers of a certain age will love. The ending is also quite optimistic, which I wasn't expecting, but did welcome.TLDR: The Future of Another Timeline is interesting book full of time travel shenanigans that is plagued by the same issues that all time travel book face. Ultimately, while the book was fun, feminist and full of salient social commentary, it wasn't compelling.3 stars - I liked it.Thanks to Netgalley and Tor for the advance copy which I received in exchange for an unbiased review. The Future of Another Timeline will be available for purchase on 24 September, but you can put your copy on hold today!
    more
  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    What I Liked: Writing Style. I enjoyed Newitz's writing style, it was a mix of lyrical and scientific. The writing style and well-crafted plot kept me reading even when I was thinking about putting to down after some of the more graphic scenes. I will be checking out more from Newitz in the future and giving her first novel a second chance. Duel Storylines. I liked how Newitz contrasted between a point of view of a non-time traveler with a time traveler who is constantly going between different What I Liked: Writing Style. I enjoyed Newitz's writing style, it was a mix of lyrical and scientific. The writing style and well-crafted plot kept me reading even when I was thinking about putting to down after some of the more graphic scenes. I will be checking out more from Newitz in the future and giving her first novel a second chance. Duel Storylines. I liked how Newitz contrasted between a point of view of a non-time traveler with a time traveler who is constantly going between different times. I felt that the use of a more contemporary storyline with Beth in 1992 balanced out the heavy science fiction in the second point of view of Tess in 2022. Original Plot. I picked up my ARC right away because of the intriguing plot. It gave me what I was expecting and more. I don't tend to read science fiction but found myself engrossed with Newitz's original version of time travel. Characters. The novel switches between two different main characters. I found myself more engaged with Beth's chapter set in a single timeline and I wish the story was mainly told from her point of view. Tess was also an interesting character but I felt she was somewhat lost with the heavy focus on time travel. Twists. There is a twist that happens near the end of the book that I did not see coming at all. It was shocking and added a new layer to the novel. Feminist Message/Historical Elements. Newitz includes a section about the historical elements she incorporated into the novel at the end. I suggest checking it out beforehand if you find the plot confusing or want to know more about her sources. I felt that the use of actual history but with a twist added to science fiction plot and it was an interesting way to get across the strong feminist message. The author tackles a lot of genres and messages and I felt that she did a great job with it. I cannot wait to see what she does next! What I Disliked: Ending. I felt a little unsatisfied with the end. I wanted a clearer ending and more explanation about the time travel war. It was a bit too open-ended for me. Explicit Content. I found some of the sex and violence too much for me. I felt that some of the scenes could have been toned down or omitted. I would not recommend it for people who do like to read those things. Rating: 3.5 Stars Out of 5 Stars
    more
  • Tabor
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ARC from Tor Books in exchange for an honest review3 1/2 stars. This was a really fun read with with some intriguing details. It follows two storylines: Beth and Tess, who live in a world, where time travel exists. They exist in different eras. Beth in the early 1990s and Tess in the 2020s, but who often travels to 1890s. However, it's not time traveling like you've ever seen it before. Instead, geologists travel through machines that are encased in a prehistoric rock. Hence, the I received this ARC from Tor Books in exchange for an honest review3 1/2 stars. This was a really fun read with with some intriguing details. It follows two storylines: Beth and Tess, who live in a world, where time travel exists. They exist in different eras. Beth in the early 1990s and Tess in the 2020s, but who often travels to 1890s. However, it's not time traveling like you've ever seen it before. Instead, geologists travel through machines that are encased in a prehistoric rock. Hence, the reason that those who travel are called cultural geologists, which I love since geology is the most underappreciated of all the sciences! Each geologist has their own specific time era and they only have a limited number of visits before they're unable to travel there anymore. Beth and Tess may be across separate times but their paths cross in a really dynamic ways that effect the past and future. In the 90s, Beth is dealing with college applications, her dad's odd behaviors, and the fact that her best friend is murdering misogynistic boys. Tess is on a mission to edit the past and stop the uprising of Comstock, which leads to abortions being illegal and other anti-women legislation. However, she has to deal with Comstockery, a truly delightful word, or a league of men fight for their rights, who are trying to stop her and her friends from altering the past. This book was a wonderful surprise for me. I won it through a Twitter contest and reading through the synopsis I had no idea what to expect. Having read it now, I would describe the plot as if June had the ability to time travel and could stop Gilead from forming. I also really liked the scientific concepts in the story with the time traveling machines, the philosophies that grow from studying how to edit the past and the various secret alliances that form as they try to make a better future for themselves. It also has a delightfully diverse cast including a non-binary character and badass women of color. Shoutout to Anita, who I could read a whole book about.
    more
  • Janey earlybirdbookworm
    January 1, 1970
    Tess is part of a group of cis and trans women and nonbinary folks who are time travelers in a timeline edit war against a group of male time travelers who are determined to strip women of basic rights and privileges. (If that sentence makes no sense to you, hang in there!) In addition to stopping these men from making edits in the past that will effect women in her present and future, Tess attempts to make some changes that will help women in the long run with regard to reproductive rights. Whi Tess is part of a group of cis and trans women and nonbinary folks who are time travelers in a timeline edit war against a group of male time travelers who are determined to strip women of basic rights and privileges. (If that sentence makes no sense to you, hang in there!) In addition to stopping these men from making edits in the past that will effect women in her present and future, Tess attempts to make some changes that will help women in the long run with regard to reproductive rights. While Tess is waging an edit war on the men attempting to alter history in their favor, she finds her younger self and attempts to make some changes in her own timeline as well. The first portion of this book was a bit of a trudge. I picked it up and put it back down at least 3 times and ended up reading the first 50 pages more than once. I struggled with the basic concept of time travel as it is presented in this novel as it is much different than other versions I have read about. Once I fully grasped how everything worked I was able to get into the rhythm of the book and appreciate the story line a little more. Though it seemed with each iteration of time travel a new element was added or we learned something new, this became a bit hard to keep straight. I found the parts where Tess interacted with her younger self to be the most interesting parts of the book. Both Tess and her younger self have strong personalities yet their communication often did not go anywhere because both held on to the belief that they were on the right path. I found Beth's chapters much easier to read than Tess's because while we were with Tess the story had to move forward much more quickly and often with a lot of backstory and lengthy explanations.I loved the themes, a time traveling non gender conforming punk rock girl group that is editing history to make everything better for women is something I am here for. The delivery took away from the themes at times but overall the novel accomplished what it set out to do and I am thankful for the opportunity to read a review copy!
    more
  • Daniel Cuthbert
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating Spin on Time Travel and the Lure of Changing History (I received an ARC of this book in a giveaway, and appreciate the opportunity to review this impartially and voluntarily.)"Back To The Future" meets "The Handmaid's Tale" in this rather brilliant examination of time and the lure of being able to change the past.Tess is on a mission. Not necessarily from God, but one in which the future of time itself could be irrecoverably changed. She is one of a select group of people who can tra Fascinating Spin on Time Travel and the Lure of Changing History (I received an ARC of this book in a giveaway, and appreciate the opportunity to review this impartially and voluntarily.)"Back To The Future" meets "The Handmaid's Tale" in this rather brilliant examination of time and the lure of being able to change the past.Tess is on a mission. Not necessarily from God, but one in which the future of time itself could be irrecoverably changed. She is one of a select group of people who can travel back and forth in time, and she intends to make sure that past and present generations can be safe from the "Comstocks," a group of men hell-bent on reverting society to one in which women have few, if any, rights at all. Contrasted with Tess's story is Beth, a young women from 1992, who has to contend with an unexpected situation at a concert that leaves her on a increasingly violent path. These two women will find themselves linked in ways that may result, quite literally, in changing time as we know it, forever.This was an absolutely delightful trip! Time travel is also a tricky thing to deal with, whether book or movie, and while there were a few quibbles that inevitably seem to come up every time you are dealing with the mechanics of time travel, the plot and characters were so good, the other stuff fell away. The writing not only brought me back to my 90's childhood, but did a great job of combining the history of women's rights and censorship in a thriller-esque framework.All-in-all, Annalee Newitz has made a wonderful addition not only to the thriller/sci-fi world, but also highlighted the very real and powerful battle over rights that continues to this very day. You will come for the story, but leave recognizing that the best of science fiction has roots in a potential reality that, like your side mirror, may be closer than you think.
    more
  • Kate Grace
    January 1, 1970
    Although Annalee Newitz's second novel, The Future of Another Timeline, is an intelligent experiment in speculative fiction, my reaction as a reader remains mixed. And I'm having a tough time explaining my conflicted response to the book. At first glance, The Future of Another Timeline should be a solid match for me - it's a feminist alternate history that echoes some literary predecessors I have experience with (H. G. Wells' The Time Machine), and some I even LOVE (Margaret Atwood's The Handmai Although Annalee Newitz's second novel, The Future of Another Timeline, is an intelligent experiment in speculative fiction, my reaction as a reader remains mixed. And I'm having a tough time explaining my conflicted response to the book. At first glance, The Future of Another Timeline should be a solid match for me - it's a feminist alternate history that echoes some literary predecessors I have experience with (H. G. Wells' The Time Machine), and some I even LOVE (Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale). However, "on the ground", my, I guess, academic investment never fully kicks in. And the emotional investment's not entirely there, or consistent, either. The aspect I love most about the book is author's voice. Whether spinning scientific theories or revising turning points in history, Newitz's erudition and investment shine through in the writing. Ultimately, I think the book's biggest issue is its scope. It's an ambitious story, and it tries to do too much - to cover too much. If the focus is meant to be on women's health and reproductive rights, it helps to remember that the personal is political; there's a lot that could be addressed within Beth's storyline. At what point does the epic layering of timelines mean losing focus - mean possibly obscuring central message(s)? There's one other concern I want to mention - I think the book's descriptions of violence, committed both against and by girls and women, is gratuitous. And when I say violence, I'm referring to physical as well as verbal attacks. They didn't negate my interest in the book, but they will prevent me from putting it on my classroom shelves. Thank you to Annalee Newitz, Tor/Macmillan, and Bookish First for my ARC of The Future of Another Timeline.
    more
  • Allie
    January 1, 1970
    Fans of The Handmaid’s Tale, I am talking to you about this one!! This was a fabulous feminist sci-fi novel, and I recommend it to every woman and man out there because this is the kind of stuff we should be thinking and talking about. The high level summary is that the book revolves around an “edit war,” in which a fierce group of female time travelers are battling out the history of women’s reproductive rights with a group of male “Comstockers” who think women shouldn’t have rights at all. I’m Fans of The Handmaid’s Tale, I am talking to you about this one!! This was a fabulous feminist sci-fi novel, and I recommend it to every woman and man out there because this is the kind of stuff we should be thinking and talking about. The high level summary is that the book revolves around an “edit war,” in which a fierce group of female time travelers are battling out the history of women’s reproductive rights with a group of male “Comstockers” who think women shouldn’t have rights at all. I’m sure I don’t have to explain why I am passionate about this subject. The story is split between Tess, one of the time travelers who is focusing on saving women’s rights in the late 19th century, and Beth, who is a teenager in the early 1990s, and is dealing with her own personal set of issues. At first glance those two stories do not seem related, but trust me, they are. There is science and honestly, some magic, because a lot of the aspects of time travel just can’t be explained. I’m more than fine with that since I am not a technically minded person, but if you are looking for a really in depth time travel explanation, this is the wrong book to read. What I find most interesting about the time travel in this story though is that instead of it being invented in a future time, it is an inherent part of the world that people have been studying since the dawn of humanity. There is a lot going on in this book and all of it is great, which is why I also feel that it would be a fantastic book club novel. I’m certainly going to discuss it at my next book club, but for anyone who needs a little punk rock riot grrrl energy in their life right now, this one is for you!
    more
  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    I won an advance reading copy of this book, and I'm not sure I've ever been more excited about an ARC in my life. Not only is Tor my favorite publishing house -- I love their roster of writers and everything they are doing with sci fi, fantasy, and speculative fiction -- but I am also such a sucker for a good time travel story. Time travel narratives can be fickle and so, so tricky to get right, but when they are done well they are my absolute delight.This book is time travel done so well. On an I won an advance reading copy of this book, and I'm not sure I've ever been more excited about an ARC in my life. Not only is Tor my favorite publishing house -- I love their roster of writers and everything they are doing with sci fi, fantasy, and speculative fiction -- but I am also such a sucker for a good time travel story. Time travel narratives can be fickle and so, so tricky to get right, but when they are done well they are my absolute delight.This book is time travel done so well. On an Earth where time travel is relatively normal, a group of women are trying to correct a reality in which women's rights are seriously endangered or nonexistent by changing the past at different points in time, while a group of men is working counter to them to see that women have no rights at all. The way that different "edits" effect the future, past, and present is scarily plausible and fun to read. It is hard not to talk about a time travel book without giving away spoilers, but the changes to timelines are written so well that they don't get confusing, and I absolutely loved the characters.This book is perfect for anyone who liked Naomi Alderman's The Power, the 12 Monkeys TV series, Charles Yu's How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe, or anyone who just enjoys a good time travel tale. (Content warning: My only hesitation in recommending it to everyone I know is that there is a brief but explicit description of childhood sexual abuse toward the end that threw me right out of the story. If you are extra sensitive to that use caution. Apart from that it was entirely my jam.)
    more
  • Naberius
    January 1, 1970
    Timetravel + feminism + social justice = an unforgettable story.In 1992, 17 year-old Beth is navigating life with a difficult father, as well as a friend who seems to be going down a dangerous path. Immersed in the punk scene, Beth gets involved in acts of escalating violence, especially when she and her friends realize other girls and women need protection from the harm that threatens them.In 2022, Tess is determined to help her present by going back and rewriting the timeline. However, it's no Timetravel + feminism + social justice = an unforgettable story.In 1992, 17 year-old Beth is navigating life with a difficult father, as well as a friend who seems to be going down a dangerous path. Immersed in the punk scene, Beth gets involved in acts of escalating violence, especially when she and her friends realize other girls and women need protection from the harm that threatens them.In 2022, Tess is determined to help her present by going back and rewriting the timeline. However, it's not as simple as changing one person or event, especially when it comes to the Comstockers, men determined to make sure women have no reproductive rights. When Tess discovers a way to make an edit in the timeline that will make a huge difference, she encounters a group of dangerous timetravelers who are determined to stop her.As Tess' time traveling intersects with Beth's timeline, we start to understand how the two women are linked and how their futures depend on each other. With the two perspectives of both characters, it isn't clear right away how they are connected but as the story progresses, things become much clearer. An additional bonus to this story (to me, at least) was the backdrop in Tess' story of the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. The historical details in that timeline and part of her story made the book even more interesting --- and I was already finding it to be a fascinating read. Definitely a unique take on the time-travel story, and the inclusion in real-life women's issues made it thought-provoking, as well. Great read!
    more
  • Laura (crofteereader)
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as a raffle prize from BookishFirst in exchange for my honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.This is a strange one. Told in a radically shifting span of time (anchored in the 1990s but bouncing back and forth between 2022 and 1893 with occasional forays into the way-back past), this story addresses the intricacies of time travel in a way I haven't really seen before. Our characters are setting out to alter time in small ways - because the big ones are all but i I received this book as a raffle prize from BookishFirst in exchange for my honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.This is a strange one. Told in a radically shifting span of time (anchored in the 1990s but bouncing back and forth between 2022 and 1893 with occasional forays into the way-back past), this story addresses the intricacies of time travel in a way I haven't really seen before. Our characters are setting out to alter time in small ways - because the big ones are all but inevitable - but these small changes end up making a huge impact on their present.Tess is a time traveler who specializes in the late 19th century and women's rights in that tumultuous time. Beth is a teenager in the 1990s who is discovering independence and trying to free herself from toxic relationships. We get Beth's life as kind of a baseline to see how Tess's edits come into effect. It's honestly a really genius idea. I also really love seeing the growth of radical feminism through the ages - particularly in times (past and present) when women have very few rights.However, it felt very scattered. I liked the baseline of Beth because Tess's storyline seemed to be all over the place. Each thing she did involved a lot of traveling and skipping time and meeting lots of different people. I think this would be a great story for history lovers (which I am not) and it has something for sci-fi nerds as well (which I definitely am)
    more
  • Susan Beamon
    January 1, 1970
    I have not been a fan of time travel books. They generally spend lots of time on avoiding paradoxes or changing the time line, while failing both and spending large parts of the story fixing the changes they caused. It tends to get complicated and messy and finally annoying. So it's fun to run into a time travel book where changing the past is the object of traveling. This book is told in two parts. One of our narrators is a traveler, out to change the Comstock Laws. These are a set of regressiv I have not been a fan of time travel books. They generally spend lots of time on avoiding paradoxes or changing the time line, while failing both and spending large parts of the story fixing the changes they caused. It tends to get complicated and messy and finally annoying. So it's fun to run into a time travel book where changing the past is the object of traveling. This book is told in two parts. One of our narrators is a traveler, out to change the Comstock Laws. These are a set of regressive laws that severely limit women's autonomy and reproductive rights to ultimately reduce women to property. The other narrator is the teenage friend of the first. Both characters give us insights that we need to understand what this time struggle is all about.I did enjoy the way the author mixed real history with her imaginings of a world where things can change overnight, or so it would seem. The Comstock sections were very scary, especially since, for the most part, they were real. There is also an interesting if limited discussion about the "Great Man" verses "Collective Action" theories as a force in history. I personally think it's a combination of both, but I don't study such things in detail. I may not go put and read more time travel books, but I did like this one. I recommend it everybody.
    more
  • Kelsey
    January 1, 1970
    I got an ARC of this book from Bookish First.Somehow, from the first look that I read of it, I thought this was going to be a bit more entertaining than it turned out to be. I usually read books to escape from real life, but this book kind of dragged real life back in. I was a fan of the time traveling and I wished there was more explaining and finding out where the Machines came from, who built them, or how they came to be. The Tess parts of the story were interesting at times and I liked learn I got an ARC of this book from Bookish First.Somehow, from the first look that I read of it, I thought this was going to be a bit more entertaining than it turned out to be. I usually read books to escape from real life, but this book kind of dragged real life back in. I was a fan of the time traveling and I wished there was more explaining and finding out where the Machines came from, who built them, or how they came to be. The Tess parts of the story were interesting at times and I liked learning about some of the alternative history (the blurbs of real history at the back of the book were cool too) but I kept dropping out when it kind of got too, dare I say preachy? Plus she got to break the rules of time travel and she turned out okay, unlike the example that was mentioned as what happened when the rules were broken. The solution to her issues at the very end kind of seemed like a cop out to make it end happily for all the parties involved.I think I liked Beth's part of the story better, even if it did not involve the time travel so much, except on the peripheral. It felt better written, though again, I usually read books to escape reality and this was a big dose of it. This book was alright but I probably won't read it again, or recommend it. The cover is cool though.
    more
Write a review