Vendetta in Death (In Death, #49)
The predator becomes the prey in the newest thriller in the #1 New York Times bestselling series featuring homicide detective Eve Dallas.She calls herself Lady Justice. And once she has chosen a man as her target, she turns herself into a tall blonde or a curvaceous redhead, makes herself as alluring and seductive as possible to them. Once they are in her grasp, they are powerless.The first victim is wealthy businessman Nigel McEnroy. His company’s human resources department has already paid out settlements to a couple of his young victims—but they don’t know that his crimes go far beyond workplace harassment. Lady Justice knows. And in one shocking night of brutality, she makes him pay a much steeper price.Now Eve Dallas and her husband, Roarke, are combing through the evidence of McEnroy’s secret life. His compulsive need to record his misdeeds provides them with a wide range of suspects, but the true identity of Lady Justice remains elusive. It’s a challenging case, made even more difficult by McEnroy’s widow, who reacts to the investigation with fury, denial, and threats. Meanwhile, Lady Justice’s criminal crusade is escalating rapidly, and if Eve can’t stop this vigilante, there’s no telling how much blood may be spilled…

Vendetta in Death (In Death, #49) Details

TitleVendetta in Death (In Death, #49)
Author
ReleaseSep 3rd, 2019
PublisherSt. Martin's Press
ISBN-139781250207173
Rating
GenreMystery, Romance, Futuristic, Fiction, Crime, Science Fiction, Romantic Suspense, Suspense, Thriller, Audiobook

Vendetta in Death (In Death, #49) Review

  • Hulya Kara Yuksel
    January 1, 1970
    Ummm J.D.Robb, can you publish the 50th book a little bit sooner? 😁😁😁 Ahhh I should've read this book very, very slowly but when it comes to Eve & Roarke, I couldn't hold myself. 😜 I literally devoured this book. ❤ What can I say more? I just love them, this series sooooo much. ☺☺-------------Sneak peek of the Vendetta in Death!!! :) https://gallery.mailchimp.com/915f698...OMG I can't wait to meet with Eve & Roarke again. <3Expected publication: September 3rd 2019
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  • MicheleReader
    January 1, 1970
    The In Death series never gets old. Not an easy feat when you’re at book #49. Incredible. Always great to have another adventure with Eve and Roake. This time they are working to solve the Lady Justice murders. We start off with the brutal death of Nigel McEnroy who seems on the surface to be the perfect man – successful business owner, good husband and loving father but he has a very dark side and is also a rapist and sadist. When someone parading as a female vigilante takes credit for the crim The In Death series never gets old. Not an easy feat when you’re at book #49. Incredible. Always great to have another adventure with Eve and Roake. This time they are working to solve the Lady Justice murders. We start off with the brutal death of Nigel McEnroy who seems on the surface to be the perfect man – successful business owner, good husband and loving father but he has a very dark side and is also a rapist and sadist. When someone parading as a female vigilante takes credit for the crime, the hunt begins. This is not a mystery that waits until the end to be solved. The actions of the killer and the means of capture keep things interesting. Always fun to escape into the futuristic world of this entertaining series. Many thanks to Edelweiss and St. Martin's Press for the ARC.
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  • Annika
    January 1, 1970
    Audiobook reviewI can’t believe that’s it’s been almost 50 books since I first met Eve, Roarke and the rest of them. Well more if you count the novellas. I think that very few series can survive these many books and still keep true to themselves. Story-wise Vendetta in Death isn’t the strongest in the series. I would say that it’s lost some of its shine, its essence, compared to the other books. These books have always been as much about the cast of characters surrounding Eve, as it has been ab Audiobook reviewI can’t believe that’s it’s been almost 50 books since I first met Eve, Roarke and the rest of them. Well more if you count the novellas. I think that very few series can survive these many books and still keep true to themselves. Story-wise Vendetta in Death isn’t the strongest in the series. I would say that it’s lost some of its shine, its essence, compared to the other books. These books have always been as much about the cast of characters surrounding Eve, as it has been about solving the current crime. Granted the current crimes are more brutal and gruesome than they usually are. In this book though, the relationships and the friendships were way in the background and more often than not they felt like an afterthought. As if those few scenes or mentions were just thrown in just to keep the reader/listener from forgetting them. Like we’d have any hope to forget any of them, we’ve followed and loved them for 50 frickin’ books now. So I missed them in this book, even Roarke wasn’t as present and prominent as he usually is and where was Somerset. Does it count as a “real in Death” book if Eve and Somerset aren’t sniping at each other?There were a couple of priceless scenes in this book though; Mavis’ encore. They had me laughing out loud. I could just picture Eve and Roarke’s faces; they totally made the book for me. I think that Susan Ericksen has a lot to do with that. I mean she knows these characters and can portray them like no other. With every line she delivers she brings them to life, their feelings and actions are always spot on. Not to mention the unbelievable amount of voices she effortlessly switches between. In truth, these audiobooks wouldn’t be what they were if not for Ms. Ericksen.
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  • Johnna Thiessen
    January 1, 1970
    I love J. D Robb and her In Death series. I wait for these books to come out. I've read all of them in order. It's so easy to enter into this futuristic world and to cheer for Dallas, Roarke, Peabody and all their quirky friends to catch the bad guys and win the good fight.
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  • Barbara Rogers
    January 1, 1970
    Series: In Death #49Publication Date: 9/3/19Number of Pages: 368Anyone might think that after 49 books a series would start to decline, be repetitive or lose its focus. Thank goodness that isn’t even remotely the case with this series. I’m as excited for each new release as I was in the beginning – and I am NEVER disappointed. I adore all of the secondary characters and you can’t get a better set of main characters that Eve and Roarke. If you want to get a real buzz, listen to the audio version Series: In Death #49Publication Date: 9/3/19Number of Pages: 368Anyone might think that after 49 books a series would start to decline, be repetitive or lose its focus. Thank goodness that isn’t even remotely the case with this series. I’m as excited for each new release as I was in the beginning – and I am NEVER disappointed. I adore all of the secondary characters and you can’t get a better set of main characters that Eve and Roarke. If you want to get a real buzz, listen to the audio version where narrator Susan Ericksen says – in Roarke’s lilting Irish accent – “Darlin’ Eve”. Whew – it is worth the cost of an audiobook just for that!There is a new vigilante in New York. Lady Justice has begun to mete out her own version of justice to the men who have been cheating on, abusing and stealing from women. Just before dawn one morning, Eve gets the call from dispatch – there is a mutilated dead body and he is hers to solve. He’s identified as Nigel McEnroy and he lives very near where he was dumped. The following two mornings bring additional bodies, Thaddeus Pettigrew and Arlo Kagan. Their connection? They are victims of Lady Justice and each has a personalized poem written about him – telling the world about his misdeeds. It is readily apparent that Lady Justice hates men and Eve knows it is only a matter of time before she spreads from the group she’s targeting to any male.As Eve and Peabody identify Lady Justice fairly early, but there is no proof – only a hunch. Lady Justice is smart, and she’s a planner. She’s gone through every move multiple times and has a contingency plan for whatever happens. How will they stop her if they can’t even get enough evidence to get a search warrant?Eve sets a plan in place to trap Lady Justice – but again – Lady Justice is one step ahead. The fourth victim is now in her hands – can Even, Roarke, Peabody and the rest of the crew manage to save him?As always, the book is excellently written, plotted and delivered. The characters are as wonderful as always – and Mavis, Leonardo, and Bella have some news to share. Definitely highly recommend the book.I voluntarily read and reviewed an Advanced Reader Copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Dani
    January 1, 1970
    5/5 starsLoved this one! Gahh so excited for #50!Every time I hear there is another book in the In Death series I'm grateful for everything. Gah...love the cover, love the synopsis. My body and mind are ready for more Roarke and Eve..J.D thank you, thank you, thank you for continuing to write this series
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  • Sofie Hern
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, St. Martin's Press, for providing this ARC!Eve Dallas and company are at it again. In this installment, Lieutenant Eve Dallas of the NYPSD is after a killer going by the name of Lady Justice. As always, it's a treat to be able to visit with these characters who are as familiar to us as a close friend.Lady Justice believes that she must give justice to those women who may have been mistreated and abused by men. She has taken it upon herself to be judge, jury, and executioner and is del Thank you, St. Martin's Press, for providing this ARC!Eve Dallas and company are at it again. In this installment, Lieutenant Eve Dallas of the NYPSD is after a killer going by the name of Lady Justice. As always, it's a treat to be able to visit with these characters who are as familiar to us as a close friend.Lady Justice believes that she must give justice to those women who may have been mistreated and abused by men. She has taken it upon herself to be judge, jury, and executioner and is delivering justice by torturing and killing those she believes deserve it. It is up to Eve Dallas, Detective Peabody and the rest of the gang to find the killer and bring her to justice.After 49 books-and counting-J.D. Robb is still producing amazing work and her character development is incomparable. Her characters are believable and relatable. At one point this book had me cheering and doing a happy dance. As the series progresses, it only keeps getting better.
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  • Vivian
    January 1, 1970
    3.5-star readLieutenant Eve Dallas and Detective Delia Peabody are Homicide detectives on the New York City Police and Security Department in the near future. These women and their colleagues in various departments across the police force have tried to solve cases and gain justice for the murdered victims, even if the victim was...let's just say not a nice person. In the spring of 2061, Dallas and Peabody are called in on the murder of one Nigel McEnroy. The victim was obviously bound, tortured, 3.5-star readLieutenant Eve Dallas and Detective Delia Peabody are Homicide detectives on the New York City Police and Security Department in the near future. These women and their colleagues in various departments across the police force have tried to solve cases and gain justice for the murdered victims, even if the victim was...let's just say not a nice person. In the spring of 2061, Dallas and Peabody are called in on the murder of one Nigel McEnroy. The victim was obviously bound, tortured, and mutilated before his murder. A "poem" attached to his body indicates his death was at the hands of "Lady Justice" for his crime perpetrated against women, namely drugging and raping them. Although Mr. McEnroy was married and had children, he obviously continued to find sexual gratification outside of his marriage and this was usually done by unwittingly drugging the woman, raping her, videotaping the rape, drugging her again and then sending her home. The next day, another male murder victim is found with another poem attached to his mutilated body. Dallas begins to wonder if this is another vigilante women's group at work or the work of one person out to settle a score? Will she and Peabody be able to find and stop this person before more men wind up dead? For those of you that follow me on social media or on Goodreads, you probably know that I reread the "In Death" series from book 1 to the latest book at least once every other year. Sadly, I didn't have time to do that this year before reading Vendetta In Death, the 49th book in this series. Yes, you read that right...49 books in one series. There are some series that feel played out after only a few books and some that continue to feel fresh no matter how many books there are in the series. For me, the "In Death" series definitely falls into the latter category. Yes, you know there's going to be a murder. Yes, you know that Dallas, Peabody, and friends are going to be on the case, but you don't know what twists and turns the case is going to take or just how Dallas or Peabody are going to arrive at the conclusion of the case with an arrest after identifying the bad guy (or gal) and that's the fun part of these reads for me. Vendetta In Death has all of our old friends, okay all of Eve Dallas's old friends and coworkers, from previous books including her multi-billionaire husband Roarke; Eve's BFF - Mavis; Mavis's husband and clothing designer extraordinaire Leonardo; Mavis and Leonardo's daughter - Bella (come on, she's adorable!); Roarke's majordomo and the bane of Eve's life - Summerset; Eve's police partner - Delia Peabody; Delia's significant other and EDD police officer - Ian McNab; head forensic pathologist and friend to all - Dr. Morris; head of the Electronic Detective Division and former police partner to Eve - Captain Feeney; forensic and clinical psychiatrist and surrogate mother figure to Eve - Dr. Charlotte Mira; criminial investigative reporter and author, as well as friend - Nadine Furst; police and homicide regulars: Jenkinson, Reineke, Baxter, and Trueheart; and more. The interesting thing about this storyline is that it is twisted yet simple. Men who did women wrong are dying horrible deaths. Are these deaths justice, vengeance, or just a sick twisted mind at work out on a vendetta cloaked in the guise of justice? Even though Eve Dallas reveals the bad guy (these books are a "whydunnit" at heart), the problem is finding how and why and then proving it. That is another part of these stories that I enjoy, although the continuing romance between Eve and Roarke doesn't hurt. Yes, these are romantic-suspense stories, but they are light on the romance and could just as easily be categorized as suspense thrillers because there's lots of suspense and quite a few thrills along the way. I could tell you more about the story, but if I started I probably wouldn't stop and then you wouldn't need to read the book (psst...read the book!) I thoroughly enjoyed Vendetta In Death by J.D. Robb and am looking forward to book 50, Golden In Death scheduled to be released in early 2020. Between now and then, I'll be re-re-re-re-re-reading the entire series to prepare. I'm hoping you're as big a fan of the "In Death" series as I am, and if so, go grab yourself a copy of Vendetta In Death if you haven't already placed a preorder. Happy Reading y'all! I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review. This review originally published on 08/28/2019 at https://www.thebookdivasreads.com/201....
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  • CatBookMom
    January 1, 1970
    Eve has moved into a much kinder, gentler phase. Not a bad thing, at all, just unexpected. Doesn't mean she's not still a kick-ass, but she seems to stop a beat and think about the people around her, doesn't just steam-roller over them.Many of the issues, even many of the details, in this are quite similar to "Brotherhood in Death," and I'm trying to decide why the author would repeat this so close to the last book (#42).
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  • Cmkage
    January 1, 1970
    Solid entry in the series, which is incredible considering this is the 49th book in this series. I looking forward to every new release and am never disappointed. While the case was relatively easy to guess, watching Eve figuring it out and trying to prove it, was interesting. As always I enjoyed the characters so much. Eve is amazing and her interaction with all the familiar characters was fun and special as usual. The audio book makes everything even better. The narration is perfect.Now I'm im Solid entry in the series, which is incredible considering this is the 49th book in this series. I looking forward to every new release and am never disappointed. While the case was relatively easy to guess, watching Eve figuring it out and trying to prove it, was interesting. As always I enjoyed the characters so much. Eve is amazing and her interaction with all the familiar characters was fun and special as usual. The audio book makes everything even better. The narration is perfect.Now I'm impatiently waiting for the next book yet again.
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  • Darcy
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this one, but it won't be one of the series that stands out for me. Most of the book was a bit boring. Mavis, as usual, was the bright spot. I loved her surprise for Dallas and how Dallas's interactions with Bella. The crimes in this one didn't make me very sympathetic for the victims. I thought some of them deserved what they got. I mostly felt sorry for the women and how large the group of support was.
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  • Barb Lie
    January 1, 1970
    Vendetta in Death by J.D. Robb is the 49th book in her wonderful In Death series. I am a huge fan of this series, with our fantastic heroine Eve Dallas, and her awesome sexy husband, Roarke. Forty Nine books later, not to mention novellas, I still cannot get enough of Eve and Roarke.Vendetta in Death was an intense and exciting story, with a violent murderer called Lady Justice. Eve is dispatched to the scene of a horribly mutilated body, and from there, she, Roarke and Peabody become enmeshed i Vendetta in Death by J.D. Robb is the 49th book in her wonderful In Death series. I am a huge fan of this series, with our fantastic heroine Eve Dallas, and her awesome sexy husband, Roarke. Forty Nine books later, not to mention novellas, I still cannot get enough of Eve and Roarke.Vendetta in Death was an intense and exciting story, with a violent murderer called Lady Justice. Eve is dispatched to the scene of a horribly mutilated body, and from there, she, Roarke and Peabody become enmeshed into a case that is not only violent, but also emotional, as the victims are not nice men.The first victim, Nigel McEnroy was a wealthy respected businessman, who was devoted to his family; but behind the scenes he was a dark and evil man, who preyed on women, either women he hired for his company, or those he picked up in bars. Nigel would drug the women, and rape them, then he would blackmail them to keep it quiet. The second victim left his wife for a younger woman, and stole the business from under her. The third victim brutally beat his wife into submission, and though now divorced, she still felt threatened by him. Most of these women belong to a private support group that enabled them to share amongst themselves their stories and get past the trauma they suffered. Lady Justice was part of this group, taking it upon herself to secretly take vengeance against the men who tortured these women, by torturing, mutilating and murdering them.Eve and Peabody begin their investigation by finding the names of the women in the support group, and to interview all of them. Half way through, we can guess who the murderer is, but Eve needs to find proof, and time is of essence as now there are three murders, and another one may be near. What follows is an exciting, intense and thrilling story line that will keep us glued to our seats, unable to put the book down. It many ways this was a different type of story, with the evil men deserving justice, but not at this horribly violent manner. Eve having spent many years coming to terms with her abusive childhood, does not allow herself to be sympathetic, despite the evil men. Eve always stands for the dead; she is determined to stop this murderer.Again, I have to say I just love the relationship between Eve and Roarke, and in this book it was even better; they are so great together, with their love and banter…… the best literary couple ever. I also love Peabody, who has come a long way to not only be the perfect partner, but also stepping up more. It is always great to spend time with the fabulous recurring secondary characters in this series; Peabody, Nadine, Mavis, McNab, Baxter, Feeney, Trueheart and Morris.Vendetta in Death was very exciting, emotional, as well as tense and even dark, but it was a fantastic read. From start to finish, there was never a dull moment. J.D. Robb once again gives us a fantastic addition to this wonderful series, which I hope keeps on rolling for many years to come. This was so well written by Robb, and if you have not started this series…..What are you waiting for?BarbThe Reading Cafe
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  • Paraphrodite
    January 1, 1970
    4 stars.Yay! I feel as if the original JD Robb is back in this latest instalment. The writing is back to the way it used to be, with lots of funny banter and snarky interactions between the characters. The storyline is plucked straight from the current #MeToo movement. Although I have to admit it'll be very disappointing if such disrespect for women is still be going on 40 years from now. :(A very solid addition to the series... with a delightful surprise from Mavis!
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  • Make
    January 1, 1970
    Readers new to Robb's In Death near-future murder mystery series will be able to jump right in with VENDETTA IN DEATH. Long term Eve Dallas fans will find plenty of swoony Roarke and Eve moments and a pleasing hunt for a vengeful serial killer. Robb's VENDETTA IN DEATH provides just the right mix of suspense, humor, and emotion to keep the reader glued to the book until the last captivating page.See my full review at Fresh Fiction: http://freshfiction.com/review.php?id...
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  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    The best part of this book are the moments that touch on the personal growth of Eve. She sees what she has in her relationship with Roarke, and she understands how lucky she is to have that. Don't want to spoil anyone, so my only other comment is that there's a lovely scene with Bella Eve, Mavis, Summerset and Eve.
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  • Alyssa
    January 1, 1970
    It wasn’t as exciting as her earlier books - but I still enjoyed it.
  • Kathy Davie
    January 1, 1970
    Forty-ninth in the In Death romantic suspense series and revolving around Lieutenant Eve Dallas in the New York of April 2061.My TakeWhat a load of crap. I don't know who actually wrote this. If it really was "Robb", a.k.a., Nora Roberts, she is really bored with writing the series. It was all surface...yuck...with assorted details tossed in that relate to the characters, but are nothing as usually presented. It simply did not read true to previous stories. Not to mention all the "mentions" the Forty-ninth in the In Death romantic suspense series and revolving around Lieutenant Eve Dallas in the New York of April 2061.My TakeWhat a load of crap. I don't know who actually wrote this. If it really was "Robb", a.k.a., Nora Roberts, she is really bored with writing the series. It was all surface...yuck...with assorted details tossed in that relate to the characters, but are nothing as usually presented. It simply did not read true to previous stories. Not to mention all the "mentions" the video got — that made me wonder if the movie was the star of this.Robb uses a third person dual point-of-view from Dallas' and Darla's perspectives, and I think Dallas must be on Valium. There's so little snark in this. Dallas and Peabody's exchanges about the victims and survivors are...tame. As for Dallas' behavior at the transpo center...WTF? When did she become such a wimp? There's all the oohing and aahing over the "stars" of The Icove Agenda, and yet Dallas barely reacts to it. I barely recognized this Dallas for how easygoing she is about a lot of events.Since when is Dallas summoned to Tibble's office? This moment is also the only time Whitney appears...with that lame dialogue. I know we don't normally discover what happens to the bad guys at the end once Dallas has arrested them, but there are all these perpetrators that Dallas is coordinating with SVU to put them away, and we don't get to find out anything? Not even who she's working with?Oh, please, that scene with the heat and e-sensors that was so vague about people's positions...?? It's as if we're still in 1999, technology-wise. And what is with all the repetition as to who is with who and where they're supposed to go? Padding by the writer? Alzheimer's for the characters? Roarke's EDD mates? I thought he liked to "play with his friends"? The pizza scene with Dallas' comment about Roarke's deal with her office AC?There's an interesting take on Dallas' early career when Feeney comes across a nasty scene that is ripe for exploitation. And Robb doesn't really do much with it. Actually, there are a number of opportunities whoever the author really is didn't use. There's so little action between Dallas and all the security guards she encounters. And no, they don't all work for Roarke.Laughing, oh yeah, $22 mil is small change. As for Eve's comment about the lookie-loos passing an accident scene...oh, yeah!! I so agree! But I hadn't considered popcorn?!I'm liking the relationship developing between Roarke and Nadine's Jake. I also appreciate that Dallas is still into helping people. At least that's still accurate.I gotta say I was sympathizing with Lady Justice until Dallas pointed out how much longer the agony would be if the perpetrators were in jail.Ya know, Robb has a good premise. It's too bad no one was interested in writing it well. I normally read a new In Death release, review it, and then re-read it for the pure joy of it. This one? I won't bother. Nor will I be spending my money on it for my own collection.The StoryIt's a nasty slice of a death that brings Lieutenant Dallas and Detective Peabody out in the wee hours. As more victims are discovered, Dallas and Peabody find a commonality among them. One that explains the killer who calls herself Lady Justice.There's no telling how much blood will spill, if Eve can't stop Lady Justice’s criminal crusade from escalating.The CharactersLieutenant Eve Dallas is in charge of Homicide at Cop Central. Roarke is her mega-hunk bazillionaire husband who is so very supportive of her career, her passion. Summerset is Roarke's major domo and father figure. Galahad is their fat, happy cat. An Didean is the shelter for troubled kids Roarke is funding. Mavis is a singing sensation these days and Dallas' best friend. She's married to Leonardo, a fashion designer, and they have a daughter, Bella. Nadine Furst is another friend of Dallas' and an award-winning author (of The Icove Agenda) and TV journalist. She's dating Jake Kincade, the lead singer for Avenue A, a famous rock ’n roll band. Trina is the stylist who terrifies Dallas.Homicide, New York Police and Security Department (NYPSD)Detective Delia Peabody is Dallas' partner. Josie McNamara is Peabody's grandmother whom Eloise remembers well. Detective Jenkinson has a thing for virulent ties while his partner, Reineke, is color coordinating with socks. Detective Trueheart is still a sweetheart and an interesting contrast to Detective Baxter, who doesn't make any cracks regarding his favorite hobby. Detective Santiago keeps losing bets with Carmichael.Captain Ryan Feeney heads up EDD, the Electronic Detectives Division. Detectives Callendar and Ian McNab are some of Feeney's boys. Ian is also Peabody’s live-in boyfriend.Dr Charlotte Mira is the chief profiler for the police. Dick "Dickhead" Berenski is the chief lab tech. A jerk, but really good at his job. Harvo is the queen of hair and fiber. Tibble is the chief of police. Commander Whitney is Eve's boss. Dr Morris is the head medical examiner. Cher Reo is an assistant prosecuting attorney who frequently works with Dallas.Officers Rigby, Keller, and Andrew show up on assorted scenes. Brigg Cohen used to be on the job and now works night security.Detective Lavina Smythe works for the Metropolitan Police in London.Darla Pettigrew has moved in with Grand, a.k.a., Eloise Callahan, an award-winning and very famous actress, a widow who still mourns her husband, Bradley Stone. Donnalou Harris is the in-home nurse helping Grand through her pneumonia; Harry is Donnalou's husband. Data Point is the company Darla created. Maura Fitzgerald was a character Eloise played.Nigel B. McEnroy is brilliant in business, that of placing the right person in the right job with Perfect Placement. Outside of business? You don't want to know. Geena McEnroy is his wife, and they have two daughters. Frances Early is the girls' tutor. Lance Po is McEnroy's admin; he's married to Westley Schupp who teaches art and coaches football at a high school. The hard-hitting Sylvia Brant runs the New York office; Ray is her husband.Tisha Feinstein is engaged to Clipper Vance and lives in the same building as McEnroy. Tisha's friend Lydia has a brother who's a cop.Women for Women is......a support group...for women. It's led by Natalia Zula who is dating Geo Fong. Her daughter, Kendra Zula, set up the group's webpage.Leah Lester now works for Universal Financial. Nick Forret is head of security. The jerky Jim is with building security. Londa, female security, knows a Lt Dana Shelby at Central. Abner Henry is a client Leah's been trying to land. Frank "Frankie" Carvindito, an editor for Vanguard Publishing, is the boyfriend Leah is hoping to want.Jasmine Quirk moved to Chicago. Jessica Alden now works at the Broadmoore as a marketing executive and is no longer dating Chad. Rowan Rosenberg is a student at Julliard. Emilie Gorman was the oldest. Cecily Freeman is gay. Una Kagen Ruzaki has a son, Sam. Her cheap ex, Arlo Kagen, has serious drinking issues. Tiller is the bartender at the Nowhere. Rachel Fassley's son is Jonah; her husband, Chaz, had been murdered. James Tyler had been the son-half of the travel brokers. Sasha Cullins brought an accusation, and Grant Flick is serving time. Jacie Pepperdine is a singer who ran afoul of Ryder Cooke, the head of Delray, a star-maker. Ming was raped at a party by Gregory Sullivan and Devin Noonan.Sherri Brinkman was dumped by her jerk of an ex, Linus Brinkman, the CEO of Lodestar Corporation which promotes events. He's currently cohabbing with LaDale Gerald. She's a piece of work! Wynona is security at reception. Hermine is the droid maid. Ulysses is Gerald's stylist. Darren is in charge of security at the transpo center; Len is the idiot guard; and, Monika mans the check-in counter. I don't think Darren or Len got the memo...Thaddeus Pettigrew epitomizes the worst about lawyers and is a partner at Moses, Berkshire, Logan, and Pettigrew. Marcella "Marci" Horowitz is his helpless girlfriend. Her mother, Bondita Rothchild; her sister, Rozelle; and a friend, Claudia Johannsen, took a trip with Marci.Maxim Snow is the manager for This Place and has lined up Tee DeCarlo, head server; Edmund Mi, who works the door; and, Lippy Lace and Win Gregor, bartenders. Blick is the midnight bartender. Araby Clark is the owner of Discretion, a company that dispatches licensed companions. Kerry is the receptionist. "Lady Justice" seeks justice for women wronged. Her alter egos include Solange who is French, Angelique, and Selena who is compensation. Wilford is her droid accomplice. Jimmy is another droid.Drivers include Shelly, Oliver Printz, and Viktor, who is Brinkman's usual driver. Ms Kinder is frail these days. Mark and Jeannie Horchow are from Toledo.The Cover and TitleThe cover breaks with Robb's usual with a top two-thirds of cracked bluish-gray cement for a background and a relief of scales of justice imposed on it. The lower third is the city skyline, birds flying in the late twilight sky, the river running from left to right, lights reflecting green on its waters. The top edge of the graphic appears burned with a torn edge. There's an info blurb at the top in black. The author's name is centered over the scales in an embossed metallic dark green. The title is in an embossed distressed white across the graphic. The title is her mission, a Vendetta in Death, taking vengeance for woman wronged.
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  • Sara ✨ Next Book Review Blog ✨
    January 1, 1970
    Eve is a character that always makes me smile. Some of her thoughts are so adorable as it's in complete opposite of what she does day to day. There isn't much to say about the story. The case the book is centered around was simply amazing. Really, it's was just crazy as I've come to expect from a JD Robb story.Seriously, there was a section that had me laughing hysterically at Roarke and Eve's reaction to life. I adore their antics and can't help but be seriously smitten with the two of them tog Eve is a character that always makes me smile. Some of her thoughts are so adorable as it's in complete opposite of what she does day to day. There isn't much to say about the story. The case the book is centered around was simply amazing. Really, it's was just crazy as I've come to expect from a JD Robb story.Seriously, there was a section that had me laughing hysterically at Roarke and Eve's reaction to life. I adore their antics and can't help but be seriously smitten with the two of them together! After 49 books I am even more obsessed with these books than I was during the first dozen. I now feel like they are apart of my life. Every 6 months I need my Eve hit. I'm looking forward to the Golden in Death book and crossing my fingers my shelfie makes the cut for the inside cover! I can't wait to see!!I listened to Susan Erickson narrate. Just like all her other books, she does excel at becoming Eve Dallas. As always, these are my favorite stores!
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  • H
    January 1, 1970
    Vendetta in Death is #49 in the In Death series. It is a classic Eve Dallas story with all of the usual character interactions, whodunit, and charm. We are introduced to the murder less than halfway through the book, and we know who it is. Is it more fun when we have to solve it along with Dallas or when we see how she will catch them?There are nice callbacks to previous events throughout the series that have shaped Dallas's life and circle of friends. We even meet an actress that has been menti Vendetta in Death is #49 in the In Death series. It is a classic Eve Dallas story with all of the usual character interactions, whodunit, and charm. We are introduced to the murder less than halfway through the book, and we know who it is. Is it more fun when we have to solve it along with Dallas or when we see how she will catch them?There are nice callbacks to previous events throughout the series that have shaped Dallas's life and circle of friends. We even meet an actress that has been mentioned several times and is Roarke's fav. It would have been sweet to see him meet her and see Roarke fanboy a little. Vendetta in Death is much better than its sequel, Golden in Death, in my opinion. If you want a book that is true to the spirit of the series, read this one and, perhaps, just skim the next.Review based on an ebook ARC from Edelwiess.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    I received a digital ARC of this title from Edelweiss.Another great book in the series. The mystery wasn’t as strong as in some of the previous books, but the plot didn’t disappoint!
  • Kathy Martin
    January 1, 1970
    In this 49th in the In Death series, Eve pits her wits against a murderer who tortures, mutilates and murders men and who calls herself Lady Justice. The first victim is Nigel McEnroy who is a wealthy businessman with a genius for matching the right person to the right job. He is also a serial rapist who has a thing for redheads and the habit of drugging them and then videotaping the sexual encounters. As she and Peabody look into his life, they find a couple of women who worked for him and took In this 49th in the In Death series, Eve pits her wits against a murderer who tortures, mutilates and murders men and who calls herself Lady Justice. The first victim is Nigel McEnroy who is a wealthy businessman with a genius for matching the right person to the right job. He is also a serial rapist who has a thing for redheads and the habit of drugging them and then videotaping the sexual encounters. As she and Peabody look into his life, they find a couple of women who worked for him and took settlements to keep them from reporting him. When talking to the women, they find their way to a support group called Women for Women.They also run afoul of Mrs. McEnroy who refuses to believe that her husband did the things that Eve and Peabody have ample evidence to prove. She vows to go all the way to the Mayor with complaints and she does. Fortunately, Eve's superiors know who they can believe.The second victim is Thaddeus Pettigrew. He cheated on his wife, divorced her, cheated her out of the company she was the brains behind, and chose to live with the woman who helped him cheat. Darla Pettigrew is the granddaughter of famous actress Eloise Callahan. She lives with her Grand who is getting over a rather serious illness. Darla has also attended the support group. The third victim is a man who raped and beat his wife and who didn't pay attention to the restraining order she took out on him. She is also an attendee at the same support group.With Lady Justice picking a new victim every day, Eve and her team are under time pressure to discover and stop the murderer. We, along with Eve, learn who the murderer is by about the mid-point of the book. However, Eve doesn't have any evidence that supports her instincts and that would generate a search warrant. I love this series. The relationship between Roarke and Eve is my favorite of all the romantic relationships I've read. Their banter and Eve's banter with her partner Peabody is always entertaining and humorous. I like that Eve is learning to deal with the many traumas of her childhood through the love of her husband and friends.
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  • Monica
    January 1, 1970
    NOTE: there may be some spoilery bits in this long, long review, so proceed at your own risk. My disorganized, incoherent thoughts on this book are as follows: Recycled themes, devices, and tropes in clued: angry, embittered Fem Fatale and/or twisted female vigilante (Strangers, Reunion, Obsession, Brotherhood, to name a few) Death side calling cards ala Creation/Obsession/Loyalty/Vengeance in Deathrebroken psychological bones (this was one that was presumably repaired in NY to Dallas) the highh NOTE: there may be some spoilery bits in this long, long review, so proceed at your own risk. My disorganized, incoherent thoughts on this book are as follows: Recycled themes, devices, and tropes in clued: angry, embittered Fem Fatale and/or twisted female vigilante (Strangers, Reunion, Obsession, Brotherhood, to name a few) Death side calling cards ala Creation/Obsession/Loyalty/Vengeance in Deathrebroken psychological bones (this was one that was presumably repaired in NY to Dallas) the highhanded hero/love interest and the well-trained heroine who “doesn’t argue” (Does Eve, a woman in her 30’s, need to be told when to eat or sleep, and why, when her partner is due to meet her at the scene, does she require her spouse to accompany her on job related trips after hours?) Roarke’s accompanying Eve during fieldwork and crime scene work should be a rarity, something necessary only when Peabody is unavailable. His “whether you like it or not “approach, and Eve’s refusal to “argue,” kind of chips away at her tough as nails image. Pressure from the brass because powerful, rich, and aggrieved family of victimsDespicable men who’ve done despicable things who are nonetheless worthy of justice (Witness, Echo’s, Brotherhood, Salvation, off the top)Decent pacingTopical in a Law and Order: Special Victims Unit sort of way (the only thing missing is a high-profile celebrity on the slab) I don’t really like the employment of dramatic irony in a mystery novel, even if it’s only for a second. Eve catches on almost immediately, but I knew who done it from the moment they ran down the details on the suspect. The path to justice from that point on was lit with floodlights, sigh.More importantly, and unless I’m reading too much into the implications of the novel, there seems to be some suggestion that the men who have recently been implicated in sex scandals and crimes are the victims of metaphorical castrations. I hope that’s not what’s being suggested here. I’ve been reading JD. Robb/Nora Roberts for many years, and though she seems to have some biologically essentialist ideas about the roles and behaviors of men and women , not to mention a tendency to incorporate elements of D and S (even if it is of the bastardized, 50 shades variety) into the In Death romance (I control the sex and you’ll dress how I say, eat what and when I say, sleep when I say, behave how I say), she always takes care to ensure that toxically masculine, mouth breathing, knuckle-dragging, domestic abusing rapists and murderers get their due in the end. That said, continuously depicting extreme examples and putting them up against Roarke’s love based domination doesn’t fly for me (see below for more on this). Roarke’s “for her own good” rules for eve are beginning to dampen my enthusiasm for the books, most especially because Eve appears to be well trained (not arguing about bedtimes, her diet, or his accompaniment during cop related trips she makes after hours or early in the morning). If Eve, having been on the force for more than a decade, isn’t tough enough to head to a crime scene in the dark of early morning, mayhap a desk job might be a bit more appropriate.I can’t get past how topical this particular book is, and how the power and money that often protects and enables predators seems to get a shrug. I did appreciate Eve’s anecdote, though I don’t know why, given all of the confiding she’s done over the course of the series, the incident in question never came up.What does it say about me that I couldn’t quite work up the appropriate level of outrage for the antagonist in this novel (this was the case with the ones in witness and Brotherhood)? There is no question that Lady Justice had absolutely no right to eliminate these men, even the worst among them; there were degrees of heinous represented among the “victims,” but nothing they did justifies their torture and murder. In a perfect world, the worst of these men would have been charged, tried, and convicted for their crimes, no matter how well insolated they thought they were from the consequences of their actions. Still, as we have and will continue to see, the legal system we have tends to revictimize people, and the various societies within which women must operate tend to blame women for what happens to them while excusing their victimizers on the grounds that their maleness is an incurable condition, the symptoms of which include the bullying and abuse of women and girls. Ultimately, this was an OK read marred by tattered, grating devices and tropes and superfluous, “obligatory” scenes designed to remind us that the female protagonist, for all her strength and abilities, nonetheless requires a husband’s firm hand. The relationship dynamic between Eve and her husband is probably a stupid thing over which to take issue, but for some reason, I am finding it increasingly more difficult to take seriously a woman who refuses to protect her professional and personal autonomy on the grounds that it is useless to argue.
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  • Marlene
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published at Reading RealityIt’s strange to say that a series that always begins with a dead body is a comfort read, but the In Death series has always been one for me. The series is now 49 books in, and at this point I’m reading it more to catch up with my “friends”, the characters in this long-running series, than I am to see whodunnit – or how or why for that matter.This one begins with more than a bit of schadenfreude. While the killer seems somewhat righteous albeit more than a b Originally published at Reading RealityIt’s strange to say that a series that always begins with a dead body is a comfort read, but the In Death series has always been one for me. The series is now 49 books in, and at this point I’m reading it more to catch up with my “friends”, the characters in this long-running series, than I am to see whodunnit – or how or why for that matter.This one begins with more than a bit of schadenfreude. While the killer seems somewhat righteous albeit more than a bit off the rails, the victim, well, the victim was no innocent. His death seems like a case of evil getting its just desserts. The more we find out about the scumbag, the less we sympathize with him.But this series, is not, and never has been, about vigilantism. There’s a motto on the door of Eve Dallas’ Homicide squad room that reads:NO MATTER YOUR RACE, CREED, SEXUAL ORIENTATION, OR POLITICAL AFFILIATION, WE PROTECT AND SERVE*, BECAUSE YOU COULD GET DEAD.*EVEN IF YOU WERE AN ASSHOLE.All of the victims in this entry in the series were definitely assholes. The serial killer taking them out got their names – and the nature of their crimes – from their victims, the members of a support group for women who have been harassed, abused, raped or otherwise victimized by men.Eve Dallas knows how those women feel firsthand. It’s part of her own history that her father raped and beat her until she killed him when she was 8, completely, totally, utterly and absolutely in self-defense. At the age of eight she had already been on both sides of this case, as the victim of the abuser and as the killer of same.But as much as she empathizes, she’s a firm believer in the rule of law. For her, vigilantism is never the way.So she hunts down a killer who expects to find in Eve a kindred spirit. And is instead uncovered by a righteous cop.Escape Rating B: This was the book I wanted to read this week. The book I’m listening to has its sad and serious aspects, so I was looking for something that would sweep me away to something not-so-heartbreaking for a little while. The irony is that this series, steeped in tragedy and death, does that for me.The appeal of this series is in the characters. Part of the appeal of police procedurals in general is the ambiance of the cop shop that lies at its center. In the case of the In Death series, I just plain like these people. It’s not that they are all nice – because some of them certainly are not. It’s that they are interesting, they do their jobs well, they care about each other, and they all have a terrific line in snarkitude. Even Galahad, Dallas’ and Roarke’s cat, has snarkitude to spare. Although his is probably more cattitude. But he’s definitely a scene-stealer – and he humanizes people who might otherwise be either too perfect, too broken, or too perfectly broken to otherwise work.So I read this series just to catch up on the gang. That being said, there isn’t anything particularly special about this entry in the series. Which doesn’t change the fact that I enjoyed spending time with them.There’s always a case. This time around the case feels more a part of our early-21st century than Dallas’ mid-21st century – or attitudes don’t change much in the intervening 40 years. And probably the latter, damn it.The spree killing that Dallas has to stop feels like a direct response to the #MeToo movement, and the idea that it has to have failed, again, to change much is a bit depressing. On the other hand, so far we haven’t had the Urban Wars that her world went through, so there’s that.But we don’t feel for the victims in this one. They are all scum. It’s easy to see what sets the killer over the edge. All victims had first victimized the women in their lives – and they all got away with it. And for all the reasons that women who report being raped or abused don’t get justice in the real world. The men have more power and society is predisposed not to believe us because we’re women.The killer is easy to spot, and relatively easy for Dallas to catch. The only thing that allows the spree to stretch to four victims is that the killer strikes every single night. This story is fast, taking place over four short but jam-packed days and nights.Good does triumph and evil does get its just desserts. But this is fiction, so there will be a part of many readers, including this one, wondering if the killer should have been allowed to go on just a bit longer. And that’s a scary thought in a way. It turns out that the lesson is that vengeance is easy, but that justice is very, very hard.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Another riveting tale in the In Death seriesBook number 49 in this series continues the long established and brilliantly carried out time spent in the masterclass level world building that this series embodies. It seems important, on the eve of book 50 in the series (plus several novellas) which is coming in February, to point out that this series, written over the course of 24 years but taking only a little over three years in book time (2058-2061), has built and maintained an entirely new cult Another riveting tale in the In Death seriesBook number 49 in this series continues the long established and brilliantly carried out time spent in the masterclass level world building that this series embodies. It seems important, on the eve of book 50 in the series (plus several novellas) which is coming in February, to point out that this series, written over the course of 24 years but taking only a little over three years in book time (2058-2061), has built and maintained an entirely new culture and developed and continued to allow to grow a whole host of characters we have come to love.That last thought is what struck me the most about this book. The evolution of these characters, particularly our main protagonist Eve Dallas. As much as this is romantic suspense and the romance between Eve and Roarke is the foundation, make no mistake this series is about Eve. (For those who do not know, this series was originally intended to be trilogy of the type the author is known for in the romance world but proved popular enough to continue on.)A good deal of this book is reflective on Eve’s part. She recognizes everything she has now and how it shapes her. She is actually able to verbalize to Roarke what his care taking, something that has always annoyed her son much, gives her.The suspense story is an intriguing one with another level of message to it that ties back in to Eve’s personal journey. It’s a little different in that we get the big hint, soon verified, as to the killer’s identity fairly early in the process. The killer’s mission which is based on torturing and eliminating men who are cheaters, liars and betrayers is juxtaposed nicely with our reminders of the wonderful, caring men who populate this series like Roarke, McNab, Feeney, Leonardo, Summerset, Trueheart, Baxter, Whitney, Tibble, Jenkinson, Reineke, Morris, Mr Mira & Crack (in absentia) and Jake. I really got an overall tone of reflectiveness and “look how far these people have come” from this book.The only downside to this book, and it’s a hazard of creating such a dynamic universe over 24 years, is that there are so many wonderful characters we want to see them all every time and it just isn’t possible. I mean what’s a book without Trina terrorizing Eve?! I did also miss the mention of the Grey button as that’s usually a standard.The usual wit, clever banter, and humor are present of course. The mystery of the storyline keeps the reader’s interest and the action of the confrontation with the villain, while not in the same life threatening vein as so many, is nonetheless exciting and holds potential for danger. This was a stay up all night, read in one sitting book for me as usual. And now I will impatiently wait for February and book 50.
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  • Tina
    January 1, 1970
    Wherein Eve Dallas meets #MeToo only more murderous.In this one we get an adversary for Eve whose motives are understandable but as far as Eve is concerned, killing is never a good look.Our first victim is businessman who roofies and uses various other drugs on co-workers and other women he comes in contact with though work. He's particularly terrible and his fate is as well, since he is kidnapped, tortured and his dead body dumped in front of his house with a pityh poem about his woman abusing Wherein Eve Dallas meets #MeToo only more murderous.In this one we get an adversary for Eve whose motives are understandable but as far as Eve is concerned, killing is never a good look.Our first victim is businessman who roofies and uses various other drugs on co-workers and other women he comes in contact with though work. He's particularly terrible and his fate is as well, since he is kidnapped, tortured and his dead body dumped in front of his house with a pityh poem about his woman abusing ways.Since this is an In Death book and this series has never met a serial killer it didn't like, the death is not a stand alone. And the killer quickly targets and kills another cheater/abuser and another and another. She thinks of herself as a super hero and calls herself Lady Justice.Eve and Peabody and all the regulars are in effect as they track down the killer. And bring Lady Justice to Justice.This was a very quick read. I always like it when the victims are awful because IRL it just seems like awful people don't get the justice they deserve and who hasn't had dreams of being some sort of heroic vigilante meting out that justice? In this case I think the book did a good job of making both the victims and the self appointed 'hero' somewhat dislikable so you could be happy with everyon's fate.As I mentioned in my opening this book is definitely a nod to the current MeToo climate. As Eve is building her case and tracking down potential suspects, she comes across a veritable cornucopia of wronged women. We get a good cross section of the different type of abusers, from the Bill Cosby-type druggers to the Harvey Weinstein/Les Moonves-type sleep with me for advancement or I will kill your career to the Bosses who fondle and grope to the garden variety domestic abusers. Eve even recounts her own MeToo moment to Peabody from her days as a rookie.With the subject matter (I am all for abusers getting justice) to all the favorites showing up to a qiick and snappy read, I should have liked it more than I did. But it felt.... soulless. There is something about it that just felt it was ticking off a lot of boxes: Roarke uses his skills to hack into a difficult system, Dickhead needs to be bribed to get Eve quick results, Nadine argues with Eve to get a scoop, Reo comes through with a much needed warrant., somebody stole the candy, etc. etc.Yeah those are nice familiar things but they show up with clock like regularity and just feel overused at this point. In the end I did not feel any real emotional reaction to the book, not happiness or satisfaction, just 'nice quick read' onto to he next thing on my list.
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  • Monnie
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars, actually.If I had to describe this book - the latest in the popular series featuring NYPD Lt. Eve Dallas, of which I've read almost all - in just one word, it would be this: Bland.On the plus side, readers do see glimpses of Eve's uber-wealthy and hunky Irish husband Roarke's love for his wife (he's on my Top 10 list of favorite book heroes, I hasten to add), but the couple's sizzling (and fairly graphic) bedroom antics that heated up the pages of past books are virtually nonexistent. 3.5 stars, actually.If I had to describe this book - the latest in the popular series featuring NYPD Lt. Eve Dallas, of which I've read almost all - in just one word, it would be this: Bland.On the plus side, readers do see glimpses of Eve's uber-wealthy and hunky Irish husband Roarke's love for his wife (he's on my Top 10 list of favorite book heroes, I hasten to add), but the couple's sizzling (and fairly graphic) bedroom antics that heated up the pages of past books are virtually nonexistent. I suppose I could say that the three murders that take place herein are grisly enough in the sex department to make up for it - think hours of torture and perimortem dis"member"ment - but honestly, it just ain't a good substitute.Besides that, there's not a lot of suspense as Eve and her cohorts, including the thankfully still-effervescent Peabody, try to track down what appears to be a serial killer. Instead, we learn the identity about halfway through. I was hoping that was just a diversion - and there'd be a gobsmacking twist at the end (I even came up with one I thought would be perfect) - but no. Even the futuristic (and fun) elements, like cars that can "go vertical" and Auto Chefs programmed to instantly spit out whatever food or beverage the stomach desires are sort of glossed over (which, I suspect, could be confusing to new-to-the-series readers who might not realize this series is set some 40 years from now) . So basically, what we're left with is a fairly standard police procedural. Since the plot is solid, well-written and very readable, that's not necessarily a bad thing; but I suspect long-time fans will find the lack of pizzazz a bit disappointing. All that aside, the first murder is of a rich guy who's a known rapist, and the mutilated body is discovered minus an apparently ill-used body part. Attached to the body is a poem cryptically signed "Lady Justice." It's enough to disturb the most emotionally detached of cops; and when a second body turns up with an almost identical MO, Eve knows this killer is on a crusade and isn't planning to stop anytime soon. As team members follow up on clues, connections are made to various suspects, one of whom moves to the top of the list rather quickly. After that, the trick is to identify the next victim and get to him before the killer does.All in all, it's not bad - but neither is it one I'd recommend to those interested in starting this series. The Eve and Roarke of past books are infinitely more intriguing and likable, and my hope is they'll get their joie de vivre back in the next installment.
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  • Jilly
    January 1, 1970
    So when Dexter tortures and cuts up killers he's a hero, but when a woman does it to rapists in a pseudo Wonder Woman suit she's suddenly crazy? I call sexism!!She was just living the dream...Okay, so maybe she is a little crazy. But who doesn't go a little crazy when their significant other screws them over? One time, when I was a teenage drama queen, I wrote "Asshole" in lipstick on a boyfriend's car window. I mean, sure it wasn't quite as dramatic as torturing him and cutting off his genitals So when Dexter tortures and cuts up killers he's a hero, but when a woman does it to rapists in a pseudo Wonder Woman suit she's suddenly crazy? I call sexism!!She was just living the dream...Okay, so maybe she is a little crazy. But who doesn't go a little crazy when their significant other screws them over? One time, when I was a teenage drama queen, I wrote "Asshole" in lipstick on a boyfriend's car window. I mean, sure it wasn't quite as dramatic as torturing him and cutting off his genitals until he bled to death, but you know he had to think about what he did as he got out the paper towels and Windexed that window. That taught him real good! Plus, we were young and he would have had to ask his mom where they kept the Windex. My diabolical plan was diabolical.Crazy Wonder Woman calls herself Lady Justice. She is killing all the mens and leaving bad poetry with their mutilated bodies about how they deserved it. Again, totally channeling the teenage angst. Writing bad poetry about scorned love? Girl, why don't you just dye your hair black and listen to angry lesbian indie music instead? It will be a lot less jaily that way.Although some "poets" should go to jail. Don't call this your "art", Not-Dave!!Eve is determined to catch CWW, even if these guys had it coming. *sigh*Okay, Eve, you do your cop thing.I for one will be thinking that CWW might have done womankind a favor, even if she went a little too far. Who am I to judge her methods of processing her emo feelings?Well, okay..The book was pretty good. I always wish for more interactions between Peabody and McNab, and never get it. But Eve an Roarke's relationship is pretty steady these days, and Roarke continues to be one of my favorite book boyfriends. He's gone from an alpha to a beta, but he's still hot.
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  • Mari (Smut Duchess)
    January 1, 1970
    almost 4 ⭐IMO Vendetta in Death wasn't the strongest book in the series, not the weakest either. If you like the chase of a good 'who done it' you'll be disappointed. The story began with the gruesome murder of a man who regularly picked up women, drugged and raped them. The next day another man who took emotional / financial advantage of a woman was murdered. After interviewing a few people Eve quickly has a hunch who the murderer is. The rest of the book is finding evidence to arrest and convi almost 4 ⭐IMO Vendetta in Death wasn't the strongest book in the series, not the weakest either. If you like the chase of a good 'who done it' you'll be disappointed. The story began with the gruesome murder of a man who regularly picked up women, drugged and raped them. The next day another man who took emotional / financial advantage of a woman was murdered. After interviewing a few people Eve quickly has a hunch who the murderer is. The rest of the book is finding evidence to arrest and convict. Her investigation leads her to a support group for abused women. There were several plot similarities to Brotherhood in Death. For fans of the series there's plenty of Peabody, McNab, Mavis and Bella and the rest of the regular characters.One thing that's been bothering me about the series in the last few books. Rourke seems to ignore his own work to be Dallas' sidekick. I can see Rourke accompanying Dallas occasionally but he's not a cop. He has to remind her to eat, sleep, what to wear, etc. He's become a wonderful wife. Also, I don't recall how many books it's been since the Icove mystery but I'm getting weary of every character Eve encounters gushing about how great Nadine's book and the vid was. I think it's just become part of J.D. Robb's writing habit........enter new character, have to mention the Icove case. She probably doesn't even think about it anymore. I was never able to get into reading the books of the series so I tried the audio versions and was hooked. If I do try to read I hear Susan Ericksen's excellent narration and character voices. She uses the same character voices throughout the series. There are several audio books in the series I've loved and listened to several times. I enjoyed reconnecting with the characters but doubt I'll listen to again. Overall, it's still one of the best series I've read / listened to. There are few authors who can write 49 books and several novellas about the same characters and keep fans coming back for more. Kudos to J.D. Robb / Nora Roberts.Now I have to wait until February for the next installment.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Obviously, I’m including a content note for rape, blood, and torture. It’s at roughly the same level as many of the other books in the series, so if you’ve liked the books so far, there’s little reason why you’d stop now.It’s a plot-heavy entry into the series, rather than the occasional world- and character-heavy volumes. We do get to see Mavis in this briefly and of course Roarke comes along to help out Eve. We get the usual nods to series regulars such as Nadine and Jake, and Eve narrowly avo Obviously, I’m including a content note for rape, blood, and torture. It’s at roughly the same level as many of the other books in the series, so if you’ve liked the books so far, there’s little reason why you’d stop now.It’s a plot-heavy entry into the series, rather than the occasional world- and character-heavy volumes. We do get to see Mavis in this briefly and of course Roarke comes along to help out Eve. We get the usual nods to series regulars such as Nadine and Jake, and Eve narrowly avoids doing some socializing. Unsurprisingly, more and more of the people Eve has to interview recognize her and Peabody from Nadine’s book and movie. Sometimes this helps, and sometimes it hinders, but Eve is starting to learn to cope with it. In this volume, Eve gets to meet a movie legend. Even though Eve has no idea who she is, Peabody is star-struck!I wish I had a better idea of how droids are supposed to act and function in this world. It has never really come together for me. In this volume, we quickly see that part of the reason one woman can deal with manhandling large guys is because she has a droid drive the car and string up the victims. But in all of Eve’s speculations, she and her colleagues keep coming back to the idea that the culprit must have an ally, if just to have someone driving the car. It never seems to occur to them that a droid could operate a car, but it’s also never mentioned that they generally can’t, so wouldn’t Eve have thought of that?The text isn’t quite as gloriously quotable as my favorite entries in the series. Also, Eve’s argument-with-the-perp dream is unnecessary; we already know why she disagrees with the killer’s sense of “justice”.Somehow Eve always leaves me wanting pizza! Good thing I have all the ingredients necessary in the apartment. I definitely enjoyed this book; it isn’t a perfect In Death novel, but it’s solidly good!Original review posted on my blog: http://www.errantdreams.com/2019/09/r...
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  • Melissa McHugh
    January 1, 1970
    I'm thinking about doing another deep dive and rereading this series again so I can articulate why I feel like it's really past time for this series to draw to a close and yet -- I still buy every book and read it as soon as it comes out.I think it comes from the fact I still really like this world and the characters in it. I still like the mysteries. But the truth is that Eve Dallas and Roarke caught my attention and held it firmly for forty-odd books because they were damaged loners who were f I'm thinking about doing another deep dive and rereading this series again so I can articulate why I feel like it's really past time for this series to draw to a close and yet -- I still buy every book and read it as soon as it comes out.I think it comes from the fact I still really like this world and the characters in it. I still like the mysteries. But the truth is that Eve Dallas and Roarke caught my attention and held it firmly for forty-odd books because they were damaged loners who were figuring out how to love deeply and build a world of people around them depended on them. The surrounding universe of people is deepy layered and rich.But Eve and Roarke are done growing as people or, at least, they've been static over the last few books. They have a relatively healthy relationship and have figured out how to be part of a family, even if it's not a traditional one. So if you're someone who was drawn to the series because of the characters, there's not as much here as there used to be. I'm not mad that Eve and Roarke got to this place -- I've truly loved following their journey since I found these books in 2003. But they're starting to feel a bit stale.If we're going to keep going, I need the world to shake up a bit. A new character, a new challenge, a change. Something. Otherwise, this is just a really good procedural series. It reminds me, honestly, of Bones, my favorite TV show. I still rewatch this show, but when it ended in Season 12, I was ready to move on because the lead characters, Booth and Brennan, had gone as far as they needed to go. But I still loved the world and the people, so if you told me it was coming back tomorrow, I'd be excited to revisit it. But it would never feel as good as it did in those first ten years. That's where I am with In Death as a series. These are still REALLY good books if you love mysteries and this world. And I do. But they don't resonate and linger with me the way they used to because there's not nearly as much emotional connection. I hope this is just a lull before the next big thing.
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