Nothing Ventured
Nothing Ventured heralds the start of a brand new series in the style of Jeffrey Archer’s #1 New York Times bestselling Clifton Chronicles: introducing Detective William Warwick. But this is not a detective story, this is a story about the making of a detective . . .William Warwick has always wanted to be a detective, and decides, much to his father’s dismay, that rather than become a lawyer like his father, Sir Julian Warwick QC, and his sister Grace, he will join London’s Metropolitan Police Force.After graduating from university, William begins a career that will define his life: from his early months on the beat under the watchful eye of his first mentor, Constable Fred Yates, to his first high-stakes case as a fledgling detective in Scotland Yard’s arts and antiquities squad. Investigating the theft of a priceless Rembrandt painting from the Fitzmolean Museum, he meets Beth Rainsford, a research assistant at the gallery who he falls hopelessly in love with, even as Beth guards a secret of her own that she’s terrified will come to light.While William follows the trail of the missing masterpiece, he comes up against suave art collector Miles Faulkner and his brilliant lawyer, Booth Watson QC, who are willing to bend the law to breaking point to stay one step ahead of William. Meanwhile, Miles Faulkner’s wife, Christina, befriends William, but whose side is she really on?This new series introduces William Warwick, a family man and a detective who will battle throughout his career against a powerful criminal nemesis. Through twists, triumph and tragedy, this series will show that William Warwick is destined to become one of Jeffrey Archer’s most enduring legacies.

Nothing Ventured Details

TitleNothing Ventured
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 3rd, 2019
PublisherSt. Martin's Press
ISBN-139781250200761
Rating
GenreFiction, Mystery

Nothing Ventured Review

  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    First and foremost, a large thank you to NetGalley, Jeffrey Archer, and St. Martin’s Press for providing me with a copy of this publication, which allows me to provide you with an unbiased review.Having loved Jeffrey Archer’s Clifton Chronicles, I was pleased to see this new series that will have my fellow fans just as excited. Those who remember Harry Clifton and his prodigious career as a writer will remember the William Warwick novels that were the author’s bread and butter. Archer has decide First and foremost, a large thank you to NetGalley, Jeffrey Archer, and St. Martin’s Press for providing me with a copy of this publication, which allows me to provide you with an unbiased review.Having loved Jeffrey Archer’s Clifton Chronicles, I was pleased to see this new series that will have my fellow fans just as excited. Those who remember Harry Clifton and his prodigious career as a writer will remember the William Warwick novels that were the author’s bread and butter. Archer has decided to shed some light on these, writing a series of novels about the man who climbed the ranks of the police service. In this series debut, William has decided not to follow in his father’s footsteps and refuses to read law. Instead, he chooses the path of art history before enrolling in the police academy. After passing his entrance exams, Warwick is sent to the beat, where he garners some much needed experience under the tutelage of a seasoned copper. When given the chance to write the detective’s exam, he soars through the experience and is soon assigned to Art and Antiquities, using his attention to detail and past academic experiences. Warwick has much to learn, but is also tossed out to juggle a number of cases, all of which take him in different directions and has him meeting book forgers, currency schemers, and even traffickers in stolen artwork. While not entirely won over by his son’s choices, Sir Julian Warwick QC can see the benefits to Warwick’s choices and works with him on a side project. It would seem the woman who has caught young DC William Warwick’s eye has a secret she has tried to keep her herself. However, as Warwick grows fonder of Beth Rainsford, he cannot fight the urge to unravel yet another mystery. A brilliant launching pad to what I hope will be a sensational series, Archer does not disappoint readers with this piece. Highly recommended to those who love Lord Archer’s writing style, as well as readers who like a light and fast-paced police procedural series with artistic flavourings.In my long reading career, I can say that I have long loved every opportunity that I have had to curl up with a Jeffrey Archer novel. His ability to keep the story simple and yet enthralling is second to none, while also developing strong characters and a plot that keeps the reader wanting more. As I mentioned above, this is an interesting project, one in which Archer almost assumes the role of Harry Clifton in crafting these stories that appeared throughout the Clifton Chronicles. William Warwick serves as a wonderful protagonist whose early rise as an officer of the law is documented here. From his passion for police work on the beat through to his intuition and ability to find clues where others fail, Warwick is both in tune with his surroundings and a character worthy of the reader’s attention. The novel portrays both his personal and professional sides, injecting the needed passion in each to develop a well-rounded individual who enriches the larger story. There are many threads left dangling, which Archer will hopefully tie-off or add to in the subsequent novels of the series. Others enrich the story and the plot lines, complementing Warwick where possible, but also developing sub-plots that could emerge in future novels. The story was strong and introduced the reader to this most formidable character. While some may worry that there is a need to know the Clifton Chronicles to read this piece, the Warwick novels are independent of the previous series, though I am sure devout fans of Clifton will see tie-ins when Harry mentioned the novels throughout his time as a protagonist in Archer’s earlier work. A mix of short and longer chapters, as well as Archer’s use of themes from past novels—art, policing, court proceedings—allow this series debut to be one that is sure to garner much discussion and anticipation between novels. I, for one, cannot wait to see how William Warwick will rise through the ranks to the pinnacle of his career.Kudos, Lord Archer, for this great start. As you mentioned in the author’s note, I can only hope you will survive the entire journey as you dazzle your countless fans.Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...
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  • Judy
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first time reading anything written by Jeffrey Archer. I have no idea why I haven't picked up one of his books earlier - didn't know what I was missing! First of all I really, really enjoy British detective novels and this fits the bill to a tee. This is the first in the William Warwick series. William has wanted to be a detective since the age of eight so he chooses to pursue that path - against his father's wishes (his father is an attorney and wants William to follow in his footste This is my first time reading anything written by Jeffrey Archer. I have no idea why I haven't picked up one of his books earlier - didn't know what I was missing! First of all I really, really enjoy British detective novels and this fits the bill to a tee. This is the first in the William Warwick series. William has wanted to be a detective since the age of eight so he chooses to pursue that path - against his father's wishes (his father is an attorney and wants William to follow in his footsteps). William has good instincts and has put in his time learning the trade when he gets tapped for the Arts and Antiquities department in Scotland Yard. It was fun following William through his first cases and seeing both his successes and his failures. William gets wrapped up in a doozy of a case and I enjoyed following the leads with him. I look forward to reading the next book in this series when it becomes available!Thanks to Jeffrey Archer and St. Martin's Press for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • MicheleReader
    January 1, 1970
    Fans of Jeffrey Archer rejoice. We have a new series to savor. The first book in this new saga was simply wonderful. We meet William Warwick (who we actually first met as a fictional character in The Clifton Chronicles,) son of Sir Julian Warwick QC as he chooses law enforcement as his career and quickly rises to Scotland Yard in its Arts and Antiquities squad. We already know he is bound for great things. His first major case is solving the theft of a Rembrandt from the Fitzmolean Museum, where Fans of Jeffrey Archer rejoice. We have a new series to savor. The first book in this new saga was simply wonderful. We meet William Warwick (who we actually first met as a fictional character in The Clifton Chronicles,) son of Sir Julian Warwick QC as he chooses law enforcement as his career and quickly rises to Scotland Yard in its Arts and Antiquities squad. We already know he is bound for great things. His first major case is solving the theft of a Rembrandt from the Fitzmolean Museum, where he meets his love interest Beth, who has some secrets of her own. Wonderful storytelling and character development. Very entertaining read. Can’t wait for the next installment. Many thanks to NetGalley, St. Martin’s Press and the wonderful Lord Jeffrey Archer for an advance copy. (On a personal note, Archer was my late mother’s favorite author and through her, I discovered his books. Sadly she never got to read the final installments of The Clifton Chronicles which she loved so much. Now every time I finish one his latest books, I feel I am reading it for the both of us. Thanks Mom, you taught me well!)
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  • Susan Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I was surprised at how much I enjoyed this. It's a nice, easy read that was quite pleasant. Set in 1979, William Warwick is the son of a famed barrister. His father wants him to follow in his footsteps but William wants to be a police detective. He gets his degree in Art History, does some traveling and then joins the police force in London. After two years of patrol duty, he takes the detective exam and passes at number 1. He is assigned to the Art and Antiques Division where his first case is I was surprised at how much I enjoyed this. It's a nice, easy read that was quite pleasant. Set in 1979, William Warwick is the son of a famed barrister. His father wants him to follow in his footsteps but William wants to be a police detective. He gets his degree in Art History, does some traveling and then joins the police force in London. After two years of patrol duty, he takes the detective exam and passes at number 1. He is assigned to the Art and Antiques Division where his first case is investigating a missing Rembrandt. He has other small cases including books with forged author signatures. He meets a girl who works at the museum with the missing Rembrandt and discovers her father is in prison for murder. He gets his father to investigate along with his sister, Grace, also a lawyer. These two case investigations take up most of the book and they are both interesting in their own way. I really enjoyed reading about famous paintings and the market for signed books. I liked the characters in this book. This is the first book in a new series and I am looking forward to reading more. I think it will be a fun series. The ending actually made me laugh which is a good way to end a book. Thanks to NetGalley for a copy of this book in exchange for a fair review.
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  • Unseen Library
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced proof of Nothing Ventured from Pan Macmillan Australia to review.One of the biggest names in modern fiction, Jeffrey Archer, returns with Nothing Ventured, an intriguing piece of historical crime fiction that starts up his brand-new William Warwick series.William Warwick, son of a respected London defence attorney, has always dreamed of becoming a detective in the London Metropolitan Police Force. Despite the opposition of his father, William enrols as a trainee police off I received an advanced proof of Nothing Ventured from Pan Macmillan Australia to review.One of the biggest names in modern fiction, Jeffrey Archer, returns with Nothing Ventured, an intriguing piece of historical crime fiction that starts up his brand-new William Warwick series.William Warwick, son of a respected London defence attorney, has always dreamed of becoming a detective in the London Metropolitan Police Force. Despite the opposition of his father, William enrols as a trainee police officer at the start of the 1980s after finishing university. Armed with determination, sharp observation skills, an education in fine art and a can-do spirit, William is unaware of the adventures in store for him.After quickly making the rank of detective constable, William is assigned to Scotland Yard’s Arts and Antiquities squad. While also investigating of a series of different art crimes and frauds across London, the squad is mainly concerned with capturing Miles Faulkner, a criminal mastermind responsible for the thefts and forgeries of some of the most expensive art in England. All previous attempts to capture Faulkner have failed miserably, as the criminal is always two steps ahead of the police.As William becomes more and more involved in investigating the various crimes Faulkner is organising, he makes a crucial breakthrough when he befriends Faulkner’s wife, Christina. Christina is willing to return a valuable stolen Rembrandt from Faulkner’s personal collection in return for help from the police. Can Christina be trusted, or will Faulkner once again evade justice and continue his dastardly schemes? In addition, what happens when William falls head over heels in love with Beth, a research assistant at the museum the Rembrandt was stolen from, whose family secrets may drive a terrible wedge between her and William?View the full review at:https://unseenlibrary.com/2019/07/16/...For other exciting reviews and content, check out my blog at:https://unseenlibrary.com/
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  • Laurie • The Baking Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    Jeffrey Archer is a favourite among many of my library patrons and I've enjoyed the first book from his popular Clifton Chronicles series. Now, Archer is back with a new series which stars Detective William Warwick, one of London's Metropolitan Police Force's newest officers.Nothing Ventured focuses on two art-themed schemes and readers are given a brief background on Warwick's family life. Art fans will enjoy the mentions of famous art pieces/artists and the ensuing art fraud but those topics d Jeffrey Archer is a favourite among many of my library patrons and I've enjoyed the first book from his popular Clifton Chronicles series. Now, Archer is back with a new series which stars Detective William Warwick, one of London's Metropolitan Police Force's newest officers.Nothing Ventured focuses on two art-themed schemes and readers are given a brief background on Warwick's family life. Art fans will enjoy the mentions of famous art pieces/artists and the ensuing art fraud but those topics didn't quite hold my interest and I felt the tension was lacking just a bit. There is a romantic aspect but their connection happens quite quickly leaving readers to be told about their relationship but not actually witnessing it. The author's blurb states that this book is "not a detective story, but a story about a detective" but I came away feeling that I didn't get to know Warwick as well as I would have hoped. The good news is, this is a series so I figure readers will get to know Warwick better as the series progresses.While I'm not overly enthusiastic with this first book in the series, this was a good read and I appreciate that Warwick is a smart and eager good guy. He's a breath of fresh air and I'm hopeful that we'll get to know Warwick (and his family who added wit) better in future books.Disclaimer: My sincere thanks to St Martin's Press for my complimentary digital copy of this book, via NetGalley, in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent first installment in a new series by Jeffrey Archer. Great characters I look forward to following for a few years.William Warrick has always wanted to be a member of Scotland Yard. When his knowledge of art comes to light he is assigned to the Art & Antiquity department of Scotland Yard where he meets and becomes engaged to Beth Rainford who works at an art gallery. William's father and sister, both lawyers (barristers) team up to have Beth's father's conviction overturned when the Excellent first installment in a new series by Jeffrey Archer. Great characters I look forward to following for a few years.William Warrick has always wanted to be a member of Scotland Yard. When his knowledge of art comes to light he is assigned to the Art & Antiquity department of Scotland Yard where he meets and becomes engaged to Beth Rainford who works at an art gallery. William's father and sister, both lawyers (barristers) team up to have Beth's father's conviction overturned when they prove false police work led the jury to declare him guilty sending an innocent man to prison.William's investigation into a stolen painting has him doggedly following Faulkner even when doing so causes him to compromise his principles.. The plot twists and turns along with character development was steady and intriguing. I will definitely be purchasing this series. Hopefully it won;'t be as long as the Clifton Chronicles though each of those seven books were fantastic.
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  • Deb
    January 1, 1970
    Nothing Ventured by Jeffery ArcherIf you’re a fan of Jeffery Archer, this story is for you. Mr. Archer has a winner here with travel, investigations, trials and intrigue. The characters are fun, the story is very good, but the ending is so perfectly laid on the reader, that you have to laugh.This rather lighthearted tale, which is in present day England, unfolds as the protagonist William ends up working for Scotland Yard in their Arts and Antiques unit. He is now Constable Warwick investigating Nothing Ventured by Jeffery ArcherIf you’re a fan of Jeffery Archer, this story is for you. Mr. Archer has a winner here with travel, investigations, trials and intrigue. The characters are fun, the story is very good, but the ending is so perfectly laid on the reader, that you have to laugh.This rather lighthearted tale, which is in present day England, unfolds as the protagonist William ends up working for Scotland Yard in their Arts and Antiques unit. He is now Constable Warwick investigating an art theft. There are many players, but it all boils down to two trials runningsimultaneously, with the author leap-frogging from one trial to the other. One concerns the art theft, but I’ll not detail the second trial as it would be a major spoiler for the story. It does, however, involve William as a bystander. Five stars and a tip of the hat to Mr. Archer for this delightful novel.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    notified today (8/9) that I have won a First Reads copy :-) Book arrived today (8/15) so the reading can commence! Had to wait to start while my husband read it first!! :-)Jeffrey Archer, storyteller extraordinaire, has written the perfect antidote to combat the current blistering heat and soul-sucking news coverage. When the book becomes available in early September, grab a copy, a cool drink and find a comfy spot. Once you enter the world of William Warwick you will want to continue reading un notified today (8/9) that I have won a First Reads copy :-) Book arrived today (8/15) so the reading can commence! Had to wait to start while my husband read it first!! :-)Jeffrey Archer, storyteller extraordinaire, has written the perfect antidote to combat the current blistering heat and soul-sucking news coverage. When the book becomes available in early September, grab a copy, a cool drink and find a comfy spot. Once you enter the world of William Warwick you will want to continue reading until the tale is told. William, not Bill, Warwick realizes his childhood dream of becoming a policeman, but only after gaining a degree in art history. His father is a renowned barrister who had hopes William would follow him into the same profession just as his daughter Grace has done. Despite William's defiance the family gets along well and eventually accepts his choice.Thanks to his uni degree and a chance encounter with detectives who think they have solved a seven year old art theft, William is fast-tracked and becomes a member of the art fraud team. He learns the ropes with the help of his new colleagues, finds love and manages to solve a few other art/fraud crimes along the way. The book is "not a detective story, but a story about a detective" as stated before chapter 1 begins. It is a pleasure to read a story about a detective who is not damaged and full of angst. Nor is he surrounded by problematic family, colleagues or friends. Hopefully William and his career will continue successfully in subsequent books. He is a character to be cheered on as he ascends the ranks in London's Metropolitan Police Force.Thanks to First Reads and St. Martin's Press for my ARC as well as the nifty "limited-edition enamel pin" which depicts William's badge. The accompanying letter promises more pins and books as he is promoted through the ranks. Can't wait!
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    A delightfully naive young man becomes a police constable; along the way, he learns about love, fraud, deceit, murder. By the end he is still delightful, just less innocent. I look forward to the next in the promised series.
  • Sharyn
    January 1, 1970
    I have been a Jeffrey Archer fan for decades and was pleased to receive a free e-ARC of this first book in his latest series from NetGalley and the publishers in exchange for an honest review.The book started with a rather unbelievable scene in which a rookie copper noticed something that seasoned detectives had missed. I let that one slip as the book took off and Archer's style swung into play with a very readable story which kept me reading, and I mostly enjoyed what I was reading. I think the I have been a Jeffrey Archer fan for decades and was pleased to receive a free e-ARC of this first book in his latest series from NetGalley and the publishers in exchange for an honest review.The book started with a rather unbelievable scene in which a rookie copper noticed something that seasoned detectives had missed. I let that one slip as the book took off and Archer's style swung into play with a very readable story which kept me reading, and I mostly enjoyed what I was reading. I think the book looks 'oomph', it's a gentle romp through art fraud and miscarriages of justice but it fails to deliver any punches. The detectives are praised for detecting something that I think any reasonably intelligent person would have noticed. And the ending came as no surprise at all. Overall a bit of a disappointment, but one I quite enjoyed reading.
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  • Casey Wheeler
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book by the author I have read even though he has been around for quite a while. I decided to read this one as it is the start of a new series revolving around the character of William Warrick. The story takes place in and around London. I was able to quickly pick up on the differences in how they refer to things versus here in America. I also found having watched a number of British show and movies that it was easier to follow the location changes. Overall this was a very enjo This is the first book by the author I have read even though he has been around for quite a while. I decided to read this one as it is the start of a new series revolving around the character of William Warrick. The story takes place in and around London. I was able to quickly pick up on the differences in how they refer to things versus here in America. I also found having watched a number of British show and movies that it was easier to follow the location changes. Overall this was a very enjoyable book and I look forward to the rest of the series and I will definitely check out some of his earlier works.I received a free Kindle ARC courtesy of Net Galley and the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would provide an honest review and post it on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon and my review blog. I also posted it to my Facebook page.
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  • Olga
    January 1, 1970
    Nothing Ventured is a typical Jeffrey Archer book - enjoyable, witty and very easy to read. It's a start of a new series and I am looking forward to reading the next one. Many thanks to Netgalley and Macmillan publishers for the ARC.
  • Megan Jones
    January 1, 1970
    William Warwick has always wanted to be a detective, and decides, much to his father’s dismay, that rather than become a barrister like his father, Sir Julian Warwick QC, and his sister Grace, he will join London’s Metropolitan Police Force. After graduating from university, William begins a career that will define his life: from his early months on the beat under the watchful eye of his first mentor, Constable Fred Yates, to his first high-stakes case as a fledgling detective in Scotland Yard’s William Warwick has always wanted to be a detective, and decides, much to his father’s dismay, that rather than become a barrister like his father, Sir Julian Warwick QC, and his sister Grace, he will join London’s Metropolitan Police Force. After graduating from university, William begins a career that will define his life: from his early months on the beat under the watchful eye of his first mentor, Constable Fred Yates, to his first high-stakes case as a fledgling detective in Scotland Yard’s Art and Antiques squad. Investigating the theft of a priceless Rembrandt painting from the Fitzmolean Museum, he meets Beth Rainsford, a research assistant at the gallery who he falls hopelessly in love with, even as Beth guards a secret of her own that she’s terrified will come to light.Any reader of The Clifton Chronicles will remember Harry Clifton’s work as an author and creator of William Warwick, now Archer has brought Warwick and those books to life by writing them. I was so excited to start reading this and intrigued by Archer writing fiction about fiction, a great literary twist.I was not to be let down either. I should quickly say you do not need to have read The Clifton Chronicles to read this, although I highly recommend you do read them, they are such a great series! Anyway back to this book and we follow Warwick as he takes his first tentative steps into the adult world and into his career as a policeman, we learn about his family and background and can slowly piece together Warwick the man. Then we follow Warwick on his first few cases as a policeman before his involvement in an art theft case, I have to stress how enjoyable and well written this is. The investigation is enticing, full of twists and I for one could not put it down. I was enthralled by Warwick’s world and his work and relished getting to follow their investigation. On paper it does not sound the most exciting of investigations but I promise you Archer has worked his magic and created a gripping plot.The characters in this are fantastic too, all of them are well developed with interesting stories to tell. Obviously we gain a deeper understanding of some more than others and they are the characters that I cannot wait to follow up with next time. Warwick and Beth are two terrific characters who lead the plot well and I enjoyed my time with them.‘Nothing Ventured’ is the beginning of a brilliant new series from Archer and one blessed with the character of William Warwick. I adored this read and cannot wait for the next instalment into Warwick’s life.Thank you to NetGalley and Pan Macmillan for an advance copy.
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  • Lesa
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a little nervous that Jeffrey Archer is starting a new series. I really enjoyed Nothing Ventured, butArcher says in a note to the reader that he's working on the second, and the progress of the series will depend on his longevity. Archer is 79.The new series is set in the 1980s. Archer says it's a story of a detective, not a detective story.William Warwick's father, a criminal barrister, always hoped his son would join him in his practice. But, from the age of eight, William knew he wanted t I'm a little nervous that Jeffrey Archer is starting a new series. I really enjoyed Nothing Ventured, butArcher says in a note to the reader that he's working on the second, and the progress of the series will depend on his longevity. Archer is 79.The new series is set in the 1980s. Archer says it's a story of a detective, not a detective story.William Warwick's father, a criminal barrister, always hoped his son would join him in his practice. But, from the age of eight, William knew he wanted to be a police detective. Warwick's mother sided with him, and he went to university, studied art, and became a police officer.Warwick could have been fast-tracked as a college graduate, but he chose to start at the bottom, walking a beat as a police constable. For the first year, his lessons are on the street, under the guidance of an experienced, street-wise constable, Fred Yates. But, when it was time to move on, and he passed his detective exam, he was assigned to the Metropolitan Police Force, attached to Art and Antiques.While he works several cases, his major assignment involves the theft of invaluable paintings, forgeries, and a finder's fee when the paintings are "recovered" on behalf of the insurance companies. In the course of his investigation, William meets a beautiful gallery research assistant, Beth Rainsford, who has family secrets. Warwick's case, and Beth's secret, result in riveting simultaneous court trials, in a story that builds in intensity.While the storyline and the investigations are straightforward, the resulting trials are fascinating. Archer ups the suspense by putting them opposite each other in the courthouse so the reader is eagerly waiting to see the judgments.Jeffrey Archer's latest novel (and hopefully a series) features a likable police officer who works hard. The supporting cast, Warwick's family, other officers, Beth Rainsford, are interesting characters, as so many of Archer's have been over the years. Let's hope there's time for more books in the William Warwick series.
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  • Abi
    January 1, 1970
    William Warwick has wanted to be a detective since childhood and solving the case of the missing Mars bar. Much to the dismay of his father, Sir Julian Warwick QC.After graduating from university and two years on the beat under the tutelage of seasoned copper Fred Yates, William finds himself as part of the Art and Antiquities division at Scotland Yard. Quickly embroiled in a high-stakes case William must find his feet as a fledgling detective whilst trying to save one of the worlds most pricele William Warwick has wanted to be a detective since childhood and solving the case of the missing Mars bar. Much to the dismay of his father, Sir Julian Warwick QC.After graduating from university and two years on the beat under the tutelage of seasoned copper Fred Yates, William finds himself as part of the Art and Antiquities division at Scotland Yard. Quickly embroiled in a high-stakes case William must find his feet as a fledgling detective whilst trying to save one of the worlds most priceless works of art.On his journey William meets a young research assistant of the Fitzmolean Museum, Beth Rainsford, and falls madly in love, but Beth has a secret she fears will jeopardise this new found relationship.Can William navigate his way through cases and dealing with forgers, art collectors and lawyers that are willing to bend the law to breaking point, or will they always be one step ahead of him?I was extremely happy to be approved for this ARC. Jeffrey Archer is high on my list of favourite storytellers. I found this series to be an interesting concept having been the works of a former character, Harry Clifton. Unfortunately, I am yet to pick up the Clifton Chronicle series as a family member let some spoilers slip, but they are on my TBR list for when I have forgotten the details!I can already tell the Warwick family are going to become one of my fictional favourites, they are full of love yet easily mock each other without true judgement. The conversations that take place around the dinner table are so typical of this author, making the reader want to take a seat and join in. William makes for a wonderful protagonist, he is easily likeable and shows great passion for his chosen field. He sometimes shows a little naivety, but I found this to be endearing rather than annoyingly obvious. The other characters, and Williams relationships with them, enhance the story and also develop possible plot lines for the future.As usual Archer had me laughing within the first pages and then only a few chapters later I was wiping away tears. I simply cannot wait to follow William through his career and see where life, and Archer, take him.For more reviews, please visit: https://twiabblog.wixsite.com/theworl...** Thanks to Pan Macmillan, via NetGalley, for this ARC **
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  • Buddy Gott
    January 1, 1970
    Prior to this novel, the only Jeffrey Archer novel I'd read was Kane & Abel. I loved that one and always intended to read more by him, but I just never got around to it. When I saw that Nothing Ventured was the first book in a new series by him, I was anxious to give it a try.After finishing the book, I glanced at some reviews by other readers of it to see if other people felt the way I did about it. It seems as if I'm in the minority of people who were not overly impressed by the book. I li Prior to this novel, the only Jeffrey Archer novel I'd read was Kane & Abel. I loved that one and always intended to read more by him, but I just never got around to it. When I saw that Nothing Ventured was the first book in a new series by him, I was anxious to give it a try.After finishing the book, I glanced at some reviews by other readers of it to see if other people felt the way I did about it. It seems as if I'm in the minority of people who were not overly impressed by the book. I liked it well enough, but I never felt like I loved it. Actually, let me change that. I didn't even like it all that much. Sure, it's well-written and there is a decent story, but it just didn't connect with me. I felt that things often came a little too easily for the main character. I saw another reviewer say that they didn't think there was enough conflict in this story. I totally agree. While I don't see myself reading any more books in this series, I am still interested in trying out Archer's other series, The Clifton Chronicles, which I know has a loose connection to this new series. Despite me not enjoying Nothing Ventured, I still think Jeffrey Archer is a very good writer and I want to read more by him.*Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher, St. Martin's Press, for providing me a copy of this book in exchange for a fair review.
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  • Vikram
    January 1, 1970
    In one word: An Excellent read. Jeffrey Archer continues to be a master story-teller. Unlike many other authors, who get books 'ghost written' by others, Jeffrey Archer continues to turn-out quality books.
  • Darren
    January 1, 1970
    I got this as a arc e book from Net Galley for my i pad. I enjoyed reading this book. It had a good story to it. I have read other books by this author and liked them too.
  • Hannelore Cheney
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for the eARC.This is the first in a new series featuring William Warwick whose dream has always been to join the police force, much to the dismay of his father, a distinguished barrister. I'm the late 1970's William ends up as a DC on Scotland Yard's Art & Antiques team. There are two main cases: the disappearance of a famous Rembrandt and an antique silver coin scam. While trying to find the Rembrandt, William meets the woman he will probably end u Thank you NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for the eARC.This is the first in a new series featuring William Warwick whose dream has always been to join the police force, much to the dismay of his father, a distinguished barrister. I'm the late 1970's William ends up as a DC on Scotland Yard's Art & Antiques team. There are two main cases: the disappearance of a famous Rembrandt and an antique silver coin scam. While trying to find the Rembrandt, William meets the woman he will probably end up marrying.I seem to be the only one so far who wasn't as enthusiastic as the other reviewers. The story was ok, William is a good guy and a sympathetic character, but all in all I was not really drawn into the book. Sorry!
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  • Stacey
    January 1, 1970
    Let me begin by stating that I won Nothing Ventured by Jeffrey Archer in a giveaway I put in for as I've become quite the fan of detective murder mysteries thanks to Agatha Christie, however this was not that. In saying that, I also thought it a bit ridiculous for him to mention her name in this novel, as well as Poirot's when stating that DNA evidence was making it harder to defend criminals, as Poirot does not defend anyone--he seeks only the truth! It was a name drop, and a confusing one, as Let me begin by stating that I won Nothing Ventured by Jeffrey Archer in a giveaway I put in for as I've become quite the fan of detective murder mysteries thanks to Agatha Christie, however this was not that. In saying that, I also thought it a bit ridiculous for him to mention her name in this novel, as well as Poirot's when stating that DNA evidence was making it harder to defend criminals, as Poirot does not defend anyone--he seeks only the truth! It was a name drop, and a confusing one, as the author himself states that this novel is not a detective mystery but a novel about a detective's life. In saying all that, the novel is well written (other than William laughing as much as he did, it felt childish) and was very easy to read, but if you are unaware with some British terms you may need to look them up (though the rest of the sentences should fill in the blank for you) (examples: kip=sleep, gaffer=boss, and kerb=curb (just difference in British and American spelling)). However, I wanted to give it three stars (I liked it) but some parts of the novel were just too much of a miss for me so I gave it two stars (it was okay). The first three chapters for example I thought were a slow way of beginning to story while being cheesy at that. It begins with a father disappointed in his son not following his footsteps (snooze). The story began for me in chapter four, but then once again felt cheesy and cliche in the fifth chapter when the officer who has taken the young rookie William Warwick under his wing was killed in a routine stop, one day short of his retirement (saw that coming). If someone dies in a novel, I think you should feel something and for me this death was not surprising in the least, it's been so overdone in other stories I rolled my eyes when William woke up in his hospital bed to find his partner had been killed. William then meets a beautiful girl named Beth and after 6 short months they both announce how madly in love they are and want to marry, this too felt pretty cliche but hey, some loves are like that (still feels cliche, I think the author added it to the story possibly to give the next part of the story a door to cross, though it was another issue I had with the novel)The part that gives conflict to his relationship with Beth is when Mrs. Faulkner climbs into bed with Warwick (cliche) and he felt he had two choices--to turn on the light and tell her to leave possible risking the return of the priceless art or to sleep with her and not tell Beth, securing the Rembrandt's return. This kinda made no sense to me on a few levels, 1) he had just told Beth how much he loved her and he wants to marry her so would he really risk that? Perhaps someone married a long time in a semi-happy relationship would but I don't think a madly in love person would, 2) Mrs. Faulkner needed the cops on her side more than William needed to sleep with her to secure the painting, it and the detective were already on board the yacht on the way to the museum with the police to be receiving them when they docked (I really don't think he was in enough of a corner to justify it-so in my mind it just makes him an non-loyal, untrustworthy creep), and 3) Mrs. Faulkner had put a private eye on her husband to gather as much information on his adultery as possible to secure the best possible out-come in her divorce proceedings, why would she risk her husband doing the same to her (which she should believe he would as he has the resources to do so) and discover she had slept with the detective? In my opinion, what she stood to gain from the divorce would have been too much a risk to ruin it on a young detective who hardly seemed receptive of the advance in the first place (he never made any show of flirtation towards her). The final cheesy and cliche part was the very end of the book. Mr. Faulkner gets off with probation on the condition he does not commit any crimes or is thrown in prison to serve his full sentence, fine. But why on Earth when he shows up to the grand revealing of the returned Rembrandt and of the Rubens which he was so kind in gifting he museum would Faulkner whisper into Warwick's ear that he'd love to show him the real original Rubens in his New York apartment?!?!?! This made NO sense, considering the judge let him off easy on the condition that he supply the museum with the Rubens they believed to be the real deal (Warwick could bring this to someone's attention and have the Rubens at the museum scrutinized) and for the mere fact that this is the man who basically almost put you in prison and relieved you of your "two precious" (stolen) artworks!!! Why would he light that fire inside the detective again, considering he kinda got away with it (just barely) the first time? There's no way someone would be so foolish, and I get that it sets up the next book but it is so far from anything realistic. If Faulkner doesn't go to prison next time, I feel the readers of the series will be surely let down, because of the blatant careless demeanor Faulkner showed and the fact that it will be just another failure to the "hero" Warwick.
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  • Margaret
    January 1, 1970
    Years ago I enjoyed reading a few of Jeffrey Archer’s books, including Not a Penny More, Not a Penny Less and Kane and Able. Archer is a prolific author, but I haven’t read any of his later books or his diaries about his time in prison. But I was interested when I saw that he had started a new series about William Warwick – Nothing Ventured. It is the first in the series of books following William’s progress from detective constable to the commissioner of the Metropolitan Police.It is indeed, a Years ago I enjoyed reading a few of Jeffrey Archer’s books, including Not a Penny More, Not a Penny Less and Kane and Able. Archer is a prolific author, but I haven’t read any of his later books or his diaries about his time in prison. But I was interested when I saw that he had started a new series about William Warwick – Nothing Ventured. It is the first in the series of books following William’s progress from detective constable to the commissioner of the Metropolitan Police.It is indeed, a story about a detective, rather than a detective story and as such it is rather episodic, following William Warwick’s career.William joins the Metropolitan Police force, against his father’s wishes. Sir Julian Warwick QC, had hoped his son would join him in chambers and train to be a barrister, like his sister Grace. He works on the beat in Lambeth before transferring to the Art and Antiques Squad at Scotland Yard, where he becomes involved in a number of cases of fraud and theft, including tracing the whereabouts of a phial of the moon dust brought back from the Apollo 11 mission by Neil Armstrong, and arresting an old man who had forges the signatures of famous authors in first editions. Whilst investigating the theft of a Rembrandt painting, the Syndics of the Cloth Makers Guild, from the Fitzmolean Museum in Kensington, he meets Beth Rainsford, a research assistant at the gallery and they fall in love almost at first sight – but Beth has a secret that she keeps from him. The premise is promising, but it’s written in a very straight-forward and factual style and my overall impression, despite the crime elements, is that this is a rather mundane and bland novel. William does this, does that, goes here, goes there, often at a break-neck pace that gives impetus. But the characters are drawn very sketchily with little depth – William is an intelligent young man, precocious and naive, eager to please and to learn, his father, Sir Julian, a suave, elegant and successful QC and Grace, his sister, an up and coming young barrister, and so on.I suppose it is the base for the rest of the series but I found it too predictable. However, I thought the court scenes and the final little twist at the end enjoyable and I’m wondering if I want to go one to read the next book in the series which focuses on William’s time as a young detective sergeant in the elite drugs unit. I’m not sure that I do want to – there are so many more enticing books to read.My thanks to Macmillan for an e-book review copy via NetGalley
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  • Kath
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars rounded up.This is another well established but new author to me and another back catalogue to add to my ever growing TBR. In this series opener, we are introduced to William Warwick. Son of a prodigious QC he shuns the chance of following in his footsteps as, since an early age, he has a hankering to join the Metropolitan Police Force. We see the bargain he strikes with his family when he decides to follow this path, through University, studying Art History, and as he takes his first 4.5 stars rounded up.This is another well established but new author to me and another back catalogue to add to my ever growing TBR. In this series opener, we are introduced to William Warwick. Son of a prodigious QC he shuns the chance of following in his footsteps as, since an early age, he has a hankering to join the Metropolitan Police Force. We see the bargain he strikes with his family when he decides to follow this path, through University, studying Art History, and as he takes his first steps as a bobby on the beat. Through his early days with the force as he is mentored by Constable Fred Yates and then as he gets his first glimpse of glory as a newbie Detective in the Arts and Antiquities Squad. Intelligent as he is, his precociousness shines through as he rubs others up the wrong way as he both finds his feet and proves himself as a Detective worth listening to, despite his greenness. We see him fall in love and how he struggles to juggle work and home life, especially when certain secrets come to light. And, the crux of the matter, how he goes up against an Art Collector and his pet QC in the case of a priceless missing painting. There's an awful lot going on in this book but it lays down some very solid foundations to a series which I think will have a great run. He's smart and (mostly) sensible but still a little wet between the ears in some things. But he proves himself a worthy adversary to someone who I can see him having some great battles with in the future. That and the fact that he finds himself pitting his wits against not only the criminal element but also against his own family of defense lawyers gives this book a bit of an edge compared with others in the genre. There's also quite a bit of humour interspersed throughout which adds colour to the mysteries being investigated and the romance is mostly implied rather than spelled out which suits me. All delivered in a style that really fits with me as a reader and containing little if no padding which meant that the stories being told got on with themselves very well.All in all a solid foundation to a character whose ongoing stories and cases I really can't wait to continue. My thanks go to the Publisher and Netgalley for the chance to read this book.
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  • Joan
    January 1, 1970
    Despite his father’s objections, William Warwick eschews reading law at Oxford [as his father had done] and earns a degree in art history at King’s College London. Then he attends Hendon Police College and joins London’s Metropolitan Police Force after graduation. As a probationer at Lambeth Station, William works a beat with Constable Fred Yates, a twenty-eight-year veteran who would become his mentor. After some eighteen months on the beat, William becomes a neophyte detective in Scotland Yard Despite his father’s objections, William Warwick eschews reading law at Oxford [as his father had done] and earns a degree in art history at King’s College London. Then he attends Hendon Police College and joins London’s Metropolitan Police Force after graduation. As a probationer at Lambeth Station, William works a beat with Constable Fred Yates, a twenty-eight-year veteran who would become his mentor. After some eighteen months on the beat, William becomes a neophyte detective in Scotland Yard’s Arts and Antiquities squad where one of his cases involves the hunt for a Rembrandt painting stolen some seven years earlier from the Fitzmoleon Museum. His career, both with the Met and with Scotland Yard, will define his life.Serving as the inaugural book for a new series, “Nothing Ventured” is a genial introduction to William Warwick. With likable characters and some interesting twists in the plot, the narrative keeps the reader’s interest. Throughout the telling of the tale, William grows, both in his career and in his personal life. However, readers are likely to find that Detective Constable William Warwick’s decision near the end of the book makes no sense in light of his earlier declarations and the story’s complete lack of necessity to carry out such a questionable act. Unnecessary to the telling of the tale, it’s a decision that doesn’t fit the previously-established character of the man, thus managing to disappoint readers as it serves only to lower the readers’ opinion of the character.And then there’s the ending that, while certainly designed to serve as a lead-in to the next book in the series, is sure to leave readers wondering why, given the circumstances, Miles Faulkner would ever voluntarily make such a comment to William. It seems completely out of character for a suave, clever, resourceful man.Fans of “The Clifton Chronicles” are sure to enjoy the author’s new series; this pleasant introduction is encouraging enough to have readers seeking out the next volume.Recommended.
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  • Toni
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 StarsThis is the first book in the William Warwick series by Jeffery Archer.This felt like a community story more than a single man searching for the truth. He is a very agile minded man who could have been a lawyer like his sister and father but instead chose to be a detective. He is quickly pulled into the art and antiquities section when he notices by happenstance that the painting his fellow officers have recovered was indeed a fake.William meets Beth and is immediately enamored with her 4.5 StarsThis is the first book in the William Warwick series by Jeffery Archer.This felt like a community story more than a single man searching for the truth. He is a very agile minded man who could have been a lawyer like his sister and father but instead chose to be a detective. He is quickly pulled into the art and antiquities section when he notices by happenstance that the painting his fellow officers have recovered was indeed a fake.William meets Beth and is immediately enamored with her. Unfortunately, she has a stake in getting the missing masterpiece back into the possession of the museum. But she has other motives as well which are not related until near the end of the book which throws William for a loop.I really liked how William’s father and sister were included in this book. The whole scene where his sister was cross examining him was classic! I wish I could watch that on tv just to see him squirm. And William’s father, Sir Julian Warwick QC was the type of man you wanted on your side when you were between a rock and a hard place.When William makes that choice to sleep with Christina Faulkner, the wife of the man with the stolen painting, I thought it would be all over between him and Beth but that fact never truly came forth. I wonder if it will be brought up in future books. I have to admit that I feared for William after that occurred.I am invested. I am ready for book two! I look forward to anything new Archer brings forth in this world. It is my first Jeffrey Archer book and I know for sure I will be picking up others. It is no wonder this man is a world-renowned author. This man knows how to craft a story. I am surprised tv series haven’t produced some of his books. Maybe they have and I am just not aware.Great stuff. Pick this up for sure!I received this as an ARC (Advanced Reader Copy) in return for an honest review. I thank NetGalley, the publisher and the author for allowing me to read this title.
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  • Vicki
    January 1, 1970
    “Nothing Ventured,” by Jeffrey Archer, St. Martin's Press, 336 pages, Sept. 3, 2019.William Warwick has always wanted to be a detective rather than become a lawyer like his father, Sir Julian Warwick. After college, he joins London’s Metropolitan Police Force.He starts as a patrol officer, a job he has to hold for two years before he can take the detective’s exam. His training officer is Constable Fred Yates. He takes the exam, but before he gets the results, he is ordered to go to Scotland Yard “Nothing Ventured,” by Jeffrey Archer, St. Martin's Press, 336 pages, Sept. 3, 2019.William Warwick has always wanted to be a detective rather than become a lawyer like his father, Sir Julian Warwick. After college, he joins London’s Metropolitan Police Force.He starts as a patrol officer, a job he has to hold for two years before he can take the detective’s exam. His training officer is Constable Fred Yates. He takes the exam, but before he gets the results, he is ordered to go to Scotland Yard and meet with Commander Hawksby. He’s told that he passed and is assigned to Peckham, but while in the office, he recognizes a painting as a forgery because of his degree in art history.Warwick is stabbed and Yates is killed during Warwick’s last night on patrol. When he recovers, he is assigned to the Scotland Yard Art and Antiques unit. His first big case is investigating the theft of a priceless Rembrandt painting from the Fitzmolean Museum. Police have been investigating Miles Faulkner.At an art lecture, he meets Beth Rainsford, who eventually becomes his fiancée. He doesn’t realize that she has a big secret. The ending is two unconnected trials running at the same time in separate courtrooms.This is the start of a new series. In a letter to readers at the beginning of the book Jeffrey Archer says that Warwick will eventually become police commissioner. He says this is not a detective story, it is a story about a detective. That is true. The novel is more about Warwick’s career than any of the crimes investigated. In accordance with FTC guidelines, the advance reader's edition of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for a review.
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  • Gail Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Jeffrey Archer continues to amaze me with his masterful storytelling abilities. At the end of his last series, The Clifton Chronicles, Archer concluded the seventy-year saga of Harry and Emma Clifton. Harry was a successful international writer whose fictional character was William Warrick, police detective. The ever-resourceful Archer has begun a new series with the fictional William Warrick as the main character. And the first book in this new series is as compelling as all of Archer’s other n Jeffrey Archer continues to amaze me with his masterful storytelling abilities. At the end of his last series, The Clifton Chronicles, Archer concluded the seventy-year saga of Harry and Emma Clifton. Harry was a successful international writer whose fictional character was William Warrick, police detective. The ever-resourceful Archer has begun a new series with the fictional William Warrick as the main character. And the first book in this new series is as compelling as all of Archer’s other novels.William Warrick joins Scotland Yard on the arts and antiquities squad after serving two years with the London Metropolitan Police. He is following his own vision for his future rather than that of his father, Sir Julian Warrick QC. The elder Warrick hoped William would follow him and become a barrister, like his sister before him. William’s first case is that of a missing Rembrandt, which opens many doors for him, including love. In his first court case, he is pitted against his sister. Like the Clifton Chronicles, family plays an important role in this new series. Archer has laid the groundwork for another saga which he promises to continue for eight books, with Warrick’s ability and determination, as well as Archer’s longevity, playing a role in the ultimate length of the series.One of the things that I love about Jeffrey Archer is the conversational tone that he employs in his writing. He knows how to shape a story through vignettes that draw the plot line while allowing the reader space to make their own conclusions. Good characters and strong plotting are always part of Archer’s books, but his use of wit and intrigue are two of my favorite parts of his writings. (I must confess that even after multiple readings I still have not figured out one of the clues in his short story collection Twelve Red Herrings.) Nothing Ventured is a great read and ends with a chuckle. You go Jeffrey Archer.I thank Minotaur Books/St. Martin’s Press and Netgalley for allowing me to read an Advanced Readers Copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Mary C
    January 1, 1970
    Fans of Jeffrey Archer’s previous books will find all the usual elements in his story-telling in this “first in a new series” novels. For those who haven’t read any of his work before, this is not a bad place to start. As in Archer’s previous books, deaths, even murders, are not blood-spattered, romances and relationships are formed quickly and easily (as are enemies, come to that), and there are clearly defined good guys and bad guys. The narrative moves along quickly and, for the most part, wi Fans of Jeffrey Archer’s previous books will find all the usual elements in his story-telling in this “first in a new series” novels. For those who haven’t read any of his work before, this is not a bad place to start. As in Archer’s previous books, deaths, even murders, are not blood-spattered, romances and relationships are formed quickly and easily (as are enemies, come to that), and there are clearly defined good guys and bad guys. The narrative moves along quickly and, for the most part, will keep the reader’s interest.Happily, he avoided a technique he overused in the Clifton Chronicles where at the end of nearly every volume there was a cliffhanger that couldn’t be resolved until the next one came out. Given the amount of time between releases, it was truly frustrating and felt like a straight money grab (BUY MY NEXT BOOK). Anyhow, in this book the story wraps up neatly, but there are sufficient dangling threads that could be unraveled in future books. I have read all of the novels he’s written and would rate this as middle of the pack. His earlier stories were less facile and the characters didn’t have so much just fall into their laps. I wish that he would re-introduce some of that struggle. I also wish there was more character development. I finished this a few days ago and can’t really say I recall many characters in detail. However, overall it was an enjoyable, easy read and I would probably read the next in the series.My thanks to NetGallery, the publisher, St. Martin’s Press, and the author for an advance copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    Nothing Ventured is described as NOT a detective story but as a story of a detective in the making. Perhaps therein lies the rub. This book was a bit more simplistic, in all aspects, than the books I have previously read by Jeffrey Archer. It had a sort of “Golly Gee Whiz” (although in a very British way) feel about it.Sir Julian Warwick, a jurist who has made a brilliant career of defending villains of the worst order, has high hopes that his son will follow him at his old college reading law a Nothing Ventured is described as NOT a detective story but as a story of a detective in the making. Perhaps therein lies the rub. This book was a bit more simplistic, in all aspects, than the books I have previously read by Jeffrey Archer. It had a sort of “Golly Gee Whiz” (although in a very British way) feel about it.Sir Julian Warwick, a jurist who has made a brilliant career of defending villains of the worst order, has high hopes that his son will follow him at his old college reading law and ultimately join him in chambers. William Warwick antithetically wants to join the Metropolitan Police Force and spend his life “making sure those…villains are locked up…not allowed to go free…. thanks to his father’s skillful advocacy.” The members of the Warwick family are introduced, and each allowed to play their part in the furtherance of the story. The first two thirds of the book see William promoted from division to division eventually ending up in the Art and Antiques Squad of Scotland Yard. There is dry humor, a love interest, the investigation of an art theft, a very cheap affair, and a very interesting trial.The last third of the book was worth wading through the earlier extraneous bits of “this and that”. Thankfully and interestingly Sir Julian plays a significant role in the latter part of the book and this is where I found Archer at his best.Nothing Ventured was an easy, pleasant read, setting the stage for the future installments of DC William Warwick which will undoubtedly be forthcoming.Thank you NetGalley and St. Martin’s Press for an advance copy
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  • Janice
    January 1, 1970
    William Warwick had wanted to be in law enforcement since he was 8 years old, much to the dismay of his father, an attorney. After completing his study of Art History at London University, William begins work as a beat cop. After two years, he is able to become a detective, and is assigned to a specialized unit, Art and Antiquities, where he participates in an investigation of a ring that steals valuable paintings, and then makes deals with the insurance companies. Currently the unit is focused William Warwick had wanted to be in law enforcement since he was 8 years old, much to the dismay of his father, an attorney. After completing his study of Art History at London University, William begins work as a beat cop. After two years, he is able to become a detective, and is assigned to a specialized unit, Art and Antiquities, where he participates in an investigation of a ring that steals valuable paintings, and then makes deals with the insurance companies. Currently the unit is focused on a Rembrandt that has been missing from the Fitzmolen museum for seven years. William and his coworkers devise a plan to catch the thieves, and this eventually leads to a courtroom setting. The author does a good job of developing an entertaining story, and the courtroom drama is every bit as interesting a read as the complex activities for nabbing the thieves. There is also some romance for William developed into the story. Other characters, such as William's sister and coworkers of William add interest and depth to this novel. This was my first try at a Jeffrey Archer book, as something had made me think I would not like his style of writing. I found that to be entirely inaccurate in reading this book. I enjoyed the style, and I especially liked the frequent playfulness of the dialog, and sometimes the narrative. I plan to continue this series, and give a try to some of the author's other offerings.I want to thank Netgalley, the author, and St. Martin's Press for the copy of this book I was provided.
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