1973
A fascinating account of the music and epic social change of 1973, a defining year for David Bowie, Bruce Springsteen, Pink Floyd, Elton John, the Rolling Stones, Eagles, Elvis Presley, and the former members of The Beatles. 1973 was the year rock hit its peak while splintering—just like the rest of the world. Ziggy Stardust travelled to America in David Bowie’s Aladdin Sane. The Dark Side of the Moon began its epic run on the Billboard charts, inspired by the madness of Pink Floyd's founder, while all four former Beatles scored top ten albums, two hitting #1.FM battled AM, and Motown battled Philly on the charts, as the era of protest soul gave way to disco, while DJ Kool Herc gave birth to hip hop in the Bronx. The glam rock of the New York Dolls and Alice Cooper split into glam metal and punk. Hippies and rednecks made peace in Austin thanks to Willie Nelson, while outlaw country, country rock, and Southern rock each pointed toward modern country. The Allman Brothers, Grateful Dead, and the Band played the largest rock concert to date at Watkins Glen.Led Zep’s Houses of the Holy reflected the rise of funk and reggae. The singer songwriter movement led by Bob Dylan, Neil Young, and Joni Mitchell flourished at the Troubadour and Max’s Kansas City, where Bruce Springsteen, Bob Marley, and Iggy Pop shared bill. Elvis Presley’s Aloha from Hawaii Via Satellite TV special attracted more viewers than the moon landing, while Elton John’s albums dominated the number one spot for two and a half months.Just as U.S. involvement in Vietnam drew to a close, Roe v. Wade ignited a new phase in the culture war. While the oil crisis imploded the American dream of endless prosperity, and Watergate’s walls closed in on Nixon, the music of 1973 both reflected a shattered world and brought us together.

1973 Details

Title1973
Author
ReleaseDec 3rd, 2019
PublisherThomas Dunne Books
ISBN-139781250299987
Rating
GenreMusic, History, Nonfiction

1973 Review

  • Evelina | AvalinahsBooks
    January 1, 1970
    How I read this: Free ebook copy received through NetGalleyThis was a wonderful book, although I do admit that the historical detail sometimes went over my head. There's A LOT of stuff about musical history from that time, and by a lot, I mean that only a true fan of rock will know ALL of the musicians that were talked about in this book. Regardless, I enjoyed it immensely because there was so much new information.The thing I liked best about the book was that it wasn't solely about the music - How I read this: Free ebook copy received through NetGalleyThis was a wonderful book, although I do admit that the historical detail sometimes went over my head. There's A LOT of stuff about musical history from that time, and by a lot, I mean that only a true fan of rock will know ALL of the musicians that were talked about in this book. Regardless, I enjoyed it immensely because there was so much new information.The thing I liked best about the book was that it wasn't solely about the music - there were so many cultural tidbits, little side stories about people who were influential - even the Watergate scandal is touched upon. Big movements and events are also discussed, for example, there are stories about how music influenced the women's equality movement, the LGBT movement and it seems all sorts of other freedoms that weren't even considered before made themselves apparent in the decade. It's like everything happened in 1973! Everything in the latest cultural history that matters... Basically had its roots then. Fascinating.Anyway, this book is quite detailed and in depth and may prove to be a little much if you're expecting an easy read. But for a true fan or for someone who is curious about the detailed history of music throughout 1973 (and not only), this is a wonderful read. I really enjoyed it despite my lack of knowledge in the area.I thank the publisher for giving me a free copy of the ebook in exchange to my honest review. This has not affected my opinion.Book Blog | Bookstagram | Bookish Twitter
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  • *TUDOR^QUEEN*
    January 1, 1970
    This book is encyclopedic in its breadth of information regarding the music scene in 1973. It is very detailed, not only in aspects of the music itself, but the culture, social and political climate at the time. I grew up as a Beatles fan in the sixties because of my older brother. Almost like one grows up in a religion, it was just part of me. However, I really grew up musically as my own person during the seventies. For that reason, I was keen on reading this book. However, I did not realize This book is encyclopedic in its breadth of information regarding the music scene in 1973. It is very detailed, not only in aspects of the music itself, but the culture, social and political climate at the time. I grew up as a Beatles fan in the sixties because of my older brother. Almost like one grows up in a religion, it was just part of me. However, I really grew up musically as my own person during the seventies. For that reason, I was keen on reading this book. However, I did not realize just how deep it was going to go, off into tangents of musical artists whose genres I was not particularly drawn to, and some of its surrounding cultural climate during that year. Therefore, I very much skimmed through parts I was not interested in. However, I must commend the extraordinary research conducted to execute such a thorough examination of the musical lexicon during the seminal year of 1973. Thank you to St. Martin's Press / Thomas Dunne Books for providing an advance reader copy via NetGalley.
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  • TJ
    January 1, 1970
    Pretty good overall. I learned a few new things about artists that I never really got into and albums that I never thought had such a sordid history. A Lot of it is lazy rehashing, rewriting, and assumptions on the author's part to take all the lyrics and original sources at face value. I have a hard time with author's looking at lyrics and thinking that's EXACTLY how an artist felt or compelled to get across. Bowie's shadow is all throughout this book with his crowning Ziggy year being 1973, Pretty good overall. I learned a few new things about artists that I never really got into and albums that I never thought had such a sordid history. A Lot of it is lazy rehashing, rewriting, and assumptions on the author's part to take all the lyrics and original sources at face value. I have a hard time with author's looking at lyrics and thinking that's EXACTLY how an artist felt or compelled to get across. Bowie's shadow is all throughout this book with his crowning Ziggy year being 1973, and he's pretty darn cryptic. The guy used William S. Burroughs cut up method! It's a little bit of everything so us the reader gets a dash of every musical genre and artist within the year. I feel like this would have been better titled '1973: Pop Music at the Crossroads' rather than having the 'Rock' in the title. Rock is featured heavily, but the thesis of the book is 'at the Crossroads'. ALSO.... WHERE'S FRANK ZAPPA?? Lost a star for excluding one of the biggest counterculture and influential rock masters of the age. That band in 1973 was probably the best live act and is nowhere to be found in these pages.
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  • Janice Lombardo
    January 1, 1970
    Originally, I thought this would be a book about rock bands, etc. I was so pleasantly surprised to find out that the book encompasses ALL genres of interest in the early 1970's. I admit that I was 22 that year yet a lot of that time holds fond (and some not so fond) remembrances for me.A completely comprehensive, very detailed, account of the year 1973 (and a bit of 1972 and 1974). This read includes (but is not limited to) songs & artists, news, films, sports and more. Information from the Originally, I thought this would be a book about rock bands, etc. I was so pleasantly surprised to find out that the book encompasses ALL genres of interest in the early 1970's. I admit that I was 22 that year yet a lot of that time holds fond (and some not so fond) remembrances for me.A completely comprehensive, very detailed, account of the year 1973 (and a bit of 1972 and 1974). This read includes (but is not limited to) songs & artists, news, films, sports and more. Information from the mainstream newspapers to the Village Voice is depicted.This is a NOT TO MISS read for those from that generation as well as anyone interested in this era.Great Work, Andrew Grant Jackson!!!Many Thanks to St. Martin's Publishing Group and NetGalley for a wonderful piece of nostalgia.
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  • J Earl
    January 1, 1970
    1973: Rock at the Crossroads by Andrew Grant Jackson is an informative nostalgic read for those of us who remember the year and a wonderful glimpse into a landmark year for both rock music and society as a whole for those too young (not old enough?) to remember 1973.As someone who remembers 1973 quite clearly, my opinion of the book will be heavily colored by that fact. One of the things happening during this time was the shift from AM stations to FM stations for rock and, eventually, other 1973: Rock at the Crossroads by Andrew Grant Jackson is an informative nostalgic read for those of us who remember the year and a wonderful glimpse into a landmark year for both rock music and society as a whole for those too young (not old enough?) to remember 1973.As someone who remembers 1973 quite clearly, my opinion of the book will be heavily colored by that fact. One of the things happening during this time was the shift from AM stations to FM stations for rock and, eventually, other popular music. This book almost reads like a hybrid of those two formats. AM radio, while having some stations that were more narrowly focused on one type of music, was dominated by Top 40 stations, usually with a slight emphasis in one direction or another. On these stations you would hear a mix of different types of rock as well as different types of R&B and even some country. FM, starting with Album Oriented Rock stations, began the era of the separation of genres more clearly. This had positives and negatives. You could listen to more music in whatever genre you preferred, but it also meant far fewer opportunities to expand your tastes unless you consciously changed to a station playing a different genre. Which brings me to why I think of this book a lot like a hybrid of those formats.While the book is chronological it also can't be strictly chronological and still tell a decent story. So each chapter uses something that occurred on this timeline but, in telling the story (of an album or a song), it moves back to what led to the event and moves forward to tell what it foreshadows. So each segment (of which there were several in each chapter) might be primarily about rock or R&B, the next segment often changed genres. So you did get some immersion in a specific genre but you also read about what was happening in a different genre. So many books, understandably, focus on a particular narrowly defined type of popular music, mainly because those books are telling a history of that genre. This book, because it is describing a specific and short period of history covers a wider range because that more accurately portrays what was going in most areas of the music business as well as society.As for the actual information, there is a lot here that isn't so much new as presented within a holistic context. For example, it hadn't occurred to me that Bette Midler's Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy might not have been as popular had it been released just a little sooner while the Vietnam War was still claiming American lives. It might not have made a difference but it is something to consider. There are many such connections made in the book that make this nostalgic trip something more than just a passive ride down memory lane.I would recommend this to anyone with an interest in the period, whether limited to music or more societal and cultural. And of course those of us of a certain age can both reminisce and learn some things.Reviewed from a copy made available by the publisher via NetGalley.
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  • Chris Jaffe
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. An exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) coverage on that was the year that was. Picking 1973 as a focal point makes sense. Jackson notes at the outset that a study (by 538.com) of classic rock stations shows that this is the year that receives the most plays on those stations. That makes sense: The big names from the 1960s were still around (ex-Beatles, Stones, Who, some old Motown warhorses), and the big 1970s names were in high gear (Bowie, Zep, Pink Floyd, Elton John). Also, 3.5 stars. An exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) coverage on that was the year that was. Picking 1973 as a focal point makes sense. Jackson notes at the outset that a study (by 538.com) of classic rock stations shows that this is the year that receives the most plays on those stations. That makes sense: The big names from the 1960s were still around (ex-Beatles, Stones, Who, some old Motown warhorses), and the big 1970s names were in high gear (Bowie, Zep, Pink Floyd, Elton John). Also, Jackson points out that you see the beginnings of new movements occurring. The Stooges and the New York Dolls help presage punk. A house party in NYC helps kick off hip-hop. Disco is a rising force. So there is a lot of good things about this. Yet I rounded down to 3 stars instead of rounding up to 4. Why? Well, maybe I'll reconsider sometime later, but for now it comes down to how the material is presenting. One of my favorite phrases for understanding material is the old line: you can't see the forest through the trees. Jackson is so bloodminded determined to give us a little bit on EVERYONE in 1973 that it's hard to have any sense of a bigger picture. It's all tree, and no forest. You learn a little bit about this guy and a little bit on that guy and a little bit on so many - but it's so low on so many that it ends up being too little on too many. The book is an inch deep and a mile wide. He may have been better off focusing on some of the key players and then giving a paragraph or two on all the others. I read a book on the year 1971 in rock a few years ago. That worked better precisely because it took a bigger picture, focused on some themes and didn't try to give equal coverage to every damn act under the sun. I mean, I might still revise my opinion and think it deserves four stars. But my main impression: This is like reading a lengthly encyclopedia article on the year of rock: 1973.
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  • Diane Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    So what’s so important about 1973 to rock? A lot of bands and cultural icons began that year. From the first Dick Clark New Year’s Rockin’ Eve to the first albums of diverse acts like Bruce Springsteen, Queen, the New York Dolls, and Aerosmith, music had plenty to celebrate while Nixon was impeached and left the White House. Punk, disco, and hip-hop all began in NYC in 1973. The Vietnam War ended. And Ziggy Stardust died.Readers who remember 1973 are in for a treat and a trip down memory lane. So what’s so important about 1973 to rock? A lot of bands and cultural icons began that year. From the first Dick Clark New Year’s Rockin’ Eve to the first albums of diverse acts like Bruce Springsteen, Queen, the New York Dolls, and Aerosmith, music had plenty to celebrate while Nixon was impeached and left the White House. Punk, disco, and hip-hop all began in NYC in 1973. The Vietnam War ended. And Ziggy Stardust died.Readers who remember 1973 are in for a treat and a trip down memory lane. It helps if you have a subscription music service to play the music discussed in the book. Pandora even has a playlist for the book!1973’s real change was the merging of different music styles together. 1973: Rock at the Crossroads covers all types of music from punk to hip-hop to country outlaws like Willie Nelson.If you love music, especially 1970s music, you need to read this book. It is filled with a bunch of insider stories. For example, a backup singer for Ike and Tina Turner’s band was the inspiration for the Stones’ “Brown Sugar” as well as Bowie’s “Lady Grinning Soul”.Overall, 1973: Rock at the Crossroads is an excellent gift for music fans and a fascinating look at a different era. 5 stars!Thanks to Thomas Dunn Books and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    I would really rate this a 3.5. 1973 was the year that many new forms of rock began to emerge ( punk, disco, hip-hop, country outlaws, reggae, technopop, female rockers, glam, and gender benders) "Classic Rock stations today play more songs from 1973 than any other year" I enjoyed portions of this well-researched book, but I got lost in many of the details. Although I was a freshman in college in 1973, I honestly do not remember many of the bands and musicians mentioned in this book...and I love I would really rate this a 3.5. 1973 was the year that many new forms of rock began to emerge ( punk, disco, hip-hop, country outlaws, reggae, technopop, female rockers, glam, and gender benders) "Classic Rock stations today play more songs from 1973 than any other year" I enjoyed portions of this well-researched book, but I got lost in many of the details. Although I was a freshman in college in 1973, I honestly do not remember many of the bands and musicians mentioned in this book...and I love Classic Rock! Apparently, I was too busy studying...hmmm. I suppose if you are an aficionado of rock history, you will find this book more relevant.What I did like most about the book is that the author wrote about the historical events that were happening at the time. This feature helped put the music into perspective. Also, he included some biographical information and anecdotes about the artists that I always find interesting. The structure of the book goes season by season in chronological order. I liked that it did not skip around. Also, do not skip reading the Introduction...it helps set the stage for the era.
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  • Cassie-Traveling Sister-
    January 1, 1970
    I love talking about the 70s with my mother in law, she talks about how different it was and she still loves the music from during that time period . So when I spotted this book I was so excited! I’ve been making it a point to spread my wings and add some non fiction and this book was perfect! I loved that this book wasn’t just about music but how the world during this time affected the music and how the music played a part of its history! You can tell the author did an amazing job researching I love talking about the 70s with my mother in law, she talks about how different it was and she still loves the music from during that time period . So when I spotted this book I was so excited! I’ve been making it a point to spread my wings and add some non fiction and this book was perfect! I loved that this book wasn’t just about music but how the world during this time affected the music and how the music played a part of its history! You can tell the author did an amazing job researching the facts and I didn’t feel like I was reading a non fiction book at all , it held my interest and of course I would hit my mother in law with a text and tell her what I was reading about. There was some spots that the author discussed outside of 1973 and I enjoyed some of the backstories as well! I also thought that it was neat that it didn’t just focus on the music but added in some spots that included the news and sports. The pictures that were also in this book made me want to go back and witness these amazing stars first hand! I give this a solid five stars! Highly recommend you add this to your Christmas list for anyone that would enjoy reading this gorgeous book!
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    DISCLAIMER: A digital version of this book was given to me by NetGallery in exchange for a fair and honest review.I waiver between 3 and 4 stars on this one because it was a mixed bag for me.1973 was among my most important formative years and music played a big part in all of that. Like so many, a song from that time frame can take me back to a time and place within seconds.I loved the many facts listed in this book, but also was a little disappointed that the book really seemed more list-like DISCLAIMER: A digital version of this book was given to me by NetGallery in exchange for a fair and honest review.I waiver between 3 and 4 stars on this one because it was a mixed bag for me.1973 was among my most important formative years and music played a big part in all of that. Like so many, a song from that time frame can take me back to a time and place within seconds.I loved the many facts listed in this book, but also was a little disappointed that the book really seemed more list-like to me than anything. There seemed to be an amazing opportunity to share photos and to flesh out the stories a little more fully.I was very pleased to see the book did not simply touch on ROCK but on many genres of music.At this point, I am undecided about whether I would purchase a copy for myself, but I might borrow it from the library as another walk down memory lane.
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