Mentors
Could happiness lie in helping others and being open to accepting help yourself?Mentors – the follow up to Sunday Times number one bestseller, Recovery – describes the benefits of seeking and offering help.‘I have mentors in every area of my life, as a comic, a dad, a recovering drug addict, a spiritual being and as a man who believes that we, as individuals and the great globe itself, are works in progress and that through a chain of mentorship we can improve individually and globally, together . . . One of the unexpected advantages my drug addiction granted is that the process of recovery that I practise includes a mentorship tradition.I will encourage you to find mentors of your own and explain how you may better use the ones you already have. Furthermore, I will tell you about my experiences mentoring others and how invaluable that has been on my ongoing journey to self-acceptance and how it has helped me to transform from a bewildered and volatile vagabond to a (mostly) present and (usually) focussed husband and father.’Mentors: How to Help and Be Helped describes the impact that a series of significant people have had on the author – from the wayward youths he tried to emulate growing up in Essex, through the first ex-junkie sage, to the people he turns to today to help him be a better father. It explores how we all – consciously and unconsciously – choose guides, mentors and heroes throughout our lives and examines the new perspectives they can bring.

Mentors Details

TitleMentors
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 24th, 2019
PublisherBluebird
Rating
GenreAudiobook, Self Help

Mentors Review

  • Mohammad Javad
    January 1, 1970
    Really enjoyed Russell's new book. His honesty and wisdom make the book very pleasant to read. Really enjoyed it.
  • Kylie
    January 1, 1970
    Look, lets get this out of the way first - Russell Brand is wordy. He strings out a sentence that could be condensed down into three words, but he does it in such a way that you know his brain has been slow cooking the thoughts for such a time that the meat of the sentence is falling off the bones and can only be held together with poetic expanse and entropic tangential lines of thought. Oh, it seems I am a bit wordy too. I really liked this one, I did not read Recovery, despite my addiction to Look, lets get this out of the way first - Russell Brand is wordy. He strings out a sentence that could be condensed down into three words, but he does it in such a way that you know his brain has been slow cooking the thoughts for such a time that the meat of the sentence is falling off the bones and can only be held together with poetic expanse and entropic tangential lines of thought. Oh, it seems I am a bit wordy too. I really liked this one, I did not read Recovery, despite my addiction to writing longer sentences than necessary and my obsession with needing to know everything, I didnt think it was applicable to me. I may have to go back and read it, because if asked, I would have thought Mentors didnt apply to me either, but I got a lot out of it. I read the book in the same month that I started listening to Under the Skin, and so there was a bit of crossover. But the relationships he mentions that were either mentor or mentee at various stages of his recovery or his life, were beautiful to experience. Whether spiritual, physical, psychological or just based in friendship, Brand explores the people that have inspired him to become the bearded bastion of philosophy that is today. I think fatherhood has had an enormous impact on Brand's view of the world, and it comes through in his recollections of past relationships and present experiences. The knowledge that the ultimate role of mentorship has been thrust upon him forever has given him insight into what it takes to allow yourself to be helped or guided by the wisdom of others, and what it means to pay that forward. This is a book for everyone, and serves as a reminder to stop and think about the people that have - deliberately or not - become mentors to you on your own journey. Russell Brand is becoming one of my favourite voices in this mixed self-help/philosophy/motivation genre.
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  • Mark Farley
    January 1, 1970
    As an additional adjacency to his brilliant self-help tome, Recovery, Russell introduces us to the many different characters in his life that has aided and abetted him (so to speak) throughout his spiritual improvement over the last decade or so. From sages to ex-addicts such as himself to business and medical professionals who guide and impart their wisdom, Mentors is full of great advice along with Brand's trademark wit. It's inspiring and thoughtful, tragic and sad in parts, but most of all, As an additional adjacency to his brilliant self-help tome, Recovery, Russell introduces us to the many different characters in his life that has aided and abetted him (so to speak) throughout his spiritual improvement over the last decade or so. From sages to ex-addicts such as himself to business and medical professionals who guide and impart their wisdom, Mentors is full of great advice along with Brand's trademark wit. It's inspiring and thoughtful, tragic and sad in parts, but most of all, clever and impactful.
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