Cub
A laugh-out-loud funny and empowering graphic memoir about growing up and finding your voice. Twelve-year-old Cindy has just dipped a toe into seventh-grade drama—with its complicated friendships, bullies, and cute boys—when she earns an internship as a cub reporter at a local newspaper in the early 1970s. A (rare) young female reporter takes Cindy under her wing, and Cindy soon learns not only how to write a lede, but also how to respectfully question authority, how to assert herself in a world run by men, and—as the Watergate scandal unfolds—how brave reporting and writing can topple a corrupt world leader. Searching for her own scoops, Cindy doesn’t always get it right, on paper or in real life. But whether she’s writing features about ghost hunters, falling off her bicycle and into her first crush, or navigating shifting friendships, Cindy grows wiser and more confident through every awkward and hilarious mistake.

Cub Details

TitleCub
Author
ReleaseJan 7th, 2020
PublisherAlgonquin Young Readers
ISBN-139781616208486
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Childrens, Middle Grade, Historical, Historical Fiction

Cub Review

  • Christi M
    January 1, 1970
    Cub, a graphic novel memoir, is a refreshing look at what it was like to grow up as a female in the school year of 1972 as we get to watch a young middle-grader navigate through friendships, boys, job/future opportunities, bullies, and more.Thoughts:There is so much to love about this graphic novel. Admittingly, I went into it rather skeptically. I’m not a big fan of the 70s decade, although it did give us Star Wars, and I question my ability to properly evaluate graphic novels. But only a page Cub, a graphic novel memoir, is a refreshing look at what it was like to grow up as a female in the school year of 1972 as we get to watch a young middle-grader navigate through friendships, boys, job/future opportunities, bullies, and more.Thoughts:There is so much to love about this graphic novel. Admittingly, I went into it rather skeptically. I’m not a big fan of the 70s decade, although it did give us Star Wars, and I question my ability to properly evaluate graphic novels. But only a page or two in and I was hooked by the drawings, humor, and main character.Middle school life is tough. Cub starts out showing us what Cindy’s life is like at both home and school, but mostly school or otherwise known as the “Wild Kingdom,” introducing us to the bullies (and ways to avoid them), her best friend Katie, and then also her favorite teacher, Mrs. Schulz who teaches English. It is this teacher who gives Cindy the idea that she could one day become a writer and hooks her up with a local female newspaper reporter.Soon, the big day arrives for her first assignment with the Leslie, the female newspaper writer, and off they go to The Board of Education’s Finance Subcommittee meeting. (Boy, that sounds like fun.) Cindy takes notes even though she has no idea what any of it means and feels a little down. But Leslie is great and gives her encouragement by providing a story about how Bob Woodward of the Washington Post started out.As year progresses, Leslie and Cindy continue to go on more and more varying assignments and you can see Cindy’s enjoyment and confidence continue to grow as well. But at the same time, Cub also shows what happens in between the assignments as Cindy works through changing friendships and even boys! She makes mistakes, learns new things about herself and others and continues to evolve.I was impressed by how Cub covers so many topics so very well, including:- Difference between what stories female reporters were assigned to versus what male reporters were assigned to.- 1970 current events including the Vietnam war, ERA Amendment, Nixon Watergate and presidential election.- Difference in how fathers discussed future jobs with their sons as compared to their daughters.- Cindy’s growing interest and encouragement in a variety of subjects that gave her growing confidence.- How friendships grew and changed in the middle grade years.If I ever get a chance to go back and relive a period of my life, it won’t be middle school and I would wager that this is true for most of us. It is that period of your life when you begin to start growing up emotionally, mentally, physically, and intellectually and it is tough. Cub encompasses many of these middle school moments so well in this graphic novel bringing everything to a satisfying conclusion.Rating: 5 starsThanks to Algonquin Young Readers for the advanced reader copy and the opportunity to provide an honest review.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    *thank you to Netgalley, Algonquin Young Readers and Cynthia L Copeland for an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review*4 stars.Cub by Cynthia L. Copeland, is an entertaining and well told story about a 12 year old girl who becomes a Cub Reporter, while also dealing with day to day life of being 12 years old and facing the minefield of the usual ups and downs of school life, with friendships, bullies, dating, hair and make up, and also discovering who you are. It's a lot to go through. *thank you to Netgalley, Algonquin Young Readers and Cynthia L Copeland for an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review*4 stars.Cub by Cynthia L. Copeland, is an entertaining and well told story about a 12 year old girl who becomes a Cub Reporter, while also dealing with day to day life of being 12 years old and facing the minefield of the usual ups and downs of school life, with friendships, bullies, dating, hair and make up, and also discovering who you are. It's a lot to go through. This Graphic Novel shows young females what it is like and her experiences while providing readers a positive role model. We get to follow Cindy through her journey in the early 1970s. It isn't always easy and it isn't always fun, but she gets through it by working out what she needs to do and with help from her mentor, a female reporter named Leslie Jacobs, she manages to learn how to be a reporter. She also discovers her love for drawing and photography, which she is very good at.While aimed for middle grade readers, I reckon adults who are still children at heart will also this book. The illustrations are very good, both in the style and the colouring. I would highly recommend this for those who live authors such as, Shannon Hale, Kayla Miller and Raina Telgemeier.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Discovering a knack for writing, Cindy's 7th grade English teacher suggests she consider a career in it. But never having met a writer before -- this was the early 70s before the internet made them more accessible -- her teacher tracks down a local female reporter to show her the behind-the-scenes of being a journalist. Cindy's interest grows, as does her experience, and she knows she's found her passion when she sees her name in print for the first time.But this isn't just a graphic memoir Discovering a knack for writing, Cindy's 7th grade English teacher suggests she consider a career in it. But never having met a writer before -- this was the early 70s before the internet made them more accessible -- her teacher tracks down a local female reporter to show her the behind-the-scenes of being a journalist. Cindy's interest grows, as does her experience, and she knows she's found her passion when she sees her name in print for the first time.But this isn't just a graphic memoir about Cindy being a journalist. It's about being 12. Cindy's best friend is drifting away, toward a group of girls who'd always been mean toward them, and now Cindy has to figure out things like making new friends and figuring out where to sit in the lunch room. She's also navigating the ups and downs of having her first "boyfriend." It's when a new girl moves to town that Cindy sees the power in viewing people through a lens of freshness and that helps her connect with new friends . . . as well as revive old ones.Fun art, with a lot of humor, this book nails being 12. Though set pre-internet and pre-cell phone, it'll resonate deeply. It reminded me quite a bit of NOW AND THEN and tapped into a lot of the feelings that film did for me about being young and hungry, but also scared and alone. There's a lot of great stuff about the burgeoning second wave feminist movement, about environmentalism, and other social reforms that, well, remain much more similar now than should be. Though I read a print galley and it was in black and white, it's clear there's racial diversity among the characters in the book, which will be great to see in full color.
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  • chloe ♡
    January 1, 1970
    a big thank you to algonquin young readers for sending me an advanced readers' copy in exchange for an honest review. 4.5 starscub is a fun middle grade graphic novel with some amazing lessons. in the book, the main character, cindy, a seventh-grader who aspires to become a reporter someday, gets an internship at a local newspaper, and starts discovering more about herself along the way.cindy is such a relatable character, and i'm sure both young children and adults alike would find her story an a big thank you to algonquin young readers for sending me an advanced readers' copy in exchange for an honest review. ♡4.5 starscub is a fun middle grade graphic novel with some amazing lessons. in the book, the main character, cindy, a seventh-grader who aspires to become a reporter someday, gets an internship at a local newspaper, and starts discovering more about herself along the way.cindy is such a relatable character, and i'm sure both young children and adults alike would find her story an interesting and inspiring one. in cub, cindy deals with bullies, her best friend becoming distant, and criticism on the newspaper articles she writes. but throughout the course of the novel, she meets new friends, stays strong, tries her hand at photography, and slowly gets better at writing. the character growth was so well written, and i loved reading about cindy's experiences at and outside of school.i also really liked cindy's relationship with her english teacher, mrs schultz. mrs schultz has always been a bit of an outcast like cindy, seen from how she chooses to stay in her classroom rather than hang out with the rest of the teachers on their smoke breaks. she guides cindy and introduces her to a journalist at the local newspaper so that she can get a taste of her dream career. i feel that middle grade books often paint teachers as boring old farts just so they can make small kids (ie. their intended audience) crack up, but that isn't the case in cub and it's so refreshing and heartwarming to see such a great teacher-student relationship in a book for younger readers.to sum up, cub is a fun read with the cutest illustrations, amazing friendships and important messages. would 10/10 recommend!
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  • Lea ♞ That_Bookdragon
    January 1, 1970
    4/5 Thank you so much to the publisher for providing me with a free e-ARC of this graphic novel in exchange for an honest opinion.This graphic novel is a memoir following Cynthia L. Copeland as she discovers her true passion for writing and being a reporter during the 1970s as she is twelve years old. She is given the opportunity to go on the field with another reporter thanks to her English teacher and becomes a cub reporter. I have very rarely been disappointed by Middle Grade books and this 4/5 ⭐️Thank you so much to the publisher for providing me with a free e-ARC of this graphic novel in exchange for an honest opinion.This graphic novel is a memoir following Cynthia L. Copeland as she discovers her true passion for writing and being a reporter during the 1970s as she is twelve years old. She is given the opportunity to go on the field with another reporter thanks to her English teacher and becomes a cub reporter. I have very rarely been disappointed by Middle Grade books and this one is no exception. It is excellent in the way it shows how to deal with bullies and embracing your passion. I loved the way it was written and it is truly empowering for women and young girls. The role model has a very positive role and is not afraid to show how much she loves what she is doing. I also really enjoyed the drawing style of this graphic novel. The overall message of the story hit me right home and I do believe adults will enjoy this graphic novel as much as a younger audience.
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  • laurel [suspected bibliophile]
    January 1, 1970
    An absolutely adorable middle grade graphic memoir about growing up and finding your voice!Cindy Copeland loves to write, but has never met a woman writer! When her English teacher hooks her up with an internship with a reporter for the local paper, Cindy starts to hone her craft, learn to observe and report—and realizes that flying under the radar isn't all that!I utterly adored this. It was cute, sweet and poignant—and damn doesn't 1972 resemble 2019 an awful lot...Our country is in turmoil, An absolutely adorable middle grade graphic memoir about growing up and finding your voice!Cindy Copeland loves to write, but has never met a woman writer! When her English teacher hooks her up with an internship with a reporter for the local paper, Cindy starts to hone her craft, learn to observe and report—and realizes that flying under the radar isn't all that!I utterly adored this. It was cute, sweet and poignant—and damn doesn't 1972 resemble 2019 an awful lot...Our country is in turmoil, chaos in the White House, a senseless war, environmental crisis, women having to fight for equal rights...Which is all why fair and accurate reporting is more important than ever to get the truth out to people.Cindy learns this, and also realizes the importance (and difficulty) of following your passion. It's not enough to have a talent for writing and an eye for composition—to be great there's a lot of hard work involved, and research and learning and perseverance, and a lot of success is being assertive and asking for what you want, or just going for an opportunity.Leslie the reporter was a fantastic mentor, giving great constructive criticism and always doing her best to take Cindy with her without being condescending or diminishing of Cindy's talents or ignorance.I also liked Cindy's relationships with her friends, as she and her BFF drift away (her BFF drawn to the greener pastures of the mean girls group) and Cindy collects other friends who are cool and fun and interesting.Cindy's relationship with her family was also a great read. While I didn't like her father at all and was annoyed that he only realized Cindy had worth beyond her future as wife and mother when she wrote an article for the daily paper, I did like that he changed. It was a small change and perhaps only directed towards Cindy (and her brothers), but it did bring them closer and made him realize that his daughter had a talent and drive that should be nurtured just as much as his sons'.Anywho, this is a great and very timely read about a girl growing up in a time of turmoil for America.And when your country doesn't know what it is, how can you expect a 12-year-old to figure out herself?I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review.
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  • Cathi - LovesBooksMore
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this! As a mother of two teen girls this girl empowerment book really hit home. I didn’t grown up in the 70’s, but I was born in them. This book can relate to all girls on all levels of early teen drama and getting into adult ‘real-world’ issues. It was inspirational to put a female as the main character in the limelight. Cindy is 12 and in 7th grade. She gets the opportunity as a new ‘cub reporter’ at the local newspaper. She sees up close how in the 70’s the job market was ruled by men, Loved this! As a mother of two teen girls this girl empowerment book really hit home. I didn’t grown up in the 70’s, but I was born in them. This book can relate to all girls on all levels of early teen drama and getting into adult ‘real-world’ issues. It was inspirational to put a female as the main character in the limelight. Cindy is 12 and in 7th grade. She gets the opportunity as a new ‘cub reporter’ at the local newspaper. She sees up close how in the 70’s the job market was ruled by men, reporting and writing on a corrupt president in Watergate, All this while dealing with friends, boys and every other 12yr old drama that crosses her path!
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC provided by Edelweiss PlusCindy finds that middle school in the early 1970s is fairly stressful-- all the cool girls are wearing elephant bells and blue eyeshadow, but her parents are more conservative and make her wear longer dresses and sensible shoes. She also finds that they encourage her brothers more than they encourage her. She has one really good friend, but that friend starts hanging out with the cool, mean girls. On the bright side, she finds a boy in her class with whom she has E ARC provided by Edelweiss PlusCindy finds that middle school in the early 1970s is fairly stressful-- all the cool girls are wearing elephant bells and blue eyeshadow, but her parents are more conservative and make her wear longer dresses and sensible shoes. She also finds that they encourage her brothers more than they encourage her. She has one really good friend, but that friend starts hanging out with the cool, mean girls. On the bright side, she finds a boy in her class with whom she has a lot in common, and the two hang out and talk a lot. Also, she talks to her English teacher about writing, and her teacher connects her to a local newspaper reporter, a woman, who brings Cindy along to various events and helps her write articles, one of which is published in the newspaper. Cindy manages to make new friends, keeps up with writing as well as photography, and manages to gain the support of her parents for her endeavors. Strengths: The details of school, fashion, home life, and sociopolitical events are all covered in an engaging and interesting way. The fact that this is a graphic novel actually helps tremendously with the understanding of what the world looked like at this point in history. I loved the reported with the VW Beetle, and yes, Cindy's parents probably would have been totally fine with her tagging along. This was also rather poignant-- in the 1970s, writing was still something that one could use for a career. I am always worried for journalism majors now!Weaknesses: This was definitely a white, middle class story, but also a great feminist one. We just need some graphic novels about people from various backgrounds, and if they are also historical, so much the better. Graphic novels are a strain to read on my e reader (the pages have to be about 3"x5", so the print is minute), so I'm sorry for the lack of details in this review. What I really think: Like Holms' Sunny books, this one made me ridiculously happy, since it covers a period of time during my own childhood. Will probably purchase at least two copies. I do sort of wish the cover were avocado green, though. Or maybe purple. Or orange. Better if it were a plaid of all three-- that would have captured the colors of the time! I was a little surprised that girls wore jeans to school; we weren't allowed until 1976.
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  • Jill Jemmett
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book!It is set in the 1970s, but there were many parallels with today’s world. There were many news headlines that are similar to the ones today, like the Watergate scandal, women’s rights, and environmental concerns. This could make the story more relatable for kids today, even though it is set decades ago.There were also universal parts of growing up in this story. Cindy had her first boyfriend, and she also had to deal with bullying and losing friends. At the same time, I really enjoyed this book!It is set in the 1970s, but there were many parallels with today’s world. There were many news headlines that are similar to the ones today, like the Watergate scandal, women’s rights, and environmental concerns. This could make the story more relatable for kids today, even though it is set decades ago.There were also universal parts of growing up in this story. Cindy had her first boyfriend, and she also had to deal with bullying and losing friends. At the same time, she made new friends, who she didn’t expect to like.This was a great graphic novel!Thank you Algonquin Young Readers for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Cassie Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this graphic novel so much! What a great way to inspire students to follow their dreams!
  • Melanie Dulaney
    January 1, 1970
    Cynthia Copeland’s graphic novel is very similar to new ones by Shannon Hale, Maria Scrivan and others. Seems like personal retrospectives directed at girls are the latest trend in the genre, but with positive themes like finding your own voice and being happy in your own skin also being a part of those books, this librarian is OK with the similar feel in many recent releases. In “Cub,” young Cindy equates life in 1970s junior high with the predator-prey dynamic in the animal kingdom and battles Cynthia Copeland’s graphic novel is very similar to new ones by Shannon Hale, Maria Scrivan and others. Seems like personal retrospectives directed at girls are the latest trend in the genre, but with positive themes like finding your own voice and being happy in your own skin also being a part of those books, this librarian is OK with the similar feel in many recent releases. In “Cub,” young Cindy equates life in 1970s junior high with the predator-prey dynamic in the animal kingdom and battles the same insecurities and friend drama that is common among teens and tweens. Readers will likely make connections and chuckle at scenes in the cafeteria, the Valentine’s dance and the school’s hallways. The illustrations are engaging and complement the text wonderfully. The publisher notes that the target audience is ages 8-12 and the reading level and simple plot support that range. However, Copeland makes a reference to one girl French kissing an older boy, has several girls making much about a picture that emphasizes a man’s “thing,” and one girl criticizes another because she is “a stiff” and probably won’t make out with a boy. Those kinds of statements make this a book for older readers and would cause a ruckus in my 4th and 5th grade libraries among both the giggling students and their unhappy parents. Placement for this book should be ages 12 and up. Thanks for the dARC, Edelweiss.
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  • Tasha
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel looks at life in middle school during the 1970’s, a time filled with bullies, bell bottoms, and possibilities. Cindy is in seventh grade and dealing with being one of the prey in a school with plenty of predators, particularly mean girls. Cindy plays dead and doesn’t react to the comments of people like Evie Exley, so they leave her alone. Cindy loves reading and creating art, so when her favorite English teacher suggests that she become a writer, Cindy jumps at the chance. This graphic novel looks at life in middle school during the 1970’s, a time filled with bullies, bell bottoms, and possibilities. Cindy is in seventh grade and dealing with being one of the prey in a school with plenty of predators, particularly mean girls. Cindy plays dead and doesn’t react to the comments of people like Evie Exley, so they leave her alone. Cindy loves reading and creating art, so when her favorite English teacher suggests that she become a writer, Cindy jumps at the chance. Soon she is working as a cub reporter for the local paper, accompanying a real reporter to meetings and events around the community. She starts taking photographs and learns to edit her writing to be appropriate for a newspaper. She also finds her voice and a group of friends who are just as unique as she is.Middle school can be painful but this graphic novel is a breath of fresh air. While it does address the larger issues of middle school bullying, it is truly about simply being yourself in the midst of it all and finding other kids who are doing the same thing. There is a touch of romance here, but only a touch that is just right for the seventh grade setting. The focus on self-esteem and following your dreams is a call for all young girls to find their own paths and then work hard to reach their goals. Cindy is an example of someone who makes mistakes, learns from them, improves and reaches goals that she may not have realized she even had in the beginning. The art in this graphic novel is immensely approachable, embracing the seventies setting with fashion, hair styles, and the cars being driven. The time period is a large part of the story as Watergate is breaking just as Cindy starts being a cub reporter. Journalism is an inspiring profession both in the seventies and today, something that is worth commenting on in today’s world.A graphic novel with a strong female protagonist who follows her own dreams. Appropriate for ages 9-12.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for an ARC in exchange for an honest reviewThis was pretty cute, I love middle grade graphic memoirs, so I was excited to read this, but unfortunately, this didn't quite reach the level of other books in this genre that I've loved like Smile, Real Friends, and El Deafo. I think this book just maybe has less crossover appeal for general audiences. The other books I've mentioned are books that I feel children and adults can enjoy, but this one felt more like Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for an ARC in exchange for an honest reviewThis was pretty cute, I love middle grade graphic memoirs, so I was excited to read this, but unfortunately, this didn't quite reach the level of other books in this genre that I've loved like Smile, Real Friends, and El Deafo. I think this book just maybe has less crossover appeal for general audiences. The other books I've mentioned are books that I feel children and adults can enjoy, but this one felt more like it was just for kids, which is absolutely fine and doesn't mean I think this has less value than those other books. It just means that for me, I didn't get the same enjoyment from it. I also wasn't super keen on the art, it just wasn't my kind of style, so overall, while I had fun reading this, it's not particularly one I would recommend to adults who enjoy middle grade.
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  • Alyssa
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC at NCTE (and immediately read it!). Thank you, Algonquin!CUB is the story of 7th Grade student Cindy as she navigates a year in middle school (1972-1973). She is a shy kid who aims to stay under the radar, until a teacher connects her with a local reporter. Slowly, Cindy begins to come out of her shell, both in her writing and with her family and friends. Of course, this means she also becomes a bigger target for the school mean girls group...I admit I don’t often read books I received an ARC at NCTE (and immediately read it!). Thank you, Algonquin!CUB is the story of 7th Grade student Cindy as she navigates a year in middle school (1972-1973). She is a shy kid who aims to stay under the radar, until a teacher connects her with a local reporter. Slowly, Cindy begins to come out of her shell, both in her writing and with her family and friends. Of course, this means she also becomes a bigger target for the school mean girls group...I admit I don’t often read books where a gentle plot through school drama is the central focus, but I found CUB charming and engaging. I really liked that Cindy’s personal growth is set against the backdrop of world news (war in Vietnam, Nixon’s presidency), and I could see this as a really useful resource for students reading this book (a great way to help readers think about both the character herself and the world she lived in, without feeling like too much history). It reminded me a bit of THE WONDER YEARS, actually, in that sense.I’d recommend this for readers who have an interest in news/reporting/writing/photography and who are also at that stage of discovering themselves, their parents, and their true friends.
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  • Nick
    January 1, 1970
    I read this from an ARC, so I haven't seen the color version of the art.While not quite as good as the best graphic non-fiction for middle-school readers, it's certainly a really good read. Because so much of the story is fixed in a specific time, it can be a little distracting. The main character is in 7th grade when Nixon is re-elected and the announcement of the end of the Vietnam war is made, so these things dominate the scenes in which she is learning about how to be a reporter. There is I read this from an ARC, so I haven't seen the color version of the art.While not quite as good as the best graphic non-fiction for middle-school readers, it's certainly a really good read. Because so much of the story is fixed in a specific time, it can be a little distracting. The main character is in 7th grade when Nixon is re-elected and the announcement of the end of the Vietnam war is made, so these things dominate the scenes in which she is learning about how to be a reporter. There is also, though, the point that the male reporters are covering the big news, and the female reporter is stuck covering the fluff, which only changes during the story. That, combined with things like the fight for the Equal Rights Amendment for women, puts a lot of things in perspective, and that is very well done.Unfortunately, a small number of readers will have trouble getting into the historical parts of the story. That's really too bad, because the story itself covers a lot of things, including surviving life in middle school, getting past the "mean girl" clique's activities, and changes in the way you live and think about things as you grow up.
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  • Dorrit
    January 1, 1970
    Look, I'm not going to sit here and pretend I know what a good book for a 12 yo is. There's this scene in this book where the older reporter who is mentoring our cub gives her The Second Sex, The Feminist Mystique and Silent Spring to read. I'd do that and even i didn't get through The second sex. So I'm kind of a bad judge.However, I do have to say that I agreed -and enjoyed- all that was there in this book. I was cheering for our 12 yo feminist reporter, photographer, artist, hybrid person all Look, I'm not going to sit here and pretend I know what a good book for a 12 yo is. There's this scene in this book where the older reporter who is mentoring our cub gives her The Second Sex, The Feminist Mystique and Silent Spring to read. I'd do that and even i didn't get through The second sex. So I'm kind of a bad judge.However, I do have to say that I agreed -and enjoyed- all that was there in this book. I was cheering for our 12 yo feminist reporter, photographer, artist, hybrid person all along. And if at times I felt like things were a bit too easy and more intersectional aspects of feminism weren't touched, the way it did handle the tricky problems posed (there's a dad that's a bit off) was not bad. There was never a point where things got bitter or even sour (rankling the part of me that waits for insurmountable and unresolvable issues at every corner), but like i've said I don't know what's good for a 12 yo. This is a 'memoir' though, so I'm really not sure if i'm supposed to see it from that aspect. But that's it I suppose. I've said all I want to. Super enjoyed it. Thanks for teaching me journalism better than my school ever did.
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  • Peacegal
    January 1, 1970
    I honestly wasn't too interested in reading this one until I learned it was set in the early 1970s. I guess it's the grumpy old person coming out, but I don't really have a lot of interest in reading about young people post-digital revolution. But anyway, this is a junior comic memoir based upon the author's own experiences as a junior high "cub" reporter shadowing a local newspaper's only female reporter. Young Cindy struggles through the universal troubles of that age group: cliques, rapidly I honestly wasn't too interested in reading this one until I learned it was set in the early 1970s. I guess it's the grumpy old person coming out, but I don't really have a lot of interest in reading about young people post-digital revolution. But anyway, this is a junior comic memoir based upon the author's own experiences as a junior high "cub" reporter shadowing a local newspaper's only female reporter. Young Cindy struggles through the universal troubles of that age group: cliques, rapidly shifting friendships, dating woes, and so forth. Larger societal issues that may have seemed confined to their era will seem eerily prescient to attentive readers: a White House embroiled in scandal, an arduously long war, a more politically active and engaged segment of the population making themselves heard. I did find it a little funny that the "mean girls" clique who bullied Cindy and her friends dressed like hippies, whereas I got bullied for dressing in the same way, twenty years later. I am happy that Cindy had plenty of other friends to back her up, although I do question whether the bullied kids would have stood up to the bullies en masse the way they did in the book. I sometimes wonder if I just grew up in an especially vicious time for bullies, or if our memories of how childhood actually went get a little too rosy as time passes.
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  • ♛primadonna♛
    January 1, 1970
    Cub is the story of a "cub" reporter in the 1970's. Our MC Cindy begins to shadow a female journalist and is taught how to write articles for her local newspaper.Cub is a really good Coming-Of-Age story that shows Cindy trying to navigate life at school, life at home, life at work/job-shadowing, and also trying to navigate the highs and lows of friendships and dating. Cub shows Cindy come into her own and the hard but necessary journey along the way. I love that the story is based in the 1970s Cub is the story of a "cub" reporter in the 1970's. Our MC Cindy begins to shadow a female journalist and is taught how to write articles for her local newspaper.Cub is a really good Coming-Of-Age story that shows Cindy trying to navigate life at school, life at home, life at work/job-shadowing, and also trying to navigate the highs and lows of friendships and dating. Cub shows Cindy come into her own and the hard but necessary journey along the way. I love that the story is based in the 1970s and that it's more of a "modern" historical fiction. I also loved that the actual things that were taking place in the news at the time the story takes place, are also talked about in the book.
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  • Shakera
    January 1, 1970
    Cub is an absolute genius way to tell your story! I was a little worried about reading this because I tend to not read memoirs. It could be from all the years of having to do research papers for school, but memoirs just don't do it for me. I enjoyed every page of this! There were moments where I had to remind myself of the time period, but I thought it was interesting to see how much time has changed, but how much it also stayed the same. The accurate description of what it junior school is like Cub is an absolute genius way to tell your story! I was a little worried about reading this because I tend to not read memoirs. It could be from all the years of having to do research papers for school, but memoirs just don't do it for me. I enjoyed every page of this! There were moments where I had to remind myself of the time period, but I thought it was interesting to see how much time has changed, but how much it also stayed the same. The accurate description of what it junior school is like brought back memories, not bad memories, but memories nonetheless. It was inspiring to read about a teacher who takes a particular interest in Cynthia and to watch the excitement on her face as one of her articles is published in the newspaper, along with her writing articles while Leslie, proofs them. Cub shows young readers, but specifically, young women, your dreams are obtainable, once your dreams become obtainable, dream bigger. This was so interesting, I read this in one sitting!
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Algonquin Young Readers for sending me an ARC of this book!Cub was an awesome read! I read this in one sitting and loved every page of it. Even though Cub was a book way out of my normal genre - a children's nonfiction graphic novel, which I've never read before - I'm so glad that I got to experience it. Cub is a memoir about the author and her middle-school experience as a "cub reporter" in the 1970's, where she gets to be an intern for a local newspaper editor. Cub isn't just about Thanks to Algonquin Young Readers for sending me an ARC of this book!Cub was an awesome read! I read this in one sitting and loved every page of it. Even though Cub was a book way out of my normal genre - a children's nonfiction graphic novel, which I've never read before - I'm so glad that I got to experience it. Cub is a memoir about the author and her middle-school experience as a "cub reporter" in the 1970's, where she gets to be an intern for a local newspaper editor. Cub isn't just about journalism, though; the book has a strong message about growing up and how popularity is less important than accepting yourself and achieving your goals in life. I swear I almost cried at the end because Cub's theme was so powerful! The only thing I did not like about Cub was the art style. The drawings seemed more sloppy towards the end, and it wasn't that great to begin with. The art does the job of portraying its message, though.I really thought that Cub wouldn't be for me because its subject matter is so specific. However, I loved this graphic novel even though I don't plan on becoming a journalist, and I think that any kid would like this book, no matter what career they're planning on having when they grow up.
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  • Katie Lawrence
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this! More later, but this was great! Especially as a former high school news reporter, I appreciated all of the details about writing for a paper. I also loved the strong 70's vibe, I feel like it's hard to find books about the 70's for middle grade readers. The fact that this is a graphic memoir means it will go like gangbusters at my library. I'm thrilled that readers will find it!
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  • Lara Lillibridge
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fun historical fiction graphic novel (based on true events). Mean girls AKA "the predators" are tough to navigate no matter the era, and this story about finding your tribe and your voice will resonate with kids of all ages. Copeland's juxtaposition of common social stresses with the historic rise of feminism, Watergate, and Vietnam make a compelling read.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Read ARC: This was a great graphic memoir. Defintely for the Smile/Sisters/Guts crowd as it is biographical and takes place in a similiar time period.
  • Queen Cronut
    January 1, 1970
    For fans of Smile and Real Friends, Cynthia Copeland's memoir follows Cindy, an aspiring reporter trying to navigate through the challenges of middle school (mean girls, dating, figuring out who you are, etc). It was a pretty cute story with relatable themes and I loved how it incorporated 1970s news while also including feministic ideals as journalism was predominately led by men. While I enjoyed reading this one, I didn't connect with it as much and felt that the story lacked some depth in For fans of Smile and Real Friends, Cynthia Copeland's memoir follows Cindy, an aspiring reporter trying to navigate through the challenges of middle school (mean girls, dating, figuring out who you are, etc). It was a pretty cute story with relatable themes and I loved how it incorporated 1970s news while also including feministic ideals as journalism was predominately led by men. While I enjoyed reading this one, I didn't connect with it as much and felt that the story lacked some depth in exploring some of its subplots and topics. Yet it was a nice quick read and I can see this appealing to the middle school demographic. *Thank you to NetGalley and Algonquin Young Readers for providing a free ARC
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  • Candyce Kirk
    January 1, 1970
    In all honesty, I don't know much about the '70s, except for what you hear on the news and some of the history I learned in high school. Cub takes us back and we see everything through Cindy's eyes. This may be her memoir, but I loved the history part of this story. I thought it was amazing how the author incorporated that in this graphic memoir. I definitely learned some new facts while reading.Our main character, Cindy loves writing and her 7th grade teacher suggests she tag along with a In all honesty, I don't know much about the '70s, except for what you hear on the news and some of the history I learned in high school. Cub takes us back and we see everything through Cindy's eyes. This may be her memoir, but I loved the history part of this story. I thought it was amazing how the author incorporated that in this graphic memoir. I definitely learned some new facts while reading.Our main character, Cindy loves writing and her 7th grade teacher suggests she tag along with a female journalist during the school year. Of course, this is a great adventure for Cindy. I loved how much this journalist was a role model to Cindy in such a positive way. My favorite part was the fact that she learned a lot from Cindy as well. We also get a glimpse at the articles Cindy writes as time goes on and this was such a fun touch.Cub isn't only about journalism, writing and thinking about future careers. Cindy is a 12 year old and she's starting to grow up and things are changing. Her best friend starts talking to someone Cindy sees as a bully and she hates that things are starting to change. That is until a new girl moves to their town and she sees the world through her eyes. I think Cindy learns that things change and eve she sees things differently than in the past. Her first crush and boyfriend also come in to play and it really takes on everything 12 years olds start to experience.Not only does Cub have an amazing storyline, but the graphics are a lot of fun and fit this memoir perfectly. I really enjoyed Cub and think it's good for the middle grade age group, along with adults like me who love learning more as well. I think most of us can remember what it was like being that age as well.
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  • Lucy Goodfellow
    January 1, 1970
    4 Stars A laugh-out-loud funny and empowering graphic memoir about growing up and finding your voice. I like how the reader gets to see Cindy's progression from novice to trainee as she learns how to write like a journalist and find her purpose in the world. She develops as a person and learns to question the systematic oppression of the female voice in the media- teaching young readers how to make their voice heard. This graphic memoir gives easy tips on how to overcome the common mistakes an ⭐⭐⭐⭐4 Stars A laugh-out-loud funny and empowering graphic memoir about growing up and finding your voice. I like how the reader gets to see Cindy's progression from novice to trainee as she learns how to write like a journalist and find her purpose in the world. She develops as a person and learns to question the systematic oppression of the female voice in the media- teaching young readers how to make their voice heard. This graphic memoir gives easy tips on how to overcome the common mistakes an aspiring journalist may make and quietly discusses feminism and the patriarchy. The bright vibrant art style reminds me of the early 2000s and Groovy Chick which unfortunately dates this novel from the onset (perhaps this is worse as its actually set in the 1970s) meaning I don't think this would necessarily appeal to a younger audience from an artistic perspective as they may expect a different calibre of art. This is unfortunate because it nails the issues that it tackles. Themes of voicelessness run deep through this novel. It is a graphic memoir and therefore it isn't representative of the female experience as a whole. We focus in on the story of a twelve-year-old girl in an upper-middle-class white neighbourhood, whose talent was spotted by her teacher. This does not reflect the experience of women from the lower socioeconomic background, women of colour or the queer community. However, I felt that Cindy as a protagonist was able to offer an optimistic outlook for women in her industry. All the characters were well rounded and Cynthia L Copeland's way of characterising girls and depicting their growth into young women (and all of the drama that comes with it) was realistic and heartfelt. We saw her childhood in this book. I enjoyed the subtle anxiety representation and how Cindy reacted to her bullies. Although some of the lines and metaphors were hyperbolic for some cheap laughs I think this is perfectly suited for its middle-grade audience. The book offers a reflective perspective on history. It is a good (but subjective) way for young people to learn about historical events that occurred in the early '70s. It covers Nixon’s reelection and the women's rights movements with the passion of an activist. I would have liked a time skip to Cindy today to see if she followed her dreams and became a journalist. It would be good for us to see the effects of diversity in the industry and know not everything has been addressed. There is still room to grow -as Cindy's beliefs change through the story.Overall I think this is an important read for young people who need some encouragement to follow their dreams. BUYthis book now for only £9.99I received an advance review copy for free via NetGalley in alliance with Algonquin Young Readers after they contacted me to be part of their media campaign. I am leaving this review voluntarily 📚.
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  • Alice
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, thanks to NetGalley and Algonquin Books for sending me an eARC in exchange for a honest review.You have to know English isn’t my first language, so feel free to correct me if I make some mistakes while writing this review.I don't think, as Italians, we can experience working as a (cub) journalist at the age of 12 - surely not where I grew up - but with all her middle school problems, heck if Cindy didn't bring me back to my time as a twelve-year-old girl.It doesn't matter if it's First of all, thanks to NetGalley and Algonquin Books for sending me an eARC in exchange for a honest review.You have to know English isn’t my first language, so feel free to correct me if I make some mistakes while writing this review.I don't think, as Italians, we can experience working as a (cub) journalist at the age of 12 - surely not where I grew up - but with all her middle school problems, heck if Cindy didn't bring me back to my time as a twelve-year-old girl.It doesn't matter if it's the early 1970s or the early 2000s - 2001/2002, in my case: it's a little sad and a little comforting at the same time realizing some things never change. Cindy is a good student, nobody would associate the word "fashion" to her clothes and she has only one, true friend. She sees school the way it is: a jungle full of preys and predators. Unfortunately she's one of the preys and Cindy has her tactics to avoid the predators, hoping to stay invisible and out of their radar. Guess what? It doesn't always work. Yeah, because mean girls like Evie, Tammy and Leah seem to always be able to find her. Really, you have no idea about the huge déjà-vu I experienced. What if her friend Katie joins the popular girls at their table in the cafeteria?What if Cindy gets the occasion to try something new out of school, something she could make a difference at and carve an opportunity for her future out of it? What then?It's 1972 when it all begins: Nixon is president, but the Washington Post is exposing the Watergate to the public opinion. Journalists are under the spotlight like never before, but women doing this job are only a few - and they cover minor stories. It's a world ruled by men at every level - Cindy's very own father gives advices for a successful future to his sons, but not to Cindy. Cindy though has a great example in her English teacher and a greater one in Leslie, the reporter teaching her the job and a way to do even better - in doing so, even Leslie finds the courage to ask her editor for major stories coverage. Under Leslie's wing, Cindy learns to write about important issues in a way that is true and objective, but she also learns the world is so much bigger and complex than her middle school drama: corruption, war, environment, equality between men and women treated as a matter of fact but still ignored by laws in many States all over the country. Cindy's teenage years are marked by activism and people finding their own voice - just like Cindy at the end of her seventh grade. Cub is a coming of age graphic novel that you're not gonna be able to put down - because no matter how popular you were in middle school, that kind of drama between friendships and bullies is something you lived one way or another - and that reminds us we have to fight for our dreams, to let the world hear our voices no matter those who want to shot us down.
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  • Nicole Hewitt
    January 1, 1970
    This review and many more can be found on my blog: Feed Your Fiction AddictionI’m guessing this graphic novel will be a big hit with middle graders! It’s perfect for fans of Raina Telgemeier’s books because it’s very similar to her books in style (and some of the themes). I especially loved that Copeland included empowering messages about young girls without hitting us over the head with them. She shows the ways that she was treated unequally without having a graphic novel that constantly This review and many more can be found on my blog: Feed Your Fiction AddictionI’m guessing this graphic novel will be a big hit with middle graders! It’s perfect for fans of Raina Telgemeier’s books because it’s very similar to her books in style (and some of the themes). I especially loved that Copeland included empowering messages about young girls without hitting us over the head with them. She shows the ways that she was treated unequally without having a graphic novel that constantly decries those injustices. For instance, there was the fact that her father had high expectations of her brothers but not really of her—but then he was very supportive when she took initiative and started accomplishing things on her own. The reporter that Cindy worked with was very blatantly the only woman in the news office and she wasn’t getting great assignments (at least at first)—but the book showed her taking action about that (and getting what she wanted). Cindy has a boyfriend who’s sort of insensitive to her, but we see that in the subtle way he cuts her off when she talks or how he complains when she takes time for things that are important to her—we didn’t need for her to give big speeches about how wrong he was. The situation was all given to the reader in a very subtle way, but in a way where I think kids will still come away with all the right messages (and won’t feel like they’re being preached to).This is a very honest story, where we see some of Cindy’s failures too—many kids will be able to relate to the way Cindy caves to pressure to say something she doesn’t mean about the boy she likes or the way she fails to befriend the slightly strange girl in class until someone else does. Fractured friendships (and changing ones) are also featured—I loved seeing Cindy find her friend group in the midst of loneliness.The graphic novel format is perfect for this story because it gives us such a fun sense of the time period (70s clothes and hair are featured prominently in fun ways) and makes the autobiographical nature of the story more accessible to middle schoolers. I also love that the author sneaks some writing lessons in (showing us examples of early articles marked up by her mentor). Some kids will skim right past those, but I suspect others will be curious as to what makes a good lede and how you shouldn’t include inconsequential details in an article.Cub is an incredibly inspiring autobiography masquerading as a simple story of surviving middle school. Middle graders will enjoy its themes without feeling like they’re being hit over the head with moral lessons. I HIGHLY recommend this book to middle grade readers, teachers and librarians.***Disclosure: I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. No other compensation was given and all opinions are my own.***
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  • Panda Incognito
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel is delightful and engaging, exploring the usual ups and downs of middle school against the backdrop of seventies cultural and world events. In this sense, it is similar to the Sunny series, but because this book is based on the author's experiences working as a cub reporter for her local newspaper, it has a particularly unique and inspiring appeal.However, even though I would have liked to give this book four stars, I docked it a star for its one-sided treatment of the ERA. This graphic novel is delightful and engaging, exploring the usual ups and downs of middle school against the backdrop of seventies cultural and world events. In this sense, it is similar to the Sunny series, but because this book is based on the author's experiences working as a cub reporter for her local newspaper, it has a particularly unique and inspiring appeal.However, even though I would have liked to give this book four stars, I docked it a star for its one-sided treatment of the ERA. This book presents some feminist dynamics without being preachy, but it fails entirely when it comes to this issue, implying that the men who opposed the ERA were all sexist and that the women who opposed it were crazy and didn't have their own best interests at heart. This teaches girls to think, "WHAAT? People didn't think I should have equal rights!!!" without explaining why people thought that the ERA would have problematic consequences.This book covers the end of the Vietnam War, but the author never connects this social dynamic to people's alarm at the idea that women might be required to register for the draft if the ERA passed. The Vietnam War had lasted TWENTY YEARS, was the fourth deadliest war in American history, and had occasioned tremendous protests at home over the draft and over the war's violence against Vietnamese civilians. Now, here was an amendment that proposed to eliminate all gender distinctions between men and women in the eyes of the law. Many people were concerned that the ERA would require women to serve in combat in the next war, and that it would also reduce existing protections for women by changing laws regarding marriage, divorce, and alimony.Even though I enjoyed this book and the glimpse into the past that it provides, it bothers me very much that it did not provide historical context for why so many people opposed the ERA. Even though plenty of people were against it for anti-feminist reasons, that is not the entirety of the story. This book mythologizes a particular chapter of feminist history and political activism without taking into account the potential consequences of the ERA or why people thought that it was an ultimately harmful idea, and even though the ERA only plays a small role in this story, I am disappointed that this book will introduce young readers to the concept without providing a balanced perspective.
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    Cynthia Copeland tells her story as a middle school kid in 1972 and 73. A crossroads in our nation’s history as women’s rights, the war in Vietnam, environmentalism, Watergate, and fashion try to distract her from the wild kingdom in the halls of Litchfield Junior High School.She enjoys hanging with her friends, riding her tandem bike with her BFF, and trying to stay away from the predators, the kids who want to dominate the middle school food chain. One afternoon she visits with her English Cynthia Copeland tells her story as a middle school kid in 1972 and 73. A crossroads in our nation’s history as women’s rights, the war in Vietnam, environmentalism, Watergate, and fashion try to distract her from the wild kingdom in the halls of Litchfield Junior High School.She enjoys hanging with her friends, riding her tandem bike with her BFF, and trying to stay away from the predators, the kids who want to dominate the middle school food chain. One afternoon she visits with her English teacher (her favorite) and Mrs. Shultz hooks her up with an internship at the local paper. Cynthia becomes a cub reporter for a reporter named Leslie Jacobs and this is when her confidence and writing ability soars. They go all over town to report and take pictures of community events. Jacobs gives Cynthia tips and advice to enhance her journalism skills and step away from the fishbowl of middle school.Copeland continues her analogy of Predators and Prey as she illustrates the social groups and her younger self navigate her way through those cliques. Things begin to change when she finds a mentor and the confidence to not care about the “mean” girls in her class. This is the most important theme of the book to me. Finding a caring mentor and a little bit of help through a tough time.Cub is a touching and relevant memoir that would be a great addition to any middle or high school library.5 out of 5 starsThank you to Edelweiss, Algonquin Press, and the author for an advanced copy for review.For my full review: https://paulspicks.blog/2019/12/13/su...For all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog
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