The Worst Is Yet to Come
For most of her fourteen years, Tasha Davis has languished in the rural-suburban town of Skillute, Washington. Her parents offer plenty of comfortable—if stifling—emotional support, but what she needs is a best friend.In her final year at Clark Middle School, Tasha meets a strange, new classmate. Briar Kenny is the self-styled rebel Tasha wants to be, and the Davises are the kind of close-knit family Briar covets. A moment of unexpected violence spawns a secret between the two girls and awakens a mystery from the past.Unknown to Tasha and Briar, their secret also attracts something monstrous from a forgotten corner of Skillute. The town is haunted by its history, scarred with the lingering spirit of broken and scattered families, abandoned real estate ventures, and old scores never settled between neighbors. But there’s more to the place than memory and legend. Beneath the landscape something malignant rages, and it will stop at nothing to find a route into the physical world.Cover art and design by Mikio Murakami.

The Worst Is Yet to Come Details

TitleThe Worst Is Yet to Come
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 22nd, 2019
PublisherTrepidatio Publishing
ISBN-139781947654464
Rating
GenreHorror, Fiction, Fantasy, Supernatural

The Worst Is Yet to Come Review

  • Char
    January 1, 1970
    Small town living-it's just the best, right? There's none of that violence you hear about in big cities and the people are friendlier too or so we've all heard. Unfortunately, none of that applies to Skillute. A couple and their young daughter move to Skillute for exactly the reasons listed above. But Skillute is a dying town, and as it turns out? The people are really not that friendly. Especially, if like the Davis family, you're coming from liberal-town USA. It's not only the politics of the Small town living-it's just the best, right? There's none of that violence you hear about in big cities and the people are friendlier too or so we've all heard. Unfortunately, none of that applies to Skillute. A couple and their young daughter move to Skillute for exactly the reasons listed above. But Skillute is a dying town, and as it turns out? The people are really not that friendly. Especially, if like the Davis family, you're coming from liberal-town USA. It's not only the politics of the situation that keep the Davis family isolated though, it's Skillute itself. When the Davis' daughter, Tasha, finally makes friends with a new classmate, Briar, her parents are excited, yet fearful. Briar isn't all they had hoped for -being from a broken family and all. But Tasha and Briar's friendship soon becomes more solid, with their secrets being the thread that stitches them together. What are their secrets? What is wrong with Skillute? You'll have to read this to find out!Over the last few years, I've forgotten how much I enjoyed the work of S.P. Miskowski. She writes a quiet kind of horror which is the kind I prefer these days. The town of Skillute reminds me in some ways of Charles L. Grant's Oxrun Station. The history of Skillute can be found in a few of Miskowski's other books, (THE SKILLUTE CYCLE), but it's not necessary to read them to "get" this one. They all take place in different time periods so that the history of Skillute unfolds in front of you, mostly through the eyes of its women. There are ghosts in this town, there are witches and there are spirits as of yet undefined. Not everything is spelled out for you like a game of Scrabble. Some things you have to figure out for yourself. I enjoy that. I feel that the author respects me enough to trust me to see where she's going. To see the meaning-to see the inevitable end. And boy, that end?! I suspect it's going to raise some hackles out there! It didn't raise mine though: for me, it ended on a perfect note. I loved this tale of small town life, the supernatural, and most of all: the people. The characters here came alive and while none of them were perfect, they all came across as real to me and as such? I felt for them. Maybe you could let yourself feel for them too?My highest recommendation! Available February 22, but you can pre-order here: https://amzn.to/2Tj7VZO*Thank you to S. P. Miskowski for providing a free e-ARC with no strings attached. I freely chose to read and review this book honestly.*
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  • Jack Tripper
    January 1, 1970
    I'm upping my rating from 4 to 5 stars, even though I almost set the book down for good about 35 pages in. You ever read a novel where it seems as if the author inserts themselves at brief moments in order to spout their political and moral beliefs? That always breaks the immersion for me, even if I happen to agree with those views. And that happened here, big time, totally sucking me out of the story. Luckily I stuck with it, as this was one of the best "small town horror" tales I've read in re I'm upping my rating from 4 to 5 stars, even though I almost set the book down for good about 35 pages in. You ever read a novel where it seems as if the author inserts themselves at brief moments in order to spout their political and moral beliefs? That always breaks the immersion for me, even if I happen to agree with those views. And that happened here, big time, totally sucking me out of the story. Luckily I stuck with it, as this was one of the best "small town horror" tales I've read in recent years, right up there with Ms. Miskowski's 2011 debut novel, Knock Knock.It takes place in the same town as Knock Knock, the slowly dying Skillute, Washington, so it probably would help to have some familiarity with the author's previous work in that locale, but it's not necessary. I'm sure there was quite a bit I missed out on due to not having read any of the accompanying"Skillute" novellas, but this can definitely still be enjoyed as a standalone story. It concerns 14 year-old Tasha, a normal girl with a normal loving family, who meets and befriends the new girl in town, Briar, who "isn't quite right," at least according to Tasha's mom, Kim. The same Kim who previously espouses her ultra-progressive views on prejudice for nearly an entire chapter -- even going so far as to "unfriend" someone on Facebook for making an offhand comment about Asians being good at math -- is now judging this new girl solely based on her neck tattoo and the fact that she lives in a trailer park. Hypocrite, much? (part of why I forgave the earlier "holier than thou" moralizing was due to the fact that the eventual hypocrisy of Kim's internal monologues may have been the author's intent all along). Turns out, though, Kim just may be right about Briar.Skillute is a town full of buried secrets, ghosts, and other "things," things that may be looking for a vessel to take over, and Briar appears to fit the bill. It seems nothing that happens in this town stays buried for long--it will always re-manifest itself in some way. That's one of the strengths of this novel, and the Skillute books in general. There are so many mysteries to unravel that, just when you think you're starting to get a handle on things, the mystery only deepens.Miskowski's main strength, I feel, is her characters. This book barely cracks 200 pages, but I knew and cared about these people, which made all the supernatural weirdness much more effective. There's an emotional weight attached to everything, even during the creepy-as-hell moments (maybe especially so). All I know is I can't wait to read the connected novellas. I was thinking it would answer some of the questions I had while reading, but now I think it may just do the exact opposite.And I'm totally fine with that.4.5 Stars
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  • Sadie Hartmann Mother Horror
    January 1, 1970
    I have so many excited thoughts!! I'm struggling to gather them all up and know where I want to start with this review.*settling down*Okay, let's just start with some facts. This is my introduction to S.P. Miskowski's work and after devouring this book, I know I'll be browsing her other titles.Also, what a treat that I just moved to Tacoma, WA and this tale is nestled in the heart of rural, small towns just on the fringes of Destiny City.Most importantly, this story has so many secrets.I'm grinn I have so many excited thoughts!! I'm struggling to gather them all up and know where I want to start with this review.*settling down*Okay, let's just start with some facts. This is my introduction to S.P. Miskowski's work and after devouring this book, I know I'll be browsing her other titles.Also, what a treat that I just moved to Tacoma, WA and this tale is nestled in the heart of rural, small towns just on the fringes of Destiny City.Most importantly, this story has so many secrets.I'm grinning as I type that.Many. Many. Secrets.And I love it!! I love when an author holds some cards back from the reader--there's absolutely no way to grasp everything that's swirling and simmering just under the surface until the author chooses to reveal them to you and I just am so impressed! Each time I read something scandalous, it was like a big exclamation in my mind, "YES!! I LOVE THIS!! YES!"I enjoyed the way the author unraveled this story a little at a time through carefully crafted character development and scene selection.Almost instantly, I grabbed on to the fact that I was on a journey of discovery. Some reviewers call it "a slow burn" and I'm fine with using that as well, with one caveat:This is a slow burn with some nightmare fuel to stoke those flames whenever the author wants to.Several engaging scenes will go by and then CRACK, the ending of a chapter flashes like a hot streak of lightening. My hair would stand up and my eyes would get wide and I'd eagerly jump to the next scene but that lightening had moved on into the distance as quickly as it arrived and it was back to "normal".But now there's a new normal.Because your mind can't let go--you can't unsee what you saw.It was so much fun, you guys.I really want to impress that on anyone reading this review. You seriously have no idea what anyone in this book is capable of and the title is so appropriate, the worst is yet to come.(and damn that ending!! I know some people are going to have words about it for me, I'm down with it. I loved it.) Highly recommend. This book is available for preorder. Comes out on Feb. 22nd, 2019
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  • Tracy Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    My review on www.scifiandscary.comI have a deep and abiding love for beautiful and clever book covers. Yes, I know – the story is important – but when they are well done, so much is added to the overall experience of reading. The cover art created by Mikio Murakami is remarkable. After reading, I saw the subtle connections between the cover and what unraveled in the writing.This book is set in the town of Skillute, Washington, a place that Miskowski has used for several other stories as well. I My review on www.scifiandscary.comI have a deep and abiding love for beautiful and clever book covers. Yes, I know – the story is important – but when they are well done, so much is added to the overall experience of reading. The cover art created by Mikio Murakami is remarkable. After reading, I saw the subtle connections between the cover and what unraveled in the writing.This book is set in the town of Skillute, Washington, a place that Miskowski has used for several other stories as well. I have heard it is unnecessary to read others to fully experience this story, and I certainly didn’t feel as if I was left in the dark by any means. I do want to explore the other Skillute titles because I enjoyed this story and I take delight in finding little connections and nuances between books based in the same universeMiskowski’s writing isn’t gimmick-y and even in the early form of the novel I experienced, it is a smooth read. Characterization is spot-on – the teenage girls, Tasha and Briar, are portrayed true to life. Even the most despicable characters (here’s looking at you, RAY) are lifelike, convincing, and their actions suit the person we come to know. As a reader, this is important to me. Nothing pulls me out of a story faster than established characters behaving in ways that are the complete opposite of who I know them to be. Thankfully, as crazy and wild as things get in TWIYTC, Miskowski retains this sense of creepy realism she has so carefully crafted.There are a couple of places in which the narrative lost something for me. In particular, there is one chapter regarding the politics of two different areas, Seattle and Skillute. It could be intended to add to the sense of “otherness” the Davis family has. It DID work, but the way it was laid out removed me from the storyline a bit. I struggled to see why it was presented in this way while everything else is woven in so delicately.Finally, as I compose this review, I have been flipping back through the story to check character names and quotes I previously highlighted. In doing so, I caught myself skimming over sections, re-reading them in a sense, and I am picking up a mountain of hints that lead to the major points of this novel. I caught none of them when I first read the novel because it is so carefully crafted. I think a re-read may be in my future just so I can marvel at how this storyline comes together. It boasts an insidious horror that is personal, societal, psychological, and supernatural.
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  • Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    I am so torn with this book! On one hand, the writing and characterization was fantastic. I felt that it was easy to differentiate between the time periods when we occasionally were taken back to witness a past scene. The best was the feeling that you KNEW and UNDERSTOOD the two main teens in this tale, Tasha and Briar.I loved the little threads woven throughout that later piece together to create a greater whole. I believe that the biggest problem--for me--was that I was aware that there was MU I am so torn with this book! On one hand, the writing and characterization was fantastic. I felt that it was easy to differentiate between the time periods when we occasionally were taken back to witness a past scene. The best was the feeling that you KNEW and UNDERSTOOD the two main teens in this tale, Tasha and Briar.I loved the little threads woven throughout that later piece together to create a greater whole. I believe that the biggest problem--for me--was that I was aware that there was MUCH more going on in this town than the particular case I was reading about, and I wanted to know more. While the conclusion to THIS story was perfect, in my opinion, I still was left feeling like the book was incomplete. There were so many other people and places I wanted to learn about, and only got a small taste of.After I finished reading this (which was my first book by the author), I read some other reviews and found out that she has other stories occurring in this town. That explains why I picked up on the "other instances", and since they didn't concern this tale, and why they weren't elaborated on. Due to the fact that I did enjoy her writing, it makes me want to read more about some of these other places/times. However, I'm not sure where to start! Overall, I give credit to Miskowski for building a great "universe", and only wish that I was content with the one story, instead of wanting to know more about so many others.
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  • Suzanne Morrison
    January 1, 1970
    I can never seem to take my time with one of S.P. Miskowski’s novels or stories. I invariably tear through them, skipping meals and staying up too late to find out what’s going to happen to her all-too-human characters. Once I enter one of her worlds, I don’t want to leave. That’s exactly what happened with The Worst is Yet to Come; I sat down to read a chapter or two in the mid-afternoon and didn’t stop reading till it was dark and I was thoroughly freaked out. Miskowski’s Skillute is a place I I can never seem to take my time with one of S.P. Miskowski’s novels or stories. I invariably tear through them, skipping meals and staying up too late to find out what’s going to happen to her all-too-human characters. Once I enter one of her worlds, I don’t want to leave. That’s exactly what happened with The Worst is Yet to Come; I sat down to read a chapter or two in the mid-afternoon and didn’t stop reading till it was dark and I was thoroughly freaked out. Miskowski’s Skillute is a place I would never want to visit except in the pages of a book, but I want to visit it there as often as Miskowski will let me. It’s like my nightmarish home away from home, where the brutality and mystery of the Pacific Northwest have malevolent supernatural undercurrents. This book stands on its own, but will also delight anyone who’s read Miskowski’s other Skillute novels and novellas and wants to reunite with some witchy friends and terrifyingly familiar entities, and see what’s become of all the old haunts.Maternity—the urges, the desires, the frustrations and delusions of mothers and would-be mothers (not to mention the would-rather-not-be mothers)—has long been one of Miskowski’s themes, but here she takes us to new, distressing depths in the maternal psyche. Gorgeously written, eerie and vivid and quite funny at times, this is a thrilling, creepy, fascinating look at evil both quotidian and supernatural. It’s also unexpectedly heartwrenching. I’m used to waking up in the middle of the night and reliving the frights in Miskowski’s books. This time I thought about those creepier moments, but also about the terrible sadness of some of her characters, and the longing that animates them. This is one of her best stories yet.
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  • Spencer
    January 1, 1970
    S.P. Miskowski returns to the fictional town of Skillute in 'The Worst is Yet to Come' along with the darkness that lurks within the shadowy corners of the town...The writing is absolutely fantastic, I adored the characters and the setting and felt instantly connected to both. The cast, especially Tasha and Kim felt very real - Tasha reminded me of my own sisters when they were younger. The story depicts the usual and not-so-usual problems of two teenage girls but also as a contrast to this the S.P. Miskowski returns to the fictional town of Skillute in 'The Worst is Yet to Come' along with the darkness that lurks within the shadowy corners of the town...The writing is absolutely fantastic, I adored the characters and the setting and felt instantly connected to both. The cast, especially Tasha and Kim felt very real - Tasha reminded me of my own sisters when they were younger. The story depicts the usual and not-so-usual problems of two teenage girls but also as a contrast to this the tribulations of their mothers, this brings an interesting balance to the story to be able to see each side of this relationship. The horror is also wonderfully understated and allows the story to unfurl at its own pace while also creating a tense atmosphere. From the start I wasn’t sure where the story was going and throughout there were a few unexpected turns that I didn't see coming, the book definitely kept me on my toes!You don’t need to have read any of Miskowski’s other books to enjoy this as it stands on its own, but it does have enough references to please fans of the previous Skillute books. I’d highly recommend this and even if you’re unfamiliar with S.P. Miskowski as this would be a great place to start.*The author provided me with a free copy of this book with no obligation to produce a review and the opinions expressed here are all my own*
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  • Mike Thorn
    January 1, 1970
    Miskowski oscillates masterfully between insights into adolescent alienation and painfully adult revelations about regret and self-deception. Come for the perfectly mounted thriller plot, stay for the connective tissue—the ups and downs of relationships, trauma, disappointment, boredom and introspection.Full review
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    If you have traveled through S.P. Miskowski's Skillute before you know that evil resides there. Not just the occasional psycho passing through; not just more than the average number of inexplicable tragedies. Evil thrives in Skillute. Evil is Skillute or Skillute is evil. The classic which came first, and does it really matter.For generations Skillute has fed off its homegrown source of corruptible citizens. Evil always turns on evil and so neighbor turned on neighbor, then husband turned on wif If you have traveled through S.P. Miskowski's Skillute before you know that evil resides there. Not just the occasional psycho passing through; not just more than the average number of inexplicable tragedies. Evil thrives in Skillute. Evil is Skillute or Skillute is evil. The classic which came first, and does it really matter.For generations Skillute has fed off its homegrown source of corruptible citizens. Evil always turns on evil and so neighbor turned on neighbor, then husband turned on wife, and children turned on elders. Eventually a generation would die out and evil would go dormant until wakened again, by accident or intent, and the cycle continued. With each passing decade Skillute becomes more destitute, hopeless, devoid of humanity. Fewer and fewer of the original families survive. The people who remain in Skillute just don't care any more. They can't change their futures so they give up; they isolate themselves and adopt daily habits that let them pretend they lead normal lives. Which is no fun at all for evil. Evil is a narcissist. It needs to be admired and constantly flattered. So at this point in Skillute's story evil has, out of necessity and with the help of social media, started recruiting outsiders haunted by their pasts and terrified they can't forestall the consequences, those people desperate enough to find refuge in Skillute Washington. The trap was set years before this story began but what are mere years to evil. Evil adapts and evil can still win. In Skillute the worst is always yet to come.If this book is your first trip to Skillute, make sure it is not your last. If like me this is just your most recent visit, you will not want it to be your last. Evil has not left Skillute. I doubt it ever will. Skillute still has stories to be told and I am hoping S.P. will continue telling them.
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  • Angel Gelique
    January 1, 1970
    Definitely entertaining and engrossing but the end seemed too rush and I felt that there was too much left unresolved.
  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    "We're not defined by other people unless we want to be. Try to remember that."3.5⭐I am so torn on how to write this review. I loved the concept of this story, and SP Miskowski wrote a very captivating story. The characters were interesting, and I was dying to see how the story would unravel. However, in the end, I was left feeling dissatisfied, and like too many pieces were missing. Vague storylines are hit or miss for me. Sometimes I feel like the perfect amount of information is given so that "We're not defined by other people unless we want to be. Try to remember that."3.5⭐I am so torn on how to write this review. I loved the concept of this story, and SP Miskowski wrote a very captivating story. The characters were interesting, and I was dying to see how the story would unravel. However, in the end, I was left feeling dissatisfied, and like too many pieces were missing. Vague storylines are hit or miss for me. Sometimes I feel like the perfect amount of information is given so that you can still feel content even without all the answers. Other times, like with The Worst is Yet to Come, everything feels disconnected because there's no clarity on what happened. I think I might have enjoyed this more as a short story - obviously a lot of information is left out in short stories, but when I'm reading a full-length novel, I have the expectation of the pieces of the story being woven together. Maybe that's on me. There were a lot of cool subplots in this book, but I feel like too many different things were crammed in instead of simplifying it a bit to have a complete story. I kept thinking certain things would come back up later & tie into the overall plot, but they just disappeared. There were too many plot holes for me to get fully on board with this book. I wish it was either longer or shorter. Even though The Worst is Yet to Come didn't totally work for me, I was still fascinated by the story. I was dying to see how everything unraveled, and I stayed interested in the story up until the end. I will definitely read more from SP Miskowski; I just struggled a bit with this one.
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  • Vincenzo Bilof
    January 1, 1970
    For the most part, I am not convinced horror novels can actually be “scary”. They can, however, be unsettling, and The Worst is Yet to Come by S. P. Miskowski is a novel that truly makes terror feel like a personal experience. Audiences who enjoyed the 2018 horror film Hereditary will instantly connect with this work, as the complexity of the horror within the narrative unfolds through the haunted lives of people who attempted, sometimes in vain, to make the family dynamic functional. The novel For the most part, I am not convinced horror novels can actually be “scary”. They can, however, be unsettling, and The Worst is Yet to Come by S. P. Miskowski is a novel that truly makes terror feel like a personal experience. Audiences who enjoyed the 2018 horror film Hereditary will instantly connect with this work, as the complexity of the horror within the narrative unfolds through the haunted lives of people who attempted, sometimes in vain, to make the family dynamic functional. The novel seems to establish that the narrative will pivot upon the relationship between two teenage girls against the backdrop of a mysterious evil. This appears to be a horror story we’ve encountered before; the outcast from the doomed family (Briar) joins forces with a goody-good from the archetypical stable family (Tasha). Miskowski seemingly counts on this familiarity and trades it for a darker, more personal narrative. As someone who works with teenagers on a daily basis, it’s heart wrenching for me to see children suffer; this is a narrative trick that a lot of authors use effectively, but here we witness a young lady battle against temptations that have dire consequences for people who may—or may not, depending on your sense of morality—“deserve” their reckoning. This, however, is only the simplest challenge Miskowski offers us. I don’t think I will ever forget the narrative arc for Kim. Her struggle with the idea of parenthood—and this is certainly a simplification—really struck home for me. Kim’s battle against the concept of normalcy neatly parallels Briar’s longing for this very thing that Kim has seemingly given to her daughter, Tasha. This is truly where the horror element comes into play, and it offers a story that is painfully familiar. I am not confident the novel necessarily needed any supernatural elements. The twists and turns were certainly interesting, but I’m not sure those were “necessary”, either; the supernatural concepts were directly impactful on the narrative, but I see the same story unfolding without it. Sometimes, simple and real make for the most important horror stories. This is not to say anything here is contrived or forced, as Miskowski gives us the supernatural from the very start of the novel and keeps it in play throughout. The brutal realism employed by Miskowski forced me to take a few days away from this book; as someone who avoids the evening news specifically because I want to avoid hearing about tragedies that involve families (especially children), I found myself riveted by Miskowski’s ability to handle powerful, game-changing moments.
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  • Jody Rose
    January 1, 1970
    Weirdly engaging, conflicted characters beset by supernatural forces in Skillute, Washington, an old lumber town where residents not only wrestle with maladaptive personal afflictions, but also those of arcane influence. The Worst Is Yet To Come unfolds in the Delphine Dodd Universe in S.P. Miskowski's Skillute Cycle, a great psychological horror series with supernatural undercurrents.Highly recommended!
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  • Sam Edwards
    January 1, 1970
    As a writer, I envy S.P. Miskowski. No one should be able to do what she does. Even as she meanders away from the plot, taking us down some memory or long description of a rapidly changing Skillute, things manage to stay impactful and important. It's all in the telling, and Miskowski tells it like a spider. By the time the reader is so engrossed in the story the threads begin to connect and snap. And then, then it's too late. I WILL say, though this can be read independently of the Skillute cycl As a writer, I envy S.P. Miskowski. No one should be able to do what she does. Even as she meanders away from the plot, taking us down some memory or long description of a rapidly changing Skillute, things manage to stay impactful and important. It's all in the telling, and Miskowski tells it like a spider. By the time the reader is so engrossed in the story the threads begin to connect and snap. And then, then it's too late. I WILL say, though this can be read independently of the Skillute cycle, there is a layer here that might be lost if you come in without reading "Knock Knock" and the other Skillute stories. They're quite affordable on amazon kindle and other sites, and have constructed one of the most compelling sagas in modern horror. I would advise readers not to be discouraged by this, but to take their time savoring the works of a modern master before working their way up to this one.
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  • Andrew Violette
    January 1, 1970
    This novel has a slow build to one of the more messed up endings ever
  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    My introduction to the world of Misowski and it won’t be my last. The small town environment created a dark, engaging, and frantic atmosphere. The character interactions were heartwarming in one chapter and disturbing and abysmal the next.
  • David Thirteen
    January 1, 1970
    S.P. Miskowski’s characters may seem simple at first but the more you delve, the more they become thorny briar patches of dubious morality, causing the reader to question both their attachment to the character as well as themselves. This is the second novel of hers I’ve read, and it makes me wonder if she ever lets the reader off the hook or does she always hold our feet to the coals. The Worst is Yet to Come left me conflicted. Without a doubt, it is a thought-provoking, dreadful horror story w S.P. Miskowski’s characters may seem simple at first but the more you delve, the more they become thorny briar patches of dubious morality, causing the reader to question both their attachment to the character as well as themselves. This is the second novel of hers I’ve read, and it makes me wonder if she ever lets the reader off the hook or does she always hold our feet to the coals. The Worst is Yet to Come left me conflicted. Without a doubt, it is a thought-provoking, dreadful horror story with some unsettling supernatural elements and complex characters who may be even more unsettling than the forces of darkness. But even though some of the characters were revealed to be less innocent than first thought, I hated seeing their fates play out. The ending had me cringing with anxiety. Not an easy thing to do and certainly not a bad thing in a horror novel, no matter how unpleasant in the moment. But it made it difficult to say, “Wow, I loved that,” when I finally put the book down. Although after spending some time processing it, I did respect it.Part of my conflict stems from the antagonist being a vague malevolent force that the characters weren’t usually aware of until it was too late. I haven’t read any of Miskowski’s other Skillute books and I wonder how much of the ambiguity surrounding the supernatural elements is due to that lack of background. But in any case, I would have liked to have seen the characters more on the defense against what was happening to them, although I fully recognize this is a matter of personal taste.Even with my hedging, the writing here is superb and the emotional core of the novel is deep and resonate. I would highly recommend this novel.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    My only quibble with this story is that events move a little quickly–the opposite of my take on Knock Knock. Briar barely has the chance to be established as a character in our minds before Miskowski messes with her. Because of this she’s a little hollow as characters go.Kim, Tasha’s mother, on the other hand, ends up taking center stage. She isn’t very likable once the details start to emerge, but that suits her place in this story. She was an aspiring painter who gave up her dreams because her My only quibble with this story is that events move a little quickly–the opposite of my take on Knock Knock. Briar barely has the chance to be established as a character in our minds before Miskowski messes with her. Because of this she’s a little hollow as characters go.Kim, Tasha’s mother, on the other hand, ends up taking center stage. She isn’t very likable once the details start to emerge, but that suits her place in this story. She was an aspiring painter who gave up her dreams because her husband wanted a child, and that, as well as later events, have shaped her interactions with Tasha in odd ways. She obsesses over Tasha’s attentions, and takes an instant disliking to Briar.I find I can’t say much more about this tale without giving too much away. There’s a handful of twists and surprises that keep things interesting. Events and characters are quite creepy, and I want to read more about the town of Skillute.Consider my rating a 4.5Original review posted on my blog: http://www.errantdreams.com/2019/02/r...
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  • Ian Welke
    January 1, 1970
    S.P. Miskowski is one of my favorite writers, particularly for the craftsmanship of her writing. She always seems to use the perfect word or phrase and without the phrasing getting in the way of the narrative. It makes total immersion in the story an effortless process for the reader. The Worst Is Yet To Come is set in Skillute, Washington, a town she created, fictitious yet I could swear I have been there… Like the other stories she’s written set in this town, there’s an ever present set of eer S.P. Miskowski is one of my favorite writers, particularly for the craftsmanship of her writing. She always seems to use the perfect word or phrase and without the phrasing getting in the way of the narrative. It makes total immersion in the story an effortless process for the reader. The Worst Is Yet To Come is set in Skillute, Washington, a town she created, fictitious yet I could swear I have been there… Like the other stories she’s written set in this town, there’s an ever present set of eeriness. Miskowski measures the perfect quantities of information to give the reader to lure them in, but not to overdo it and spoil the sense of mystery. Highly recommend.
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  • Bryce Warren
    January 1, 1970
    There is much more to this story than meets the eye. On the surface it is a story of Tasha whose new best friend Briar is an incredibly bad influence. But the mystery from the past turns this story on its head. S.P. Miskowski is a horror writer to watch. A great new discovery!
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  • Amanda McReynolds
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to like the book, but it was very all over the place without seeming to have a major reason. There were several story lines going on, some of which did not have an actual resolution, which is why the book scored low for me.
  • Damien Angelica Walters
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely chilling!
  • Logan Noble
    January 1, 1970
    Review incoming...
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