Lies of Descent
In this compelling fantasy from a debut author, two people must unite warring cultures to banish the gods who destroyed their homeland.The Fallen Gods' War drove the remnants of a victorious army across the ocean in search of a new homeland. A thousand years later, the lifeless continent of Draegora is largely forgotten, a symbol for the regiments that remain. Demons to some. Protectors to others. The power of their god-touched blades has forged a nation, though many resent their absolute control.Riam and Nola are unknowing descendants of the old world. When it's discovered they carry enough Draegoran blood to serve in the regiments, they are dragged away from their families to begin training. If they survive, they will be expected to enforce the laws of the covenant, to fight the Esharii tribesmen who raid along the border, and to be judge, jury, and executioners for those accused of crimes.For Riam, who welcomes his escape from an abusive father, the power to protect those who cannot defend themselves is alluring. For Nola, who wishes to return home, it is a betrayal by all she holds dear.Neither is given a choice...and neither may ever get the chance to serve.Lies of Descent begins an epic trilogy of fallen gods, betrayal, and magic--where dark motives often dwell within the true and just, and where the things most feared sometimes lead to salvation.Praise for Lies of Descent:"...Lies of Descent depicts how factual accuracy, military culture, and religion all conceal a long-standing historical deception about to implode into a conflagration fueled by the lust for power and fanned by mythic misconceptions." —L. E. Modesitt, Jr.

Lies of Descent Details

TitleLies of Descent
Author
ReleaseAug 20th, 2019
PublisherDaw Books
ISBN-139780756415457
Rating
GenreFantasy

Lies of Descent Review

  • Angii Golosov
    January 1, 1970
    Phenomenal storyline. The author has an amazing ability to link the emotions of the reader to his characters. You will find yourself rooting for them, crying over them, and wanting nothing but the best or worst for them. Mr. Bucher's elegant writing style flows effortlessly throughout the story making the multiple point of views come together flawlessly. Truly loved the novel and cannot wait for the release of the second. Must read.
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  • Christi M
    January 1, 1970
    In this new epic fantasy series a world has been created full of enemies that have opposed each other for hundreds of years. The Draegora and Esharii drew sides against each other long ago, but even amongst themselves they have competing factions vying for power.Thoughts:In Lies of Descent, one of my lasting impressions after reading is how the path the main characters were on changed course more than once, which frustrated me even while I enjoyed reading it. Just as I got settled into a story p In this new epic fantasy series a world has been created full of enemies that have opposed each other for hundreds of years. The Draegora and Esharii drew sides against each other long ago, but even amongst themselves they have competing factions vying for power.Thoughts:In Lies of Descent, one of my lasting impressions after reading is how the path the main characters were on changed course more than once, which frustrated me even while I enjoyed reading it. Just as I got settled into a story path the direction of it would shift and I would have to relook at where I thought it was heading, only to have it shift again. However, it is well known that epic fantasy and science fiction can at times require a lot of world building and in order to explain what the true story or issue at stake is all these different directions needed to be taken. So while I am not surprised in how some of the story lines changed, I was a bit surprised by how often it occurred. There is a great deal of world building done within this book, not only do you learn the world in general, but characters, politics, and how the fallen gods are involved. Keeping up with who the fallen gods were and how their history pertained to the present day was at times a bit confusing and I found myself having to go back and re-read sections again to make sure I had everything straight.Lies of Descent has two main characters – Riam and Nola – although Riam does feel like the primary main character. At the age of 12 every child must be tested to see if they have Draegoran blood. Gairen, a Warden of the Owl clan, has been searching for quite a while for a specific descendant when he discovers Riam. In finding Riam, he hopes he can change his father’s mind about accepting new recruits into his clan for training. Since the Owl clan stopped taking new recruits several years back, other clans have been able to become more powerful. Other clans that are more corrupt and more power hungry. To Gairen, balance amongst the clans must be kept. It is by following Riam we learn the Draegoran structure and politics as Gairen and Master Iwynd take time to explain and show it to him. Overall, I found Riam to be very likeable and an easy character to root for.Nola, the other main character, was one of the two children Gairen found when performing the Draegoran descendant test. However, due to an unexpected turn of events, Nola takes a different path than Riam and ends up with the Escharii tribesman instead of the Draegoran. It is through her and a couple of other Escharii that the reader is allowed to see into Escharii, their past, and their current political situation. Because of the path Nola finds herself on, I felt that I didn’t quite get to know her as well as I expect readers will in future books. I don’t dislike her by any means, I just don’t feel like I know her as well as I know Riam.From what I understand, this new epic fantasy series will be a trilogy. Due to the amount and type of information we learn in Lies of Descent, the novel does a lot of plot setup and world building explanation that one might expect from the first book. It is entertaining and engaging and I believe fans of epic fantasy will want to be sure to try this one out. Rating: 4 starsThanks to Netgalley and Berkley Publishing Group for the advanced reader copy and opportunity to provide an honest review.
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  • Alastair Patton
    January 1, 1970
    Lies of Descent by Troy Carrol Bucher was an incredibly captivating and original fantasy. The story follows a young boy and girl, Riem and Nola, who may be descendants of fallen gods, and their journey into becoming important figures in the world Bucher has created. The book flows seamlessly between both perspectives. Bucher's characters and world building are refreshingly original and leave the reader craving more. This is the first book in The Fallen Gods' War series and I cannot wait for the Lies of Descent by Troy Carrol Bucher was an incredibly captivating and original fantasy. The story follows a young boy and girl, Riem and Nola, who may be descendants of fallen gods, and their journey into becoming important figures in the world Bucher has created. The book flows seamlessly between both perspectives. Bucher's characters and world building are refreshingly original and leave the reader craving more. This is the first book in The Fallen Gods' War series and I cannot wait for the next.I was given an advance reading copy (ARC) by the author. The book goes on sale 20 August 2019.
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  • Tanya
    January 1, 1970
    I read Lies of Descent in an early draft and was instantly captivated by this surprisingly elegant and deliciously complex story. Bucher blends epic battle scenes, original mythologies, and sweeping landscapes into a beautifully paced narrative that captures your attention from the start. So thrilled to see this series come to market.
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  • Pat M
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced reader copy from the author and I have to say that the writing is solid and the plot is engaging from the first pages all the way to the end. This was an excellent read and I'm very excited for the rest of the trilogy.
  • Todd
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance readers’ edition through a goodreads giveaway.Great start to a series I’d like to continue reading. The book started off at a quick pace, capturing my attention early, introducing Riam in the first chapter and Nola in the second. Each child is violently pulled from their current lives and taken from their homes by a Draegoran, to where and for what purpose neither know at the time.It was interesting seeing the interactions between the children and the Draegoran as they trav I received an advance readers’ edition through a goodreads giveaway.Great start to a series I’d like to continue reading. The book started off at a quick pace, capturing my attention early, introducing Riam in the first chapter and Nola in the second. Each child is violently pulled from their current lives and taken from their homes by a Draegoran, to where and for what purpose neither know at the time.It was interesting seeing the interactions between the children and the Draegoran as they travelled, though before long Nola is separated from the others. That’s when the book begins rotating between narratives, with several chapters focusing on Riam and his interactions with the Draegorans, followed by several chapters focusing on Nola and her captors. This ends up giving us both perspectives in an age old conflict between the Draegorans and the Esharii, and the real world realization that neither side is ever completely good, evil, right, or wrong, or even in agreement about the path forward.There are interesting forms of magic used throughout the story. We only slowly learn how the magic works as different characters learn, but times are changing and things happen that should be impossible, leaving the future uncertain. There were several times when some power, or aspect of the magic, was mentioned or hinted at but never fully explored, leaving me to assume (hope) that a future book picks up that thread.I did sometimes become a bit confused by the references to the various fallen gods, or powers that came before. There are small snippets about them between some chapters, and some references throughout the story, but these were far enough apart I sometimes had to flip back to reread some of them to recall which fallen god did or represented what. But this didn’t detract from my enjoyment, and to be honest I’ve had this issue with many other fantasy series I ended up really enjoying. I look forward to seeing where this series leads.
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  • Tom
    January 1, 1970
    I pre-ordered this book months ago based on word-of-mouth from several friends and serious genre fans. Wish I could start reading it NOW, 'cause I'm overdue for a fantasy epic done right. But I've waited this long, so I guess I can make it through a few more weeks. (And the price came way down from when I first ordered, so I guess that's good.) My 5-star review is based on my anticipation, a preview excerpt, and additional buzz I've been hearing. What's with the recent rash of 1-star reviews? Up I pre-ordered this book months ago based on word-of-mouth from several friends and serious genre fans. Wish I could start reading it NOW, 'cause I'm overdue for a fantasy epic done right. But I've waited this long, so I guess I can make it through a few more weeks. (And the price came way down from when I first ordered, so I guess that's good.) My 5-star review is based on my anticipation, a preview excerpt, and additional buzz I've been hearing. What's with the recent rash of 1-star reviews? Update: the 1-star reviews are all courtesy of users with obviously bogus profiles. C'mon, Goodreads, clean up your act!
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  • Barb Lie
    January 1, 1970
    Lies of Descent by Troy Carrol Bucher is the 1st book The Fallen Gods War trilogy. As stated in the description above, The Fallen Gods war drove a victorious army across the ocean for a new homeland, but a thousand years later, Draegora has fallen apart and two factions, Draegoriana and Eshari are still determined to destroy each other .We meet our young hero, Riam, who after watching his hated father get killed, is taken away by a Draegoran warrior to begin training to be able to fight Eshari t Lies of Descent by Troy Carrol Bucher is the 1st book The Fallen Gods War trilogy. As stated in the description above, The Fallen Gods war drove a victorious army across the ocean for a new homeland, but a thousand years later, Draegora has fallen apart and two factions, Draegoriana and Eshari are still determined to destroy each other .We meet our young hero, Riam, who after watching his hated father get killed, is taken away by a Draegoran warrior to begin training to be able to fight Eshari tribesmen, as he has the ‘blood’. Which means that he has ties to other Draegoran descendants, and has possible powers. Riam will meet a young girl, Nola, who has also been violently taken from her family. She too has the blood, and will also go to training. However, in a short time they are attacked by Eshari warriors, and though Riam escaped, Nola is taken.What follows is a slow and at times exciting journey, with POV’s between Riam and Nola, as they both go difficult and separate directions. Both Dragegoran and Eshari see in the Riam or Nola their abilities that could help either group fight and win the war. This is a difficult review to write, as this world building at times is confusing, and telling too much would be spoilers. I did like Riam and Nola, and found it interesting in the different roads they each travelled.Lies of Descent was well written by Bucher, as it was an epic fantasy about fallen gods, magic in dark violent world. If you like epic fantasies, I suggest you read Lies of Descent.BarbThe Reading Cafe
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  • James MrOcean
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this novel. That's all that really needs to be said. Its captivating and the characters' struggles feel real and their victories well earned. The web of conspiracies are well foreshadowed and the shifting POV keeps you wanting more of the other but gives you time to cool down without enough going on to forget about the others. The antagonists are miserable in the best way. The combat is brief and believable. (as they can be with magic involved) There are some issues I have with it but I enjoyed this novel. That's all that really needs to be said. Its captivating and the characters' struggles feel real and their victories well earned. The web of conspiracies are well foreshadowed and the shifting POV keeps you wanting more of the other but gives you time to cool down without enough going on to forget about the others. The antagonists are miserable in the best way. The combat is brief and believable. (as they can be with magic involved) There are some issues I have with it but they are minor and more nitpicking than real issues. (some of the graphic scenes felt a bit forced. Like I don't think they added to the story/character at all, and the author repeated themselves several times in the novel. Telling things that were shown later) I will be looking forward to the rest of this series and hope to trail along with the characters.
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  • Salahuddin Majeed
    January 1, 1970
    I usually stay away from the fantasy genre but this book was amazing. Once I started it I couldn’t put it down until I finished it. It’s the start of a great series and I’m looking forward to reading the next entry.
  • DaMaar
    January 1, 1970
    Nice World I wasn’t in love with either of the POV’s. That lack of connection took away from a really nice world built in a non traditional setting. What I liked most about the book was the author obscuring the evil until the last 1/4 of the story. I’ll be looking out for book 2.
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