Into the Planet
From one of the world’s most renowned cave divers, a firsthand account of exploring the earth’s final frontier: the hidden depths of our oceans and the sunken caves inside our planetMore people have died exploring underwater caves than climbing Mount Everest, and we know more about deep space than we do about the depths of our oceans. From one of the top cave divers working today—and one of the very few women in her field—Into the Planet blends science, adventure, and memoir to bring readers face-to-face with the terror and beauty of earth’s remaining unknowns and the extremes of human capability.Jill Heinerth—the first person in history to dive deep into an Antarctic iceberg and leader of a team that discovered the ancient watery remains of Mayan civilizations—has descended farther into the inner depths of our planet than any other woman. She takes us into the harrowing split-second decisions that determine whether a diver makes it back to safety, the prejudices that prevent women from pursuing careers underwater, and her endeavor to recover a fallen friend’s body from the confines of a cave. But there’s beauty beyond the danger of diving, and while Heinerth swims beneath our feet in the lifeblood of our planet, she works with biologists discovering new species, physicists tracking climate change, and hydrogeologists examining our finite freshwater reserves. Written with hair-raising intensity, Into the Planet is the first book to deliver an intimate account of cave diving, transporting readers deep into inner space, where fear must be reconciled and a mission’s success balances between knowing one’s limits and pushing the envelope of human endurance.

Into the Planet Details

TitleInto the Planet
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 20th, 2019
PublisherEcco
ISBN-139780062691545
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Science, Autobiography, Memoir, Adventure, Biography Memoir, Environment, Nature

Into the Planet Review

  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    Heard a super interesting interview with her on NPR, now I'm curious to read this!
  • Krista
    January 1, 1970
    When we transcend the fear of failure and terror of the unknown, we are all capable of great things, personally and as a society. We might not always know where the journey will lead us. We might feel a burden of difficulty, but all paths lead to discovery. Both good and bad life events contribute to the fabric of who we are as individuals and as a civilization. If we continue to trek purposefully toward our dreams, into the planet and beyond, we just might achieve the impossible. Jill Heinert When we transcend the fear of failure and terror of the unknown, we are all capable of great things, personally and as a society. We might not always know where the journey will lead us. We might feel a burden of difficulty, but all paths lead to discovery. Both good and bad life events contribute to the fabric of who we are as individuals and as a civilization. If we continue to trek purposefully toward our dreams, into the planet and beyond, we just might achieve the impossible. Jill Heinerth seems to have led a life of trekking purposefully toward her dreams, and despite personal sacrifices and the constant risk of mortal danger, she has built an enviable career as a cave diver and explorer, as an advanced trainer of technical diving, and as a filmmaker and writer. Part memoir, part chronicle of modern cave diving and the evolving science that allows humans to go deeper and for longer on these dangerous dives, Into the Planet is an often thrilling and always interesting book about an extreme sport and an extreme life. [Note: I read an ARC and passages quoted may not be in their final forms.] The archway of ice above our heads is furrowed like the surface of a golf ball, carved by the hand of the sea. Iridescent blue, Wedgwood, azure, cerulean, cobalt, and pastel robin's egg meld with chalk and silvery alabaster. The ice is vibrant, bright, and at the same time ghostly, shadowy. The beauty contradicts the danger. We are the first people to cave dive inside an iceberg. And we may not live to tell the story. The book opens with a prologue set inside the iceberg known as B-15 – a large chunk of Antarctica that broke off in the year 2000, and at the time that Heinerth and two others made several unprecedented dives into its interior, it was the largest free-floating object on Earth – and right from the beginning, the storytelling is thrilling and beautifully wrought. The narrative then rewinds to Heinerth's childhood and early adult experiences, and still, it's all fascinating. When the young professional decides to leave her life and her career as the co-owner of a Toronto-based graphic design firm in order to become a dive instructor in the Caribbean, her journeys into the planet begin in earnest. As every major expedition that Heinreth and her co-divers propose require sponsors and fundraising before the fact, it's interesting to see how she eventually uses her expertise in graphic design and photography to create the brochures and promotional materials that make the eventual dives possible (and then to see how she develops her love of underwater photography into groundbreaking filmmaking). The stories of the major dives that follow are worthy of any fictional adventure novel, but I have to admit that I wasn't as interested in the parallel story of the author's strained marriage to fellow diver Paul Heinreth (but can't ultimately fault her for putting this large part of her life into her own memoir). I was intrigued by the additional pressures that the author faced as one of the few women in her field, and acknowledge that it must have been horrible to be a pioneer at the dawn of the internet, before most of us knew to ignore the trolls. As the story of an adventuresome life, this is all good stuff. If you cave dive long enough, you will eventually face the death of a friend. Worse, you may even recover the body of one, or hold them as their life force ebbs. In those moments, your life will be changed forever. Back then, in Huaulta, I was new enough to cave diving and exploration that I had not yet lost a close friend. In my gut, I knew that if I were going to participate in extreme endeavors like this expedition, my days of innocence were numbered. There is quite a bit about the dangers involved in trying to dive deeper and longer than anyone has before; cave diving seems to be an extremely competitive endeavor and Heinreth knows that every time she swims into the unknown she not only risks her own life but the peace and mental security of those she might leave behind; and particularly the peace and mental security of those of her friends who might be called upon to recover her lifeless body if she fails to resurface on her own. Heinreth explains that she has the “7R” gene (that causes people to seek the dopamine rush of novel situations), but unlike those who participate in extreme “sports” for the thrills alone, Heinreth stresses the scientific knowledge that her dives have provided – and especially those dives that trace the surprising sources and underground pathways of drinking water – and that does seem to legitimise her endeavors beyond the “because it's there” ethos. Overall, this is the story of a large life, and it's told well. I'm glad to have gotten to know Jill Heinreth and I wish her success and safety in the future.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    "I will take you on an uncomfortable rendezvous with fear. You will feel cold and claustrophobic when you read this book. But I challenge you to recognize the humanity in that sensation of terror you're experiencing. I encourage you to accept that you are an explorer like me." Before reading Into the Planet, I knew very little about cave diving. As an avid Nat Geo reader, I have seen some incredible photos taken in remote caves, but I had absolutely no idea of the technique, training, and skill "I will take you on an uncomfortable rendezvous with fear. You will feel cold and claustrophobic when you read this book. But I challenge you to recognize the humanity in that sensation of terror you're experiencing. I encourage you to accept that you are an explorer like me." Before reading Into the Planet, I knew very little about cave diving. As an avid Nat Geo reader, I have seen some incredible photos taken in remote caves, but I had absolutely no idea of the technique, training, and skill that lies behind those photos until I read this book. Jill Heinerth's story had me hooked from the very beginning. The prologue opens with a harrowing scene set in the middle of an iceberg and then transitions back to her earlier years in the first chapter. The story touches on her introduction to cave diving, follows her major diving expeditions, and highlights some of her best diving stories. Throughout the book, Heinerth also weaves a subtle reminder of the importance of water and its protection and conservation. This book is my favorite non-fiction read of the year so far! I absolutely loved it. Heinerth's prose is beautiful. She artfully transported me to the underwater caves as she retold her diving experiences, which are fascinating, exhilarating, and even terrifying at times. The pacing worked well. There weren't too many flashbacks and I never felt lost. I also appreciated her explanations of the technical side of diving. It wasn't complicated, but it was enough that I understood what was going on and why certain things happened. If I had any criticism at all, it might be that the last part of the book doesn't seem as cohesive as the rest of the book, but it was no less captivating than any other part. Heinerth will no doubt inspire a new generation of cave divers with her memoir, but for me, it confirmed that I am definitely too claustrophobic to take up cave diving. Nonetheless, I still loved the opportunity to journey along with Heinerth and explore some of the deepest parts of the earth through her eyes. I will definitely re-visit this book again in the future!A huge thanks to Jill Heinerth, HarperCollins Publishers, and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this lovely book!
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  • Katie - Girl About Library
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the publisher and author for allowing me to read this book prior to publication in exchange for an honest review. 3.5 stars, rounding to 4 because GRs doesn’t believe in the power of half stars- full review to come!
  • Onceinabluemoon
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 rounding up. This book was fascinating, but unsettling, I had a gambit of emotions. I found the author off putting, but her accomplishments astounding. Loved the photos, always entranced at others bravery, but something about her didn't sit well with me. Despite my negative edge, well worth reading, to see how the wild ones live and thrive.
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  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    I was so sad to finish this book, the author Jill Heinerth is some force of nature. I greatly enjoyed it.I am now on the hunt for more (female) adventure writers, and to take a scuba trip!
  • Allison
    January 1, 1970
    I expected this book to be interesting and informative. I was pleasantly surprised to discover it was fast moving with sections of humor. A very enjoyable read.
  • sbtbkb
    January 1, 1970
    This was a great book. It's often hard to relate to "thrill seekers" but the author did a great job of explaining why she continues to pursue this passion. I never thought much about cave diving but the writing was so superb that it made it accessible. I liked the parallel progression of her career and the sport of cave diving. The writing style was quite immersive
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  • Chad Guarino
    January 1, 1970
    Imagine a grueling, weeks long ship journey from New Zealand through the Roaring Forties, Furious Fifties, and Screaming Sixties, being tossed around like a cork in your bunk as the ship is buffeted by rogue waves and storms on your way to Antarctica. The ship lists dangerously, colleagues are seasick, and you have to cocoon yourself in your bunk just to avoid being thrown from it. Now imagine that this isn't even the most dangerous part of your mission: you still have to dive in the frigid anta Imagine a grueling, weeks long ship journey from New Zealand through the Roaring Forties, Furious Fifties, and Screaming Sixties, being tossed around like a cork in your bunk as the ship is buffeted by rogue waves and storms on your way to Antarctica. The ship lists dangerously, colleagues are seasick, and you have to cocoon yourself in your bunk just to avoid being thrown from it. Now imagine that this isn't even the most dangerous part of your mission: you still have to dive in the frigid antarctic waters looking for underwater caves in an iceberg. Jill Heinerth has lived through this, and a myriad other life threatening situations in her career as a cave diver. Into the Planet is her memoir of that career, from her decision to leave her desk job through the many dives and expeditions she's been a member of. Heinerth's writing is at its best when she's recalling her dives, which are full of sensory details and danger. Admittedly, my interest flagged a bit during the segments in between, especially those involved with the more "mundane" aspects of life, such as running a dive store or her prior career in advertising. It's obvious she lives for adventure and not the mundane, and this comes through loud and clear in her writing. Heinerth's career choice is a brave one, not only for the risk of death in any given dive, but also given the male dominated nature of diving. She details many troubling instances of sexism and judgment she's handled throughout her diving career, and her evolving ability to handle those situations. While I found it hard to connect with her extremely adventurous nature (a trait she attributes to the "7R Gene", ostensibly a wanderlust gene, albeit one I've never heard of. I'll take her word for it), I admired her perseverance in a field where she's seen so many friends and colleagues perish. This is a worthy memoir for the vicarious thrills, especially for those like myself who will most likely never cave dive. **I was given a copy of this book by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. My thanks to Harper Collins.**
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  • Ben
    January 1, 1970
    I expected much more. This is mostly about Heinerth's experiences on other people's cave diving expeditions, especially Bill Stone's projects. Bill Stone has an excellent book himself, "Beyond the Deep: Deadly Descent into the World's Most Treacherous Cave," so I don't see a reason for reading this one. Beyond that, the writing is very average. There is way too much information about her relationships. I didn't expect to be reading about her frustrations with online dating, and swiping right or I expected much more. This is mostly about Heinerth's experiences on other people's cave diving expeditions, especially Bill Stone's projects. Bill Stone has an excellent book himself, "Beyond the Deep: Deadly Descent into the World's Most Treacherous Cave," so I don't see a reason for reading this one. Beyond that, the writing is very average. There is way too much information about her relationships. I didn't expect to be reading about her frustrations with online dating, and swiping right or left. It is neither interesting nor novel. I don't know if she has repressed impostor syndrome, but she is constantly pointing out what an amazing explorer she is. > We were on top of the world, and I was comfortable in my role as an exploration diver and felt I was an important asset to the success of the entire team.> In this wild and almost unimaginable situation, I continue to blossom in the purity of unhindered exploration. I’ll be afraid, but I’ll never concede.Stone didn't constantly write how great he is. He didn't have to, because his stories stood for themselves. She complains constantly, about everything from bugs to her husband to online trolls. I'm sympathetic to her about trolls, but don't think that either engaging with them or complaining about it in your memoir is at all productive. And she unfortunately undercuts herself; on one page she complains about others saying saying she didn't earn her way onto her husband's expedition, and on the next page she writes: > Not yet envisioning myself as capable of that level of advanced technical exploration diving, I first settled into a management and marketing role, bringing my artistic skills, photography, and technical background to the group.There are a few interesting stories here, but they are buried in a mess. > I was still too exhausted to communicate with Paul, who was sitting only five yards away at the fire. I wished he would sweep me up and make it all go away. Was our bond so weak that he could not even ask me what was wrong? … I wanted my indomitable French-Canadian husband to sweep me into his arms and make everything better.
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  • Jenny GB
    January 1, 1970
    In Into the Planet Heinerth gives an intimate look at the thrill and danger of cave diving. She deeply analyzes her love, fear, and sorrow at engaging in her sport. While reading this you'll feel the thrill of exploring unseen worlds, the horror of getting the bends, and the sorrow of losing friends. Heinerth is unsparing in the details, which really allowed me into her thoughts and feelings. Sometimes this wasn't great since I found it really difficult to read about the physical experience of g In Into the Planet Heinerth gives an intimate look at the thrill and danger of cave diving. She deeply analyzes her love, fear, and sorrow at engaging in her sport. While reading this you'll feel the thrill of exploring unseen worlds, the horror of getting the bends, and the sorrow of losing friends. Heinerth is unsparing in the details, which really allowed me into her thoughts and feelings. Sometimes this wasn't great since I found it really difficult to read about the physical experience of getting the bends and to read about retrieving divers that died. However, I ultimately couldn't stop reading about her adventure while knowing it was something I would never experience myself. The accompanying photos really enhanced my reading experience, although I was disappointed not to hear stories about the shipwreck. Overall, this was a really engaging and satisfying read that I highly recommend.
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  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    A claustrophobic nightmare but fascinating, nonethelessPersonally I do not understand how anyone could do the things in this book. I am very claustrophobic (but must be slightly masochistic to read and enjoy books such as this).Cave diver Jill Heinerth is also an underwater explorer, writer, photographer, filmmaker, and educator. She has dived in underwater caves all over the world and also in caves under an iceberg in Antarctica. She has become an advocate for protecting fresh water resources.T A claustrophobic nightmare but fascinating, nonethelessPersonally I do not understand how anyone could do the things in this book. I am very claustrophobic (but must be slightly masochistic to read and enjoy books such as this).Cave diver Jill Heinerth is also an underwater explorer, writer, photographer, filmmaker, and educator. She has dived in underwater caves all over the world and also in caves under an iceberg in Antarctica. She has become an advocate for protecting fresh water resources.This was a fascinating book and an insight into the mind of an adventurer I would never want to emulate. I tell you this woman has mucho ba**s.Her story starts in 1967 and goes through to 2018.I highly recommend this non-fiction story to all adventurers and armchair adventurers out there.I received this book from Ecco Books through Edelweiss in the hopes that I would read it and leave an unbiased review.
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  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    Jill Heinerth is an exceptional diver who has pushed to make a place for women in a what is often a macho, elitist sport. She periodically shows that she’s adopted that elitism as a personal value, for example, claiming her experiences of Antarctica are superior, “There is simply no comparison between a carefully managed tourist experience and the real threats and discomfort we endured on our crossing,” where an egalitarian person would have chosen to embrace shared experiences and values. Or, i Jill Heinerth is an exceptional diver who has pushed to make a place for women in a what is often a macho, elitist sport. She periodically shows that she’s adopted that elitism as a personal value, for example, claiming her experiences of Antarctica are superior, “There is simply no comparison between a carefully managed tourist experience and the real threats and discomfort we endured on our crossing,” where an egalitarian person would have chosen to embrace shared experiences and values. Or, in another example, literally dedicating a chapter to claiming her genetics as an explanation for her success as an explorer. Even without this elitist vein distancing the author from the reader, the writing is uneven and choppy. Heinerths’ dive experiences are exceptional and the photos in the book are spectacular. But, it could have been much better.
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  • Anne M.
    January 1, 1970
    As this book ended I felt a tremendous sense of sadness because I wasn’t ready to say goodbye to her beautiful storytelling. I listened to this as an audiobook and I have to say that my preference in non fiction is for the author to read their own text. It just makes it so much better. The nuances of tone and inflection come naturally to one telling their own story. She is an excellent narrator. I loved this book. There were moments when I found myself holding my breath, my heart racing as I lis As this book ended I felt a tremendous sense of sadness because I wasn’t ready to say goodbye to her beautiful storytelling. I listened to this as an audiobook and I have to say that my preference in non fiction is for the author to read their own text. It just makes it so much better. The nuances of tone and inflection come naturally to one telling their own story. She is an excellent narrator. I loved this book. There were moments when I found myself holding my breath, my heart racing as I listened. Other times I laughed at the humor and sighed or smiled at a moment. I am a wanderer and likely have the 7R gene she writes about but I would never find myself cave diving. I prefer to hike and stroll through caves. Listening to her book allowed me to vicariously travel to Antarctica without ever leaving Florida. I am now seeking another book that will be its equal.
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  • Jana Bouc
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating memoir of a life as a scuba diver adventurer, explorer and deep cave diver and what it’s like to do it as a woman. It includes some interesting side notes about a type of gene that people have who seek extreme adventure, that has something to do with dopamine processing. Besides loving water her whole life and always seeking the bleeding edge of exploration in it, the author is also brilliant, strong, competent and caring about the community of divers and the resource of water. She n Fascinating memoir of a life as a scuba diver adventurer, explorer and deep cave diver and what it’s like to do it as a woman. It includes some interesting side notes about a type of gene that people have who seek extreme adventure, that has something to do with dopamine processing. Besides loving water her whole life and always seeking the bleeding edge of exploration in it, the author is also brilliant, strong, competent and caring about the community of divers and the resource of water. She narrates the book and does a wonderful job of conveying her excitement, fear, disappointments and successes.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    I was swept away by this book. I didn't even notice the time as I devoured the pages in breathless anticipation to see what happened next. If you love adventure like I do, "Into the Planet" will tempt you to chuck it all to live a life of only scuba diving travel. If you're an armchair adventurer, this book will likely inspire you to explore even if it's just a little something out of your comfort zone. Either way, you won't ever forget Jill's epic life story. I cannot recommend this book highly I was swept away by this book. I didn't even notice the time as I devoured the pages in breathless anticipation to see what happened next. If you love adventure like I do, "Into the Planet" will tempt you to chuck it all to live a life of only scuba diving travel. If you're an armchair adventurer, this book will likely inspire you to explore even if it's just a little something out of your comfort zone. Either way, you won't ever forget Jill's epic life story. I cannot recommend this book highly enough!
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  • Beth Brock
    January 1, 1970
    I was listening to NPR a couple of weeks ago and listened to an interview with the author on this book and was immediately hooked. I purchased the book yesterday and am already halfway through it. This is the story of a cave diver. I have loved the idea of scuba diving since I was a kid and used to watch Sea Hunt on television. I have never had the opportunity to try it, though I do love the water. Caves, not so much. I am claustrophobic so I know I could never be a cave diver, but love reading I was listening to NPR a couple of weeks ago and listened to an interview with the author on this book and was immediately hooked. I purchased the book yesterday and am already halfway through it. This is the story of a cave diver. I have loved the idea of scuba diving since I was a kid and used to watch Sea Hunt on television. I have never had the opportunity to try it, though I do love the water. Caves, not so much. I am claustrophobic so I know I could never be a cave diver, but love reading about someone who has the courage to do so. I hope to finish this tonight.
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  • Shane Burgel
    January 1, 1970
    Jill categorizes her time as a cave diver well and her accomplishments are staggering but the book didn't really "excite" me, even during the harrowing dives that she recounts. I'm not sure if it was the story telling or the way it was read (I listened to the Audio Book), but I wasn't as blown away as I probably should have been. So I found it very interesting but not exciting, if that makes sense. Still a very worthy read, just to better understand the cave diving culture and the risks that the Jill categorizes her time as a cave diver well and her accomplishments are staggering but the book didn't really "excite" me, even during the harrowing dives that she recounts. I'm not sure if it was the story telling or the way it was read (I listened to the Audio Book), but I wasn't as blown away as I probably should have been. So I found it very interesting but not exciting, if that makes sense. Still a very worthy read, just to better understand the cave diving culture and the risks that they undertake.
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  • pianogal
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this one for the most part, but there were sections that just left me flat. Also, I thought it was a little weird how much detail she went into with her first relationship/husband and almost included her second/current "Love of her Life" as an after thought. Not a job I could ever do. This one left me claustrophobic just reading it, much less actually doing these things. Um, no thank you.
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  • Lori Ann
    January 1, 1970
    I didn’t realize modern-day explorers existed. Very interesting to see how she built a very varied career out of scuba diving. All stories were interesting, though I thought the editing could have been tighter. I also felt there was a chapter or two of fairly stilted writing in the beginning, but it seemed like she found her voice a few chapters in. Overall a really interesting memoir about a truly off-the-beaten-path career.
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  • Katrina
    January 1, 1970
    What a fast, uncomfortable read. Heinerth writes so descriptively about diving that I found myself shying away from the descriptions until I was sure everyone returned from the dive safely (spoiler: they don't always) - only then could I go back and engage in the dive narrative. I was curious about the author and see that she's written quite a lot, and I plan to pursue her other books - her style is fast paced, engaging, and evocative.
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  • Edwin Howard
    January 1, 1970
    INTO THE PLANET: MY LIFE AS A CAVE DIVER is an amazing memoir written by Jill Heinerth, a pioneer in the cave diving field. Heinerth covers her beginnings in a regular job and how diving grew from a hobby to a lifestyle to something she is forever connected to. She recounts several of her monumental dive experiences in glorious detail and all the while sharing how her personal life was and is affected by diving; from relationships, to how her mind yearns to discover new things, to the diver com INTO THE PLANET: MY LIFE AS A CAVE DIVER is an amazing memoir written by Jill Heinerth, a pioneer in the cave diving field. Heinerth covers her beginnings in a regular job and how diving grew from a hobby to a lifestyle to something she is forever connected to. She recounts several of her monumental dive experiences in glorious detail and all the while sharing how her personal life was and is affected by diving; from relationships, to how her mind yearns to discover new things, to the diver community as a whole. Heinerth's ability to describe the diver experience is remarkable. The reader really feels how the beauty of the underwater cave world is exhilarating while always juxtaposed with the diligent attention to safety and looming possibility of something going wrong. That balance Heinerth describes is admittedly exciting and fulfilling for her but she recognizes that it is not for everyone. The cave diver mentality is heavily covered as well. Diving can be a lonely experience and at the same time there is such a community to lean on in good times and bad. Even when Heinerth was diving with a buddy, she often wasn't connecting with them, making it all the more lonely. With such incredible insight in the book, the life of diver is truly unique and one few people could maintain, much less thrive in. Heinerth also shares very personal stories of death in the diver community, which are beautifully vulnerable and reinforces the dangerous edge of life that cave divers balance on whenever they dive. I couldn't get enough of this book and at least for the moment has me wondering what it would take for me to learn how to become an amateur diver. Heinerth has a memoir that I won't soon forget and I am left with a better understanding of cave diving and the beauty of discovery that goes along with it. I received this book as part of the Goodreads Giveaway program.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Heinerth's memoir of her life as a cave diver rocks. Though I always love an adventurer/explorer books, the vulnerability Heinerth shows repeatedly throughout made it engaging. Her career and life's work are remarkable of their own accord, but her talents as a writer, in crafting and shaping her own personal narrative, kept me reading.
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  • Michelle Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book with Goodreads in exchange for an honest review.This book took me way longer than it should have to read. I originally wanted to read this book because it sounded interesting. It turns out it wasn't as interesting as I hoped. While reading about the amazing places Jill has dived was great, her description of all her equipment all the time was not my cup of tea.
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  • Hannah Hansen
    January 1, 1970
    I could not put this down. An incredible story of fear, excitement, and exploration that had my heart racing the entire time. Jill makes me proud to be a diver - not just a female diver. She inspires me to be a safer diver, a more intimate life partner, and the explorer that I was when I was a child.
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  • Meredith
    January 1, 1970
    Truly interesting book about a woman's life as a cave diver, Jill Heinerth. Mike and I heard her speak on an NPR episode and I was fascintated enough to get the book out of the library to read. Can't say i will ever go cave diving or do any kind of diving but give her credit for following her passion.
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  • Namrata
    January 1, 1970
    Sounds really interesting and inspiring! Hope I can get my hands on it soon!
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it!!!
  • Lavender
    January 1, 1970
    PlaceholderI won this book via Goodreads Giveaways.
  • M.
    January 1, 1970
    It was a good read.
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