Inland
The New York Times bestselling author of The Tiger's Wife returns with a stunning tale of perseverance--an epic journey across an unforgettable landscape of magic and myth. In the lawless, drought-ridden lands of the Arizona Territory in 1893, two extraordinary lives collide. Nora is an unflinching frontierswoman awaiting the return of the men in her life--her husband, who has gone in search of water for the parched household, and her elder sons, who have vanished after an explosive argument. Nora is biding her time with her youngest son, who is convinced that a mysterious beast is stalking the land around their home.Lurie is a former outlaw and a man haunted by ghosts. He sees lost souls who want something from him, and he finds reprieve from their longing in an unexpected relationship that inspires a momentous expedition across the West. The way in which Nora's and Lurie's stories intertwine is the surprise and suspense of this brilliant novel.Mythical, lyrical, and sweeping in scope, Inland is grounded in true but little-known history. It showcases all of T�a Obreht's talents as a writer, as she subverts and reimagines the myths of the American West, making them entirely--and unforgettably--her own.

Inland Details

TitleInland
Author
ReleaseAug 13th, 2019
PublisherRandom House Audio Publishing Group
ISBN-139780449807057
Rating
GenreFiction, Historical, Historical Fiction, Literary Fiction

Inland Review

  • Will
    January 1, 1970
    Téa Obreht burst onto the literary scene in 2011 with her debut novel, The Tiger’s Wife, a National Book Award finalist and winner of the Orange Prize. I thought it a remarkable first novel and have been eagerly (and impatiently) waiting for her follow-up. I never expected that the follow-up would be a historical novel of the American West and I imagine other readers of The Tiger’s Wife might share that surprise. No worry, her reimagined vision of the western (and a little-known piece of history Téa Obreht burst onto the literary scene in 2011 with her debut novel, The Tiger’s Wife, a National Book Award finalist and winner of the Orange Prize. I thought it a remarkable first novel and have been eagerly (and impatiently) waiting for her follow-up. I never expected that the follow-up would be a historical novel of the American West and I imagine other readers of The Tiger’s Wife might share that surprise. No worry, her reimagined vision of the western (and a little-known piece of history) is stunning, the eight-year wait well worth it. The writing here is gorgeous, Obreht fulfilling all the promise of her debut. Her description of a beautiful, but often unforgiving landscape is astonishing. I felt the heat and experienced the thirst of the parched, drought-stricken terrain. Her imagery is nothing short of brilliant and so necessary in a novel that is as much about the land as it is the people. As far as plot goes, to reveal even a little may be to reveal too much. I’ll only say there is a steady buildup of suspense, a sense of foreboding, accompanied with wonderful twists and surprises. I was left dumbstruck at the end and any wavering between a 4 and 5 star review was determined in those final pages. Obreht is simply a superb story-teller and delivers a sweeping tale rooted in time and place and the ghosts of an American West. I want to thank Goodreads giveaways and Random House for this ARC.
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  • Joy D
    January 1, 1970
    Deeply imagined historical fiction based on an unusual episode in the history of Arizona Territory in the mid-to-late 1800s. Obreht threads together two seemingly disparate stories: Lurie, a Turkish immigrant whose alliances have led to his status as a wanted man, and Nora, a mother toiling in a rugged landscape to care for her family in a drought while her husband searches for water. These two storylines eventually merge in a satisfying way. I don’t want to give away too much of the plot, as I Deeply imagined historical fiction based on an unusual episode in the history of Arizona Territory in the mid-to-late 1800s. Obreht threads together two seemingly disparate stories: Lurie, a Turkish immigrant whose alliances have led to his status as a wanted man, and Nora, a mother toiling in a rugged landscape to care for her family in a drought while her husband searches for water. These two storylines eventually merge in a satisfying way. I don’t want to give away too much of the plot, as I found part of the enjoyment in reading this novel is figuring out the connections. The characters are well-crafted, and the style of prose is suited to the time period. The reader is privy to the inner thoughts of the two main characters, how they view what they have done in life, and the stories they tell themselves. They each have experienced grief, and it continues to influence them at a cost to their mental well-being. Their personal stories and a few well-kept secrets are gradually revealed, containing a few surprises for the reader. The desert is a character unto itself. The author expertly evokes the oppressive heat, arid landscape, and the harsh realities faced by anyone trying to make a life in the desert. It felt authentic in its portrayal of what life may have been like on the lawless, rough frontier. I recommend keeping a water bottle at hand!I should mention that this book contains a few ghosts, called “the other living,” that can be read either as supernatural elements or as figments of the characters’ imaginations. I found it very easy to explain these apparitions as a product of extreme grief, influence by others, or a deterioration in mental health. This novel works on several levels: it is a picture of the challenges within a long-term marriage, the lingering impact of the death of loved ones, and the impact of individual choices on a person’s life. I highly enjoyed it. I received an advance reader’s copy from the publisher. This book is due to be published August 2019.
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  • Jamie Burgess
    January 1, 1970
    I just spent two days reading Inland basically without coming up for air. It is beautiful on the sentence-level and I wish I spent more time with each sentence, but the truth is the story was so good that I was compelled to rush along to find out what happened. It was one of those where I was resenting everyone and thing in my day that took me out of the world of the book. The first novel I’ve read like that in a while. I am much more for western literature than I am for the actual West, it turn I just spent two days reading Inland basically without coming up for air. It is beautiful on the sentence-level and I wish I spent more time with each sentence, but the truth is the story was so good that I was compelled to rush along to find out what happened. It was one of those where I was resenting everyone and thing in my day that took me out of the world of the book. The first novel I’ve read like that in a while. I am much more for western literature than I am for the actual West, it turns out. But in books, the West sure is beautiful. I loved this book.
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  • Kasa Cotugno
    January 1, 1970
    Eight years ago Tea Obreht burst upon the literary scene with her truly original fable-like tale, The Tiger's Wife. With so much attention paid to her debut novel, it would not be unreasonable to fear that she experiences the sophomore curse, having what follows not measure up. But in this case, she succeeds, I think primarily because she took her time and didn't rush into a subsequent publication immediately. Here we find a totally different part of the world, drought-ridden Arizona Territory i Eight years ago Tea Obreht burst upon the literary scene with her truly original fable-like tale, The Tiger's Wife. With so much attention paid to her debut novel, it would not be unreasonable to fear that she experiences the sophomore curse, having what follows not measure up. But in this case, she succeeds, I think primarily because she took her time and didn't rush into a subsequent publication immediately. Here we find a totally different part of the world, drought-ridden Arizona Territory in the late nineteenth century. And a most unlikely band of characters who face the rigors of survival and prevail. Lurie, who immigrated from Eastern Europe with his father, is beset with ghosts, and converses with his charge, a somewhat bedraggled but heroic camel named Said. And Nora, who gives a whole new dimension to the term Pioneer Woman, who also is beset with one ghost, that of her deceased daughter with whom she seeks advice and comfort. Obreht is truly a masterful writer, and this, her second novel, proves she is the real deal.
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  • Christopher Alonso
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5, if I'm allowed. I really enjoyed Obreht's first novel, The Tiger's Wife, and Inland had some of the same qualities, a supernatural element, "ghosts" of all sorts, a historical arc. She's an excellent writer who can pull off lyrically sculpted sentences that also feel strong and taut. However, (I don't want to spoil anything), I found myself a bit frustrated with how late certain plot points came, and I would have been totally okay with this if there were stronger foreshadowing in some ear 3.5/5, if I'm allowed. I really enjoyed Obreht's first novel, The Tiger's Wife, and Inland had some of the same qualities, a supernatural element, "ghosts" of all sorts, a historical arc. She's an excellent writer who can pull off lyrically sculpted sentences that also feel strong and taut. However, (I don't want to spoil anything), I found myself a bit frustrated with how late certain plot points came, and I would have been totally okay with this if there were stronger foreshadowing in some earlier bits of the novel. I still highly recommend this to readers who liked her first novel or those looking for a unique historical novel.
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  • Victoria Marin
    January 1, 1970
    This re-imagined Western is enchanting and suprisingly moving. A modern classic.
  • Erin Cataldi
    January 1, 1970
    Charming, heart-wrenching, and seamless; this literary western is an instant classic. Two story-lines dance around each other before weaving themselves together in an unforgettable way; Nora, a stubborn frontierswomen trying to navigate family strife and find water in the midst of a drought and Lurie, a young outlaw whose past ghosts keep him company as he aimlessly meanders across the west with his camel. Nora's husband was due back two days ago, but she's not worried, she doesn't have time to Charming, heart-wrenching, and seamless; this literary western is an instant classic. Two story-lines dance around each other before weaving themselves together in an unforgettable way; Nora, a stubborn frontierswomen trying to navigate family strife and find water in the midst of a drought and Lurie, a young outlaw whose past ghosts keep him company as he aimlessly meanders across the west with his camel. Nora's husband was due back two days ago, but she's not worried, she doesn't have time to be; she has to look after her superstitious young son and the head strong and spirit seeing cousin. As the day progresses and her thirst grows stronger, Nora starts to realize something is amiss. Lurie's story on the other hand, spans decades while Nora's is merely one long, hot day. Lurie travels across the country on one expedition after another, with no place to truly call home. Home is where his camel and the spirits are Poetic, beautiful, and haunting, this story spins a tale so fascinating that the reader can't stop reading. A wonderful novel!
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance copy of this book from a Goodreads giveaway.The Tiger's Wife was one of my favorite books in recent memory and Tea Obreht's 2nd novel did not disappoint. In this incredibly harsh Arizona frontier landscape, it feels like misfortune and death are never far away and fittingly, spirits roam the landscape. Obreht's weaving of a detailed and visceral reality with supernatural elements is truly magical. Nora is the strong pragmatic frontier woman who brooks no nonsense but still I received an advance copy of this book from a Goodreads giveaway.The Tiger's Wife was one of my favorite books in recent memory and Tea Obreht's 2nd novel did not disappoint. In this incredibly harsh Arizona frontier landscape, it feels like misfortune and death are never far away and fittingly, spirits roam the landscape. Obreht's weaving of a detailed and visceral reality with supernatural elements is truly magical. Nora is the strong pragmatic frontier woman who brooks no nonsense but still has blind spots for her loved ones that allow for some surprises later in the book. I locked myself in my bedroom for the better part of a day in order to finish this without interruption. It is that good, that satisfying, and I can't wait for what Obreht will write next.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    I would really give this something like a 4.6 if that was possible. It’s possible that with more mulling it will move to a 5. In any case, the language and the setting are the most compelling things about this book, and they make it entirely worth reading. Another solid book from Tea Obreht.
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  • Carla (Carla's Book Bits)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.My overwhelming lesson that we should all learn before reading this book: Inland is not The Tiger's Wife.When The Tiger's Wife came out in 2011, I fell in love with it, and Inland is Tea Obreht's first release since then. Imagine my spine tingling in anticipation when I requested to review this book, and lo and behold, I was given the opportunity.First, it has to be said: Tea Obreht is a talented writer. She's so I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.My overwhelming lesson that we should all learn before reading this book: Inland is not The Tiger's Wife.When The Tiger's Wife came out in 2011, I fell in love with it, and Inland is Tea Obreht's first release since then. Imagine my spine tingling in anticipation when I requested to review this book, and lo and behold, I was given the opportunity.First, it has to be said: Tea Obreht is a talented writer. She's so artful, and that was one of the many things that made me love The Tiger's Wife. But again, it's way different from this new novel. For one, Inland's rhythm and cadence is different. Unfortunately for me, the writing style in it isn't one that I enjoy; frequent scene changes, short snapshots of the story instead of spending a longer time in one scene, somewhat reminiscent of All The Light We Cannot See (which I hated, lol).I found this book really really hard going. I'm afraid I'm just gonna go back to sitting with my fond memories of The Tiger's Wife because I really did not enjoy Inland. I do give this 2 stars instead of 1, however, because I know that my opinion is moreso due to an artistic choice that Obreht made (and my subjective opinion of it), and not so much her lack of skill.
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  • Helana Kutka
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautiful story.I didn't know what to expect, having never read this author before.I have lived out west and this book transported me back home.Beautiful descriptions and wonderful characters.Very well done.
  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    This one squeezed 3-stars out of me.The story-line is perfectly fine and I really liked Ms. Obreht's creativity in shaping life as it was in 1893; rough and unforgiving. Its definitely worth a read-through.A "thanks" to Random House for allowing me to give this arc-copy a chance.
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  • Diane Payne
    January 1, 1970
    Had I not lived in Arizona for twenty years, I'm not sure if the description of this novel would have made me want to pick it up and begin reading. Having read The Tiger's Wife, I figured I'd give this novel a chance. and I wasn't disappointed. I love the author's sense of humor. Nora, the mother raising her children alone, while she awaits the return of her husband and her two oldest sons, is a joy, as is her youngest son. These two make quite the team as they forge through the Wild West. In th Had I not lived in Arizona for twenty years, I'm not sure if the description of this novel would have made me want to pick it up and begin reading. Having read The Tiger's Wife, I figured I'd give this novel a chance. and I wasn't disappointed. I love the author's sense of humor. Nora, the mother raising her children alone, while she awaits the return of her husband and her two oldest sons, is a joy, as is her youngest son. These two make quite the team as they forge through the Wild West. In the author's notes, we learn more about how the author researched the Camel Corps. I loved coming across all references to these camels. This novel made three days of endless rain seem much more delightful.
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