The Second Biggest Nothing (Dr. Siri Paiboun, #14)
A death threat to Dr. Siri and all his friends sends the ex-coroner down memory lane in the 14th installment of Cotterill's quirky, critically acclaimed series set in 1970s Laos.Vientiane, 1980: For a man of his age and in his corner of the world, Dr. Siri, the 76-year-old former national coroner of Laos, is doing remarkably well—especially for someone possessed by a thousand-year-old Hmong shaman. That is, until he finds a mysterious note tied to his dog, Ugly's, tail: a death threat not just to him, but to everyone he holds dear. And whoever wrote the note claims the job will be executed in two weeks.   Thus, at the urging of his wife and his motley crew of faithful friends, Dr. Siri contemplates who would hold such a strong grudge as to wish him dead, prompting him to recount three incidents over the years: an early meeting with his lifelong pal Civilai in Paris in the early '30s, a particularly disruptive visit to an art museum in Saigon in 1956, and a prisoner of war negotiation in Hanoi at the height of the Vietnam War in the '70s. There will be grave consequences in the present if Dr. Siri can't put together the clues in the past.

The Second Biggest Nothing (Dr. Siri Paiboun, #14) Details

TitleThe Second Biggest Nothing (Dr. Siri Paiboun, #14)
Author
ReleaseAug 20th, 2019
PublisherSoho Crime
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Cultural, International

The Second Biggest Nothing (Dr. Siri Paiboun, #14) Review

  • Sarah-Hope
    January 1, 1970
    If you're not familiar with the Dr. Siri mystery series, you need to be. If you are, then The Second Biggest Nothing is a cause to rejoice. So, if you're in the second category, just stop reading now and go get this book—or skip down to the last paragraph of this review, then go buy this book.If you're in the first category, let me give you a little background.• Dr. Siri is the former medical examiner for Laos, educated in Paris. • He fought for the communists in the civil war, originally becaus If you're not familiar with the Dr. Siri mystery series, you need to be. If you are, then The Second Biggest Nothing is a cause to rejoice. So, if you're in the second category, just stop reading now and go get this book—or skip down to the last paragraph of this review, then go buy this book.If you're in the first category, let me give you a little background.• Dr. Siri is the former medical examiner for Laos, educated in Paris. • He fought for the communists in the civil war, originally because he fell in love with a woman who was committed to the revolution, but gradually he became committed to the cause himself. • He's seen the shortcomings of post-revolutionary Laos, but remains committed, in his own jaded way, to the revolution's goals.• His best friend is Civilai, a former member of the politbureau.• His wife runs a popular local noodle shop.• Dr. Siri is possessed by the spirit of a Hmong shaman who occasionally pulls Siri out of his own world into the spirit realm.• When he's in the spirit realm, Dr. Siri's guide is Auntie Bpoo, the spirit of a dramatic, cryptic, bad-poetry-writing transvestite.What Cotterill does with this mix is wonderful, simultaneously comic and respectful, with interesting insights into daily life in post-revolutionary Laos. If you're looking to begin your Dr. Siri experience, I'd suggest you start with the first one or two books in the series for context, before moving on to the newer titles.In The Second Biggest Nothing, it's 1980 and Laos is celebrating the fifth anniversary of communist rule. Dr. Siri is receiving a series of threatening letters from an unnamed nemesis who intends to kill all those closest to Siri, before killing the man himself. This gives the opportunity for several flashbacks to key moments in Dr. Siri's life that further explain his character and the depth of his friendship with Civilai. Meanwhile, Dr. Siri and his friends hope to begin filming a loosely-based-in-reality version of the adventures he and Civilai shared during the revolution. Cotterill juggles these different story lines with ease and wit. This title won't disappoint.
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  • Ronald Keeler
    January 1, 1970
    The Second Biggest Nothing by Colin Cotterill is identified by the author as A Dr. Siri Paiboun Mystery. The book is one-part mystery, one-part journey into the supernatural world, and one-part reflective philosophy into racism and nature of war. Dr. Siri’s perspective drives all parts as he directs and guides other characters, a group that has become family, whether related by bloodline or not. There are fourteen novels in the Dr. Siri Paiboun mystery series, I have read or listened to ten of t The Second Biggest Nothing by Colin Cotterill is identified by the author as A Dr. Siri Paiboun Mystery. The book is one-part mystery, one-part journey into the supernatural world, and one-part reflective philosophy into racism and nature of war. Dr. Siri’s perspective drives all parts as he directs and guides other characters, a group that has become family, whether related by bloodline or not. There are fourteen novels in the Dr. Siri Paiboun mystery series, I have read or listened to ten of them, and I have felt like a silent witness at the family table. I was saddened by the death of a family member in this fourteenth installment.Colin Cotterill is a masterful storyteller in part proven by the number of his published works. The Second Biggest Nothing has several twists, a great central plot revolving around the question of who is trying to kill Dr. Siri, and a presentation woven through with humor on several levels. I listened to the audiobook, which I believe heightened the sense of humor. A reader of the novel may not see the mood expressed in the same situations. Colin Cotterill wrote a great story but the presentation, especially the humorous asides, are thanks to the superb narration by Clive Chafer. After listening to the first audiobook in the series, I repeatedly came back for further selections because of Chafer’s excellent narration. I can’t imagine any other voice could deliver the humor I heard. Chafer is the single narrator, but through subtleties of intonation, I had no problem identifying which character was acting in different chapters. Dr. Siri is not your typical protagonist or hero. At 76 years old, he is active physically and mentally. Siri has the aches, pains, creaks, and groans of old age, but still manages some remarkable adventures, most of which are believable. The unbelievable part is when he occasionally disappears while he is coordinating with his shaman, the transvestite Aunty Puu. The reason Aunty Puu dresses as a woman goes beyond choice and I won’t spoil the interesting presentation about the supernatural world by revealing the reason. Aunty Puu can provide valuable information to Siri about how to solve his mystery, but Aunty likes to provide information indirectly in a way that requires Siri’s interpretation, giving readers/listeners further mini-mysteries.The novel spans a time from 1932 to 1980, giving Cotterill a chance to show us history. The author doesn’t lecture or recite history in a dull manner. Instead, there are glimpses which will please an audience with knowledge of the conflicts which are almost synonymous with the identities of the countries of Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand. At a coffee shop in Paris in the 30s, Dr. Siri and Comrade Sivillai are having coffee when the name of a Sivillai comrade comes up. Identified with the single name Quoc, an audience familiar with regional history will realize this to be a person with many names, one of which is Nguyen Ai Quoc (one who loves his country). Years and a few names later, the man will emerge as Ho Chi Minh. Dr. Siri, Political Cadre Sivillai, Chief of Police Posey, Second Wife (to Siri) Deng are all communists. They are loyal to ideal communism, not the one that rules present-day Laos. None of our central characters want something called Democracy; they have a shared view that it is messy. All central characters are old, having struggled all their lives to achieve a victory that once completed, has delivered almost nothing in the way of what was promised. Among themselves, they criticize the powers in charge in low tones; one never knows who is listening. They have spent their lives in the struggle and admit that at their advanced age, they can no longer contribute to changing what exists. Their criticisms are frequently sarcastic or tongue-in-cheek, but they do not advocate a system superior to communism; they only wish it would run more efficiently. In one case, the group needs something from the government, but a request will take weeks spent in filling out forms. Sivillai describes a new system by which the requester approaches the supplier directly with no forms other than an envelope of cash. All sigh with comfort that corruption has finally returned to further efficiency.A supposedly US military deserter plays an integral part in this story. Stories about this group of people are rare. They are not a monolithic group, but there were many deserters during the US adventure in Vietnam. Many of those enjoyed several months or a few years of relative freedom and comfort in Southeast Asia and were able to feed off the presence of an economy energized by the US military. The novelty wore off, and many tried different means to return to the US while at the same time covering up their desertion and avoiding punishment. Here, again, is a part of history Cotterill mentions that will be familiar to those of us who were present during The First Biggest Nothing. Note, this is not the title of Cotterill’s novel. The explanation is, however, given in the story. As a language student, I was fascinated by the discussions of Lao, Thai, and Vietnamese. I lived in northeast Thailand (described in this novel as Issan) and met many foreigners who learned Lao, Thai, and Vietnamese informally, not through schools. Translated, that means in bars and with the ladies (and men) who worked there. As Dr. Siri points out, each of the languages has vocabulary and intonations unique to men and women. Foreign soldiers fond of the bar scene, some of whom were Special Forces fighters with lots of combat experience, ended up speaking Southeast Asian languages “like a girl,” and amused residents enormously.The Second Biggest Nothing is a five-star listen or read, one that I highly recommend. Thanks to Colin Cotterill for a great story. I reserve most of my praise for the presentation by Clive Chafer, a performance that has made me come back for ten of the fourteen novels. I will listen to parts I have missed despite my unfortunate discovery of the death of one of my heroes. That should teach me to read or listen to books in a series in order of publication.Administrative Note and Apology to Colin Cotterill: I listened to the audiobook; my spelling of names is an approximation of what I heard.
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  • Martina
    January 1, 1970
    #14 in the Dr. Siri Paiboun series by Colin Cotterill. Dr. Siri is one of my all time favorite characters, as are most of the delightful people, both human and spirit, who inhabit his universe. This book will be published by Soho Crime, August 20, 2019. This one is set in 1980 in Vientiane, when Dr. Siri, the retired coroner for Laos, finds a threatening note tied to Ugly's tail (Ugly is his dog). Dr. Siri must think back to encounters in his past, in Paris, in Saigon, and in Hanoi during the Vi #14 in the Dr. Siri Paiboun series by Colin Cotterill. Dr. Siri is one of my all time favorite characters, as are most of the delightful people, both human and spirit, who inhabit his universe. This book will be published by Soho Crime, August 20, 2019. This one is set in 1980 in Vientiane, when Dr. Siri, the retired coroner for Laos, finds a threatening note tied to Ugly's tail (Ugly is his dog). Dr. Siri must think back to encounters in his past, in Paris, in Saigon, and in Hanoi during the Vietnam War in order to figure out why he and all his family and friends are being told they will die in two weeks. The Mystery Book Group read the first of this series, The Coroner's Lunch, in February 2006.Had to read it! The book begins with a reference back to the grand Lao War a1nd Peace film project. I was immediately transported to a happy place! I found this story to have a slight somber tone, moreso than I recall from other books in the series. I know I was reading an uncopyedited version of the book and that elements may change in that process, but I think it may well have been more that I was so aware of the Vietnam War era activities at so many levels that this story affected me in ways not previously experienced. There was a great deal of the humor that is always in these stories, but it was some of the behaviors and ramifications of American activity in Southeast Asia that pulled me back in time. Can't say more without spoiling the plot. Suffice to say it was a terrific read and I give Oscars to Ugly and to Rajhid for best acting in a lead role, especially in an action sequence! Have to confess that I'm particularly glad when Rajhid or Auntie Bpoo turn up! (and both do) And Geung always had a star turn one way or another. In a very important way he saved the day once again. Thank you to Soho Press/Soho Crime for the advance readers copy. If I hadn't been traveling much of the past week, I probably would have finished it within 24 hours.
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  • Cathy Cole
    January 1, 1970
    The Second Biggest Nothing is another strong entry in a series that satisfies on so many levels. First and foremost, Cotterill has created one of the best casts of characters in crime fiction. He also gives readers a true sense of what life was like in Communist Laos in the 1970s and 80s-- including just a touch of the mysticism that is a part of the culture. He's also a dab hand at creating intriguing mysteries, and he certainly knows how to make us think, make us empathize, and make us laugh.T The Second Biggest Nothing is another strong entry in a series that satisfies on so many levels. First and foremost, Cotterill has created one of the best casts of characters in crime fiction. He also gives readers a true sense of what life was like in Communist Laos in the 1970s and 80s-- including just a touch of the mysticism that is a part of the culture. He's also a dab hand at creating intriguing mysteries, and he certainly knows how to make us think, make us empathize, and make us laugh.There are some very nice twists and turns in the plot of The Second Biggest Nothing. I'd narrowed down the incident at the heart of the death threat against Siri and his loved ones, but my deductive powers failed me at the very end. That's always fun for someone who reads as many mysteries as I do.But no matter how good the mysteries and the evocation of a time and place are in this series--and this book-- the beating heart of it all is found in that marvelous cast of characters. Cotterill shows us that Communists are pretty much just like us, which is probably something not everyone wants to read (but should). This latest book in the series gives longtime fans a special treat by letting us visit with Siri and Civilai when they are young men in Paris. It's always good to be able to learn some of the backstories in an older character's life.However-- no matter how good the stories are (and they are)-- it's what Cotterill has to say through his characters that means the most to me. Through the years, Siri and his wife Daeng have created their own tribe, their own family. This family contains doctors, police officers, nurses, politicians, and restauranteurs, but it also has members with psychiatric problems, others with Down syndrome, etc. The philosophy of Siri and Daeng's tribe is that everyone has value and should be treated accordingly. Seeing all these characters live, work, investigate, and laugh together is wonderful.By all means, read this series. Read it for the mysteries. Read it for the characters. But read it to absorb what it has to say about the human race. See what I mean about Cotterill's books satisfying on so many levels?
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  • Gareth
    January 1, 1970
    I hadn't read one of the Siri Paiboun series for several years, but this was like slipping on a comfortable pair of gloves. As ever, Cotterill writes wonderfully, with some great metaphors (he describes one character as weighing no more than a Wednesday), and his usual wonderful cast of characters. There's an incredible warmth in the descriptions of his motley band, and a respect for their different stations in life, as they try to make sense of life in 1980s Laos, and Cotterill has a gift for e I hadn't read one of the Siri Paiboun series for several years, but this was like slipping on a comfortable pair of gloves. As ever, Cotterill writes wonderfully, with some great metaphors (he describes one character as weighing no more than a Wednesday), and his usual wonderful cast of characters. There's an incredible warmth in the descriptions of his motley band, and a respect for their different stations in life, as they try to make sense of life in 1980s Laos, and Cotterill has a gift for ensuring that the socio-political background is both solid and unobtrusive. On this occasion, Siri Paiboun gets to narrate several chunks of the novel, as he casts his mind back to incidents from years past, and he's as enjoyable to read as he is to read about. Highly recommended, and I'll have to fill in the gaps I've left in the series.
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  • Tonstant Weader
    January 1, 1970
    The Second Biggest Nothing is the fourteenth book in the Dr. Siri Paiboun series featuring a Laotian coroner. In this outing, Siri is the target of a revenge plot. He receives a threat, tied to his dog’s tail, in English, which he can’t read, so there is a delay before he reads it. The writer threatens to kill those Siri holds dear before killing Siri.There is a gathering of journalists to honor the five years of the Laotian government’s existence which Siri calls the second biggest nothing and The Second Biggest Nothing is the fourteenth book in the Dr. Siri Paiboun series featuring a Laotian coroner. In this outing, Siri is the target of a revenge plot. He receives a threat, tied to his dog’s tail, in English, which he can’t read, so there is a delay before he reads it. The writer threatens to kill those Siri holds dear before killing Siri.There is a gathering of journalists to honor the five years of the Laotian government’s existence which Siri calls the second biggest nothing and Siri assumes that the killer might be among them. It becomes even more likely when two journalists are killed in an accident Siri is certain is murder.Further investigation leads to more than one natural death is actually a murder cleverly managed by this unknown revenge-seeker and Siri and his wife seem rather recklessly insouciant.I will always remember the thrill of reading “The Coroner’s Lunch.” I had never read anything like it. As the series progresses, the role of magic and spirits became more and more important. The stories became increasingly madcap and comic. Still, the deep moral force that Dr. Siri embodies has always been a strong component. This time, we see that in his stories of the past. Now, though I think he seems, if not tired of life, fully ready for death. I know I would feel much more alarm at the threats than he did.Sometimes series get tired and become more and more reworking the character’s quirks than presenting a mystery. This release treads on that line. I am not giving up on Dr. Siri, not yet, but I can see the wear and tear starting to show.The Second Biggest Nothing will be released August 20th. I received an e-galley from the publisher through Edelweiss.The Second Biggest NothingColin Cotterill author site“Don’t Eat Me” by Colin Cotterill reviewhttps://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpre...
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  • Martha Bullen
    January 1, 1970
    I await Colin Cotterill's annual mystery starring the inimitable Dr. Siri with great anticipation every summer. This is the 14th book featuring one of my very favorite characters and his remarkable family and friends, and it's a terrific read.I must caution you, however, that picking up this book without knowing Siri's back story or having read the earlier installments is not recommended. So many unlikely incidents in the real and spiritual worlds have taken place since in this series since the I await Colin Cotterill's annual mystery starring the inimitable Dr. Siri with great anticipation every summer. This is the 14th book featuring one of my very favorite characters and his remarkable family and friends, and it's a terrific read.I must caution you, however, that picking up this book without knowing Siri's back story or having read the earlier installments is not recommended. So many unlikely incidents in the real and spiritual worlds have taken place since in this series since the first book, The Coroner's Lunch, so it's best to go back to the beginning and read these books in order.If you are a Dr. Siri fan, you will be greatly rewarded when you read this latest novel, despite its dismissive title (and a sad surprise along the way.) I love Cotterrill's humor, affection for his characters, and ability to create the most wildly improbable plots which hold readers' rapt attention from start to finish. I particularly enjoyed the scenes from Siri's and Civilai's long lives and friendship set in Paris, Saigon, and Hanoi, and how the French occupation, drug trade and Vietnam War impacted their lives.I raced through this novel and now have to wait another year for the return of Dr. Siri and friends, but it will be worth the wait.
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    I was thrilled when I found out that I'd won a Giveaways copy of the latest book in the Dr. Siri Paiboun mystery series. While I've missed the last few in the series, I found it very easy to dive in and get reacquainted with this world and its characters. It was like catching up with an old friend who I haven't seen in awhile but it still feels only like yesterday since last we spoke. The newest entry starts out in 1980, but includes a series of flashbacks that provide early glimpses into Dr. Si I was thrilled when I found out that I'd won a Giveaways copy of the latest book in the Dr. Siri Paiboun mystery series. While I've missed the last few in the series, I found it very easy to dive in and get reacquainted with this world and its characters. It was like catching up with an old friend who I haven't seen in awhile but it still feels only like yesterday since last we spoke. The newest entry starts out in 1980, but includes a series of flashbacks that provide early glimpses into Dr. Siri's and lifelong friend Civilai's time in Paris in the 1930s, a memorable trip to Saigon in 1956, and prisoner of war negotiation in Hanoi at the height of the Vietnam War in the 1970s. Not only do faithful readers of the series get more of Dr. Siri's backstory, but all of those flashbacks have bearing on the present. At the beginning of the story, a mysterious note is found tied to his dog, Ugly's, tail. The note, written in English, contains an ominous threat to both Dr. Siri and those he holds dearest. His wife and friends urge him to try and determine who would want him dead, which prompts the flashbacks to three key times in his life. It's clear that he will have to act quickly to decipher the clues from his past, before something dire happens in the present. Even though I'm a few books behind, I thoroughly enjoyed #14 in the series and felt that it had all of the traits that I've loved about it -- a complex mystery set in a unique location; characters that I care about; offbeat humor sprinkled throughout; and historical details that bring the story to life. Thanks to Goodreads and Soho Crime for this Giveaways win!
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  • Margaret Sankey
    January 1, 1970
    Cotterill returns to his series character, Dr. Siri, ex-guerilla, French-trained physician and the retired coroner of Communist Laos. It is 1980, and Laos is hosting a party of international journalists to show off their new society. In the midst of the low-key festivities, people close to Siri begin dying, forcing him to take stock of an eventful life--is someone getting revenge for his witnessing the assassination of a French colonial official in 1932? Or catching retreating administrators loo Cotterill returns to his series character, Dr. Siri, ex-guerilla, French-trained physician and the retired coroner of Communist Laos. It is 1980, and Laos is hosting a party of international journalists to show off their new society. In the midst of the low-key festivities, people close to Siri begin dying, forcing him to take stock of an eventful life--is someone getting revenge for his witnessing the assassination of a French colonial official in 1932? Or catching retreating administrators looting the national museum of Vietnam in 1954? Or blowing the whistle on an American's stolen valor as a fake POW in 1974? Meanwhile, an epidemic of succubi ghosts are tormenting young Lao men in Thai refugee camps and the Cold War is about to reignite tensions that had simmered down in southeast Asia. These are always a lot of fun, and the cynical, inside view of revolutionary bureaucracy is very satisfying.
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  • RMazin
    January 1, 1970
    In one of the best adventures yet, Dr. Siri Paiboun is confronted with a mystery than unless solved, will threaten those around him and himself. Dr. Siri receives cryptic clues that his friends believe are somehow connected to one of Siri’s past adventures. Could it be the assassination he witnessed in Paris where he was a student? Or perhaps it was a political act that he participated in when he was in Saigon? Or maybe it was when he was asked to become involved in the repatriation of American In one of the best adventures yet, Dr. Siri Paiboun is confronted with a mystery than unless solved, will threaten those around him and himself. Dr. Siri receives cryptic clues that his friends believe are somehow connected to one of Siri’s past adventures. Could it be the assassination he witnessed in Paris where he was a student? Or perhaps it was a political act that he participated in when he was in Saigon? Or maybe it was when he was asked to become involved in the repatriation of American soldiers towards to end of the Vietnam War. Cotterill takes the reader back to these times so that Siri becomes even more of an enchanting, elusive and erudite detective of what may be amiss. Highly recommended.Thanks to Edelweiss and Netgalley for providing the opportunity to read this title.
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  • Lynda
    January 1, 1970
    It is hard to know what to say about this book. It is good. The plot involves gruesome threats on Siri and all his loved ones. The threats against Siri are chilling as the potential killer seems to have a lot of information on Siri and company. Who is it and can he or she be stopped? You learn a lot about Siri's early life in Paris, his experience during the early parts of the war, his first wife and their tense relationship, the American involvement in southeast Asia and changing roles, the bre It is hard to know what to say about this book. It is good. The plot involves gruesome threats on Siri and all his loved ones. The threats against Siri are chilling as the potential killer seems to have a lot of information on Siri and company. Who is it and can he or she be stopped? You learn a lot about Siri's early life in Paris, his experience during the early parts of the war, his first wife and their tense relationship, the American involvement in southeast Asia and changing roles, the bread woman we knew in earlier books, friendship and loss...plus we meet all the regulars and their quirkiness and strengths. The background is expanded and gaps filled in. In short, if you are a fan of the Siri series, you will like this book. Read the series in order. It really is good.
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  • RMazin
    January 1, 1970
    In one of the best adventures yet, Dr. Siri Paiboun is confronted with a mystery than unless solved, will threaten those around him and himself. Dr. Siri receives cryptic clues that his friends believe are somehow connected to one of Siri’s past adventures. Could it be the assassination he witnessed in Paris where he was a student? Or perhaps it was a political act that he participated in when he was in Saigon? Or maybe it was when he was asked to become involved in the repatriation of American In one of the best adventures yet, Dr. Siri Paiboun is confronted with a mystery than unless solved, will threaten those around him and himself. Dr. Siri receives cryptic clues that his friends believe are somehow connected to one of Siri’s past adventures. Could it be the assassination he witnessed in Paris where he was a student? Or perhaps it was a political act that he participated in when he was in Saigon? Or maybe it was when he was asked to become involved in the repatriation of American soldiers towards to end of the Vietnam War. Cotterill takes the reader back to these times so that Siri becomes even more of an enchanting, elusive and erudite detective of what may be amiss. Highly recommended.Thanks to Edelweiss and Netgalley for providing the opportunity to read this title.
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  • C. Spaulding
    January 1, 1970
    I have read all of the books in this series. I found this one just not as good as the others. Partially it was uneven. The stories usually revolve around the central group of characters and that was true here, but it was inter spliced with long discussions of history. The story was interesting, but far fetched. I just didn't find it as satisfying as before. I like the characters in this story and they were just not present for most of the book. Overall, I like the Dr. Siri series and would not d I have read all of the books in this series. I found this one just not as good as the others. Partially it was uneven. The stories usually revolve around the central group of characters and that was true here, but it was inter spliced with long discussions of history. The story was interesting, but far fetched. I just didn't find it as satisfying as before. I like the characters in this story and they were just not present for most of the book. Overall, I like the Dr. Siri series and would not discourage others from reading it. Not every book in any series is up to snuff so to speak.
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  • Libby
    January 1, 1970
    When Dr. Siri becomes the target of a probable assassin, it's the perfect opportunity for readers to catch glimpses from his past, as Siri tries to figure out who hates him enough to want to kill not only him, but those he loves. Only 4 stars because I found the mystery didn't stick with me after I finished the book (although I enjoyed it while I was reading). But this is a must for series fans as we learn more about Siri and Civilai and their early lives.
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  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    An apt title for this one in the ever-amusing Dr. Siri series. Colin, don't run out of steam here, please! Go take a remedial plot class (yours was preposterous) or create a wonderful replacement for the characters you kill in this one. Whatever you do, keep writing.
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  • Shaun
    January 1, 1970
    Review TK
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