The Wolf Wants In
In a small town ravaged by the opioid crisis, a woman confronts a dark secret about her brother's shocking death--a gripping novel of suspense for fans of Sharp Objects and S-Town.Sadie Keller is determined to find out how her brother died, even if no one else thinks it's worth investigating. Untimely deaths are all too common in rural Blackwater, Kansas, where crime and overdoses are on the rise, and the small-town police force is consumed with the recent discovery of a child's skull in the woods. Sadie is on her own, delving into the dark corners of a life her brother kept hidden and unearthing more questions than answers.Eighteen-year-old Henley Pettit knows more than she'd like to about the seedy side of Blackwater, and she's desperate to escape before she's irreparably entangled in her family's crimes. She dreams of disappearing and leaving her old life behind, but shedding the past is never easy, and getting out of town will be far more dangerous than she ever imagined.As more bones are found in the woods, time is running out for Sadie to uncover the truth and for Henley to make her escape. Both women are torn between family loyalties and the weight of the secrets they carry, knowing full well that while some secrets are hard to live with, others will get you killed.Like Laura McHugh's previous award-winning thrillers, The Weight of Blood and Arrowood, The Wolf Wants In is an atmospheric, beautifully told novel that barrels toward a twisting, chilling end and keeps us turning the page to find out how these small-town secrets will unravel--and who will survive.

The Wolf Wants In Details

TitleThe Wolf Wants In
Author
ReleaseAug 6th, 2019
PublisherSpiegel & Grau
ISBN-139780399590283
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Thriller, Mystery Thriller, Suspense

The Wolf Wants In Review

  • Chelsea Humphrey
    January 1, 1970
    Atmospheric, emotional, and compelling, I found The Wolf Wants In to be a story full of heartbreak and hope. Laura McHugh has woven together a narrative that is equal parts suspenseful mystery and moving study of poverty and the effects it has on those drowning in its grasp. Highly recommended for readers who love gritty literature with unique characters. *Many thanks to the publisher for providing my review copy via NetGalley.
    more
  • Diane S ☔
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Not sure I would consider this a thriller per say. There are deaths but they result from the actions of the forces at work in this small Kansas town. The force being the opiod crisis which has affected many in towns all over the US. A once prominent town, now so store fronts boarded up, houses needing repair and drugs prevalent. The story is told by two women, Sadie, who wants to know how her brother died, and Henley, who wants desperately to leave town. Her mother regularly disappears into 3.5 Not sure I would consider this a thriller per say. There are deaths but they result from the actions of the forces at work in this small Kansas town. The force being the opiod crisis which has affected many in towns all over the US. A once prominent town, now so store fronts boarded up, houses needing repair and drugs prevalent. The story is told by two women, Sadie, who wants to know how her brother died, and Henley, who wants desperately to leave town. Her mother regularly disappears into a life of drugs. There is a house on the hill, owned by the biggest and wealthiest employer in town and his young son. There will soon be two other deaths, one a young child.The two narrators are fully realized characters, but I had to shake my head at some of their actions. I definitely liked the first part of the book more than the second. Felt that part was tightly plotted, the second half not so much. It quickly appears who the bad guys must be, those at the forefront of the drugs and violence. Maybe there was just a little to much thrown into the mix, though two of the stories do come together. The evil drugs bring, the big bad wolf at the door affecting all in its path, including the innocent. ARC from Edelweiss.
    more
  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsThis is not the type of book you read when you are looking for something light and easy. It's a pretty depressing read which isn't surprising because it deals with tough issues like grief, addiction, and divorce to name a few. It's almost like the town constantly has a cloud over it and the only way to get some sun is to hitch a ride out of there. So much sadness and pain. Life isn't all sunshine and roses though and this book does a good job in reflecting that reality. The story takes 3.5 starsThis is not the type of book you read when you are looking for something light and easy. It's a pretty depressing read which isn't surprising because it deals with tough issues like grief, addiction, and divorce to name a few. It's almost like the town constantly has a cloud over it and the only way to get some sun is to hitch a ride out of there. So much sadness and pain. Life isn't all sunshine and roses though and this book does a good job in reflecting that reality. The story takes place in the rural community of Blackwater, Kansas and alternates between the characters of Sadie and Henley. Sadie is grieving the death of her brother and also looking for answers. Henley is eighteen years old and knows the only way she can have a decent future is if she gets away from her family and her godforsaken hometown. But with so many secrets hidden in this town, these two women might never get what they want.While I liked both of the female main characters, I was drawn more towards Henley and her story. Henley's relationship with her mother was pretty heartbreaking and you could really identify with her longing to seek out a better life. In my opinion she was the heart of the story. I can't quite put my finger on it but there seemed to be something missing in this story and that's the reason it didn't reach great status and sits just at good level. I guess I was left with a feeling of wanting more, even if I'm not really sure what that is in this case. The only small criticism I can really articulate is I thought the character of Jason was not fully developed. Overall, a solid read and I do think there is potential for many readers to be able to connect with certain characters or storylines. As grim as the story can be, it is more true to life than many other novels out there.Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for the opportunity to read an advance digital copy in exchange for an honest review!
    more
  • Nenia ✨ Literary Garbage Can ✨ Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest Wow, I don't think I've been on a good book streak that lasted this long in a while! When I picked this up I had my doubts, because so many thrillers try to play the "just like Gillian Flynn" card and fail to measure up 9 times out of 10. Lucky for me, THE WOLF WANTS IN is the 1 book out of 10 that reaches the bar.Told in dual POVs, THE WOLF WANTS IN is about two women: Sadie is a middle-aged mom, divorced, whose brother Shane has just di Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest Wow, I don't think I've been on a good book streak that lasted this long in a while! When I picked this up I had my doubts, because so many thrillers try to play the "just like Gillian Flynn" card and fail to measure up 9 times out of 10. Lucky for me, THE WOLF WANTS IN is the 1 book out of 10 that reaches the bar.Told in dual POVs, THE WOLF WANTS IN is about two women: Sadie is a middle-aged mom, divorced, whose brother Shane has just died under mysterious circumstances. His wife, Crystle, doesn't seem as upset as a loving wife should, and the local police officer refuses to investigate. Henley is a young eighteen-year-old, and the daughter of an addict who cleans the house of the richest family in town when she's sober. Henley is currently dating the son of the rich guy, and she's also the cousin of Crystle, the wife who doesn't give two snips.The book is about how their stories intertwine as we learn about a town riddled with drug problems, secrets, and-- maybe-- murder. In addition to Shane, a local man and his daughter were both found dead in the woods, and Sadie gets more and more concerned as she finds links between all of these incidents, even as she struggles to maintain control over the shambles of her own life.I saw some people saying that this book was pretty depressing and I will be the first to agree this is so. It's a little like J.K. Rowling's CASUAL VACANCY in the sense that it shows people at their worst and nobody is completely good. I personally like books that show realistic portrayals of the sometimes-toxic environment that small towns can breed. Humans are capable of a lot of good, but sometimes they do some pretty horrible things, too. I was impressed by the spectrum of the emotions portrayed in THE WOLF WANTS IN, and how it addresses grief, greed, and ambition.Both POVs were well done and I liked how they began to intertwine. Around page 200, I did find myself wondering how the story would wrap up when it still seemed so unfinished, but the ending didn't disappoint me. I actually thought it ended on a note of hope: all of our endings are inevitable, but if we're lucky, we get to hold the pen as we decide how the last chapter finishes.Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review! 4 stars
    more
  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    If you call one wolf, you invite the pack.The Wolf Wants In casts the shadow of the lone wolf poised at the door. You know he's there. It's just a matter of time before he breaks through that screen and is followed by many, many others. Each has its own particular weight of unquenchable hunger in which it's not satisfied until it consumes every living thing.Sadie Keller carries a burden. A gut-wrenching burden of trying to discover what exactly happened to her brother Shane. He was found dead on If you call one wolf, you invite the pack.The Wolf Wants In casts the shadow of the lone wolf poised at the door. You know he's there. It's just a matter of time before he breaks through that screen and is followed by many, many others. Each has its own particular weight of unquenchable hunger in which it's not satisfied until it consumes every living thing.Sadie Keller carries a burden. A gut-wrenching burden of trying to discover what exactly happened to her brother Shane. He was found dead on the floor of his ramshackled house. Crystle, his wife of one year, said that he had a bad heart. That was news to Sadie and her family. News travels quickly in the underbelly of Blackwater, Kansas. How appropriate the name. How reflective of the deep, dark secrets that snuffed out any hope in this opioid-laced town.So Sadie returned from the widow's house with Gravy, the aged and nearly incompacitated dog of Shane's. Ironically, she grabbed the leash. Gravy struggled to stand up. He wasn't making a jail break any time soon. But he was pretty much all she had left of Shane.Henley Pettit is the voice of the other side of this coin. Her family has been in and out of jail on multiple charges for multiple years......especially her own mother, Missy. Henley wants nothing more than to make a break from Blackwater and everything it stands for. She follows in her mother's footsteps with working odd jobs as a housekeeper. There never seems to be enough money or energy to hit the road.Questions keep rising to the surface in regard to Shane. It's not until the body of a man and a young girl are found in a field that connections may come to light. The Wolf Wants In deals with some heavy-duty subject matter. Sadly, it's reality for many families out there today. I became more involved with Sadie's story than with Henley's. Sadie and that ol' dog will turn your head. I was set on 3.5 stars originally, but I ratcheted it up to 4 stars for the author's ability to convey the slam of the deadends in this town. Set this one up for a time when you're open for a serious read. It's all in the breakaway without leaving any tracks behind.
    more
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very strong work of fiction. I thought it was going to be a lot darker and I’m so glad it wasn’t! Don't get me wrong, this still deals with some very heavy topics (the opioid crisis, a small town community being left behind, etc.), but thanks to the previous book I read, I was in the right headspace for this. I'm glad to have read this for a couple of reasons: 1) I try and make an effort to read books that will provide an alternative view to what I have experienced 2) I had never heard This is a very strong work of fiction. I thought it was going to be a lot darker and I’m so glad it wasn’t! Don't get me wrong, this still deals with some very heavy topics (the opioid crisis, a small town community being left behind, etc.), but thanks to the previous book I read, I was in the right headspace for this. I'm glad to have read this for a couple of reasons: 1) I try and make an effort to read books that will provide an alternative view to what I have experienced 2) I had never heard of this author before 3) After I was granted my "wish" on Netgalley, I wasn't looking forward to reading it because I thought maybe it would be a little too dark for my tastes, but I'm so glad I took a chance because I would have missed out on a great book.The story is told from two different perspectives, Sadie Keller in the present and Henley Pettit a few months in the past. Both timelines eventually meet and I thought this was a great plot device to help elevate the story. Sadie's brother, Shane, has just died and the family is trying to pull answers from his wife, Crystle, whom they don't have the easiest relationship with. Her reaction to Shane's death is odd (at best) and it's causing the family to have difficulty putting this behind them. In Henley's portion of the book, you aren't quite sure what the relation is to Shane and his family, but as the book progresses, it becomes clear that there is a reason we are reading from Henley's perspective. As I said, I really liked this book and I was pulled in immediately and the grip it had over me never let go. It made me so thankful for my place in life because I could have easily been born into a community like this where certain events outside of your control put everyone a couple of steps behind. I loved these characters (particularly, Sadie and her sister Becca) and I thought the story's resolution was a little rushed in places, but overall very strong and believeable. I really want to thank Netgalley for granting my wish, Spiegel & Grau and Laura McHugh for providing me an advance copy to read and provide an honest review. I know for sure I will absolutely check out her next work as this was such a stellar effort.Review Date: 8/8/19Publication Date: 8/6/19
    more
  • Betsy
    January 1, 1970
    Not quite as much of a "thriller" as I thought I don't think "gripping novel of suspense" or "thriller" are totally accurate descriptions of The Wolf Wants In. (These words were included in the publisher's blurb as of 6/19/2019.) These elements didn't appear much until roughly the 60% mark. Around then, we finally buckle down on trying to solve the murders in this town.Because McHugh focuses on weaving the characters' stories together and explaining how they are connected, The Wolf Wants In is m Not quite as much of a "thriller" as I thought I don't think "gripping novel of suspense" or "thriller" are totally accurate descriptions of The Wolf Wants In. (These words were included in the publisher's blurb as of 6/19/2019.) These elements didn't appear much until roughly the 60% mark. Around then, we finally buckle down on trying to solve the murders in this town.Because McHugh focuses on weaving the characters' stories together and explaining how they are connected, The Wolf Wants In is more of a small-town drama. While it doesn't fit its intended genre particularly well, the novel does stand out in some respects. McHugh vividly portrays the suffocating nature of life in a small, failing town that struggles with opioid addiction. The writing is very character focused, so the two narrators are well-developed and complex. Other than my questions about categorization, my only major issue was with the novel's ending, which was a bit of a letdown. It seemed rushed, as the events happened nearly all at once instead of over time. Things also wrapped up too perfectly.3.5 stars--it's a dark but decent read. (Just don't go into it expecting a traditional thriller.)Thanks to Random House and NetGalley for providing me with a DRC of this novel, which will be available for purchase on August 6th.
    more
  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    McHugh fuels her tale with the sort of stark bleakness that charged Springsteen’s Nebraska album. Blackwater is a country town somewhere outside of Kansas City and the teens don’t know what they want but they want out. It’s a desolate country filled with opioid addicts, debt lenders, broken marriages, and broken people. Told through narrative voices of a woman Sadie and a teenage girl whose paths meander near each other. Sadie’s brother died from a seeming heart attack but she’s suspicious of hi McHugh fuels her tale with the sort of stark bleakness that charged Springsteen’s Nebraska album. Blackwater is a country town somewhere outside of Kansas City and the teens don’t know what they want but they want out. It’s a desolate country filled with opioid addicts, debt lenders, broken marriages, and broken people. Told through narrative voices of a woman Sadie and a teenage girl whose paths meander near each other. Sadie’s brother died from a seeming heart attack but she’s suspicious of his wife and her kin who are of the backwoods sort. The brother’s possessions are being divvied up and sold off and there never was any autopsy. Henley is from a broken home, no father, and her mom on a good week has stayed off the drugs. On a bad week, Missy is off making like a bad version of Matt Dillon in Drugstore Cowboy. Henley has dreams but knows she’s never escaping and not even a romantic fling with the town’s rich kid will get her out of dead end poverty. This is a powerful novel about these two characters and the small desperate world they struggle through. If you ever want to see rich complex characters developed, you’ll find it here. The only negative is that it’s a bit depressing and there’s only a tiny glimmer of hope, but maybe that tiny glimmer is all you need to spark something better.Many thanks to the publisher for providing a copy for review.
    more
  • karen
    January 1, 1970
    reviewed for l.a. review of books, scheduled to run 10/11.
  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    This story of life and death in a small Kansas town has many of the hallmarks of life all over the country in recent years especially in the influence of drugs and crime, but its atmosphere is specific to its place, people and geography. I’ve read McHugh before and she brings out the heart and soul, the good and bad of her characters as well as the tempered beauty and and growing poverty of this area left behind in our “new” economy.In Blackwater Kansas, two women, one a young mother, the other This story of life and death in a small Kansas town has many of the hallmarks of life all over the country in recent years especially in the influence of drugs and crime, but its atmosphere is specific to its place, people and geography. I’ve read McHugh before and she brings out the heart and soul, the good and bad of her characters as well as the tempered beauty and and growing poverty of this area left behind in our “new” economy.In Blackwater Kansas, two women, one a young mother, the other just out of high school, are caught up in problems of their own families. Sadie Keller is trying to discover how her older brother died during the summer when she didn’t even know he was ill. And why would his wife behave so strangely? Living in a trailer with her mother, when her mother stays clean, Henley Pettit simply wants out. She wants to have a different life away from the remains of family she has but can’t depend on. The novel is told from the alternating perspectives of Sadie and Henley which provides introductions to most people in this town. And the stories of Sadie and Henley will dance around each other in this small place until you can’t help but wonder if there will be a collision.This is a well written novel with suspense, well developed characters and a plot and setting taken from today’s news.A copy of this book was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest review.
    more
  • Linda Strong
    January 1, 1970
    Sadie Keller wants answers. Her brother was found on the floor, dead. Powers that be have stated that the man died from a drug overdose ... the leading cause of death in this small town in Kansas. The man's wife began selling or destroying his things almost immediately after his death. She's refused to allow an autopsy. She refuses to release his medical records to his sisters and mother. She wants the police to look into her brother's death, but they, too, have their hands full. A divorced man Sadie Keller wants answers. Her brother was found on the floor, dead. Powers that be have stated that the man died from a drug overdose ... the leading cause of death in this small town in Kansas. The man's wife began selling or destroying his things almost immediately after his death. She's refused to allow an autopsy. She refuses to release his medical records to his sisters and mother. She wants the police to look into her brother's death, but they, too, have their hands full. A divorced man took his young daughter and never returned her to her mother. A skull is found in the woods and it's the worst news any parent can hear. The father is found at a later date, also in the woods... both have been shot. Murder? Murder Suicide?Are these crimes connected? The more Sadie investigates, the more she learns about small town secrets and lies. She also finds that someone wants her silenced .... maybe permanently.This was a new author to me so I wasn't sure what to expect. I found a well-written mystery filled with suspense, twists and turns that led to a surprising ending. There are many, many characters, all intertwined with each other, which left me puzzled for a short while. The story premise is a good one ... and I liked how the author tackled today's problem of the use of opioids, especially in the young.Many thanks to the author / Random House - Spiegel & Grau / Netgalley for the digital copy of this crime fiction. Read and reviewed voluntarily, opinions expressed here are unbiased and entirely my own.
    more
  • Quirkyreader
    January 1, 1970
    First off, I won this as a goodreads giveaway. Thank you Penguin Random House and Spiegel & Grau for sending it to me.This book was a trill ride from the get go. I wanted to finish it in one sitting, but had to do it in three.It is a family drama chock full of the unexpected. This one is sure to hit big and hopefully win some awards.
    more
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley and Random House Publishing for granting my wish. A sister who wants answers. A teenager that wants to break the addiction cycle in her family. Upon finishing this book, I read an online review which states that the book is very personal to the author. I wish that I could have connected more with this story because the topic was very relevant. I didn't really see the thriller label as being very strong here. Goodreads review published 03/08/19Publication date 06/08/19
    more
  • Dennis
    January 1, 1970
    The Wolf Wants In is a fast paced, family-drama, in a community wrecked by drugs and poverty. Laura McHugh crafts a realistic mystery that is reminiscent of some of Mindy Mejia's works. This book really takes you on a journey of a world of desperation and drug abuse and you can definitely finish it in one sitting. I'm curious to see what else this author has up her sleeve.
    more
  • Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    The rural town of Blackwater, Kansas is in crisis: with few job prospects, the kids will do anything to get out and those who don't usually meet an untimely end at the bottom of a pill bottle.Sadie Keller refuses to believe her brother Shane, only in his thirties, died of natural causes.  Crystle, Shane's wife of one year, doesn't seem too devastated over her husband's death and isn't interested in looking further into his death.The town is consumed by the discovery of the remains of a missing c The rural town of Blackwater, Kansas is in crisis: with few job prospects, the kids will do anything to get out and those who don't usually meet an untimely end at the bottom of a pill bottle.Sadie Keller refuses to believe her brother Shane, only in his thirties, died of natural causes.  Crystle, Shane's wife of one year, doesn't seem too devastated over her husband's death and isn't interested in looking further into his death.The town is consumed by the discovery of the remains of a missing child and her father, previously thought to have been a child abduction.  Sadie is on her own to uncover the truth about Shane's final days.At the same time, eighteen-year-old Henley Pettit is desperate to leave Blackwater.  Her mom has relapsed again, she suspects her uncles are involved in several crimes, and now she needs to escape the suffocating affection of Jason Sullivan, son of the town's wealthiest resident.Alternating between the stories of Sadie and Henley, The Wolf Wants In is a slow burn mystery that reveals family secrets and connections in its own time.  While some pieces of the mystery are predictable, the fates of Sadie and Henley eventually become woven together for an overall unexpected conclusion!The Wolf Wants In is a heavy and for the most part bleak read due to the subject matter.  It's an honest look at grief, poverty, and family in rural America and at the center are several mysteries that eventually connect.If you enjoy small town mysteries and country noir, this is definitely one to stack!Thanks to Spiegel & Grau/Random House for sending me an advanced reader's copy for review.  The Wolf Wants In is scheduled for release on August 6, 2019.For more reviews, visit www.rootsandreads.wordpress.com
    more
  • Book of Secrets
    January 1, 1970
    3.75 Stars → THE WOLF WANTS IN is a quiet mystery/family drama set in a small Kansas town. Sadie Keller believes her brother has died under suspicious circumstances and wants answers. At the same time police are investigating the discovery of a child's skull found in the woods. Henley Pettit is just looking for a way out of Blackwater, a town of people plagued by the opioid epidemic, including her mother. I very much enjoy Laura McHugh's writing style and the way she crafts her atmospheric Midwe 3.75 Stars → THE WOLF WANTS IN is a quiet mystery/family drama set in a small Kansas town. Sadie Keller believes her brother has died under suspicious circumstances and wants answers. At the same time police are investigating the discovery of a child's skull found in the woods. Henley Pettit is just looking for a way out of Blackwater, a town of people plagued by the opioid epidemic, including her mother. I very much enjoy Laura McHugh's writing style and the way she crafts her atmospheric Midwestern settings. I don't think the mystery & suspense elements in this book were as strong as in her previous novels (The Weight of Blood & Arrowood). There weren't a lot of clues presented until the end, and I was left a bit confused about what happened & why. However, this character-driven book presents a realistic look at how poverty and opioid abuse affects people in small town America. Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Random House #partner for gifting me a copy of The Wolf Wants In by Laura McHuge! I read this one pretty quickly as it was an enjoyable, fast read. I would say it was a slow burn mystery and somewhat predictable but I still liked it! I love a story with more than one POV and we get two here. Small town, drugs, and secrets. Yes please! 4 ⭐ Thanks to Random House #partner for gifting me a copy of The Wolf Wants In by Laura McHuge! I read this one pretty quickly as it was an enjoyable, fast read. I would say it was a slow burn mystery and somewhat predictable but I still liked it! I love a story with more than one POV and we get two here. Small town, drugs, and secrets. Yes please! 4 ⭐️
    more
  • Alison Hardtmann
    January 1, 1970
    When Sadie's brother, Shane, dies of a opioid overdose, Sadie's family is both confused and suspicious. Shane would never have committed suicide, which is what the police think, and Shane's wife is acting oddly. So Sadie starts looking around. Haley is a part of the Pettit family, a long line of petty criminals and drug addicts. She's so eager to leave the small town of Blackwater, Kansas, where everyone knows exactly who her family is and her mother has drifted back into addiction. She just nee When Sadie's brother, Shane, dies of a opioid overdose, Sadie's family is both confused and suspicious. Shane would never have committed suicide, which is what the police think, and Shane's wife is acting oddly. So Sadie starts looking around. Haley is a part of the Pettit family, a long line of petty criminals and drug addicts. She's so eager to leave the small town of Blackwater, Kansas, where everyone knows exactly who her family is and her mother has drifted back into addiction. She just needs to save enough money to leave. She's cleaning the house of the local bigwig and spending time with his son, who is directionless and eager to spend time with her. The setting is the draw of this novel, a small rural community where the only available jobs are manual and low-paying, where the opioid epidemic rages and anyone who has the means leaves. And the plot is well developed, with alternating chapters switching between Sadie and Haley. The Haley chapters take place several months earlier and Laura McHugh does a fine job of raising the levels of tension equally in each of the timelines. I was set to rate this book very highly, but there's an abrupt end where the mystery is wrapped up in an odd sort of outline, all the bad guys confessing and all the good guys, who had previously been struggling with some serious issues, all received happy endings. I would have much preferred a longer book, better pacing and and an ending in keeping with the tone of the rest of the novel.
    more
  • Jypsy
    January 1, 1970
    The Wolf Wants In is a powerful read. The opioid crisis is only one part of the story. It's also about grief, hopelessness, poverty and family ties. Honesty, it's sad and a bit depressing, but it's still a worthwhile investment of your time. Just know that the material in this story is heavy and relevant. Told in two perspectives, these eventually tie together for a dramatic ending that will stay with you for days. It's thought provoking and chilling in the best way to engage readers with the na The Wolf Wants In is a powerful read. The opioid crisis is only one part of the story. It's also about grief, hopelessness, poverty and family ties. Honesty, it's sad and a bit depressing, but it's still a worthwhile investment of your time. Just know that the material in this story is heavy and relevant. Told in two perspectives, these eventually tie together for a dramatic ending that will stay with you for days. It's thought provoking and chilling in the best way to engage readers with the narrative. You will feel for these characters and their struggles. Excellent read! Thanks to NetGalley for an arc in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsDark, gritty & fiercely honest. Laura McHugh knocked it out the park with The Wolf Wants In. A suspicious death set in the heart of the opioid crisis in small town America - this novel reads as if it was ripped straight from the headlines. Smart, thought provoking and just how close to reality it is will startle you. Thank you to Random House Spiegel & Grau for an advanced copy. All opinions are my own 4.5 starsDark, gritty & fiercely honest. ⁣Laura McHugh knocked it out the park with The Wolf Wants In. A suspicious death set in the heart of the opioid crisis in small town America - this novel reads as if it was ripped straight from the headlines. Smart, thought provoking and just how close to reality it is will startle you. ⁣Thank you to Random House Spiegel & Grau for an advanced copy. All opinions are my own
    more
  • Kasa Cotugno
    January 1, 1970
    This novel looks not only at how the opioid infestation affects a person caught up in it and their family, but how it can be used to manipulate. Life in a small Kansas town, generally regarded as a backwater by its inhabitants who all dream of escape to different places and lives. There is such a strong depiction of time and place, fine descriptions that make a reader who's never been anywhere near rural Kansas envision the location clearly. Two connected story arcs each with its own female prot This novel looks not only at how the opioid infestation affects a person caught up in it and their family, but how it can be used to manipulate. Life in a small Kansas town, generally regarded as a backwater by its inhabitants who all dream of escape to different places and lives. There is such a strong depiction of time and place, fine descriptions that make a reader who's never been anywhere near rural Kansas envision the location clearly. Two connected story arcs each with its own female protagonist, separated by a matter of months, converge and reach a satisfying conclusion. I for one hope to find Sadie Keller in future novels.
    more
  • Anna W.
    January 1, 1970
    Another wonderful book to add to McHugh's canon. The Wolf Wants In delves into the opioid epidemic ravaging the United States, even small towns like Blackwater in the Midwest. While not a "beach read," this book will hook readers from all genres with its mysterious characters, clever plot turns, and realistic setting. Being a Midwesterner myself, the setting is very well done. McHugh adds in details that most of us in the area know (and silently judge), which adds credibility to her plot. The en Another wonderful book to add to McHugh's canon. The Wolf Wants In delves into the opioid epidemic ravaging the United States, even small towns like Blackwater in the Midwest. While not a "beach read," this book will hook readers from all genres with its mysterious characters, clever plot turns, and realistic setting. Being a Midwesterner myself, the setting is very well done. McHugh adds in details that most of us in the area know (and silently judge), which adds credibility to her plot. The ending achieves what her previous books do, too. Readers will understand the nuances and mysteries of the beginning and middle by the time the book closes, a satisfying end to an otherwise flummoxing puzzle. The Wolf Wants In is unsolvable until the end... and in the best way possible. A highly recommended read for any mystery and suspense reader, especially those who want a very realistic depiction of an actual, everyday issue.
    more
  • Mindy Mejia
    January 1, 1970
    If you’re looking for a writer who understands Midwestern life from the grand scales of economic and social contracts down to its tiniest customs and stoic beauty, look no further. Laura McHugh is the queen of the haunted heartland. In THE WOLF WANTS IN, one woman investigates her brother’s death while another tries to escape their opioid-ravaged rural Kansas town. Every scene simmers with hope and dread, making it impossible to rest until I knew these characters’ fates. An absolute must-read.
    more
  • Terri Wino
    January 1, 1970
    I won a copy of this book from the publisher through a Goodreads giveaway. Thank you to both.A dark but compelling story told alternately to the reader by Sadie, who is searching for answers in the death of her brother, and Henley, who is trying to get out from under the dark cloud of her family's history and her mother's addiction. This book tells of events starting in July through the end of the year, but there is a bit of jumping back and forth in the time line of events, so if you're not pay I won a copy of this book from the publisher through a Goodreads giveaway. Thank you to both.A dark but compelling story told alternately to the reader by Sadie, who is searching for answers in the death of her brother, and Henley, who is trying to get out from under the dark cloud of her family's history and her mother's addiction. This book tells of events starting in July through the end of the year, but there is a bit of jumping back and forth in the time line of events, so if you're not paying close attention it could be easy to get confused. I found this to be a mostly depressing read, but considering the subject matter, I didn't go into it expecting rainbows and butterflies. I found both Sadie and Henley likeable characters. Unfortunately, they were pretty much the only two characters in the book who were.I was glad that you get some definite closure as far as the investigation into the death of Sadie's brother. That's not a spoiler -- you'll have to read for yourself to find out what that explanation is.Overall a good story, but so damn depressing that I can't give it another star.
    more
  • Hannah Mary McKinnon
    January 1, 1970
    With one woman’s quest to find out what really happened to her brother, and another who’s desperate to leave the small, drug-fueled town, in The Wolf Wants In , Laura McHugh expertly paints a stark and haunting picture, filled with tragedy and tenderness. Poignant, atmospheric and utterly captivating, this novel, and its characters, will stay with me for a long time.Many thanks to Laura McHugh, NetGalley and Spiegel & Grau for the advance copy in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Jeanette
    January 1, 1970
    This book had me embedded within about 50 pages. I thought it held the Kansas countryside topography- beyond the Kansas City suburbs quite well. And I was 4 star interested until past the half way point.Then I wasn't. Why? Henley was well developed, as was Sadie- the two prime narrators. But to me, it's as if they seemed to both lose about 35 IQ points in the second half of the book. So much that was obvious as the reader, just didn't seem central to their posits or thinking much at all. And som This book had me embedded within about 50 pages. I thought it held the Kansas countryside topography- beyond the Kansas City suburbs quite well. And I was 4 star interested until past the half way point.Then I wasn't. Why? Henley was well developed, as was Sadie- the two prime narrators. But to me, it's as if they seemed to both lose about 35 IQ points in the second half of the book. So much that was obvious as the reader, just didn't seem central to their posits or thinking much at all. And some of the switches left me confused enough to reread- too many characters introduced hodge podge. It's beyond sad and increasingly more depressive the more you are into the story. And I loved the tone within days of ordinary places and tasks- but the mothers especially! They were either effusively child missing or pleasing or the complete opposite. Gushing grief or gushing missing or gushing for gushing. Or taking off for benders and not even leaving a message.What I did not like and that really grated on me enough to notice their overload throughout this entire book was the appearance descriptions. Clothing, faces, hair states (color, texture, oiliness, stringiness etc.), indoor surroundings of nasty and decrepit interiors or other negative physical material surrounds. Hoarder lengths of it. That and the constant switching of narrator and time periods just killed all the tension for me by the time I got to the last quarter of the book. And I completely and correctly guessed the endings all around. (Even to why Shane had died and how.) Despite the event that made you think otherwise and with further murder complications. Not a bad book with terrible writing overall. But sad and just unappealing for its progressions. IMHO. There was an all around seemingly "lack of energy" tied to the drug use and abuse. That's true that it does have that outcome. Yet the non-addicted were made out to be just as mediocre or "less than norm" to begin with. All characters having nearly special needs in ambition or/and learning abilities as a secondary fail point. Henley seemed like the only character in the whole town who didn't blame someone else for their own troubles or negatives. Or have a habit of whimpering or taking "a family" side. And for a town with so many churches- how is it that none of these people ever attend or seem to hold a moral code of religious beliefs in any of their actions. Social lives and communications completely "church away" too. Too bad and too sad of an entity to say I enjoyed this book. And I truly disagree with this being labeled as a thriller. No, it is not. Druggies and lots of self-pity context thoughts (always with a side of blame) had me bogged in groaning and moans the farther I traipsed into the book. I doubt if I would read this author again- she's too verbose in descriptions and her people are dumb downed all the way to sorry. And the food in this book! Maybe that's why I become so turned off by the whole crowd in general so quickly. UGH!
    more
  • OutlawPoet
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of those books in which I completely loved the characters, but was bored by the plot.Really, I didn't care about the brother and if he was murdered or not.I honestly found the plot just a bit plodding for my taste.I do think that other readers my appreciate the way the story is slowly told, but it simply wasn't for me.
    more
  • Paula DeBoard
    January 1, 1970
    McHugh doesn’t mince around here: there’s addiction and poverty, and all the things that poverty does to support addiction. As with her debut The Weight of Blood, I loved the gritty, realistic feeling of this story as two women—one who wants to leave and the other who feels drawn to stay—navigate the dark heart of this book’s mystery. Highly recommend. **My thanks to the publisher, the author and NetGalley for an advance copy of this book.
    more
  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    I remember reading this author's first book, The Weight of Blood, and being so taken with the raw and gritty atmosphere she was able to create through the place setting and her characters. I definitely wanted to read more from her. This is my second read of the author's and I was not disappointed. Although, I think not as creepy or gritty as her first novel, I also don't think this story needed that depth to convey that feeling as it was definitely portrayed through the circumstances of poverty I remember reading this author's first book, The Weight of Blood, and being so taken with the raw and gritty atmosphere she was able to create through the place setting and her characters. I definitely wanted to read more from her. This is my second read of the author's and I was not disappointed. Although, I think not as creepy or gritty as her first novel, I also don't think this story needed that depth to convey that feeling as it was definitely portrayed through the circumstances of poverty and the effects of the opioid crisis in this country. There is a very quiet, comfortable ease in which this author writes that I instantly feel at home inside her writing. The words flow easily and I get that incredible feeling of wanting to settle in for long periods of time soaking up each word. Thanks go out the NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an advanced copy to read in exchange for my honest opinion.
    more
  • Chandra Claypool (wherethereadergrows)
    January 1, 1970
    Let me just say that I think this was just not the read I needed right now. You know that mood you can get in where only a certain type of book (and at that moment you don't even know which one that would be) that will just do it for you? I was really hoping this one would be it. I actually woke up, opened it, read the first few pages and was interested enough to take it with me to the salon to get a pedicure. I read through 3/4 of the book at the salon but nothing ever really just GRABBED ME.Th Let me just say that I think this was just not the read I needed right now. You know that mood you can get in where only a certain type of book (and at that moment you don't even know which one that would be) that will just do it for you? I was really hoping this one would be it. I actually woke up, opened it, read the first few pages and was interested enough to take it with me to the salon to get a pedicure. I read through 3/4 of the book at the salon but nothing ever really just GRABBED ME.This is one of those books that's very atmospheric and has the gritty undertone that never lets up. This is one of the very best things about this read - the tone and feeling that you can't help but pick up on. Unfortunately, my mood didn't allow me to enjoy this to my fullest potential. But the quick chapters kept me turning those pages. I just really wish I could've connected. Instead it felt like that good background movie you put on while you're doing other things. Every once in a while you look up and pay attention but most of the time it's just underneath whatever else is catching your eye at the time.The characters make this story rather than the story line itself. These characters pop off the pages and although a somber read, you really feel these desperate characters clinging to you. I think I just needed something a bit lighter. However, if you're looking for a gritty, suspenseful literary fiction read, this is perfect.
    more
Write a review