The Girl in Red
From the national bestselling author of Alice comes a postapocalyptic take on the perennial classic "Little Red Riding Hood"...about a woman who isn't as defenseless as she seems.It's not safe for anyone alone in the woods. There are predators that come out at night: critters and coyotes, snakes and wolves. But the woman in the red jacket has no choice. Not since the Crisis came, decimated the population, and sent those who survived fleeing into quarantine camps that serve as breeding grounds for death, destruction, and disease. She is just a woman trying not to get killed in a world that doesn't look anything like the one she grew up in, the one that was perfectly sane and normal and boring until three months ago.There are worse threats in the woods than the things that stalk their prey at night. Sometimes, there are men. Men with dark desires, weak wills, and evil intents. Men in uniform with classified information, deadly secrets, and unforgiving orders. And sometimes, just sometimes, there's something worse than all of the horrible people and vicious beasts combined. Red doesn't like to think of herself as a killer, but she isn't about to let herself get eaten up just because she is a woman alone in the woods....

The Girl in Red Details

TitleThe Girl in Red
Author
ReleaseJun 18th, 2019
Publisher Berkley
ISBN-139780451492289
Rating
GenreFantasy, Horror, Retellings, Fiction, Science Fiction, Dystopia

The Girl in Red Review

  • Miranda Reads
    January 1, 1970
    Who's the wolf in the woods now? Red, a young woman on her own, is travelling through the forest in a post-apocalyptic world. ...they had watched in horror as town after town and city after city was decimated by this sickness, this mysterious terror that had sprung up... "The Crisis" (as she calls it) has already ruined most of the world and nearly all of her family and now Red is alone in the world - almost. Grandmas didn't die from stuff like that. Grandmas went on and on, enduring year afte Who's the wolf in the woods now? Red, a young woman on her own, is travelling through the forest in a post-apocalyptic world. ...they had watched in horror as town after town and city after city was decimated by this sickness, this mysterious terror that had sprung up... "The Crisis" (as she calls it) has already ruined most of the world and nearly all of her family and now Red is alone in the world - almost. Grandmas didn't die from stuff like that. Grandmas went on and on, enduring year after year, shriveled and worn but somehow ageless. Red's grandmother lives isolated in the woods, in a self-sustaining little cottage hundreds of miles away. And once Red makes a plan, she sticks to it. So what if she's alone in this world? So what if her supplies are running low? So what if everyone and everything out there is trying to kill her? Grandma is out there, and Red is going to see her. Only, her journey is not nearly as easy as she thought. The woods are teeming with wolves - both animal and human. The fellow across the fire gave Red the once-over, from the wild corkscrews of her hair peeking out from under her red hood to the small hand axe that rested on the ground beside her. But the joke is on them, because if there is one thing Red has been preparing for - it was the apocalypse. He'd thought she would be polite, that she would offer to share her space with him. He'd thought she would trust him, because she was alone and he was alone...she was not following his script, and he didn't know how to improvise. And there is not a thing she would not do to get to where she wants to go. "I am going to my grandma's house, and if you try to stop me I will slice off whatever I can reach and leave you here to bleed to death." In short - this book was everything that I could have hoped for and more.I have read so (SO) many tellings (and retellings) of classic fairytales that it takes a really, truly amazing one to knock my socks off.Well. Let me assure you - my socks are in the next country.Once I picked it up, I could not put it down. I honestly cannot remember the last time I finished a book in a single day.I am constantly frustrated by the absolute idiocy of main characters during apacolypse novels. I honestly wonder how most characters make it past Ch 2 and Red is wonderfully the complete opposite.She's wholly refreshing, absolutely fabulous and perfectly educated. One thing Red had learned from years of reading and movie watching was that people were far scarier than any disease... Between her confidence, her logic and her stone-cold killer instincts, I was completely fascinated. "I see two bodies with open chest wounds and some mars on the floor. Until I actually see an alien life form crawling on the ground, I'm not buying it." The plot was fast-paced and exciting - even though this was a retelling, I still had no idea where the story was going and I loved it.Highly, highly recommended. I think I'm just going to have to buy everything Henry has ever written. She had to get to her grandmother, and she still had a very long way to go. With thanks to the publisher for a free copy in exchange for an honest reviewAll quotes come from an uncorrected proof and are subject to change upon publication.
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  • Hannah Greendale
    January 1, 1970
    It's like The Road by Cormac McCarthy went skipping through the woods to grandmother's house in this dystopian sci-fi retelling of "Little Red Riding Hood." Aside from a few hackneyed attempts to insert views on certain political agendas, this is a well-plotted, swift-paced story of survival. Red, a young woman of mixed-race with a prosthetic leg, is a fierce opponent for the fallen world's wolves. Gruesome, outspoken, and forgivably predictable. The Girl in Red is a thrilling slasher. You're a It's like The Road by Cormac McCarthy went skipping through the woods to grandmother's house in this dystopian sci-fi retelling of "Little Red Riding Hood." Aside from a few hackneyed attempts to insert views on certain political agendas, this is a well-plotted, swift-paced story of survival. Red, a young woman of mixed-race with a prosthetic leg, is a fierce opponent for the fallen world's wolves. Gruesome, outspoken, and forgivably predictable. The Girl in Red is a thrilling slasher. You're a wolf and I'm a hunter. I'm no Red Riding Hood to be deceived by your mask. I know what you are.* -*Note: Quote taken from an Advanced Reading Copy.
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  • Kelly (and the Book Boar)
    January 1, 1970
    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/PUB DAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY!!!!! If you were left feeling "meh" by The Mermaid, have no fear because Henry bringeth the darkness once again with this post-apocalyptic retelling : ) A review via giffery presented by Mitchell: If you are anything like me, Christina Henry completely blew your mind when she proved in her darkly updated version of Alice In Wonderland that . . . . . When she revamped Peter Pan . . . . Mind = blown.I was p Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/PUB DAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY!!!!! If you were left feeling "meh" by The Mermaid, have no fear because Henry bringeth the darkness once again with this post-apocalyptic retelling : ) A review via giffery presented by Mitchell: If you are anything like me, Christina Henry completely blew your mind when she proved in her darkly updated version of Alice In Wonderland that . . . . . When she revamped Peter Pan . . . . Mind = blown.I was pretty much crapping my drawers to see what she would come up with next. And when I heard it was a new spin on P.T. Barnum’s famous Fiji mermaid, I was 100% ready for . . . . . But then . . . . . A kissing book? Helllllllllll nah! Get to the stabbing. Despite that one missing the mark for me, I remained a loyal stalker fan and couldn’t wait to see what Henry’s warped little mind could conjure up next. To say The Girl In Red didn’t disappoint is a true understatement. Not since . . . . . Have I enjoyed a Red Riding Hood retelling so much. Immune to a plague that has decimated the population, Red knows her only hope is to make it to Granny’s cabin – a place she is certain she and her brother can survive this end of days. But the getting there is the hard part. The road less traveled is a must as they trek across country, and the dangers waiting in the woods are plentiful. When it comes to Christina Henry, there’s only one thing to say . . . . Many thanks to the publisher for providing an ARC of this title in exchange for an honest review.ORIGINAL "REVIEW" (SPOILER ALERT, I DIDN'T HAVE TO CUT ANYONE - THEY SENT ME A PHYSICAL COPY FREE!): Who do I have to cut in order to get a copy of this? Name the name and I'll do it ; )
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  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader
    January 1, 1970
    I read something a little different, and it really paid off!. ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ I’ve long wanted to read a Christina Henry book. I’ve even bought a couple for my shelf and just haven’t read them yet. I’m thrilled that The Girl in Red was my first because what a way to begin! The Girl in Red is a post-apocalyptic spin on Little Red Riding Hood. It’s no longer safe to be in the woods. The creatures come out at night, and sometimes there are men worse than the creatures. Ever since the “Crisis” happened, the I read something a little different, and it really paid off!. ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ I’ve long wanted to read a Christina Henry book. I’ve even bought a couple for my shelf and just haven’t read them yet. I’m thrilled that The Girl in Red was my first because what a way to begin! The Girl in Red is a post-apocalyptic spin on Little Red Riding Hood. It’s no longer safe to be in the woods. The creatures come out at night, and sometimes there are men worse than the creatures. Ever since the “Crisis” happened, the woman in the red jacket (“Red”) has no choice but to enter the woods at night. Those who survived the crisis now live in quarantine camps where disease and death are formidable adversaries. Red is trying to survive. Imagine all the evil men and cruel beasts and mash them together and then you may have identified Red’s true adversary. But Red’s no weak woman. You’ll see. The Girl in Red is hauntingly dark and beautifully written. Red is a character to absolutely love. She’s a fighter and as tough as they come. I loved the pace and the ending came on fast, too, almost leaving an opening for a sequel maybe? This is a book you can easily binge. I would start it when you have time to keep going because the pace and suspense keeps you completely engaged, and I know I couldn’t bear to put it down! The Girl in Red is a magnificently compelling and smart retelling of one of my favorite fairy tales! I received a complimentary copy. All opinions are my own. My reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    "I am going to my grandma's house, and if you try to stop me I will slice off whatever I can reach and leave you here to bleed to death." With alternating timelines that reveal the decimation of the world, Red is our consistent main character who shows that being a woman in a man's ravaged world is her very underestimated strength. She doesn't need guns or an intimidating appearance or even all four limbs. She has serious smarts and fierce intuition. The Girl in Red is a violent, post-apocal "I am going to my grandma's house, and if you try to stop me I will slice off whatever I can reach and leave you here to bleed to death." With alternating timelines that reveal the decimation of the world, Red is our consistent main character who shows that being a woman in a man's ravaged world is her very underestimated strength. She doesn't need guns or an intimidating appearance or even all four limbs. She has serious smarts and fierce intuition. The Girl in Red is a violent, post-apocalyptic retelling of the little red riding hood from once upon a time. Girls are stronger now, and their grandmothers can take care of themselves, too. Check it out.My favorite quote: "Red didn’t like to think of herself as a killer, but she wasn’t about to let herself get eaten up just because she is a woman alone in the woods."Audiobook expertly narrated by January LaVoy.
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  • Jasmine from How Useful It Is
    January 1, 1970
    I started reading The Girl in Red on 5/27/2019 and finished it on 5/30/2019 at 12:55AM. This book is a great read! I love reading the author’s other book called The Mermaid as well. I have heard Alice is another blogger’s favorite and I can’t wait to read it too. This book has a lot of narrative because the main character is traveling alone but her thoughts are interesting so it wasn’t all dull. The main character loves horror movies and she learns her survival skills based on it. I like how thi I started reading The Girl in Red on 5/27/2019 and finished it on 5/30/2019 at 12:55AM. This book is a great read! I love reading the author’s other book called The Mermaid as well. I have heard Alice is another blogger’s favorite and I can’t wait to read it too. This book has a lot of narrative because the main character is traveling alone but her thoughts are interesting so it wasn’t all dull. The main character loves horror movies and she learns her survival skills based on it. I like how this book focuses on siblings not getting along but having to be around each other and their bickering. It’s more realistic than those siblings who goes above and beyond for each other. I’m not into horror stuffs so the horror movies and bits of death in this book is a bit gory personally for me.This book is told in the third person point of view following Red (Cordelia), 20 as she navigates through the woods on her way to see her grandmother with a prosthetic leg no less. It’s during dangerous times, 3 months after the Crisis and she’s traveling alone on her own among the sick and the rapist. She has an ax with her for protection and her intelligent to keep herself from getting killed. After the first chapter, the story goes back to before the apocalypse where Red lives with her professor parents and older brother Adam. Red likes camping and as soon as she’s aware of the sickness, she prepared herself for survival even when her family hesitated or believed the government will save them. The book is organized by having each chapter before the apocalypse and the next chapter after the apocalypse.The Girl in Red is very well written and a fast paced read. I like the diversity in this book and how an American kid craves eating kim chi. I don’t like how Red’s parents are so unprepared for the future when they are educated professors but I’m glad that their ending were meaningful. The organization of this story is excellent because it creates opportunity for conversations. As much as I enjoyed Red’s thoughts, I don’t want to spend too much time in it. I like Adam, Sirois, and Riley’s easy personality and fun humor. The ending is bittersweet and it’s up to readers’ imagination. I hope DJ has a happy ending though I would have liked to meet Red’s grandma. I like how the wolves are portrayed in this story and I highly recommend everyone to read this book!Pro: fast paced, page turner, siblings who doesn’t always get along, diversity, humorCon: noneI rate it 5 stars!***Disclaimer: Many thanks to Berkley Publishing for the opportunity to read and review. Please be assured that my opinions are honest.xoxo,Jasmine at www.howusefulitis.wordpress.com for more details
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  • Brenda - Traveling Sister
    January 1, 1970
    An upcoming Traveling Friends Group Read with Norma. You can find us here to join https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...Well ok, that was something different from what I have been reading lately and I have been reading something different quite a bit.The Girl in Red is an entertaining yet a little horrifying and creative, post-apocalyptic take on Little Red Riding Hood. Christina Henry is known for her retelling of fairy tales and this is a first for me. I am now curious about some of her othe An upcoming Traveling Friends Group Read with Norma. You can find us here to join https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...Well ok, that was something different from what I have been reading lately and I have been reading something different quite a bit.The Girl in Red is an entertaining yet a little horrifying and creative, post-apocalyptic take on Little Red Riding Hood. Christina Henry is known for her retelling of fairy tales and this is a first for me. I am now curious about some of her other retellings. I do secretly like post-apocalyptic stories and I have read a couple of them in the past but nothing like this one. I was pleasantly a little surprised by how much I enjoyed this one.The Little Red Riding Hood here is this tale is far from helpless and the wolf is terrifying. Our main character Red is clever, brave, resilient with a strong personality and not afraid to show everyone just how strong it is. She is unique and entertaining with her sharp tongue and references to post-apocalyptic movies and books. We see a few different sides to Red here in this tale making her an interesting character.The tale is told is dual timelines with before and after timelines creating tension and suspense to the story that had me turning the pages to find out how all this was going to wrap up. The ending came together well for me however stretch things a little over the top for me and I had to remind myself it’s a retelling of a fairy tale. Some things don’t really wrap up here as a lot was left unanswered and I do think it all works here since fairy tales don’t really need answers. I highly recommend! Thank you to Elisha from Berkley Publishing for the opportunity to read something I won’t normally pick by providing me with a complimentary copy of this tale.
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  • megs_bookrack
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, Berkley Books -- you are too good to me!ARC received and I couldn't be happier!!
  • Victoria ♡
    January 1, 1970
    this is probably my most anticipated book of 2019, IM JUST SO EXCITED FOR IT!
  • Dannii Elle
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating 3.5/5 stars.In this post-apocalyptic retelling of the classic Little Red Riding Hood fairy-tale, Red is an orphaned girl, traversing the new world alone, and the wolves that hunt her are human, but just as predatory. After the Crisis decimated a large portion of the human race the few who survived were herded into quarantine camps, which only served as a breeding ground for the virus destroying the world we know. Red sought the freedom of the trees instead, choosing to rely on her Actual rating 3.5/5 stars.In this post-apocalyptic retelling of the classic Little Red Riding Hood fairy-tale, Red is an orphaned girl, traversing the new world alone, and the wolves that hunt her are human, but just as predatory. After the Crisis decimated a large portion of the human race the few who survived were herded into quarantine camps, which only served as a breeding ground for the virus destroying the world we know. Red sought the freedom of the trees instead, choosing to rely on her own wits to guide her to safety when she could no longer put her trust in the governing bodies that had failed her. However, Red soon finds interlopers to her solitude and in this dog-eat-dog world she now inhabits she must strike first at the wolves circling her or she may not have the chance to strike at all.I adore post-apocalyptic settings and so could not fail to be intrigued by the premise for this book. The fairy-tale twist lent an extra area of interest and Henry conjoined the classic with the contemporary in a seamless and exciting amalgamation. The split-chronology between Before and After allows the reader to both learn how the Crisis began as well as how those left deal with it, in the present.I just as quickly came to adore protagonist, Red. She was a feisty individual who used her extensive knowledge of sci-fi books and movies to guide her through the world. She actively sought destruction for her many foes and never allowed herself to become the victim in any situation. She had killer instincts and a tough exterior that made her perspective into this world endlessly compelling.I also appreciated how diverse her character creation was. Red is both a POC and wears a prosthetic leg. She never allows her missing limb to hinder her progress and overcomes any hurdles it causes her in the same self-assured stride as she does any other catastrophe she faces. She is a fierce opponent for the new world and not one I would want to encounter on my way to grandma's house!Despite appreciating her character I found her concession for sarcasm sometimes disconcerting. My personal preference is for my characters to be on the whimsical or outright pretentious side and so it took a little getting used to the different personality that Red possesses and the spiky demeanour she confronts the world with. Still a solid and action-packed read with a fresh new take on the deadly virus trope.
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  • Zainab
    January 1, 1970
    A Little Red Riding Hood retelling in a post-apocalyptic setting with THAT cover? I want this so bad.EditI got it! I really want my exams to end so I can read this beauty!
  • Dianne
    January 1, 1970
    Until three months ago, life was “normal,” but the Crisis changed all that and now Red has one goal, to survive in a world filled with the monsters the new world has turned loose.THE GIRL IN RED by Christina Henry is a tale of survival, of violence and the true grit that the girl in the red hoodie has in spades as she traverses the post-apocalyptic world to reach the one place she considers a safe haven, Grandma’s house. But the forest hides more than wild beasts of prey, it now hides the uglies Until three months ago, life was “normal,” but the Crisis changed all that and now Red has one goal, to survive in a world filled with the monsters the new world has turned loose.THE GIRL IN RED by Christina Henry is a tale of survival, of violence and the true grit that the girl in the red hoodie has in spades as she traverses the post-apocalyptic world to reach the one place she considers a safe haven, Grandma’s house. But the forest hides more than wild beasts of prey, it now hides the ugliest side of humanity and no one is safe.Little Red Riding Hood unbound, untamed and wildly magnetic! Follow Red and be amazed at the sheer force of will that keeps her going, gives her heart and a newfound passion for life, even if it means walking on the dark side to find the security she needs.Tough, gritty and thoroughly engaging, Christina Henry brings a new heroine to life in a tale filled with unique twists, dark dangers and unforgettable characters!I received a complimentary ARC edition from Berkley!Publisher: Berkley (June 18, 2019)Publication Date: June 18, 2019Genre: Action /Adventure Post-apocalyptic FantasyPrint Length: 304 pagesAvailable from: Amazon | Barnes & NobleFor Reviews, Giveaways, Fabulous Book News, follow: http://tometender.blogspot.com
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  • ☆★Tinja★✮ A Court of Pizza and Laziness
    January 1, 1970
    SHUT UUUUPPPPPP AND JUST TAKE MA MONEYYYYYYY OMFG WHAT
  • Candace Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    So I just couldn’t get into this one like I have with Henry’s other books. I did like the character Red, but something about this story just didn’t grab at me. Maybe I’ll try again later.
  • Carole (Carole's Random Life in Books)
    January 1, 1970
    This review can also be found at Carole's Random Life in Books.I liked this book a lot! I really had no idea that this book would be a post-apocalyptic story but I couldn't have been happier about that fact once I started reading. I see now that little fact would have been obvious if I had read the book's summary before diving in but I like to go into books as blinding as I can so I can be surprised. It worked well in this case. Once I started reading, I was completely taken with Red as she foug This review can also be found at Carole's Random Life in Books.I liked this book a lot! I really had no idea that this book would be a post-apocalyptic story but I couldn't have been happier about that fact once I started reading. I see now that little fact would have been obvious if I had read the book's summary before diving in but I like to go into books as blinding as I can so I can be surprised. It worked well in this case. Once I started reading, I was completely taken with Red as she fought to survive in a terrifying world. I really had a fantastic time with this book!There is a virus, known as the Cough, that is wiping out much of the population. Red's family is safe but they don't know how much longer things will stay that way. They decide that the best course of action is to travel by foot to Grandma's house since she is pretty isolated. Red is prepared and ready for the challenge. Her parents and brother are not nearly as eager to start the journey.Red is an amazing character. She lost her leg in an accident when she was younger and now uses a prosthetic leg. Others often see her as disabled or crippled but Red knows she is very capable. She is also very aware of how things are different for her. I really liked the way that we got a glimpse into what life would be like with a prosthesis. The way that maintaining balance, dealing with difficult terrain, and fatigue were worked into the story was expertly handled. I also really liked the fact that Red is biracial. Racism does play a part in this story and I hated what Red and her family had to deal with.I really thought that this book was exciting. Just when I thought I knew what was going on, things would happen that made me doubt everything. This book did such a great job of keeping me guessing. I think that the way that the story was laid out worked well. We see things from Red's perspective at the beginning of the crisis and also much later on. I thought that by alternating these two points in time they both seemed just a bit more powerful. I would highly recommend this book to others. This was a thrilling story with an incredibly tough and intelligent heroine. There were lots of twists and turns that kept the pages turning through Red's tragedies and triumphs. I can't wait to read more from Christina Henry!I received a review copy of this book from Berkley Publishing Group.Initial ThoughtsThis was really pretty awesome! I really had no idea what this story would be about but I did not expect an apocalyptic story but I was excited once I realized that was what it was. I loved Red. She was such a determined and capable character. I thought it was great the way that she had a plan for everything. There were a lot of surprises in this book and I really just had a great time with it.
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  • Juli
    January 1, 1970
    Little Red Riding Hood takes on a new dystopian flavor in this awesome re-telling! Cordelia -- who prefers to be called Red -- lives with her parents and brother. Her life is relatively happy and more than a bit nerdy because both of her parents are college professors. Then....The Cough comes. Many, many people start to get sick....people start to panic....society begins to fall apart. It happens slowly, so Red prepares the best she can. She learns. She studies. She trains. And then the time com Little Red Riding Hood takes on a new dystopian flavor in this awesome re-telling! Cordelia -- who prefers to be called Red -- lives with her parents and brother. Her life is relatively happy and more than a bit nerdy because both of her parents are college professors. Then....The Cough comes. Many, many people start to get sick....people start to panic....society begins to fall apart. It happens slowly, so Red prepares the best she can. She learns. She studies. She trains. And then the time comes to leave the city....the whole family begins a trek to Grandmother's House, a remote cabin in the woods 300 miles away. Red believes they can make it...if they avoid roads, bad people and accidents along the way. It's not safe to stay put. And it's not safe to leave. There are more than Big, Bad Wolves waiting to waylay Red on her trip to Grandmother's House. This story is fast-paced and suspenseful. Red is a strong, intelligent and incredibly resilient main character. I loved seeing the character develop over the course of the story. She sees what the future is going to bring and plans ahead for it, while everyone else just seems to discount her opinions. In the end, she learns to rely on her judgment and does the best she can in a very bad situation. I'm hoping there will be another book. The ending worked but it was a bit abrupt, in my opinion. If it's a cliffhanger...I'm ok with that. If not....I'd really like to know what happens next! But even if there is never another book, I loved this story! Red Riding Hood got a great update. I previously read The Mermaid by this author. I enjoyed this book just as much or maybe even more than that one. I'm definitely going to read more by this author, especially her stories about Alice and Captain Hook. I'm a sucker for re-tellings! This book was a binge read for me...I stayed up half the night reading because I couldn't put it down. Any story that keeps me reading until 3 am deserves full stars from me. Loved the story! Great main character and interesting plot. **I voluntarily read an advanced readers copy of this book from Berkley Publishing via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.**
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  • Becca | Pages & Postcards
    January 1, 1970
    DNF @ 30%.Okay, this might be harsh, but I have a lot of thoughts. Be warned: ranting and spoilers ahead.First of all, the info-dumping. Good god. There was so much background information bogging down the story, and yet none of it actually provided any real understanding of the plot or setting.Second of all, Red is a very unlikeable character. She's a know-it-all, multi-talented teenager who is somehow able to out-fight and out-smart everyone around her. All of her convenient knowledge of medici DNF @ 30%.Okay, this might be harsh, but I have a lot of thoughts. Be warned: ranting and spoilers ahead.First of all, the info-dumping. Good god. There was so much background information bogging down the story, and yet none of it actually provided any real understanding of the plot or setting.Second of all, Red is a very unlikeable character. She's a know-it-all, multi-talented teenager who is somehow able to out-fight and out-smart everyone around her. All of her convenient knowledge of medicine, diseases, and survival is apparently self-taught, and all of her fighting abilities originate from one self-defense class she took in college. The early chapters with her parents are especially frustrating to read because of how much smarter she seems, even though they are both college professors. She somehow knew everything about everything, and it was all just very unbelievable. Also, the family dynamic is very...bizarre? Red's mom gets sick and her dad decides to stay behind with her while Red and her brother continue on a dangerous trek. He intends to either get sick and die with her, or kill himself if he survives. Excuse me but, what??? You're going to voluntarily die with your wife and leave your children alone to fend for themselves? Red isn't much better. When her and her brother are about to leave the house and a group of racists come to their house to kill them all for being black (?), and her entire family goes outside to meet them instead of hiding like Red told them to (???) she seriously considers sneaking out and leaving them all behind. This seems like very odd behavior for a supposedly strong, close-knit family.The issue of racism is handled poorly, in my mind. The fact that Red is half black, half white came up so frequently that I felt like it was being shoved in my face. Ultimately, this is a gory dystopian survival story about a deadly sickness and a girl who seeks to find safety at her grandmothers house, deep in the woods. I really wanted to like this (as I was fascinated by the premise of a dark Little Red Riding Hood retelling), but couldn't connect with the characters and the story couldn't hold my interest.
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  • Ellen Gail
    January 1, 1970
    Christina Henry + postapocalyptic Little Red Riding Hood?I am READY for it.
  • Dennis
    January 1, 1970
    Christina Henry is well-known in the publishing world for her dark, apocalyptic retellings of some of our favorite fairy tales. Her Chronicles of Alice duology was widely received and her other works have been enjoyed by many fans for years. I always think a good retelling, mixed with a little horror and fantasy could be fun, but I never seem to feel connected to them. Henry's The Girl in Red changed that for me. Cordelia, nicknamed Red, is on an mission to get to her grandmother's remote cabi Christina Henry is well-known in the publishing world for her dark, apocalyptic retellings of some of our favorite fairy tales. Her Chronicles of Alice duology was widely received and her other works have been enjoyed by many fans for years. I always think a good retelling, mixed with a little horror and fantasy could be fun, but I never seem to feel connected to them. Henry's The Girl in Red changed that for me. Cordelia, nicknamed Red, is on an mission to get to her grandmother's remote cabin in the woods. Society has fallen, due to a mysterious viral outbreak that has decimated society. She's alone in this journey, but she is prepared to defend herself anyway possible. With society on the brink of extinction, survivors are desperate for survival, and Red's biggest threat isn't the virus—it's who's out there left. The Girl in Red was a fun survival novel, and it wasn't as gruesomely dark at Alice, which was nice because it didn't have gratuitous rape or violence for no reason. I enjoyed following along with Red and her adventures, and the story ends on a note that could be interpreted in multiple ways. I did not love how the story ended, but I will probably be in the minority with that critique. As Red set out in her adventures, the characters crafted to keep the story going were enjoyable and personable—everyone served a purpose. The story has Before and After POV's, and I really enjoyed the After POV, but respected the author's choice to show how the outbreak crumbled society. If you enjoy dystopian novels, and want to read an interesting retelling, The Girl in Red may be your best bet.
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  • destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]
    January 1, 1970
    Red didn’t like to think of herself as a killer, but she wasn’t about to let herself get eaten up just because she was a woman alone in the woods. Every now and then, you find a book that is so special, so incredible, has such a massive impact on your life that when you turn that last page, you think to yourself, This is what stories are supposed to do to us. This is how it’s supposed to feel. Friends, I am so pleased to tell you that The Girl in Red was absolutely one of those books for me. “D Red didn’t like to think of herself as a killer, but she wasn’t about to let herself get eaten up just because she was a woman alone in the woods. Every now and then, you find a book that is so special, so incredible, has such a massive impact on your life that when you turn that last page, you think to yourself, This is what stories are supposed to do to us. This is how it’s supposed to feel. Friends, I am so pleased to tell you that The Girl in Red was absolutely one of those books for me. “Do you think I don’t know what kind of men this world has wrought? Every woman knows. And those men existed before everything fell apart.” Let’s start by talking about my undying love for our main character, Red: she is so complex and real and flawed in the best possible ways. She’s snarky and angry and a bit of a know-it-all, but frankly, she’s generally right and nobody really listens to her, so I think she’s totally earned that arrogance. She’s a walking, talking amalgamation of so many reasons people have to discredit a person—she’s a woman, queer (bi or pan, I’m not sure), biracial (black/white), and disabled (she has a prosthetic leg from the knee down on one side). She’s a science-loving, conspiracy-theory-holding, horror-film-aficionado, too (and, frankly, I know many people who fit so many of the same descriptions as Red, so if your argument is that she’s “too marginalized” to feel like a real human being, I’ll ask you to go ahead and leave me out of that conversation, please and thank you). It was always men like this, men who thought that they could take what they wanted and leave the broken scraps of people behind. Now, beyond my undying adoration for Red and her brilliant, nurturing self and desperate commitment to survival and freedom, let’s talk about this plot. It’s a near-future apocalypse story, and it pains me a little to say how believable it felt. As someone who is typically also very distrusting of many of the groups of people responsible for the terrors in this story, yeah, I could absolutely see something like this happening and it petrifies me a little to think about. Especially when one considers the underlying theme woven into The Girl in Red’s storyline, which is that in any given apocalyptic scenario, the biggest horror will almost always be our fellow humans. It was never the Event—illness, asteroid, nuclear war, whatever—that was the problem. It was what people did after. And people always reduced to their least human denominators when things went bad. The stakes are so high in The Girl in Red and the threats never stop coming; if it’s not the epidemic that started the whole thing, it’s the twisted, brutalized manner Red keeps finding corpses in, or the homemade militia teams prowling for food and women to take, or the leering, stained grins on the faces of so many of the men she encounters. The commentary on rape culture is powerful here and Christina Henry always excels at interlacing a suspenseful, enrapturing storyline with themes of feminism and rebelling against the idea that anyone deserves to take advantage of another human being, ever. “We all die at the end. What we do before the end is what counts.” Finally, underneath the immersive setting and story, the lovable-yet-flawed protagonist, the feminist undertones, the mortifying descriptions of the epidemic, and the stunning and powerful writing style that is so uniquely Chrstina’s… there’s also a story of family, whether they’re bound to us by blood or not. Red’s entire reason for fighting boils down not only to survival, but to protecting the people she cares about, too. The familial love is powerful and endlessly heart-wrenching as it reminds us of the lengths we’ll go to and the risks we’ll take to keep our loved ones safe. Red was going to live, and instead of triumphant victory it suddenly felt like a horse she’d have to drag with her all the rest of her days. The only consolation in being a survivor was that you’d survived. There’s so much more I’d love to say about The Girl in Red, but let’s be honest: it’s a short story full of twists and turns, and there isn’t much else I can detail without going into spoiler territory. I think this book is probably a stand-alone title, but I desperately hope Christina Henry will at least consider a sequel, because there’s absolutely room for one and I need more time with this story. I know this is the sort of book I’m going to be raving about and re-reading for a long time to come, and I hope you will, too.Thank you to Berkley for providing me with this review copy in exchange for my honest opinion!
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  • Lizzy (Bent Bookworm)
    January 1, 1970
    OMG I GOT AN ARC!!!! *drops every other book she's supposed to be reading *
  • ❆Francesca (Mother of Cats) Selina❆
    January 1, 1970
    I adored her retelling of Alice, well, the first 2/3 of it: that ending still makes me spit venom....and don’t get me started on on how I wanted to pull out my teeth while reading Red Queen.But this blurb looks SO good so I think I’m gonna give her another chance!
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  • Koeur
    January 1, 1970
    Review: This should have been titled, “Stumpy Red Riding Fail” or “A Post Pandemic Virtue Signalling Guide”.  The novel pretty much starts with the “Guns are bad” shtick. And I quote,“Red despised holding the gun, despised everything about it, hated how cold and hateful it felt in her hand.” Project much? I don’t know, it is hard for me to place a self-governing perspective on an inanimate object, but there you are.The race baiting is off the charts and at one point I was thinking, “Just shut th Review: This should have been titled, “Stumpy Red Riding Fail” or “A Post Pandemic Virtue Signalling Guide”.  The novel pretty much starts with the “Guns are bad” shtick. And I quote,“Red despised holding the gun, despised everything about it, hated how cold and hateful it felt in her hand.” Project much? I don’t know, it is hard for me to place a self-governing perspective on an inanimate object, but there you are.The race baiting is off the charts and at one point I was thinking, “Just shut the fuk up already..”. And I quote, “Red had that indeterminate mixed-race look that made white people nervous….”. Really?  I don’t feel nervous around “mixed race” people. I thought they were just, people. I am mixed race, I don’t feel different towards anyone or assume that white people will turn on us all when the shjt hits the fan. Maybe since I don’t look mixed race I can blend in with all the evil WHITE rapey men. Well this racist author drags white people through the mud and elevates other non-white races in her little book of hate for most of the novel.  And here I thought segregationists were dead.Moving on, I found that the geographical certainty that you find in most post-apocalyptic novels was absent. This usually lends a sense of validity to the novel while giving the reader some visual context to go with the story line. What the author did was make it vague enough to expedite the novel without any grounding in fact. Easier to write that way.And then there is the constant blather about Red’s amputee status, stump soreness and prosthetic. On and on and on. The author doesn’t even know enough to determine the exact name for Red’s particular condition (Transtibial amputee). The author seems like she wanted to paint Red as this smart (3.8 GPA), mixed race (Dad white, Mom Black- both University Professors) can-do survivor gal with all the odds stacked against her. She not only is an amputee trekking across the wilderness but constantly avoids all the people who want to rape her, because where would the story line go without the want of constantly raping?Lastly, what is fairly obvious is that the author knows fuk all about survival. The questions are many with regard to uncovered aspects of Red’s overland trek. The depths are never plumbed and help, in the form of available food, is readily available as are the gifts of convenient cabins and homes appearing out of the woods, stocked with food and water.  Throw in an amiable old prepper and, presto! What is also entirely unbelievable is her ability to take out grown WHITE men that have BAD guns or BIG knives with her little hatchet because she was taught a self-defense class in community college.I liked when Red kept moving forward through the countryside as it helped ground her dipshjt personality (whiney and argumentative know-it-all). Then she suddenly kills three gun toting bad WHITE men with her little hatchet and back in the shjtter we go.If you love your grandma, skip this.
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  • ♛ Garima ♛
    January 1, 1970
    While I really loved 'Lost boy', 'The mermaid' failed to make any lasting impression on me. Still have high hopes for this - setting reminds me of The Book of the Unnamed Midwife which I also enjoyed greatly.
  • Carrie
    January 1, 1970
    The Girl in Red by Christina Henry is a post apocalyptic Little Red Riding retelling. Take a minute and imagine Red as a totally kickass heroine who just happened to be a doomsday prepper and the end of the world as we know it had begun….Red, even though technically an adult now was still living with her parents when the news first began sharing stories of a new viral threat that was beginning. Folks would come down with a cough and soon they were gone without a cure in sight. Red knew what thi The Girl in Red by Christina Henry is a post apocalyptic Little Red Riding retelling. Take a minute and imagine Red as a totally kickass heroine who just happened to be a doomsday prepper and the end of the world as we know it had begun….Red, even though technically an adult now was still living with her parents when the news first began sharing stories of a new viral threat that was beginning. Folks would come down with a cough and soon they were gone without a cure in sight. Red knew what this meant, even though they were in a small town her family wasn’t safe, if only she could get them to see it.Red began training herself for a long walking journey knowing it would be tough with having a prosthetic leg from an accident as a child. She packed herself a huge backpack and knew just where her family should head, her grandmother’s house which was self sustaining and miles away from anyone. Red was determined to not be the victims she read about in all her fantasy novels, it would just be a matter of getting everyone to listen.The Girl in Red was told from Red’s point of view in a now and before style picking up with Red on her journey and going back to before things got bad in America. Having read a lot of fictional world ending tales I just have to say what a breathe of fresh air it was to have a lead with intelligence and not doing exactly what they shouldn’t. A book like this usually will feel rather slow but this one actually never really felt that way with something always happening in both sides of the story so I flew right through it. Definitely would recommend checking out this creative retelling!I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley.For more reviews please visit https://carriesbookreviews.com/
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  • Minx
    January 1, 1970
    The Girl in Red is a bold retelling of the classic fairytale, Little Red Riding Hood. This story is told from Red’s viewpoint and it picks up after the Crisis has devastated countless towns. The Crisis was caused by what was known as the Cough but no one knows where the Cough originated from and there is absolutely no cure. With the loss of life, comforts, and order, the world Red is thrust into is one of anarchy, barbarism, and destruction. You would think Red would be scared senseless but this The Girl in Red is a bold retelling of the classic fairytale, Little Red Riding Hood. This story is told from Red’s viewpoint and it picks up after the Crisis has devastated countless towns. The Crisis was caused by what was known as the Cough but no one knows where the Cough originated from and there is absolutely no cure. With the loss of life, comforts, and order, the world Red is thrust into is one of anarchy, barbarism, and destruction. You would think Red would be scared senseless but this fierce woman is determined to get to her Grandma’s house, a place that is secluded, defendable, and familiar.The telling of the events that took place in Red’s tale switch between Before and After. To be clear, the chapters flip between before and after events that are momentous to Red. So, it is not just one event represented by past-present transitions. I liked how this was written because the narrative was craftily done and despite transitioning between multiple events the flow was smooth and suspenseful. Red, as a character, was smooth as well. She was a planner and she took in all the information she could in order to achieve the best outcome. There was nothing that she wouldn’t do to stay safe but at the same time she was not just out for herself. She was willing to take some risks for what she felt was the right choice to make. Red had plenty of experience backpacking, which meant the idea of traveling to Grandma’s house, hiking through unknown terrain, was not one that overwhelmed her. I love, love, love that she paid attention to the events taking place around her and started her preparations early for what she thought was going to come. What really cracked me up and made me love Red even more was that all of her knowledge for what she thought she should be doing in this post-apocalyptic world was based upon the science-fiction, zombie, and slasher films and books that she had gorged herself on growing up. She might not have been right 100% of the time but her “knowledge” kept her safe when others were captured or worse. There is much to unpack in this story but there are also items that are not explained and left to the imagination which could be a turn off for some readers. For me though, The Girl in Red was a fast-paced post-apocalyptic thriller with an interesting twist on a beloved fairytale and I for one enjoyed the ride!This review is based on a complimentary book I received from Berkley Publishing Group. It is an honest and voluntary review. The complimentary receipt of it in no way affected my review or rating.
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  • Jessica ☢ Spartan Ranger
    January 1, 1970
    "The Girl in Red", C. Henry (2019): 5.0 Stars.Story/Plot ★★★★★Characters ★★★★★Style of writing ★★★★★Fun while reading ★★★★★Will I read it again ★★★★★Total ★★★★★FINALLY A NEW RETELLING!And it doesn't disappoint me. There were only a few things that I'd like to have explained or written differently, but in total there is not much I can say against this new retelling of my personal Retellings-Queen! I have to admit, I can't wait for her next retelling (I really hope there will be another!!)(view sp "The Girl in Red", C. Henry (2019): 5.0 Stars.Story/Plot ★★★★★Characters ★★★★★Style of writing ★★★★★Fun while reading ★★★★★Will I read it again ★★★★★Total ★★★★★FINALLY A NEW RETELLING!And it doesn't disappoint me. There were only a few things that I'd like to have explained or written differently, but in total there is not much I can say against this new retelling of my personal Retellings-Queen! I have to admit, I can't wait for her next retelling (I really hope there will be another!!)(view spoiler)[The story is gripping, I nearly wasn't able to put the book down - except when I had to go to uni or do my boring homework. The protagonist, Red, is a well-written character and somehow I wish I could behave like her in a scenario like the one described in the book. I even liked the idea of her having a prosthetic leg - it made the whole thing even better, since she was not the typical superhero from the films (as she's always saying). Also that the main character is a person of colour is a good choice - though the original protagonist wasn't of colour.This would've been enough but then ... sure ... Red used to have a girlfriend ... Normally, this wouldn't bother me at all but it seems to me that nearly every book that is released has at least one bi or gay character ... I mean ... I don't know ... it's a bit too much? But at least there was no romance during all this apocalyptic drama ... this would've been a reason to remove a star ... (please don't get me wrong, I'm absolutely pro rights of people of colour and bi or homosexual people ... and I really tried to keep the political corectness in my review)What also bother me was that in the end, I still don't know what the Cough really is and if it is somehow related to that creepy Monster growing insead people's stomachs ... I understand the Monster growing there, like the Wolf in the Grandma's body in the original story (I hope I remember it right :'D) but why the Cough? Is the Cough due to the Monster taking the place in the people's body so the lungs can't work properly anymore? Maybe I just didn't get it ...Also the end was a bit like there was something missing or there will be a cliffhanger for a second book. Red finally reached her Grandma's cabin but just a few pages ago, she was killing one of the Monsters and the next 25 days were described in like 2 pages? For me, it would have been better to stretch this part of the story a bit or don't put it at the very end of the book. (hide spoiler)]Anyway, I'm glad I was able to read the book just a few days after it's release and it does not disappoint my excitement about it. I'm already sorry if you found any writing mistakes - though I'm a language student, I prefer to write German reviews :'D.READ THIS BOOK! DO IT! Forget about exams, homework and other unfinished books! READ IT!
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    This was SO good!This is a post apocalyptic little red riding hood retelling. I would probably class this as more horror than fantasy, which I was expecting. It was very gorey and gruesome in places, so trigger warnings if you don't like blood, guts and death, but for me, it was just the perfect amount. Not too much, but not too little I really liked the writing style of this book, it was really easy to read but also quite captivatingIt was very fast paced, which was great, because it made me co This was SO good!This is a post apocalyptic little red riding hood retelling. I would probably class this as more horror than fantasy, which I was expecting. It was very gorey and gruesome in places, so trigger warnings if you don't like blood, guts and death, but for me, it was just the perfect amount. Not too much, but not too little I really liked the writing style of this book, it was really easy to read but also quite captivatingIt was very fast paced, which was great, because it made me constantly want to keep reading. There was always something happening, that made me want to read more. I also loved how diverse this book was. Red is a POC, disabled and Bi. I loved Red as a character, she's a strong willed, independent lady, but as the book goes on, you get to see her softer side.This is such a fresh and unique retelling. I know I loved this because I was genuinely excited to pick it up each time.I would really recommend this, if you love horror or dark retellings
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  • Leonie Byrne
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Titan Books for sending me a copy of The Girl in Red in exchange for an honest review.Synopsis: Since the crisis came and decimated the population many people have fled to quarantine camps. But others, like Red have decided to take their chances in the wilds of the Woods. Desperately trying to reach her grandmother’s house, Red has some decisions to make, she has to survive whatever the consequences, she has to reach her grandmother’s house.This was the first of Christina Henry’s bo Thank you to Titan Books for sending me a copy of The Girl in Red in exchange for an honest review.Synopsis: Since the crisis came and decimated the population many people have fled to quarantine camps. But others, like Red have decided to take their chances in the wilds of the Woods. Desperately trying to reach her grandmother’s house, Red has some decisions to make, she has to survive whatever the consequences, she has to reach her grandmother’s house.This was the first of Christina Henry’s books that I have read and I thought it was a really intriguing take on a retelling. Red is an interesting character with some definite character flaws, but it’s these flaws that enable her to survive in a world where only the strongest will can keep you going. I liked the idea but what was lacking for me was any answers to the questions which arose during the story. I felt like the ending was somewhat unsatisfactory, but I did really enjoy the rest of the story. If you like endings that leave you guessing then this is definitely one for you!
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  • Missy (myweereads)
    January 1, 1970
    “It was never the event - illness, asteroid, nuclear war, whatever - that was the problem. It was what people did after. And people always reduced to their least human denominators when things went bad.”The Girl In Red by Christina Henry is about a disease which destroys most of the U.S. population, Red and her brother Adam decide to try and reach their paternal grandmother, who lives over 200 miles away. Adam wants to join a quarantine camp, thinking it’s the only way to survive in this new wor “It was never the event - illness, asteroid, nuclear war, whatever - that was the problem. It was what people did after. And people always reduced to their least human denominators when things went bad.”The Girl In Red by Christina Henry is about a disease which destroys most of the U.S. population, Red and her brother Adam decide to try and reach their paternal grandmother, who lives over 200 miles away. Adam wants to join a quarantine camp, thinking it’s the only way to survive in this new world, but Red isn’t letting herself get shut away. Red is about to find out that the woods are deep and dark, and there are far worse things than wolves out in the world.I do love a re-telling of a classic tale and this one comes with an inconceivable twist and gore on dark scale. What stood out for me whilst reading this was how emotional the story between the protagonist and her family became. Red is a strong willed character who due to no fault of her own has had to deal with a tough start in life. It’s her tactical way of thinking which takes her on a bumpy road towards her grandmothers house.Along the way we get to know not just Red but several other characters. The story itself felt thrilling and intense when it came to the parts where surviving seemed like a lost concept. A definite recommend read.Thanks to @titanbooks for sending me a copy to review and congratulations to the author @authorchristinahenry on a darkly fun re-telling of a classic story.
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