No Ocean Too Wide (McAlister Family #1)
Between the years of 1869 to 1939 more than 100,000 poor British children were sent across the ocean to Canada with the promise of a better life. Those who took them in to work as farm laborers or household servants were told they were orphans–but was that the truth?After the tragic loss of their father, the McAlister family is living at the edge of the poorhouse in London in 1908, leaving their mother to scrape by for her three younger children, while oldest daughter, Laura, works on a large estate more than an hour away. When Edna McAlister falls gravely ill and is hospitalized, twins Katie and Garth and eight-year-old Grace are forced into an orphans’ home before Laura is notified about her family’s unfortunate turn of events in London. With hundreds of British children sent on ships to Canada, whether truly orphans or not, Laura knows she must act quickly. But finding her siblings and taking care of her family may cost her everything.Andrew Fraser, a wealthy young British lawyer and heir to the estate where Laura is in service, discovers that this common practice of finding new homes for penniless children might not be all that it seems. Together Laura and Andrew form an unlikely partnership. Will they arrive in time? Will their friendship blossom into something more?Inspired by true events, this moving novel follows Laura as she seeks to reunite her family and her siblings who, in their darkest hours, must cling to the words from Isaiah: “Fear thou not; for I am with thee: be not dismayed; for I am thy God”.

No Ocean Too Wide (McAlister Family #1) Details

TitleNo Ocean Too Wide (McAlister Family #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 25th, 2019
PublisherMultnomah Books
ISBN-139780525652939
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Christian Fiction, Fiction, Romance, Christian

No Ocean Too Wide (McAlister Family #1) Review

  • Carrie Turansky
    January 1, 1970
    I'm very excited to bring you this new English historical novel, No Ocean Too Wide. When the three youngest McAlister children are taken away from their widowed mother and emigrated to Canada without her knowledge or permission, the oldest sister sets off to find them and reunite the family, but her journey is much more difficult than she ever expected. She needs the help of a wealthy young solicitor and a renewal of her faith to meet those challenges. I was deeply touched when I researched chil I'm very excited to bring you this new English historical novel, No Ocean Too Wide. When the three youngest McAlister children are taken away from their widowed mother and emigrated to Canada without her knowledge or permission, the oldest sister sets off to find them and reunite the family, but her journey is much more difficult than she ever expected. She needs the help of a wealthy young solicitor and a renewal of her faith to meet those challenges. I was deeply touched when I researched child emigration and what happened to British Home Children in particular. More than 100,000 poor, orphaned, and abandoned children were sent to Canada and promised a better life, but many suffered from neglect, abuse, and prejudice. I hope this story will touch your heart and honor the memory of these children.
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  • Lindsey (Books for Christian Girls)
    January 1, 1970
    About this book:“Between the years of 1869 to 1939 more than 100,000 poor British children were sent across the ocean to Canada with the promise of a better life. Those who took them in to work as farm laborers or household servants were told they were orphans–but was that the truth? After the tragic loss of their father, the McAlister family is living at the edge of the poorhouse in London in 1908, leaving their mother to scrape by for her three younger children, while oldest daughter, Laura, w About this book:“Between the years of 1869 to 1939 more than 100,000 poor British children were sent across the ocean to Canada with the promise of a better life. Those who took them in to work as farm laborers or household servants were told they were orphans–but was that the truth? After the tragic loss of their father, the McAlister family is living at the edge of the poorhouse in London in 1908, leaving their mother to scrape by for her three younger children, while oldest daughter, Laura, works on a large estate more than an hour away. When Edna McAlister falls gravely ill and is hospitalized, twins Katie and Garth and eight-year-old Grace are forced into an orphans’ home before Laura is notified about her family’s unfortunate turn of events in London. With hundreds of British children sent on ships to Canada, whether truly orphans or not, Laura knows she must act quickly. But finding her siblings and taking care of her family may cost her everything. Andrew Fraser, a wealthy young British lawyer and heir to the estate where Laura is in service, discovers that this common practice of finding new homes for penniless children might not be all that it seems. Together Laura and Andrew form an unlikely partnership. Will they arrive in time? Will their friendship blossom into something more? Inspired by true events, this moving novel follows Laura as she seeks to reunite her family and her siblings who, in their darkest hours, must cling to the words from Isaiah: “Fear thou not; for I am with thee: be not dismayed; for I am thy God”.”Series: Book #1 in the “McAlister Family” series. Spiritual Content- Psalm 82:3-4 at the beginning; Scriptures are mentioned, memorized, quoted, & discussed; Many Prayers & Blessings over food; Church going; Witnessing; Many Talks about God & Jesus; ‘H’s are capitalized when referring to God; Laura doesn’t get why God would allow her family to go through hard times of He loves them; Mentions of God & Jesus; Mentions of prayers, praying, & answered prayers; Mentions of faiths; Mentions of Bibles, Bible reading, & other Christian books; Mentions of churches, church going, singing, & reverends; Mentions of blessings & being blessed; Mentions of sin & prejudice towards certain children thinking that sinning is in their blood; A few mentions of a cross necklace; A mention of Sunday school; *Note: A couple mentions of calling others evil; A mention of idle hands being the devil’s workshop. Negative Content- Minor cussing including: a ‘blasted’, a ‘blimey’, a ‘dumb’, and a ‘[don’t] care a fig’; Mentions of curses (said, not written); Being slapped, being shoved, & pain (barely-above-not-detailed); Being sick & passing out (barely-above-not-detailed); Mentions of attacks, injuries, & deaths; Mentions of fires, smoke, injuries/burns, & deaths (barely-above-not-detailed); Mentions of abuse, beatings, & punishments for children (barely-above-not-detailed); Mentions of stealing, thieves, & jail; Mentions of lying, lies, & liars; A few mentions of a young girl who tried to take her life; A few mentions of drinking; A few mentions of hunting; A couple mentions of jealousy; A couple mentions of cigars & smoking; A couple mentions of gossip; *Note: A mention of two infants passing away after birth. Sexual Content- a fingers kiss and a semi-detailed kiss; Touches (barely-above-not-detailed); Noticing (barely-above-not-detailed); A man gives Laura a suggestive smile & he tries to block her exit (she kicks him below the belt); Mentions of a man forcing himself on a young girl & that she’s now with child (no true details, but it’s said he did it more than once); Mentions of a man making suggestive comments towards Laura & cornering her (she said she escaped with a torn dress); Mentions of men with not-so honorable intentions; A couple mentions of reputations; A couple mentions of flirting; Some love, falling in love, & the emotions; *Note: A mention of kicking a man below the belt. -Laura McAlister, age 21-Andrew Frasier, age 24 P.O.V. switches between them & Katie Set in 1909 368 pages~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*Pre Teens- One StarNew Teens- One StarEarly High School Teens- Three StarsOlder High School Teens- Four Stars My personal Rating- Four Stars{Because of mentions of girls being forced or nearly forced upon, this book is probably not the best choice for younger girls.}I didn’t know this was a series. Seriously, HOW did I miss that?I’ve been trying to compose myself to type these final thoughts for thirty minutes now. I completely do not want to take away from the fact that Miss Carrie Turansky is a fabulous writer and the Spiritual Content was completely wondering in this novel (like all of her prior books). I’m just a bit stunned at how everything happened in this new book. As much as I mention about not liking books that end with a wrapped-up-with-a-bow ending, I love books ending closed off. This is the mindset I went in with “No Ocean Too Wide”. I read this book in exactly two hours quickly with anxiety over everything that was happening—I did know that the children would be shipped off to Canada, thanks to the back-cover, but my heart was so into this story that I literally could not read fast enough. I thought this was a stand-alone, so my reaction to the end makes sense in hindsight. This novel does discuss some abuse and horrible unjustness that children in this historical event had to face. It broke my heart again and again. “No Ocean Too Wide” does end hopeful. Let me say that again: This book ends hopeful for the next book in the series. It just completely took me by surprise. All right, ending aside now. Katie was a dear and so many times I wanted to hug her and the other children. My heart breaks for those who went through this event and those going through similar situations now. I loved that Laura was so dedicated to her family. Her faith was tested again and again throughout this story. She continued to pray and ask for guidance even when she wasn’t sure God would answer her prayers in the way that she wanted. Andrew did feel a little too…one dimensional at times, but I think that was because we didn’t see his point of view as often as most romance books typically do. As for the romance, I do think it was a bit rushed/out of left field, but, again, I believe this was do to the fact that the plot largely was surrounding the point of Laura’s siblings. So, all of that said, this novel discussed an important topic and showed great faith content. I truly am antsy for the next book in the series. Link to review: https://booksforchristiangirls.blogsp...*BFCG may (Read the review to see) recommend this book by this author. It does not mean I recommend all the books by this author.*I received this book for free from the Publisher (Multnomah) for this honest review.
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  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    This is a wonderfully written book! This book will draw you in on the first page. It is a wonderful reminder that God is always with us and we must trust him. I highly recommend this book. Thank you WaterBrook & Multnomah via NetGalley for the ARC copy of this book. This is my honest opinion of this wonderful book..
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  • Rachel McMillan
    January 1, 1970
    read for endorsement:fans of Susan Anne Mason, Cathy Gohlke and Lisa Wingate--- a fascinating excavation of a little known history :-)
  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    This story deserves 5 stars and more!Carrie has done a fabulous job in telling the story of Laura, Garth , and Grace. I really admired Laura's strength and determination to search for her siblings. She is amazing!! She's very strong proof that blood is thicker than water in other words family ties are strong. She'll go to great lengths for her family.I love how Laura learns a valuable lesson along the way. Too often we forget to trust the good Lord. We think we can do everything on our own. We a This story deserves 5 stars and more!Carrie has done a fabulous job in telling the story of Laura, Garth , and Grace. I really admired Laura's strength and determination to search for her siblings. She is amazing!! She's very strong proof that blood is thicker than water in other words family ties are strong. She'll go to great lengths for her family.I love how Laura learns a valuable lesson along the way. Too often we forget to trust the good Lord. We think we can do everything on our own. We are too impatient. I'm guilty of this much too often. I'm slowly learning to trust. God has a plan for us. Just in His own time and then He'll reveal it.Garth is a sweatheart and a protector. I love how he stands up for what is supposed to be right for him and his siblings. Then along the way we meet Andrew and Henry, Rose and Mrs. Woodward and the other supporting characters. I almost felt sorry for Mrs. Woodward. I wouldn't want to be in her position for anything in this world! Especially when something dreadful happens at the home she's in charge of. I couldn't help myself but tears leaked out of my eyes as I was reading this certain part. I enjoyed the ocean voyage across the sea and I felt like I was on board the Parisian with the girls. I could here the waves slapping the sides if the ship as she moved along on her journey westward.I have a great fascination for ocean liners of that time period.I was appalled at how some of the children were treated in the placement homes. Most people would give anything to have a child.How can anyone be so cruel. Home children need love and caring just like other children. It's just so not fair!!!Mistakes do happen but it's the children who get the just end of the deal.The ship on the cover of this book reminds me of the ship Carpathia that rescued the Titanic survivors. Overall, I enjoyed the story and I applaud the author for writing an exceptional story!Y'all I just can't wait for you to read this delious historical fiction book!!I strongly recommend it!I received a complimentary copy from Netgalley and no compensations were received. All opinions are my own!
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  • Amanda Tero
    January 1, 1970
    After reading several mysteries and suspense, I enjoyed this little genre break. Because of the aforementioned books, it seemed that this one started off slow, but once I got into it, I really didn’t want to put it down—and then when I finally finished it, I still wanted to be reading it the next few days. I am definitely looking forward to book two!This is one of those sweet historical fictions. Being that I’ve done a bit of research into the American “Orphan Train,” I was very interested in th After reading several mysteries and suspense, I enjoyed this little genre break. Because of the aforementioned books, it seemed that this one started off slow, but once I got into it, I really didn’t want to put it down—and then when I finally finished it, I still wanted to be reading it the next few days. I am definitely looking forward to book two!This is one of those sweet historical fictions. Being that I’ve done a bit of research into the American “Orphan Train,” I was very interested in the British side of displacing street orphans. I thought Turansky did a very fluent job of portraying an angle from orphans who were definitely going to something better as well as mistaken orphans and the legal side of things. I can honestly say that I enjoyed this story from every character’s point of view. Andrew was probably my favorite character, though I did like the sisters, Kate and Laura, as well.Though there is romance in it, it is more about a family than about a love interest. I found it to be fairly chaste in its portrayal of relationships. There is one orphan situation that mentions a girl who was taken advantage of. While it is not expounded (and it’s not part of the storyline—it is just a side character), Laura thinks about it several times afterwards. That would be the only part that keeps me from handing it to my younger teen sisters.The spiritual thread is thoroughly woven through the book—there isn’t just the main climax in which the characters turn to God, but rather, they are very often seeking Him and trying to follow Him. I appreciated that. There is one character who is portrayed as a strong Christian character that the MC’s look up to, and I found that to be a very nice touch.This is definitely a book I enjoyed and can recommend without any qualms.*I received this book from WaterBrook & Multnomah and happily provided my honest review*
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  • Carolyn Miller
    January 1, 1970
    No Ocean Too Wide is Carrie Turansky at her finest, as she weaves rich historical details and engaging characters with the heart-wrenching complexities surrounding the emigration of British Home Children in the early 1900s. I thoroughly enjoyed this glimpse into English and Canadian history, with its echoes of the trials faced by orphans in books such as Anne of Green Gables, and the strong message of faith and trust in the Heavenly Father who never abandons us.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Definitely worth the read, especially if you enjoy historical fiction. I learned a lot reading this book. There were times when it really stirred my emotions and it was hard not to let it affect me. Although this is a story about the past, knowing that children still suffer these types of abuse, makes it even more important to read. Seems like no matter what time period, innocent people have ended up suffering.The focus of this book is on three children, siblings, who were removed from their hom Definitely worth the read, especially if you enjoy historical fiction. I learned a lot reading this book. There were times when it really stirred my emotions and it was hard not to let it affect me. Although this is a story about the past, knowing that children still suffer these types of abuse, makes it even more important to read. Seems like no matter what time period, innocent people have ended up suffering.The focus of this book is on three children, siblings, who were removed from their home due to their mother's illness. However, once in the system, it was difficult to get them released. Parents and other siblings were disregarded and so was any courtesy by the children's home to give them any type of help or support. These children became a profit and money making strategy.Parts of this book are sad and difficult to read, I did enjoy the faith based aspect of the story My favorite characters were those who sought God frequently to help with their problems . It sure did help to be reminded, no matter what is happening, God is in full control and He has a plan for our lives.I received this book courtesy of the publisher. I was not asked to write a positive review, and all opinions are my own.
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  • AnnaScott
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It was a bit slow at the beginning, but I had no idea how it was going to end, so the suspense kept me going. The history it covers is fascinating - I wasn't really even aware that Britain sent orphans over to Canada, much less that there were issues of social justice involved, and this book did such a wonderful job of going over everything and explaining it without sounding like a history lecture. I loved Laura, Andrew, Katie, Rose, and Henry - they all worked to I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It was a bit slow at the beginning, but I had no idea how it was going to end, so the suspense kept me going. The history it covers is fascinating - I wasn't really even aware that Britain sent orphans over to Canada, much less that there were issues of social justice involved, and this book did such a wonderful job of going over everything and explaining it without sounding like a history lecture. I loved Laura, Andrew, Katie, Rose, and Henry - they all worked together so well in order to achieve justice. And the ending was a complete surprise, which I loved.I really only have two complaints for this book. First, the fact that Laura was able to think fast enough to travel with orphans to Canada to find her siblings and was brave enough to do it was impressive to me, but everyone focused on the less-than-ideal parts that got her there. If she hadn't done those things, she wouldn't have been able to save her sister, so while they weren't "good" they were understandable, and I thought everyone in the book should have appreciated her more for her actions. My second complaint is that there was a bit more "knight in shining armor rescues damsel in distress" that I would have preferred. As I mentioned previously, I thought that Laura was incredible in what she did to save her family, and yet there are several scenes where she is seen as an emotional and incapable woman who needs to be saved by a man.Overall, I am so glad I read this book, and I cannot wait for the second one to come out to find out what happens to the McAlister and Frasier families. No Ocean Too Wide officially comes out in June of 2019, and I highly recommend reading it. It covers such an interesting and relatively untouched part of history, and all of the characters are so lovable that you can't help but care about all of them and what happens in their lives.I received a copy of this book from Waterbrook & Multnomah for the purpose of this review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars"What did she expect? This was what happened when you made a hasty decision, compromised your convictions, and tried to manipulate the situation." Laura McAllister didn't start out to be deceptive, one thing just led to another, and before she knew it her misrepresentations of the truth landed her in a situation that demanded an explanation . . . to none other than the son of her former employer, Andrew Frasier. However, drastic measures had been Laura's only available recourse after di 3.5 stars"What did she expect? This was what happened when you made a hasty decision, compromised your convictions, and tried to manipulate the situation." Laura McAllister didn't start out to be deceptive, one thing just led to another, and before she knew it her misrepresentations of the truth landed her in a situation that demanded an explanation . . . to none other than the son of her former employer, Andrew Frasier. However, drastic measures had been Laura's only available recourse after discovering that her younger siblings had been removed from their home and placed in a precarious location; a British children's home where dozens of assumed orphans were being emigrated to Canada at an alarming pace. Andrew Frasier is shocked to see his mother's former lady's maid traveling under an assumed identity. As a young lawyer, he was still trying to gain experience and expertise under the tutelage of Henry Dowd, who had been granted a government commission to study the practices of British orphanages and their subsequent placements of children. Seeing Laura in her current position compromises his initial impression of the lovely young woman. Just what is she up to? And can their brief acquaintance be useful in his current investigation? Carrie Turansky's rich, relaxed writing voice serves her well in this engaging story where she meticulously places flesh and bones upon a skeleton that most readers never knew existed in the closet of Biritish history. Cleverly leaving a few questions unanswered, the next book in the series will, without a doubt, be highly anticipated. I received a copy of this book from the author and publisher. The opinions stated above are entirely my own.
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  • Paula Shreckhise
    January 1, 1970
    No Ocean Too Wide by Carrie Turansky is a story about a family of orphans transported to Canada by the English in 1909. One of the reasons I enjoy historical fiction is that I learn something. I had read books about the orphan trains in America but had not heard about the English “home children”. This book shows how the same orphan problem was handled very differently. It is a heart wrenching tale of a family that is split apart through death and illness. This book has many layers and delves int No Ocean Too Wide by Carrie Turansky is a story about a family of orphans transported to Canada by the English in 1909. One of the reasons I enjoy historical fiction is that I learn something. I had read books about the orphan trains in America but had not heard about the English “home children”. This book shows how the same orphan problem was handled very differently. It is a heart wrenching tale of a family that is split apart through death and illness. This book has many layers and delves into the motives behind sending children out of the country. It also shows how the protagonists want to live for God and how they grow spiritually. Laura McAlister is determined to find her siblings who have been shipped off to Canada without her mother’s knowledge or consent. She agrees to accompany a group of girls to Canada in hopes of finding out where her sisters and brother are. Andrew Fraiser will inherit a title and his father wants to groom him to take over the estate. Andrew has other ideas. He has a heart for the underdog so he becomes an attorney. He and his law partner are charged by the government to investigate the methods by which the orphans are chosen and make their way to Canada. They are also to see how the children are placed and if it is successful. Laura and Andrew’s paths cross. Will they ferret out what happened to Laura’s siblings? Will they find other things in common? The author builds tension: “She took one faltering step, then another. Dizziness washed over her, stealing her strength. She reached for the barn wall and opened her mouth to cry out, but her voice failed her.”Ms. Turansky puts her characters in bleak situations but shows how their faith sustains them. This book resolves some issues but leaves plenty unanswered for another book or two. I look forward to reading the next installment. *I was given a complimentary ARC copy of this book from the publisher. I wasn’t required to give a favorable review. All opinions are my own.*
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  • Patti Whitson Stephenson
    January 1, 1970
    This poignant story of the McAlister siblings touched my heart. It’s hard to imagine children that young being placed on a boat in London; shipped to Canada; and then becoming basically indentured servants for families in Canada. It seems atrocious to us today, but that’s what happened with thousands of children in the early 1900’s. Some were placed in very good homes, but some found themselves extremely mistreated with no one to advocate for them. The author has done a wonderful job of incorpor This poignant story of the McAlister siblings touched my heart. It’s hard to imagine children that young being placed on a boat in London; shipped to Canada; and then becoming basically indentured servants for families in Canada. It seems atrocious to us today, but that’s what happened with thousands of children in the early 1900’s. Some were placed in very good homes, but some found themselves extremely mistreated with no one to advocate for them. The author has done a wonderful job of incorporating the facts about these children and presenting their difficult situations to us through the story of the McAlister family. My heart ached for Katie, Garth, and Grace as they found themselves separated from each other and having little hope of being reunited. Their adult sister, Laura, risks much to travel to Canada to find them. Her faith is severely tested, and she has to trust God’s guidance and her friends’ support to accomplishment what seems impossible.There’s a love story that builds all through the story between Laura and Andrew. Separated by social class and economic status, Laura has no choice but to trust Andrew to help her with her search for her siblings. Their relationship does not always run smoothly, and they both have much to learn about faith and trust. I enjoyed reading this book and since all was not completely settled at the end of this one, I’m eager to continue the McAlister family story.I received a copy of this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.
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  • Karen R
    January 1, 1970
    A truly heartugging tale based in real history. Both touching and disturbing, yet full of hope and faith, plus a bit of tender romance. The first in a series, this story taught me about the British Home Children in a way that left an indelible mark on my memory, as the human aspect was skillfully drawn out in the McAllister family's lives. Love, courage, and determination drives Laura, the eldest sister, to right the wrongs done to her family, leading her to make some unethical decisions along h A truly heartugging tale based in real history. Both touching and disturbing, yet full of hope and faith, plus a bit of tender romance. The first in a series, this story taught me about the British Home Children in a way that left an indelible mark on my memory, as the human aspect was skillfully drawn out in the McAllister family's lives. Love, courage, and determination drives Laura, the eldest sister, to right the wrongs done to her family, leading her to make some unethical decisions along her journey across the ocean to Canada. Her personal growth followed, along with her faith in God and his care for her. I felt for her in her desperation. The author does a good job of pulling the reader into the story with just enough detail to keep it moving at a steady pace, and create a connection to the characters. Katie was my favorite, as she held onto a thread of hope and faith, doing her best in very difficult situations. She felt so real, it made me want to pray for her! Historical fiction fans who enjoy a story steeped in real history, will want to snatch this one up. It reminded me of orphan train tales set in the U.S., or stories about wrongful adoptions. Looking forward to the continuation in the next book.(An e-book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley. All opinions are my own.)
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first book I’ve read by Carrie Turansky and I’m hooked! The story captured my interest from the first page and I couldn’t put it down. This is a poignant story of four children during the era of the early 1900’s when children’s emigration from London to Canada was a very real event. In the same vein as Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate, the author explores the sometimes horrifying situations these children were put through, all through the efforts of “Christian charity”. This novel This is my first book I’ve read by Carrie Turansky and I’m hooked! The story captured my interest from the first page and I couldn’t put it down. This is a poignant story of four children during the era of the early 1900’s when children’s emigration from London to Canada was a very real event. In the same vein as Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate, the author explores the sometimes horrifying situations these children were put through, all through the efforts of “Christian charity”. This novel follows the journey of Laura, Katie, Garth, and Grace after the death of their father and a severe illness of their mother. I found myself falling in love with the children – I can’t wait until the sequel to learn more of their journeys to reunite. Thank you NetGalley and Multnomah for the ARC of this book. I was under no obligation to write a positive review; all opinions are my own.
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  • Kailey
    January 1, 1970
    I have loved Carrie Turansky’s books before this, so I knew I would enjoy this one. I really loved it! I didn’t know about the child emigration before this book. I think she did a great job telling this story. It touched my heart. My heart broke for the children. I’m definitely looking forward to reading more! I highly recommend this book!I received a complimentary copy from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. All opinions expressed are mine alone.
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  • Sarah Trout
    January 1, 1970
    Such a heart wrenching story. I love stories that have history woven between the pages of a good read. This story had twist after twist and it was so hard to believe that this really happened back in the day. I was so sad to know that the ending of the story is book #2 and now I have to wait for months for the next book!! I love the way Carrie writes and I can't wait til the next one in the series!
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  • Lilian
    January 1, 1970
    guys this book was one of the best I've read this year. I've been struggling to write a review because of how amazing it was.(also, there might be minor spoilers, but they're all included in the blurb, so they're not really spoilers? just a warning. )I absolutely adored this book. What a completely enchanting, inspiring, and heartfelt read. I remember feeling emotional after I finished it (which happens in like, oh, 1 out 200 books) because the themes of loyalty, love, and trust were so strong. guys this book was one of the best I've read this year. I've been struggling to write a review because of how amazing it was.(also, there might be minor spoilers, but they're all included in the blurb, so they're not really spoilers? just a warning. )I absolutely adored this book. What a completely enchanting, inspiring, and heartfelt read. I remember feeling emotional after I finished it (which happens in like, oh, 1 out 200 books) because the themes of loyalty, love, and trust were so strong. So, so many things made this book a five star read for me, but I think the characters were at the head. Their struggles were written so well, but they also had strong character traits that really made me want to root for them. Katie, for example, the main MC, had a lot of trust in her siblings and mother, and I really admired that. I loved the sense of loyalty Garth showed when the siblings were sent into the orphanage, and eventually to Canada. I really enjoyed reading about the whole orphan placement thing--it definitely encouraged me to research and learn more about that process.Oh, and I loved the faith and trust that the children showed in God. Laura leads a really unique separate part of the story that might seem completely unrealistic, but it was written SO well that I never even for a moment thought "no one would do that...?", so all the kudos to Carrie. Turansky's writing style also flows so well. It's exactly the type of writing that I like to read, and I cannot wait to read more of her stories. This is one of those books that I want to buy and reread, over and over again, and, not to be dramatic, but I'll be scouring the markets for the second book when it releases. 5 stars.FTC Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publishers in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jocelyn Green
    January 1, 1970
    No Ocean Too Wide is a fine example of a historical novel performing one of its most important functions: bringing to life, honoring, and preserving a piece of history that might otherwise go forgotten. Turansky’s novel is sure to capture readers with the heartache and hope entwining the McAllister family’s story. Those interested in America’s Orphan Trains will not want to miss this fresh new tale about the British Home Children.
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  • Maureen Timerman
    January 1, 1970
    The author has given us a story that will linger long after the last page is turned, and rightfully so. By the Grace of God, we could have been one of those children, orphans, or no parent to take care of them. I can’t even imagine the poverty and living on the streets, but the solution?We put faces to these children, but they have a family, and when one of the siblings attempt to retrieve them, well that is what makes this such a great read.You will find your heart breaking, and yes, I know tha The author has given us a story that will linger long after the last page is turned, and rightfully so. By the Grace of God, we could have been one of those children, orphans, or no parent to take care of them. I can’t even imagine the poverty and living on the streets, but the solution?We put faces to these children, but they have a family, and when one of the siblings attempt to retrieve them, well that is what makes this such a great read.You will find your heart breaking, and yes, I know that this was a different time, but people looking their noses down because of circumstances beyond the control of the child, oh!I love that there is another book to come and answer some more of my questions, so be sure to read the author’s notes at the end of the book!I received this book through Net Galley and the Publisher Waterbrook Multmonah Publishing, and was not required to give a positive review.
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  • Ruth
    January 1, 1970
    Have you ever heard of the “Orphan Trains”? Most fans of Christian Historical Fiction have read at least one story along that line, myself included. This is a similar story but of a variety I had never heard of before, orphans immigrating by boat from Britain to Canada! In this book, based on true events, Carrie Turansky weaves a story that draws you in and tugs at your heartstrings. A sick mother and four children, separated by tragic events - each member of the family showing us a different pa Have you ever heard of the “Orphan Trains”? Most fans of Christian Historical Fiction have read at least one story along that line, myself included. This is a similar story but of a variety I had never heard of before, orphans immigrating by boat from Britain to Canada! In this book, based on true events, Carrie Turansky weaves a story that draws you in and tugs at your heartstrings. A sick mother and four children, separated by tragic events - each member of the family showing us a different part of the system. A little bit sad, a little bit of romance, a touch of mystery, a healthy serving of heartwarming… mix it all up and you get a book that I can see myself re-reading and I’m definitely recommending to friends. I’m looking forward to reading the sequel next year and finding out what happens next! I received an advance copy of this book for my honest review, all opinions are my own.
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  • Lovely Loveday
    January 1, 1970
    No Ocean Too Wide is the first book in the McAlister Family book series written by Carrie Turansky. A heartbreaking story that is based on real history that is sure to stay with you long after reading. No Ocean Too Wide is full of love and hope with moments of sweet romance. Follow along as two sisters travel to a new world in hopes of finding love and family. Laura and Katie show strong determination as they struggle with everything life throws in their path. No Ocean Too Wide is perfect for fa No Ocean Too Wide is the first book in the McAlister Family book series written by Carrie Turansky. A heartbreaking story that is based on real history that is sure to stay with you long after reading. No Ocean Too Wide is full of love and hope with moments of sweet romance. Follow along as two sisters travel to a new world in hopes of finding love and family. Laura and Katie show strong determination as they struggle with everything life throws in their path. No Ocean Too Wide is perfect for fans of historical fiction.
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  • Denise
    January 1, 1970
    Great read! I am surprised this is based on a true story. I had no idea that children in orphanages were sent to Canada, let alone that it could be done without the parents’ consent. Well-written, intriguing, and touching. Highly recommended.
  • Faye
    January 1, 1970
    Katie, Garth, and Grace find themselves separated and put in London orphanages after the hospitalization of their mother while their older sister, Laura, is working as a lady’s maid. Garth, Katie, and Grace are put on the ship to Canada in hopes of being placed in families. Laura is stunned to hear of what happened to her siblings while she was away, and with the unexpected help of her employer’s lawyer son, Andrew, she works to reclaim her siblings. But as she runs into legality after legality, Katie, Garth, and Grace find themselves separated and put in London orphanages after the hospitalization of their mother while their older sister, Laura, is working as a lady’s maid. Garth, Katie, and Grace are put on the ship to Canada in hopes of being placed in families. Laura is stunned to hear of what happened to her siblings while she was away, and with the unexpected help of her employer’s lawyer son, Andrew, she works to reclaim her siblings. But as she runs into legality after legality, time is running out. Laura takes a job escorting orphans to Canada in hopes of find out where her siblings were placed. Based on true events, this story shows some of the plights of the working poor, and the disorganization that separated families sending children across an ocean to less than promised results. Laura finds true friends on her journey; she is inspired and encouraged by Rose’s faith. Henry is a kind man and man of strong faith, and mentor to Andrew willingly offering to help investigate the whole process and practice of what is going on. This story follows various characters throughout as their journeys eventually begin to entwine, showing various sides. Laura is hardworking and determined; she struggles to find hope in the dark times. Andrew is a budding lawyer, he is passionate about righting wrongs and is willing to learn. Katie is a bright young woman, she fights to keep her family together with what little information she has, she fights to hope despite the mistreatment she faces. A heart tugging read, compelling and historical. Friendships are forged, and faith tested. One of my favorite parts of this book was Rose and Henry and their shared strong faith and friendship. A powerful read that highlights the challenges of the working poor in England, the injustices and horrible treatment of orphans. The first in a series, I will definitely be reading the next book as soon as it comes out. I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Meagan
    January 1, 1970
    I knew No Ocean Too Wide would be a special book. I read (and loved) Across the Blue earlier this year, and jumped at the chance to review this book.For once in my life, I even started with a Book 1! No Ocean Too Wide indeed starts off a new series. That being said, it is a series, so not everything gets wrapped up here. I missed (or forgot) that “series” component, so approached the last 20 pages with the dawning realization that everything wouldn’t nicely wrap up with a bow. Turansky writes so I knew No Ocean Too Wide would be a special book. I read (and loved) Across the Blue earlier this year, and jumped at the chance to review this book.For once in my life, I even started with a Book 1! No Ocean Too Wide indeed starts off a new series. That being said, it is a series, so not everything gets wrapped up here. I missed (or forgot) that “series” component, so approached the last 20 pages with the dawning realization that everything wouldn’t nicely wrap up with a bow. Turansky writes so well that I quickly got over my disappointment, instead hoping there would be more to the story — to ensure the story gets its due! So yay – it will, though a bit of #weep that I have to wait. (I’m such a patient person, no?)No Ocean Too Wide primarily focuses on Laura’s and Katie’s stories. Possible spoiler alert: Garth makes a handful of appearances; after a certain point, Grace is not mentioned further. I’m very curious how the remaining books in the series not only tie up loose ends, but provide more to both Garth and Grace’s stories. Turansky writes eloquently and graciously on a topic previously unknown to me: that of British home children migrating to Canada. I learned so much in the read, I’m grateful she includes a list of resources at the end for additional research! (The sign of a particularly good book!) I appreciated how real and true to life the book felt. So much fiction ties everything up in a bow; don’t get me wrong, I read a lot of that and really enjoy it! Sometimes I just need that kind of read! But in this part of history, the not-so-happy endings are much more frequent. No Ocean Too Wide captures the difficulties, struggles, and pain of, quite frankly, reality … without swinging the pendulum too far to the other end, where it’s all simply disappointment. Hope absolutely remains.My only problem? I don’t know when Book 2 is coming out. Color me ready to find out what happens to this family!I received a copy of the book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.
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  • Barb
    January 1, 1970
    I love reading fiction books based on historical events and this was an especially good one. I had heard of orphan trains in the United States and the Kindertransport in Germany during WWII, but had never read about the British Home Children being sent to Canada. It was most fascinating and often heartbreaking. Just like with the orphan trains and the Kindertransport, some children were placed with loving families who treated them like their own children. However, some were taken in as servants I love reading fiction books based on historical events and this was an especially good one. I had heard of orphan trains in the United States and the Kindertransport in Germany during WWII, but had never read about the British Home Children being sent to Canada. It was most fascinating and often heartbreaking. Just like with the orphan trains and the Kindertransport, some children were placed with loving families who treated them like their own children. However, some were taken in as servants and were mistreated and even abused. No Ocean Too Wide tells the story of the McAlister family from London in 1908. The father dies and next the mother becomes ill and is hospitalized. Meanwhile, the three youngest children are taken to a children's home and then sent to Canada, all without their mother's knowledge or permission. Eventually, the mother and her oldest daughter find out about this horrific turn of events and the daughter takes a job with as a travel escort with one of the homes so that she can go to Canada to search for her siblings. Unfortunately we don't know the ending to this exciting story because this book is the first in a series. I, for one, can't wait to read what happens next! No Ocean Too Wide is the first book I have read from author Carrie Turansky, but it definitely won't be the last. I received an Uncorrected Proof of this book, which will go on sale on June 25, from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    No Ocean Too Wide is a gripping story about the British Home Children, some of whom were separated from their families by mistake. It tells the tale of a sister’s love and determination to find her three siblings after they’ve been sent to Canada. It’s truly heart wrenching what happened to one of the children and brings to light all of the pitfalls associated with ‘foster’ care before regulation and oversight really came into being. I found myself appalled and yet sadly not surprised by some of No Ocean Too Wide is a gripping story about the British Home Children, some of whom were separated from their families by mistake. It tells the tale of a sister’s love and determination to find her three siblings after they’ve been sent to Canada. It’s truly heart wrenching what happened to one of the children and brings to light all of the pitfalls associated with ‘foster’ care before regulation and oversight really came into being. I found myself appalled and yet sadly not surprised by some of the scenarios so vividly described. I cannot imagine what it must have been like for those who suffered such unconscionable treatment. Laura McAlister and Andrew Fraser are willing to fight the system in order to bring restoration to the McAlister family and so many others. Their romance brings joy and light to the story and is well done. But then I expect nothing less from this author. :)I highly recommend No Ocean Too Wide to enthusiasts of historical fiction, especially those who like it based on actual events. I received a copy of the book from the publisher. I was under no obligation to write a positive review. No compensation has been received.
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  • Joan Arning
    January 1, 1970
    A book you will not want to put down! I was astonished to learn that in the early 1900s more than 100,000 impoverished children from Britain were taken to Canada sometimes without their parents' knowledge! Laura McAlister is a caring older sister who is working for a wealthy family and learns that her mother has been hospitalized and her three younger siblings sent to Canada! You will admire Laura as she gets a position as an escort to other children being sent to Canada in order to find her bro A book you will not want to put down! I was astonished to learn that in the early 1900s more than 100,000 impoverished children from Britain were taken to Canada sometimes without their parents' knowledge! Laura McAlister is a caring older sister who is working for a wealthy family and learns that her mother has been hospitalized and her three younger siblings sent to Canada! You will admire Laura as she gets a position as an escort to other children being sent to Canada in order to find her brother and sisters. Andrew, the son of Laura's former employer, is a strong protagonist who is investigating the practice of sending the children to Canada. Your heart will go out to Katie McAlister as she has horrible experiences with the families she is assigned to. I found the history in this book fascinating and can't wait to read the next book in the series. Carrie Turansky has done a wonderful job of bringing little known history alive! I received an advance copy of No Ocean too wide from the author and Multnomah Publishing. This is my honest opinion.
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  • Paula
    January 1, 1970
    No Ocean Too Wide was a really good, thought provoking story! I honestly didn't want to put it down! It's about a family that has fallen on hard times, and the children become separated and shipped across the ocean to Canada from London. They work to find each other and be reunited, but in the end it leads into the second book, which is being written. Loved the story! While there is some romance in it, it isn't the main focus. Excellent and well written! Can't wait for book #2!
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  • Jen.
    January 1, 1970
    .No Ocean Too Wide is the first book I've read by Carrie Turansky. I'm impressed with how well-researched this book is. I'm also impressed with how the often harsh situations the siblings found themselves in were written tastefully and with respect.The characters relied on God through many thoughtful prayers, always seeking His will. Laura and Katie McAlister were very determined young women and I admired their dedication and spirit.The McAlister siblings' tale is not over yet. Storylines were l .No Ocean Too Wide is the first book I've read by Carrie Turansky. I'm impressed with how well-researched this book is. I'm also impressed with how the often harsh situations the siblings found themselves in were written tastefully and with respect.The characters relied on God through many thoughtful prayers, always seeking His will. Laura and Katie McAlister were very determined young women and I admired their dedication and spirit.The McAlister siblings' tale is not over yet. Storylines were left unfinished and will continue in future books. You'll want to read this series in order, so be sure to read No Ocean Too Wide sometime very soon!No Ocean Too Wide is recommended for fans of historical Christian fiction. No Ocean Too Wide releases on June 25th - preorder today at www.christianbook.comI received a complimentary advanced copy of this book from Waterbrook Multnomah through NetGalley. A positive review was not required. Opinions expressed are completely my own.
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  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fascinating piece of history about which I knew nothing. Taking children that aren’t wanted or are living on the streets, to a new world with parents waiting for them. It sounds like a wonderful idea, but with some involved it became a scary time for children and parents.This book follows several characters in this backdrop of history. The characters are well done, and I enjoyed getting to learn about this time in history through their eyes. I found myself wondering what choices I wou This was a fascinating piece of history about which I knew nothing. Taking children that aren’t wanted or are living on the streets, to a new world with parents waiting for them. It sounds like a wonderful idea, but with some involved it became a scary time for children and parents.This book follows several characters in this backdrop of history. The characters are well done, and I enjoyed getting to learn about this time in history through their eyes. I found myself wondering what choices I would make in certain situations. It wasn’t exactly black and white for those who so very much wanted to right the wrongs that had occurred.So take yourself on a journey through an interesting time in history...think of why your emotions, feelings, and mind would have suffered.I received this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.
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