The New Girl (Gabriel Allon #19)
At an exclusive private school in Switzerland, mystery surrounds the identity of the beautiful girl who arrives each morning and leaves each afternoon in a heavily protected motorcade fit for a head of state. She is said to be the daughter of a wealthy international businessman. She is not. And when she is brutally kidnapped across the border in the Haute-Savoie region of France, Gabriel Allon, the legendary chief of Israeli intelligence, is thrust into a deadly secret war with an old enemy that will determine the future of the Middle East—and perhaps the world . . .

The New Girl (Gabriel Allon #19) Details

TitleThe New Girl (Gabriel Allon #19)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 16th, 2019
PublisherHarper Collins Publishers
Rating
GenreThriller, Fiction, Spy Thriller, Espionage, Mystery, Mystery Thriller

The New Girl (Gabriel Allon #19) Review

  • Lynn Horton
    January 1, 1970
    This is somewhere between a 4- and 5-star book for me, but since Silva has proven that, for the 19th time, he's my favorite author, I'm going with 5.The New Girl is vintage Silva: rapid-fire pacing, shifting locations, international intrigue, clearly defined characters, and crisp dialogue. I love everything about his writing and construction, and think Gabriel Allon is one of the best (if not THE best) protagonists out there. I relate to Allon in a way that I don't a Jack Reacher (Lee Chid) or a This is somewhere between a 4- and 5-star book for me, but since Silva has proven that, for the 19th time, he's my favorite author, I'm going with 5.The New Girl is vintage Silva: rapid-fire pacing, shifting locations, international intrigue, clearly defined characters, and crisp dialogue. I love everything about his writing and construction, and think Gabriel Allon is one of the best (if not THE best) protagonists out there. I relate to Allon in a way that I don't a Jack Reacher (Lee Chid) or a Cotton Malone (Steve Berry), probably because of Allon's affiliation with the Middle East and Silva's willingness to tackle tough questions that touch on religion and religious differences. And the author manages to describe settings in a way that makes me feel as if I'm there, enhancing the story while not distracting from it.My only negative comment about The New Girl is that Allon is a little wooden. Although his inner thoughts and motivations are alluded to at times, I didn't see him develop as a character in this book. I realize that after 19 books it's hard to tease out new facets of a protagonist, and I'm confident that Silva will find a way to do this.(Addition to this review after thinking about it: Allon's stiffness may be a result of his now being head of Mossad, instead of a spy/assassin. In The Other Woman, the previous book and first with Allon as Mossad head, I commented on the same thing. Perhaps Silva is having a hard time depicting Allon as a more passive figure, instead of a very active one? Just thinking . . .)Even with my take on Allon being stilted, The New Girl is well worth the read. In my opinion Silva is the best thing going in thriller, and he's a master of international stories. I can't wait to order the book that should release next summer.Very highly recommended.
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  • Judie
    January 1, 1970
    Daniel Silva’s Gabriel Allon series is addictive. As usual, THE NEW GIRL is loosely based on recent events and moves into what could happen later on.While Allon is now older than 65 and heads Mossad, he still finds himself in the center of action. In THE NEW GIRL, he gets pulled in by the future king of Saudi Arabia, Prince Khalid, when Khalid’s twelve-year-old daughter, his only child, is kidnaped in Switzerland. Allon had great expectations for Khalid to modernize Saudi Arabia For example, wom Daniel Silva’s Gabriel Allon series is addictive. As usual, THE NEW GIRL is loosely based on recent events and moves into what could happen later on.While Allon is now older than 65 and heads Mossad, he still finds himself in the center of action. In THE NEW GIRL, he gets pulled in by the future king of Saudi Arabia, Prince Khalid, when Khalid’s twelve-year-old daughter, his only child, is kidnaped in Switzerland. Allon had great expectations for Khalid to modernize Saudi Arabia For example, women gained more rights. But then Khalid began getting rid of his opponents, sometimes by imprisonment, sometimes by murder, and appropriating their money and property. When a Saudi ex-pat journalist and dissident was lured to the Istanbul Saudi consulate and brutally murdered, Allon gave up on the Khalid. But he found he could not refuse to help him try to locate his daughter and save her life.Allon forms a team of agents with whom he has previously worked and also has to work with intelligence agencies of other countries. It’s no surprise that they are able to locate her after a lot of work. After that, the story continues to expand. Changes in the Saudi government and society continue, some going forward, some backward. Russia becomes a prime player as it tries to gain influence in the Middle East and assume America’s position as world leader.Daniel Silva explains how Wahhabism became the dominate religion in a new country, Saudi Arabia, in the 1700s when Mohamed Abdul Wahhab believed that Moslems had lost their traditional beliefs and practices and adopted the ways of other nations. By the second decade in the twenty first century, the descendants of the founders of Saudi Arabia had become very wealthy. They continued to reap millions of dollars based on their relationship and splurged on their own over-the-top desires. Khalid realized that with the declining use of oil, the country would revert to its days as a desert occupied by warring nomads.The future king knew that this country’s wealth was largely a mirage; the family had squandered a mountain of money on palaces and trinkets; that in 20 years, when the transformation from fossil fuels to renewable sources of energy was complete, the oil beneath Saudi Arabia would be as worthless as the sand that covered it. Extremists felt that the US was losing its influence and the future lie in Russia and Eurasia, especially since Russia was sowing discord where ever it could.Tidbit: While like the Jews, the Palestinians have been scattered, they have never been the target of an organized campaign of physical annihilation like the Shoah. That’s why the Jewish people must have a state of their own since they can not depend on anyone else to protect them. THE NEW GIRL keeps moving. When one problem is resolved, another pops up. There are a lot of killings, which are not detailed. There are also too many unnecessarily short chapters. References are made to previous books in the series but it is not necessary to have read them first. The book is well written and edited. As always, I’m looking forward to next year’s story.
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  • Amy Peck
    January 1, 1970
    Why can’t I read slower?Whenever I’m about to start reading the newest Gabriel Allon book from Daniel Silva, I always tell myself to read it slowly. Let the enjoyment that will overcome me when reading it last a little longer. Yep, I tell myself that every time. And every time I am able to go slowly at first but the more I read, the more involved I become with Gabriel and Ciara and Keller and Mikhail and Eli and Ari and Seymour with his wife’s earnest yet horrendous cooking. So the faster I read Why can’t I read slower?Whenever I’m about to start reading the newest Gabriel Allon book from Daniel Silva, I always tell myself to read it slowly. Let the enjoyment that will overcome me when reading it last a little longer. Yep, I tell myself that every time. And every time I am able to go slowly at first but the more I read, the more involved I become with Gabriel and Ciara and Keller and Mikhail and Eli and Ari and Seymour with his wife’s earnest yet horrendous cooking. So the faster I read. I can’t help myself. I don’t have the words to describe how stupendously good this book is and how stupendously great a writer Daniel Silva is. So again, I read it too fast. So again I must wait another 51 1/2 weeks till the next Gabriel Allon book is released.
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  • Darcy
    January 1, 1970
    It's always interesting to see how Gabriel gets pulled into the cases he works on. With this one starting out with a little girl you knew that Gabriel would help despite who her father was. I hated that they all didn't see who was behind things at first, mostly because I hoped with the knowledge the outcome could have been better.Once everyone realized what was going on Gabriel played hard and fast with the truth. I feel like I should be bothered by that, but I wasn't. I thought a few people got It's always interesting to see how Gabriel gets pulled into the cases he works on. With this one starting out with a little girl you knew that Gabriel would help despite who her father was. I hated that they all didn't see who was behind things at first, mostly because I hoped with the knowledge the outcome could have been better.Once everyone realized what was going on Gabriel played hard and fast with the truth. I feel like I should be bothered by that, but I wasn't. I thought a few people got what they deserved. I really hated how this one ended, I wanted to know what happened, were they successful or not and honestly, I don't know if I wanted them to succeed or not.
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  • Inqiad Ali
    January 1, 1970
    Gabriel Allon thrillers are the greatest. I am looking forward to the new book.
  • victor
    January 1, 1970
    The Summer is here, July is upon us and that can only mean that the time has come for another Gabriel Allon adventure from the #1 New York Times Best-selling and award-winning thriller author Daniel Silva. This year’s book is the 19th in this amazing series of thrillers and it’s called The New Girl.I listened to The New Girl in one session, ignoring work, phone calls and I can’t remember what I ate while listening… My immersion was complete from the introductory chapter to the last word and I am The Summer is here, July is upon us and that can only mean that the time has come for another Gabriel Allon adventure from the #1 New York Times Best-selling and award-winning thriller author Daniel Silva. This year’s book is the 19th in this amazing series of thrillers and it’s called The New Girl.I listened to The New Girl in one session, ignoring work, phone calls and I can’t remember what I ate while listening… My immersion was complete from the introductory chapter to the last word and I am left wanting for more, as always…The famous Gabriel Allon and the supporting cast of much loved characters are back for another heart pounding adventure in the treacherous world of espionage, terrorists, kidnappers and assassins. I always appreciated the level of humanity the author brings up in his vivid characters and this is one of the main reasons I return to this series every year.Gabriel is now head of the secret and feared Israeli organization known as The Office and, at the request of an old friend, he must work with old enemies to find a missing girl, but as one thing leads to another in his world, Gabriel and the team will be pulled into a very dangerous situation very fast…The action moves swiftly from Geneva to New York, from historical Israel and the United Arab Emirates to France, to Spain and continues at breakneck speed for the entire adventure. We meet trained spies, deadly special operators, unwilling accomplices, hateful individuals, innocent victims and a very scary plot seemingly ripped out of today’s news…The audiobook version of The New Girl is brought to life as a great narrative experience by one of the best actors, voice over artists and narrators in the Audiobooks Industry. His name is George Guidall and if you are familiar with the Audies Awards you’ll probably remember that he won one Audie a few years ago as Best Male Narrator of the Year for his performance of The English Spy: Gabriel Allon, book 15, also by Daniel Silva.The amazing George Guidall delivers The New Girl in a calm, soothing and familiar cadence. He uses many different voices and always appropriate accents for all the characters and by doing so it keeps everyone clearly differentiated in the listener’s mind. You will just know who is speaking by the French, Israeli, Spanish, American, Russian, British or Arabic accents employed in his excellent performance.He is one of my favorite narrators of all times and in my mind he is Gabriel Allon, Sheriff Walt Longmire, Mitch Rapp and The Gunslinger from the Dark Tower series.It feels like I listened to George Guidall my entire life, although there are probably just 14 or 15 years since I listen to audiobooks, I love his reading style and I consider him part of my beloved family of narrators with whom I spend long and satisfying hours every day!Daniel Silva is one of my favorite thriller and espionage authors and he continues to deliver great entertainment with his latest novel, The New Girl, which I highly recommend to everyone familiar with his works and to those who want a good thriller in the likes of Mark Greaney, Robert Ludlum, Tom Clancy and Vince Flynn.Please Vote Helpful below if you Like this review and find more of them here and on theAudiobookBlog dot com.Sometimes I post reviews at the author / narrator / publisher's request.Thank you,Victor
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  • Ana Maria Rivera
    January 1, 1970
    Once again Daniel Silva has proven my point: that you don't actually need 8 hours of sleep and you are still able to go to work next morning after staying up all night with one of his book. That said, damn. Where do I start?... oh yes by saying book # 19 of the series is absolutely freaking fucking fantastic amazing.A jaw drop perfect combination of well known characters by now, a fantastic trip around amazing places around the world, an unexpected plot twist and a scary dose of fiction mixed wi Once again Daniel Silva has proven my point: that you don't actually need 8 hours of sleep and you are still able to go to work next morning after staying up all night with one of his book. That said, damn. Where do I start?... oh yes by saying book # 19 of the series is absolutely freaking fucking fantastic amazing.A jaw drop perfect combination of well known characters by now, a fantastic trip around amazing places around the world, an unexpected plot twist and a scary dose of fiction mixed with the occasional "did I just hear that happen on the news the other day?" wondering while you read.By know I am devoted fan of this author and it would be hell waiting for his next book release till 2020...I might just have to re-read some of my favorites just to get my daily dose of spy thrilling adventures and keep my secret board in pinterest up to date with my choices for when they finally decide to make a freaking movie franchise out of this....
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  • R. E.
    January 1, 1970
    TRBS = 10/10. This tops last year's "The Other Woman" which received a 9.95/10 (The highest rating given in 2018)TRBS = The Real Book Spy review & rating
  • BOOKLOVER10
    January 1, 1970
    Daniel Silva draws inspiration from a variety of sources in his latest espionage thriller, "The New Girl." Silva focuses on Khalid bin Mohammed, a stand-in for thirty-three-year-old Mohammad bin Salman, the crown prince and likely future king of Saudi Arabia. Many believe that bin Salman ordered the brutal murder and dismemberment of Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi. MBS, as he is widely known, initially gave the impression that he would reform his repressive country. Instead, he conti Daniel Silva draws inspiration from a variety of sources in his latest espionage thriller, "The New Girl." Silva focuses on Khalid bin Mohammed, a stand-in for thirty-three-year-old Mohammad bin Salman, the crown prince and likely future king of Saudi Arabia. Many believe that bin Salman ordered the brutal murder and dismemberment of Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi. MBS, as he is widely known, initially gave the impression that he would reform his repressive country. Instead, he continued to spend lavishly on luxurious homes and yachts, enraged his rivals, and made it clear that he would not tolerate dissent. Silva depicts Khalid as an immature and spoiled autocrat who cannot see the forest for the trees. When a cherished member of his family is threatened, the prince seeks help from an unlikely source--Gabriel Allon, the Director-General of the Israeli Secret Intelligence Service. This is a tangled tale of geopolitics run amok, with the leaders of Russia, Saudi Arabia, Great Britain, and Israel jockeying to improve their international standing while chipping away at the status and influence of their adversaries. Assisted by Sarah Bancroft, Mikhail Abramov, Christopher Keller, Eli Lavon, and other familiar faces, Allon devises a fiendishly clever plan to alter the balance of power in the Middle East. As usual, the author bases his plot on events in the news. This is a lively and fast-paced work of fiction that is set, among other places, in Germany, the Netherlands, France, England, Switzerland, and Israel. "The New Girl" has its flaws, including too many stock characters, with little or no shading to distinguish one from the other. The killers are cookie-cutter villains, while Allon is a brilliant tactician and master manipulator. To his credit, Silva shows that Gabriel is a fallible human being whose schemes sometimes backfire spectacularly. Adding to the mix is a discussion of the peril posed by Iran's nuclear program, and a blueprint of Putin's efforts not only to destabilize Western democracies but also to forge alliances with his fellow tyrants. Although "The New Girl" has a number of formulaic elements, it entertains us with non-stop action, dizzying twists and turns, and relevance to our turbulent times.
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  • Jane Bedford-Crooks-Paredes
    January 1, 1970
    The New Girl book is just more than what I anticipated since this master writer Daniel Silva last book. Very well written as I am having a difficult time stopping my reading to do daily tasks. Gabriel Allon heads Israeli Intelligence is using all his past vast experiences to help solve this situation of missing only daughter of a crown prince of Saudi Arabia/internationally known businessman. Daniel Silva books builds on each other as each book releases more about the talents of each character. The New Girl book is just more than what I anticipated since this master writer Daniel Silva last book. Very well written as I am having a difficult time stopping my reading to do daily tasks. Gabriel Allon heads Israeli Intelligence is using all his past vast experiences to help solve this situation of missing only daughter of a crown prince of Saudi Arabia/internationally known businessman. Daniel Silva books builds on each other as each book releases more about the talents of each character. This book, if read first, I feel will make the reader want to know more about Gabriel Allon as his insights to life are very deep with many life challenges. I am wanting to keep reading as the twists of this unfolds this mystery with very real dangers. I do very high recommend this book as I also recommend the earlier written books about Gabriel Allon life adventures/art restorer who now heads respected Intelligence. If you or others you know enjoy well written spy books, you will be caught up in another version of life as you read each page. You will understand the “whys” many people around our world anticipates each Daniel Silva book releases for sale in the summer. This one will sit proudly with the rest of my collection of Gabriel Allon & friends breathtaking adventures. Thank you so very much for reading this review. Thank you, Daniel Silva for each and every book you have written as you are truly a master in the art of espionage details!! Sincerely Jane Bedford-Crooks-Paredes
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  • Barry Smirnoff
    January 1, 1970
    Another great summer pot boiler from Mr. SilvaEvery Summer for the past decade or so, I have looked forward to a new installment from the master spymaster Daniel Silva. This year’s story is a little different from his previous efforts. Using the recent murder of a Saudi journalist as source material, Silva has crafted another page turner that puts his hero, Gabriel Allon, at the center of the action. Allon is once again able to escape his administrative duties as boss of “the Office” and command Another great summer pot boiler from Mr. SilvaEvery Summer for the past decade or so, I have looked forward to a new installment from the master spymaster Daniel Silva. This year’s story is a little different from his previous efforts. Using the recent murder of a Saudi journalist as source material, Silva has crafted another page turner that puts his hero, Gabriel Allon, at the center of the action. Allon is once again able to escape his administrative duties as boss of “the Office” and command his personnel in the field while hobnobing with world leaders and combating the enemies of the State of Israel. I really enjoyed this book and can not think of a better way of passing these Heat Dome summer dog days than with my old friends from the “Secret World.” The ending has a nice reunion of sorts of all of the characters at Shamron’s House as a victory celebration of sorts, spoiled by incoming Hezbollah missiles being intercepted by Israel’s Iron Dome defenses. But the ending was not foreseen and it is a zinger! I can not wait to see what happens next, but we will have to wait for July 2020 to find out, if Mr. Silva can continue to meet his deadlines. I send him my best wishes for his continued success.
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  • Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    Having read all 19 Gabriel Allon books, #19 – “The New Girl” is the only one so far that I would say it would be an advantage if the reader had read #18 (“The Other Woman”) before. That is not to say it cannot be read as a stand-alone, it just means that it would be a benefit to the reader if you have done so.As per usual Daniel Silva has written a masterful spy novel and shows himself as being a cut above all other authors of this genre of novel.It is taunt, nail-biting, heart-pounding with Sil Having read all 19 Gabriel Allon books, #19 – “The New Girl” is the only one so far that I would say it would be an advantage if the reader had read #18 (“The Other Woman”) before. That is not to say it cannot be read as a stand-alone, it just means that it would be a benefit to the reader if you have done so.As per usual Daniel Silva has written a masterful spy novel and shows himself as being a cut above all other authors of this genre of novel.It is taunt, nail-biting, heart-pounding with Silva’s special, superlative brand of writing.The plot and story line is well described in the book description and to say anything further would be to give away spoilers. Further, I highly recommend you do not ignore the Author’s Note at the end of the book.If you have read the Allon series before, you know what to expect and you won’t be disappointed.If this is your first in the Allon series don’t be surprised if you get the urge to seek out and read some or many of the earlier books.
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  • Anna Amato
    January 1, 1970
    DISCLAIMER: I received an ARC yesterday which guaranteed an honest review and no spoilers. I have read all Daniel Silva's Books sometimes in 2 or 3 days I read this in 8 hours with only brief stops. This is masterful and definitely his best. He makes no secret of the fact that he stopped after 250 pages because of current events and then thought of a way to redeem the leader of Saudi Arabia. By page 34 I was completely fascinated and having trouble breathing. However, throughout the book the aut DISCLAIMER: I received an ARC yesterday which guaranteed an honest review and no spoilers. I have read all Daniel Silva's Books sometimes in 2 or 3 days I read this in 8 hours with only brief stops. This is masterful and definitely his best. He makes no secret of the fact that he stopped after 250 pages because of current events and then thought of a way to redeem the leader of Saudi Arabia. By page 34 I was completely fascinated and having trouble breathing. However, throughout the book the author intersperses humor and wit and uses the same phrases repeatedly which is something regular readers have come to appreciate. He makes you laugh while you are so completely enthralled you can't put the book down. He also doesn't hesitate to tear out your heart. He cobbles together actual political events such as the death of a journalist and the rise into power of a tyrant and know that you have to accept an imperfect ally and how to turn them into an asset. This becomes a completely believable narrative and one that by the end of the book you could wish to be true. A believable fairy tale. But not all fairy tales end with a handsome prince kissing the princess. This is definitely his best work. I may have thought that before but I KNOW that this is it.
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  • Jim A
    January 1, 1970
    Several twists make this a very good read. Silva brings back Sarah Bancroft, the former CIA operative, from a couple of previous novels. Other members of Allon's merry band are also present as usual. There is a lot of reference to the storyline and characters from The Other Woman, book 18 in the series. Probably more reference than Silva has used in past thrillers, other than Allon's basic backstory. A necessary read for any followers of the adventures of Gabriel Allon. And, while fans of Silva' Several twists make this a very good read. Silva brings back Sarah Bancroft, the former CIA operative, from a couple of previous novels. Other members of Allon's merry band are also present as usual. There is a lot of reference to the storyline and characters from The Other Woman, book 18 in the series. Probably more reference than Silva has used in past thrillers, other than Allon's basic backstory. A necessary read for any followers of the adventures of Gabriel Allon. And, while fans of Silva's Allon character really don't need any incentive to read his work, the ending on this one is WOW.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    What can I say......no one does it better than Daniel Silva!
  • Rohit
    January 1, 1970
    It was worth the wait. You can't put this book down once you start.
  • Carol Schafer
    January 1, 1970
    Read it too quickly. Darn. Now I have to wait another year for the next Daniel Silva book.
  • Jean
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant, amazing, a true masterpiece!~!
  • Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller
    January 1, 1970
    Daniel Silva found himself on the horns of a dilemma when world events abruptly shifted after he was well into his 19th spellbinding novel featuring Gabriel Allon.Gabriel is the chief of Israeli intelligence whose reputation as a spy is equaled only by his talent in art restoration. He would prefer to spend more time with his family and in his studio, and less time trying to solve the problems of the Middle East. The arc of the book was to focus on an alliance between Saudi Arabia and Israel thr Daniel Silva found himself on the horns of a dilemma when world events abruptly shifted after he was well into his 19th spellbinding novel featuring Gabriel Allon.Gabriel is the chief of Israeli intelligence whose reputation as a spy is equaled only by his talent in art restoration. He would prefer to spend more time with his family and in his studio, and less time trying to solve the problems of the Middle East. The arc of the book was to focus on an alliance between Saudi Arabia and Israel through the Saudi crown prince, Khalid bin Mohammed --- known by his initials, KBM --- who is the successor to the Saudi Arabian throne.The kingdom’s many palaces hold hundreds of works of rare art, many of which are in need of restoration. Through mutual friends, KBM has contacted Gabriel to examine the collection. During a visit to discuss the project, he shares his interest with Gabriel in bringing Saudi Arabia into the 21st century by loosening the inflexible chains on his people imposed by fiercely religious Wahhabian elders who now wield considerable power. Through KBM’s ascendancy, Gabriel sees an opportunity for an allegiance to reach common ground between Israel and Saudi Arabia that could relieve the Middle East powder keg threatening the global geopolitical scene. KBM wants to allow women to drive and dress in more modern clothing, and to lift bans on alcoholic beverages, among other radical changes from existing laws.As is his custom, Silva’s novels often reflect real times that in today’s world tend to shift with dizzying speed. KBM was originally loosely patterned after Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman, aka MBS. That is, until Washington Post reporter Jamal Khashoggi’s brutal murder made global headlines with evidence pointing to MBS or his regime. Silva writes in his foreword that some “elements of THE NEW GIRL are quite obviously suggested by events surrounding Khashoggi’s death.” But there, he states, the likeness had to end, so he hastened to rewrite major portions of the book.THE NEW GIRL opens as a teacher at an exclusive Geneva girl’s school sees the lovely dark-haired new student step into the back of the limousine that customarily arrives to pick her up. It is the last that the teacher or anyone else sees of her. Enrolled as the daughter of a wealthy Egyptian businessman, she is in reality Princess Reema bin Mohammed, KBM’s only child. KBM immediately receives a warning from her kidnappers: unless he abdicates succession to the throne within the next 24 hours, he will never see his 12-year-old daughter again.Now aware of the capacity and skills of the Israeli intelligence forces, KBM contacts Gabriel to seek Reema’s safe return. He will yield to the abductor’s threats and abdicate the throne in exchange for her life. Gabriel reluctantly agrees to help as KBM swears innocence in the murder of a dissident journalist. He insists that it's a plot to replace him on the throne by a cousin, a devout conservative with ties to ISIS.THE NEW GIRL picks up where THE OTHER WOMAN left off. When Rebecca Manning, next in line for the top position at Great Britain’s MI6, turned out to be a female Russian asset --- the daughter of infamous KGB double agent Kim Philby --- the tables turned in the western world of espionage and spycraft. Safe houses were closed and moved to new locations. No one was without suspicion. The final battle that broke out, costing many lives and reputations in Washington, uncovered the depth of the Soviet infiltration and meddling in the affairs of the free world.That the former MI6 traitor and double agent who now works expressly for the KGB will become involved as an assassin is only one of many twists and turns in Daniel Silva’s latest thriller. Book #20 in this absorbing series cannot come soon enough.Reviewed by Roz Shea
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  • Shawn
    January 1, 1970
    As with most spy thrillers, it is very hard to give a review without spoilers. I’ve tried to avoid any direct spoilers, but there are aspects that might be given away by what I say. So be warned.The worst part about a Daniel Silva’s Gabriel Allon novel is that it comes to an end. The New Girl is just as fun, exciting, moving, and thought-provoking as the previous 18. It’s hard to top the early novels, but this is up there. I do so wish Gabriel Allon (GA) was real. Maybe there are people like him As with most spy thrillers, it is very hard to give a review without spoilers. I’ve tried to avoid any direct spoilers, but there are aspects that might be given away by what I say. So be warned.The worst part about a Daniel Silva’s Gabriel Allon novel is that it comes to an end. The New Girl is just as fun, exciting, moving, and thought-provoking as the previous 18. It’s hard to top the early novels, but this is up there. I do so wish Gabriel Allon (GA) was real. Maybe there are people like him and they are so good at what they do, we don’t hear about them and the problems they prevent. But it’s also a bit like hoping Batman was real. No one person is capable of this – and even if they were it is probably not a good idea to have them doing these things in the way they are done in the stories. It works in Batman and GA because we know, because they are the protagonists of the story, that they are good guys. In real life, without an omniscient narrator, we cannot know that.The best part about The New Girl was the relationship that develops between GA and Khalid. They are, understandably, skeptical and weary of each other at first, but through the events of the story they seem to learn to trust each other and develop what seems like it could be a deep and long friendship – though the way the story unfolds that may not turn out to be the case. At this point, 19 books in, we don’t get a lot of character development from the main cast. And there is very little of that. Keller, Mihkail, Seymour, Gabriel are who they are. So you need the new characters to drive that aspect. Silva always does a great job at this, both with new protagonists and the antagonists. Sarah’s story arc is interesting – not so much specifically for the plot of The New Girl, but across the several books she has been in. I think there are some exciting things Silva could (and will) do with this character in future novels (which is part of why she was in The New Girl – as set up for the future). Silva also usually does a great job of humanizing his antagonists. They are rarely mindless fanatics: they have motivations that might have started out reasonable enough, but have gone deeply astray. Part of what he does well with this is that it is not a matter of some hackneyed, lazy moral grayness, where the good guys are a little bad, and the bad guys are a bit good. It’s more that Silva shows us these are human beings that have a complex history and that they have made (often bad) choices that have brought them to this point. We don’t sympathize with them, but we understand them. They are not merely monsters. However, some of the main antagonists in the New Girl come off a bit shallow. They are either just the tools of some mostly off-stage actor directing them (I’m trying not to spoil things) or they are motivated in fairly basic ways (sex and/or power). Nevertheless, I suppose there is some truth in that—but it does take away slightly from the drama. There are several surprising elements to this story—I can’t discuss them without spoiling them, but I will say Silva allows the story to unfold without introducing any dues ex machinas. I sort of expected a few or at least Silva to pull back. So I’m glad he had the storytelling integrity to go forward with it. There were several moments in the story related specifically to Israel that, although they are not essential to plot, I found quite moving; even got choked up a bit.I enjoy how Silva weaves in current real world events – though I do have to be careful not to confuse Silva’s world for the real one!I am not sure what I think of the ending. It’ll take some time to process it. Partly, I’m not sure what precisely happened. Time will tell.
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  • Nancy Brisson
    January 1, 1970
    Having read all of Daniel Silva’s spy novels that feature Gabriel Allon and his team of talented Israeli intelligence specialized spies, I could not resist getting to The New Girl as soon as possible. None of the other books (there are 18 of them) deals with a global situation that is quite as recent as the one we find here. Silva always uses his spy Allon, now the head of the Israeli Intelligence Service to make sure that bad actors pay for the mayhem they cause and that the activities of the b Having read all of Daniel Silva’s spy novels that feature Gabriel Allon and his team of talented Israeli intelligence specialized spies, I could not resist getting to The New Girl as soon as possible. None of the other books (there are 18 of them) deals with a global situation that is quite as recent as the one we find here. Silva always uses his spy Allon, now the head of the Israeli Intelligence Service to make sure that bad actors pay for the mayhem they cause and that the activities of the bad actors cease and desist. Often evil doers must die to insure that they will not eventually practice their crimes and terrors at some other point in the future. This time Daniel Silva wants to remind us of how important journalists and journalism are to maintaining the freedoms that people treasure. We are reminded that one of the first things dictators often do is shut down the free press and support a press that is merely a mouthpiece for the leader. The most shocking recent example involved the murder and dismemberment of Jamal Khashoggi by a Saudi assassination team sent into a Turkish embassy, perhaps by Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) the heir to the throne in Saudi Arabia, although he denies it. In a way this novel attempts to do the same thing that Quentin Tarantino did in his most recent movie Once Upon a Time in Hollywood by righting a wrong, although in both cases we know that a fictional revision of history cannot really right a past wrong. However revenge fiction can offer some personal satisfaction.The names have been changed of course, MBS becomes Khalid bin Mohammed bin Abdulaziz Al Saud. who is buying a painting in NYC from our old friend Sarah Bancroft, occasionally part of Gabriel’s team, when his daughter at a exclusive private school in kidnapped. She is only twelve. Who would know where she was? Who would abduct her? The reasons are not as mysterious. There could be many reasons why Khalid might attract violence. Stealing a child is a low-life way to get the attention of someone this powerful and it is probable that it involves a hope to get Khalid out in the open in order to kill him.Omar Nawwaf is the name of the fictional character who faces the same fate as Khashoggi and whose murder disgusts people around the world and causes us to stop noticing that MBS is handsome and to just remember that he is ruthless. The world reacts similarly to the killing of Omar Nawwaf in Silva’s book but people who know about the kidnapping of his daughter (very few people) do not believe in punishing the child for the sins of the father. Omar was trying to give Kahlid information about a plot against him by his uncle when he was assassinated. Omar’s wife, Hanifa Khoury, eventually shares what Omar learned with Gabriel, but only to help save the child.How does it all end? Well, as usual, bummer, I can’t tell you. All the other Gabriel Allon books deal with history that is further in the past. You may feel that this particular piece of global terror is too fresh to qualify for Silva’s fictional treatment of it. People’s reactions will probably be personal and varied. Although many of my favorite characters appear and there is the beginning of a romance that readers should like (but Gabriel does not think will work), I can’t help but feel that it may have been too soon to approach this subject.
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  • Monnie
    January 1, 1970
    In the interest of full disclosure, this series (more specifically, art restorer and accomplished Israeli spy Gabriel Allon) has held the No. 1 spot on my Top 10 "heroes" list for quite a few years now. This is his 19th book; and I assure you he's in no danger of losing that lofty perch. The story is intricately woven with enough suspense to make me hold my breath here and there and the writing is, as always, exemplary. Add in the appearance of several familiar characters from previous books and In the interest of full disclosure, this series (more specifically, art restorer and accomplished Israeli spy Gabriel Allon) has held the No. 1 spot on my Top 10 "heroes" list for quite a few years now. This is his 19th book; and I assure you he's in no danger of losing that lofty perch. The story is intricately woven with enough suspense to make me hold my breath here and there and the writing is, as always, exemplary. Add in the appearance of several familiar characters from previous books and the result is, well, another winner in my book.Despite the singular title, there are two characters here who are bestowed with that moniker; the first is a young lady who has been enrolled in a fancy private school in Switzerland (you'll have to read the book to learn the identity of the other one). It is this young lady, though, who kicks off the story with an unhappy event: She's been kidnapped. Conventional wisdom says it's by enemies of her father Khalid bin Mohammed, the soon-to-be king of Saudi Arabia. When he takes the throne, it's believed he will lead dramatic reforms that would bring his country and its residents into the 21st Century - not a place many of those residents want to be. Other outsiders are less inclined to believe his motives are genuine - after all, he's thought to be behind the recent murder of a dissident journalist (hmmm, now where have we heard something like that before)?Gabriel's reputation for fighting terrorists (and killing more than a few) are legendary, and Khalid wants him to find his daughter. To bring Gabriel into the fold, he turns to common acquaintance, art expert (and former CIA agent) Sarah Bancroft, with whom Khalid has a professional relationship. Gabriel isn't exactly a fan, but for the sake of the argument, he's willing to believe Khalid's claim that he'll turn his country away from radical Islam. Only one thing is certain: Both Gabriel and Khalid have a lot to lose should something go wrong (not the least of which is their lives).And go wrong it does, fairly early on with an unexpected and devastating event that changes the playing field and course of the story now focused on a Middle East power struggle. Along the way, Gabriel enlists help from colleagues old and new to work every angle he can to bring down political enemies old and new. The text is sprinkled with the author's political perspectives (I'm very interested with what's happening in that part of the world so that's fine with me, BTW). But I will carp a bit because Gabriel's beautiful wife Ciara and their young twins don't get enough mention to suit me.Everything comes to a head at the end with a cliff-hanger that may well be the impetus for the next book. For that, I'm ready already: Bring it on!
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  • carol johnson
    January 1, 1970
    "The New Girl" is another winner for Daniel Silva. One of a dwindling number of authors whose books I pre-order on my Kindle as soon as their release date is announced, Silva rarely disappoints with his Gabriel Allon books. I binge read it in one sitting the day it was released. Yes, perhaps for the benefit of the occasional first time reader, Silva employs the fact same words to describe Chiara, Ari Shamron, Mikhail, and other of his main characters: e.g. "riotous hair," "brown eyes flecked wit "The New Girl" is another winner for Daniel Silva. One of a dwindling number of authors whose books I pre-order on my Kindle as soon as their release date is announced, Silva rarely disappoints with his Gabriel Allon books. I binge read it in one sitting the day it was released. Yes, perhaps for the benefit of the occasional first time reader, Silva employs the fact same words to describe Chiara, Ari Shamron, Mikhail, and other of his main characters: e.g. "riotous hair," "brown eyes flecked with gold "(Chiara); etc. But along with that identity is a comfortable familiarity with those characters, such as a mention of Christopher Keller 's history with a certain Don and some goats (which visual always makes me chuckle). An interview with Silva revealed that he had written another novel that he scrapped after the real life murder of Saudi reporter Khashoggi last year in Istanbul, and in The New Girl Silva uses many aspects of that terrible incident and, as is usual in his novels, other real life political events to shape the book. In fact, much of what occurs in is as contemporary and reflective of actual events, perhaps more so, than any of his prior books. Perhaps more than many of his Allon books, Silva in The New Girl includes Allon in virtually every scene. Frankly, I felt he travelled around too much. Some of his and other character's appearances in places were also not, in my opinion, credible. They reasonably could not have been or travelled there unrecognized. Interestingly, Allon, while still apparently persona non grata in many places, appears throughout the world in this book fairly openly, including taking trains. Characters that appeared in prior novels reappear, new and old relationships are explained, develop or end. The characters are so well described, as are the scenes, I felt I was there. I remain unclear about what one of the characters wrote in a notebook: "You're dead. Dead, dead, dead..." What is the import of those words? I won't say more, otherwise it will spoil the book for you. I will say, though, that there is a twist at the end, so, stay tuned for the next Gabriel Allon novel!
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  • Lucy Krb
    January 1, 1970
    Waiting. Always the waiting. This sums up the best the long year I had to wait to put my hands on Daniel Silva’s new masterpiece. It's been worth the wait. Silva proved once and again why his books are bestsellers. His deep knowledge of places and situations makes you wonder if the book is really just a fiction as he claims. Now, The New Girl’s pace is set up on fast and won't let you put the book down. So fasten your seat belt and get ready for an amazing ride. You won't be just reading a book. Waiting. Always the waiting. This sums up the best the long year I had to wait to put my hands on Daniel Silva’s new masterpiece. It's been worth the wait. Silva proved once and again why his books are bestsellers. His deep knowledge of places and situations makes you wonder if the book is really just a fiction as he claims. Now, The New Girl’s pace is set up on fast and won't let you put the book down. So fasten your seat belt and get ready for an amazing ride. You won't be just reading a book. You'll be swallowed whole and you'll be living the story side by side the usual characters. Sarah Bancroft is back. Does she still have the skills Gabriel taught her? It's really difficult to forget something like that. Plus trying to live a normal life after knowing what the secret life can offer isn't easy. No wonder Sarah wants back. One does not simply leave a spy’s life behind. Obviously Barak team is back in its full glory. Gabriel wouldn't want to work without his always quarrelling family, especially when embarking on a quest against the Russian tsar. Of course, Keller can't be left behind. He has been restored by Gabriel and now is a very important asset. Where is Keller, there is Graham. Last time Gabriel and Graham didn't part their ways on a very friendly note. But Gabriel knows a thing or two that will help Graham to steady MI6 wobbly legs and put Graham on top of the game. Gabriel’s capability to work as field based director is incredible. He's never been meant for sitting in the office. He needs to be in the midst of the action and only reluctantly leaves Mikhail to take the lead. But never for too long. There is one part of Gabriel’s team that cannot be overlooked; his family. Chiara knows him the best and knows how to help Gabriel to find his way around the most cruel aspects of his work. Also the amazing twins cheer him up. Nobody can resist them. Especially not Gabriel. In short, Daniel Silva has outdone himself again. The New Girl is unputdownable book with brilliant twists, dark humour and constant flow which won't allow you to stop reading. What a ride! It's a must read.
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  • Ed
    January 1, 1970
    #19 in the Gabriel Allon series. This 2019 series entry by author Daniel Silva has Gabriel Allon as the head of Israeli intelligence, a post towards which he has ascended over the course of his career since he was recruited to assassinate the Black September terrorists who murdered 14 Israeli athletes and coaches at the 1972 Munich Olympics. This time he forms an unlikely partnership with the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia in a quest to find and rescue his kidnapped daughter. Roman à clef elements #19 in the Gabriel Allon series. This 2019 series entry by author Daniel Silva has Gabriel Allon as the head of Israeli intelligence, a post towards which he has ascended over the course of his career since he was recruited to assassinate the Black September terrorists who murdered 14 Israeli athletes and coaches at the 1972 Munich Olympics. This time he forms an unlikely partnership with the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia in a quest to find and rescue his kidnapped daughter. Roman à clef elements tie the fictional Saudi prince and murdered journalist to Mohammed bin Salman and Jamal Khashoggi, and an excellent Author's Note bridges the gap between fiction and realpolitik. I couldn't put this book down, although at 468 pages it was a bit much for a single sitting.At an exclusive private school in Switzerland, mystery surrounds the identity of the beautiful raven-haired girl who arrives each morning in a motorcade fit for a head of state. She is said to be the daughter of a wealthy international businessman. In truth, her father is Khalid bin Mohammed, the much-maligned crown prince of Saudi Arabia. Once celebrated for his daring social and religious reforms, he is now reviled for his role in the murder of a dissident journalist. And when his only child is brutally kidnapped, he turns to the one man he can trust to find her before it is too late. Gabriel Allon, the legendary chief of Israeli intelligence, has spent most of his life fighting terrorists, including the murderous jihadists financed by Saudi Arabia. Prince Khalid—or KBM, as he is known—has pledged to finally break the bond between the Kingdom and radical Islam. For that reason alone, Gabriel regards him as a valuable if flawed partner. Together they will become unlikely allies in a deadly secret war for control of the Middle East. The life of a child, and the throne of Saudi Arabia, hang in the balance. Both men have made their share of enemies. And both have everything to lose.
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  • kartik narayanan
    January 1, 1970
    Read the full review at my site Digital AmritIntroductionThe New Girl is 19th book in the Gabriel Allon series, by Daniel Silva. In case you are new to it, Gabriel Allon (the protagonist) is an Israeli assassin who also happens to be one of the best artists/restorers in the world. During the course of the series, he suffers from heart break, finds new love and matches wits with the 'enemy' of the month. This series is definitely written with the Western audience in mind though Daniel Silva tries Read the full review at my site Digital AmritIntroductionThe New Girl is 19th book in the Gabriel Allon series, by Daniel Silva. In case you are new to it, Gabriel Allon (the protagonist) is an Israeli assassin who also happens to be one of the best artists/restorers in the world. During the course of the series, he suffers from heart break, finds new love and matches wits with the 'enemy' of the month. This series is definitely written with the Western audience in mind though Daniel Silva tries to portray at least some of the antagonists as human beings in their own right - be it Palestinians, The Iranians, The Saudis or the rest of the Arab world as well as Russians. If there is one country that is blasted throughout, it is the Swiss. There is a bit of a formula that these books follow. Somebody usually approaches Allon with a problem, he gets a team together, they encounter setbacks, then more effort is put in, a minor deus ex machine occurs and most of the situation is resolved. The New Girl follows this formula to the T. Read the full review at my site Digital Amrit
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  • Larry
    January 1, 1970
    This is #19 in the Gabriel Allon series. I couldn’t wait for this book’s release – and wasn’t disappointed. (BTW, it would be nice to have read #18, but not mandatory.)In the Forward, Silva comes right out and writes he was thinking of the real Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, Mohammad Bin Salman Al Saud, or MbS, as his main character which he names KbM. Wow! (I wonder if that will ruffle feathers anywhere.) When KbM’s 12 year old daughter is kidnapped and will be killed unless he resigns, KbM seek This is #19 in the Gabriel Allon series. I couldn’t wait for this book’s release – and wasn’t disappointed. (BTW, it would be nice to have read #18, but not mandatory.)In the Forward, Silva comes right out and writes he was thinking of the real Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, Mohammad Bin Salman Al Saud, or MbS, as his main character which he names KbM. Wow! (I wonder if that will ruffle feathers anywhere.) When KbM’s 12 year old daughter is kidnapped and will be killed unless he resigns, KbM seeks assistance from Gabriel Allon, of all people, the head of the Israel’s “Office” (think Mossad). Initially set in France and Switzerland, Silva takes the reader to Saudi Arabia, Britain, Russia and, of course, Israel. The plot is right out of today’s headlines. It addresses the political struggles in the Middle East, the murder of dissident journalists as well as throwing in interesting history and various factoids. … I was crushed to read of an APPALLING terrorist attack upon an innocent. I found the book to be a very well written page-turner with an eloquently complex plot filled with espionage twists and turns. (I’m glad I don’t have to write a book report. I just couldn’t do the plot justice.) I can highly recommend it.
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  • Tony Nielsen
    January 1, 1970
    I have become a huge fan of Daniel Silva's Gabriel Allon series and "The New Girl" doesn't disappoint. Its all systems go from the very start which is just how I like my thrillers to be. The action starts with setting the scene, as you do, with a well-to-do young woman snatched in a kidnap from an expensive and exclusive school in Switzerland.The fact that her father is the Saudi Crown Prince Khalid Bin Mohammed is of course the reason for the strike, although that's not widely known. Khalid has I have become a huge fan of Daniel Silva's Gabriel Allon series and "The New Girl" doesn't disappoint. Its all systems go from the very start which is just how I like my thrillers to be. The action starts with setting the scene, as you do, with a well-to-do young woman snatched in a kidnap from an expensive and exclusive school in Switzerland.The fact that her father is the Saudi Crown Prince Khalid Bin Mohammed is of course the reason for the strike, although that's not widely known. Khalid has had a mixed career as one of Saudi's most prominent family members and he is distraught by his daughter's kidnapping. Reluctant though he is, he knows of one person who has the skillset to successfully recover her. His name of course is the famed and legendary Chief of Israeli Intelligence Gabriel Allon.It may seem like an unlikely and fraught partnership but Gabriel can see the big picture and decides to bring his abilities to do his best to achieve the successful release of the young woman. From there the plot moves forward in leaps and bounds as Daniel Silva creates a credible and brutal storyline. Yes, its sometimes violent but that's a given with his writing and the Gabriel Allon character.Its another good un.
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Daniel Silva and Gabriel Allon It is mid- July and I have finished “The New Girl” by Daniel Silva. The book was a bit longer, so thankfully I didn’t read it one sitting. But still it will be a year before Gabriel Allon appears again. I know Mr. Silva isn’t already writing, he’s touring but I would seriously like him to get to work. I don’t know how I got lost in the character of Gabriel Allon but it was many years ago. He is serious, dangerous, lovable, with a very dry humor that can make you la Daniel Silva and Gabriel Allon It is mid- July and I have finished “The New Girl” by Daniel Silva. The book was a bit longer, so thankfully I didn’t read it one sitting. But still it will be a year before Gabriel Allon appears again. I know Mr. Silva isn’t already writing, he’s touring but I would seriously like him to get to work. I don’t know how I got lost in the character of Gabriel Allon but it was many years ago. He is serious, dangerous, lovable, with a very dry humor that can make you laugh out loud. I don’t know how to a review a book. I’m 66 years old and no longer remember spelling and the rules of grammar or punctuation. So anyway: Over time the character development has been wonderful. The novels are always are jaw clenchingly fast paced. At no time do you suspend disbelief. Everyting, no matter how outlandish, is believable. You want to meet these people and have take you everywhere they have been. You want to hug Gabriel and fall in love.This author ruins me for weeks. I can’t pick up another book. No one writes this incredibly well. Books by authors I love become trash. Daniel please go home and started.
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  • Nicholas Lefevre
    January 1, 1970
    How does Daniel Silva keep doing it through so many books. This is Gabriel Allon #19 and it's one of the best. Some stand out because of the art history tie-ins. Some because of development of our central characters. Some because of elaborate and suspenseful plotting.The New Girl's strength is it's connections to current world politics. It's no spoiler to say that it involves the murder of a leading journalist by the heir to the Saudi throne. It's a slight spoiler to say that Russkie bad guys us How does Daniel Silva keep doing it through so many books. This is Gabriel Allon #19 and it's one of the best. Some stand out because of the art history tie-ins. Some because of development of our central characters. Some because of elaborate and suspenseful plotting.The New Girl's strength is it's connections to current world politics. It's no spoiler to say that it involves the murder of a leading journalist by the heir to the Saudi throne. It's a slight spoiler to say that Russkie bad guys use radioactive poison for assassination. It's also apparent that someone like Trump is President of the US. I've been wondering how political thriller authors would deal with that. I've now seen my first example.Allon has aged and now, as head of the Office, he's not the lone assassin he once was. I've aged to and I welcome the change to the more cerebral and mellow Allon.Don't miss the Author's Note. It's far more expansive than his usual acknowledgement of sources. Silva is quite open about his intent to provide commentary on our current state of international political affairs.
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