Moments We Forget (Thatcher Sisters, #2)
Jillian Thatcher has spent most of her life playing the family peacemaker, caught in the middle between her driven, talented older sister and her younger, spotlight-stealing twin sisters. Then on the night of her engagement party, a cancer diagnosis threatens to once again steal her chance to shine.Now, Jillian's on the road to recovery after finally finishing chemo and radiation, but residual effects of the treatment keep her from reclaiming her life as she'd hoped. And just when her dreams might be falling into place, a life-altering revelation from her husband sends her reeling again.Will Jillian ever achieve her own dreams, or will she always be "just Jillian," the less-than Thatcher sister? Can she count on her sisters as she tries to step into a stronger place, or are they stuck in their childhood roles forever?

Moments We Forget (Thatcher Sisters, #2) Details

TitleMoments We Forget (Thatcher Sisters, #2)
Author
ReleaseMay 7th, 2019
PublisherTyndale House Publishers
ISBN-139781496427281
Rating
GenreContemporary, Christian Fiction, Romance, Fiction, Christian

Moments We Forget (Thatcher Sisters, #2) Review

  • Madison
    January 1, 1970
    Moments We Forget is the second book in the Thatcher Sister’s series. Moments We Forget continues the story of three sisters, separated by grief and circumstances, slowly working on reconciling as they each face the ups and downs of life. Jillian well knows her role as the middle sister - peacemaker, often the bearer of bad news and someone who knows not to challenge the spotlight-stealing older and younger sisters. But, Jillian has beaten breast cancer and she’s ready to get on with her life. Y Moments We Forget is the second book in the Thatcher Sister’s series. Moments We Forget continues the story of three sisters, separated by grief and circumstances, slowly working on reconciling as they each face the ups and downs of life. Jillian well knows her role as the middle sister - peacemaker, often the bearer of bad news and someone who knows not to challenge the spotlight-stealing older and younger sisters. But, Jillian has beaten breast cancer and she’s ready to get on with her life. Yet her newly formed marriage is struggling under two busy schedules, she can’t seem to keep up at work and the kitchen renovations that were meant to be fun are turning up endless problems. Even the book club she formed with her sisters to help them all keep in touch and get along seems destined to be one big fight. When life and circumstances get you down can these sisters be there for each other?Moments We Forget isn’t exactly an easy book to read. Each of the sisters face some really tough challenges, from relationship breakdowns, the fallout of cancer treatments, and unemployment or changes in their work environments, to renovations, being forced to change their dreams for the future and all the little ways that life can throw unexpected curve balls. It’s sad and a little tough to read as these sisters face so many setbacks. The book doesn’t speed through the events, taking its time to cover the months that this story spans. Yet, Moments We Forget is also about standing together, finding and holding on to love and letting go when that’s the right things to do. It’s also about the journey to faith -also often filled with bumps and many questions.Jillian, middle sister, cancer survivor, and newlywed, is the main protagonist of this story. Her story takes the bulk of the chapters in Moments We Forget and is written in first person. Her two sisters also have a few chapters spread throughout the story, written in third person, which neatly separates the sections. From the first book in this series, the lives of the three Thatcher sisters have been intertwined, even if they might not view it like that. While Moments We Forget might have a hopeful ending, it’s clear that the Thatcher sisters still have more hurdles to face. As they face the challenges of life they are each working towards finding faith and a closer relationship with each other.If you are looking for a thoughtful and carefully woven Christian contemporary novel about sisters and relationships, I can recommend the Thatcher Sisters series. It is perhaps best to read the books in series order to fully understand and experience the relationships between these three sisters.The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library
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  • Susan Snodgrass
    January 1, 1970
    ‘It was as if I stood at the edge of an open cavern, peering down into the opaque darkness. How deep was it? And if I slipped would I ever stop falling?’Beth Vogt continues her Thatcher Sisters series with this second in line, featuring Jillian, the middle sister. Jillian is now one year out from her breast cancer diagnosis but still dealing with the effects of chemo brain and the meds she must take for another 5 years. She is left reeling from two other blows to her life as well and just doesn’ ‘It was as if I stood at the edge of an open cavern, peering down into the opaque darkness. How deep was it? And if I slipped would I ever stop falling?’Beth Vogt continues her Thatcher Sisters series with this second in line, featuring Jillian, the middle sister. Jillian is now one year out from her breast cancer diagnosis but still dealing with the effects of chemo brain and the meds she must take for another 5 years. She is left reeling from two other blows to her life as well and just doesn’t know how she can continue to stand. Then her husband, Geoff, has some secrets, too, that will affect their marriage. And oh, how we feel her pain. Payton, the younger sister, whose twin died 10 years earlier, is now struggling with her concept of God, especially since she is in a supposed relationship with Zach, who is a committed Christian. And Johanna, the eldest, the one who must control and boss everything, is back, still in a run off with Payton. These two seem to feel they have to disagree on everything. But all is not rosy in Johanna’s life, either, and Johanna does not show weakness and tell anyone her problems. Not having a sister, but a brother, the relationship dynamic was a bit foreign to me, but Vogt manages to plumb the depths of the sister relationship quite well. She takes us on a painful journey as we experience the deepest hurts imaginable with these women until we’re left wondering if they will ever experience true happiness of the soul. But what a journey! And there are two scenes near the end that touched my heart so very deeply that they left me absolutely bawling! Well done! I am so looking forward to Johanna’s story in the last book of the series.*My thanks to the publisher for a copy of this book via Net Galley. The opinions expressed here are entirely my own.
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  • Renee
    January 1, 1970
    “But maybe . . . maybe faith wasn’t so much about believing enough. Being enough. Maybe faith was realizing that the truth of who God was, and what He promised, was enough for all her doubts.”The Thatcher sisters—Jillian, Payton, and Johanna—each have their own struggles, pain, and disappointments. You’d think that would spur them to treat each other with gentleness. But not so much. They tend to push each other’s buttons and bring up old hurts before they finally get around to reacting with lov “But maybe . . . maybe faith wasn’t so much about believing enough. Being enough. Maybe faith was realizing that the truth of who God was, and what He promised, was enough for all her doubts.”The Thatcher sisters—Jillian, Payton, and Johanna—each have their own struggles, pain, and disappointments. You’d think that would spur them to treat each other with gentleness. But not so much. They tend to push each other’s buttons and bring up old hurts before they finally get around to reacting with love. Book #2, Moments We Forget, focuses on Jillian as she experiences one shocking life change after another. Her search for some kind of help or meaning leads to fledgling steps of faith. She experiences peace and hope—for the first time in a long, long time. We also catch up with what’s going on in Payton’s life as she weighs her doubts and fears against the possibility of a joyful future. And about half way through the story, Johanna’s problems get the best of her. As the story delves into what makes her tick, I found myself truly appreciating this character. Thanks to Beth Vogt for bringing these characters to life. Now I’m invested in knowing—will the Thatcher sisters find redemption, learn to love each other unconditionally, and band together for strength and support? I’ll be lining up for book #3 to find out! Quotes I liked . . . “It’s not that I don’t believe in You, God. I do. I just don’t know why I believe in You.”“Coffee is the gasoline of life. All I need is coffee and mascara. Behind every successful person is a substantial amount of coffee. I drink coffee for your protection.”“Chemo brain. I’d said the words out loud. Another label to live with. How many undesirable labels would I have to carry in my life? The words weighed on my heart like the breast form I wore. Awkward. Unwelcome.”“Every noise beyond the walls was muffled. Footsteps. Ringing phones. Voices. If I closed my eyes, the silence in the room surrounded me. Separated me from anything waiting for me. I could just be here. There was something comforting about the clean scent of ammonia that lingered in the room. I didn’t have to think about the mistakes of the past week that left me unemployed. Or the unknowns that loomed ahead of me.”“You’ve taught me to believe there is a God. I’m going to do my best to find my way all the way to Him . . . and hope He leads me back to you. But if . . . if He doesn’t, I’m going to believe it’s for the best.”‘A single thread of hope is still a very powerful thing.’Part of me wished that if I turned over all those slips of paper from the glass jar Harper had given me, if I pieced them together, I’d discover a map that led me closer to God . . . or offered me the ultimate words of comfort so I would be fine without Him.“This is a hospital, Dr. Miller, not a sports arena. We are taking care of patients, not . . . not playing volleyball.” He laughed. Laughed. “That’s true. However, it turns out that team dynamics work on the court, in the boardroom, in the operating room . . . and in a pharmacy. Humans care about being valued and believing they are doing something important.”“Soft winter sunshine streamed down through the windows, surrounding the piano and the player in a golden glow. Johanna escaped into a shadowed corner and closed her eyes, exhaling as the music found its mark. It was as if the woman offered her a cup of water, lifting the glass to her parched lips and whispering, ‘Drink . . . drink.’ How she longed to lean in, to accept what the woman offered. What she’d missed. To let each chord touch the dry fragments of her soul. There’d been no music in her life for so long.”“It was like trying to translate something for him when I barely knew the language myself. I mixed up the words. Definitions eluded me. Had I ever understood what peace was—peace that reached deep into my heart? Or had I settled for something temporary, like the warmth of the hot chocolate as I sipped on it?”
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  • Katie Beth
    January 1, 1970
    This is Beth's 2nd book in the Thatcher Sisters Series.After reading the first book (Things I Never Told You) I couldn't wait to read this book.I couldn't stand one of the sisters, loved one, & wanted to get to know one better. This book has made me think about my own journey and story on a deeper level. I now actually feel empathy for the sister I hated (I'm excited to read her story in book 3) and I SO identify with Jillian, the main character in Moments We Forget. If you want a great read This is Beth's 2nd book in the Thatcher Sisters Series.After reading the first book (Things I Never Told You) I couldn't wait to read this book.I couldn't stand one of the sisters, loved one, & wanted to get to know one better. This book has made me think about my own journey and story on a deeper level. I now actually feel empathy for the sister I hated (I'm excited to read her story in book 3) and I SO identify with Jillian, the main character in Moments We Forget. If you want a great read that will keep you turning pages, this is it!
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    Moments We Forget continues the story of the Thatcher sisters, which began in Things I Never Told You (and yes, you really should read the books in order, as much of what happens in this novel was set up in the first book). When this novel begins, middle sister Jillian has beaten breast cancer and is settling into married life ... but then circumstances arise that set her off balance and threaten all of her hopes and dreams. Youngest sister Payton finds herself open to faith for the first time i Moments We Forget continues the story of the Thatcher sisters, which began in Things I Never Told You (and yes, you really should read the books in order, as much of what happens in this novel was set up in the first book). When this novel begins, middle sister Jillian has beaten breast cancer and is settling into married life ... but then circumstances arise that set her off balance and threaten all of her hopes and dreams. Youngest sister Payton finds herself open to faith for the first time in her life, but she doesn't know if she's believing for herself or because that's what her deceased twin Pepper wanted for her. And oldest sister Johanna unexpectedly finds herself at a crossroads in her personal and professional life. As the three Thatcher sisters cope with the unexpected twists of life, they also take baby steps toward each other.After being a secondary character in Things I Never Told You, Jillian becomes the main character in Moments We Forget. After finishing her breast cancer treatment, she thought life would become easier ... but it didn't. Her story of coming to grips with her new reality and beginning a faith journey is beautiful to watch. Payton's relationship with God, which began in Things I Never Told You, continues to grow throughout this novel, and it was nice to see her more settled after the emotional roller coaster she was on in that first novel. And then there's Johanna ... I could. not. stand. her in book one, and I struggled to like her in this book, as well. She's a bossy know-it-all who can't ever say "I'm sorry." But we get to know her better in this book, and she slowly becomes more sympathetic. I'm very much looking forward to seeing how her story continues!When this series begins, no one in the Thatcher family has any semblance of a relationship with Christ. The faith journeys in these first two books strike me as authentic—while "lightning bolt" moments do happen, I think that probably more often, there's a slow awakening to an interest in the Lord, and then the time comes when you have to make a decision about whether you believe and choose to follow Christ. That's what's depicted here, at least with Payton and Jillian. (Something tells me that, just based on personality, Johanna's conversion—if it comes—will look a bit different.)Moments We Forget is a beautiful story of sisterhood, faith, and forgiveness. You'll definitely want to have a Kleenex box nearby as you read! 4-1/2 stars.Disclosure of material connection: I received this book from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review, and the opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Chautona Havig
    January 1, 1970
    The Hardest Thing about This Book and Why I Love ItObviously, the hardest thing about this book should be the cancer—how even after you’ve beaten it, you can lose. Lose your memory, your hopes, your dreams.I won’t pretend that wasn’t hard, but the point of this book is that hope isn’t found in a lack of cancer diagnosis. It’s found in Jesus.No, the hardest thing was watching the relationships between these sisters and seeing similarities in people you know and love—seeing how they create their o The Hardest Thing about This Book and Why I Love ItObviously, the hardest thing about this book should be the cancer—how even after you’ve beaten it, you can lose. Lose your memory, your hopes, your dreams.I won’t pretend that wasn’t hard, but the point of this book is that hope isn’t found in a lack of cancer diagnosis. It’s found in Jesus.No, the hardest thing was watching the relationships between these sisters and seeing similarities in people you know and love—seeing how they create their own pain. Seeing that avoiding the pain causes a different kind of pain.I love the book because the author, with brilliant use of words, welcomes you into the lives of characters. Even her point of view choices offer insights into character development and in the end, you’re left with wanting more.And that’s a good thing because guess what?This was book two. We are offered an invitation to walk through that cancer journey with Jillian in Things I Never Told You. It’s on my shelf. It’ll be hard to read. I’m walking through another cancer battle with another friend right now.Actually, that’s a bit… overstated. She’s walking. I’m following behind, weeping, praising God for victories, begging Him for more time (she’s stage IV), ready to be a support if she needs me but instead, being supported by her amazingness.This book didn’t just tell stories I related to in a brilliant and poignant way. It prepared my heart for more… for understanding more. And maybe, just perhaps… it helped prepare me for the next day when I come home from a memorial service after saying “see you soon” to a friend who has gone to be with Jesus.Not an easy book to read, but it’s not hard, either. I don’t know how to classify it, but I recommend it for people who value friendships, who understand broken relationships, and who want to invest a bit more in their lives. I’m so glad I requested and received a review copy. Looking forward to book one. Sort of.
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  • Jeanne Takenaka
    January 1, 1970
    Moments We Forget, by Beth Vogt, moved me. Just as real-life sisters are different from each other, the Thatcher sisters are each unique, and the tone of this story reflected Jillian’s personality so well.Jillian Thatcher has come out on the other side of her cancer journey and is ready to get on with life. Only, her post-cancer brain and body are not cooperating. As she grapples with how to find her “new normal” with the chemo residual effects, she struggles to accept that she can’t just get ba Moments We Forget, by Beth Vogt, moved me. Just as real-life sisters are different from each other, the Thatcher sisters are each unique, and the tone of this story reflected Jillian’s personality so well.Jillian Thatcher has come out on the other side of her cancer journey and is ready to get on with life. Only, her post-cancer brain and body are not cooperating. As she grapples with how to find her “new normal” with the chemo residual effects, she struggles to accept that she can’t just get back into the life she was living before the diagnosis.And, to top that off, her husband, Geoff, shares something with her that will determine a big piece of their future. She and Geoff discover what choosing to love well looks like, even through the hurt.This is a beautiful story of learning to thrive when all you thought you knew is no longer your reality. Jillian grapples with real-life issues in such an honest way, I can’t help but like her and cheer her on when she faces disappointments and changes.I loved the way Vogt weaves the three sisters’ lives together and brings healing to areas in their relationship. They are each committed to figuring out their relationship with each other, even when they don’t entirely understand each other. She writes about the various trials each sister faces with sensitivity and authenticity. None of these three women are cookie-cutter characters.This story’s twists and surprises had me grinning and, at times, tearing up. The themes or perseverance, loving well, and standing by each other stand out. I can’t wait to read the third book in this series. This book is a great read for those who enjoy relational stories that don’t have easy answers, for those who appreciate a story that makes them think about their own lives. Jillian, Johanna, and Payton Thatcher will stay with the readers well after they finish the final page. **I received an advance complimentary copy of the book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Joan
    January 1, 1970
    This is the second in a series of three novels covering the stories of sisters. Jillian is the middle sister, the one frequently ignored or otherwise discounted. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in the first novel. We follow her experiences in marriage and other relationships in this novel.Several relationship issues are covered in this story. The biggest one is adoption. Jillian wants to adopt while her husband is adamantly against it. Relating to this issue is the healing of past hurts. Bo This is the second in a series of three novels covering the stories of sisters. Jillian is the middle sister, the one frequently ignored or otherwise discounted. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in the first novel. We follow her experiences in marriage and other relationships in this novel.Several relationship issues are covered in this story. The biggest one is adoption. Jillian wants to adopt while her husband is adamantly against it. Relating to this issue is the healing of past hurts. Both Jillian and her husband must work through pain they still carry from childhood experiences if their marriage is to thrive.None of the sisters was a Christian at the beginning of the series. Two of the sisters had (part time) live in boyfriends, something unusual in “Christian” fiction. I am glad to see that changing as one of those sisters has become a Christian. There seemed to me to be lots of bickering and disagreements between the sisters and within the other relationships. I got kind of tired of reading those exchanges.As with the first novel, the point of view frequently changes. Jillian's experiences are told in first person while the rest of the narrative is third person. These points of view sometimes change within a chapter and I found it disconcerting.Even though Vogt's writing style is not my favorite, I am looking forward to the last novel in the series. The remaining sister whose story needs to be told is the oldest and the most forceful. I want to see how Vogt cracks her tough shell to be open to the gospel.I received a complimentary egalley of this book through Celebrate Lit. My comments are an independent and honest review.
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  • Hallie Szott
    January 1, 1970
    Catch up with the Thatcher sisters in Moments We Forget. This is the second book in Beth K. Vogt’s series, following Things I Never Told You, and I highly recommend reading them in order—but don’t worry; they’re both worth it.Sisters Johanna, Jillian, and Payton all encounter more with which to deal in this continuation, and middle-child Jillian is at the center of it all (an unfamiliar place for her to be, for sure). Life is, by no means, easy, despite what she has already overcome, and yet, th Catch up with the Thatcher sisters in Moments We Forget. This is the second book in Beth K. Vogt’s series, following Things I Never Told You, and I highly recommend reading them in order—but don’t worry; they’re both worth it.Sisters Johanna, Jillian, and Payton all encounter more with which to deal in this continuation, and middle-child Jillian is at the center of it all (an unfamiliar place for her to be, for sure). Life is, by no means, easy, despite what she has already overcome, and yet, this story pushes her to consider both her sisters and her faith through the ups and downs.If you love contemporary stories of sisterhood, challenging and authentic circumstances, and the discovery of faith (especially when set in Colorado!), definitely read Moments We Forget. Vogt delivers an emotional roller coaster of a story that should not be missed.This review is also posted on Hallie Reads.I received a complimentary copy of this book and the opportunity to provide an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review, and all the opinions I have expressed are my own.
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    ‘A single thread of hope is still a very powerful thing.’Moments We Forget is an incredibly moving story. I will admit it was hard for me to read. I see parts of myself in all three of the Thatcher sisters. Each one has unique protective measures in place and they’re explored with depth and clarity. My emotions swirled and at times plummeted like a kite losing its wind. Johanna, the oldest sister, is a piece of work and I often found myself talking to her, even scoffing at her. Out loud, of cour ‘A single thread of hope is still a very powerful thing.’Moments We Forget is an incredibly moving story. I will admit it was hard for me to read. I see parts of myself in all three of the Thatcher sisters. Each one has unique protective measures in place and they’re explored with depth and clarity. My emotions swirled and at times plummeted like a kite losing its wind. Johanna, the oldest sister, is a piece of work and I often found myself talking to her, even scoffing at her. Out loud, of course, because that’s the way I roll. Then as the story progressed and circumstances unfolded, my heart was deeply affected, as it was toward Jillian and how she is surviving the aftermath of cancer and chemo. And she is in survival mode. It’s raw and real. It isn’t all gravity and we get a glimpse into some tender moments that truly show the bond between sisters no matter what is taking place. Personality differences aside, in the end, your sister is still your sister. You might be a little like me and you’ll see a broken or strained relationship represented here between yourself and your mom or daughter. I envisioned scenarios in my life with the ones closest to me and ended up stopping several times to pray and seek God’s wisdom.I anticipate a fabulous end to this series when the final book releases because Vogt’s writing is amazing, intense and convicting. Moments We Forget will touch many readers deep in their hearts; discoveries will be made and hope found.I received an advanced reader copy from the publisher. No review was required. No compensation received.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    This is the second book in a series and I highly recommend reading book one. I really enjoy these books because they are set in a place that is familiar to me. The Thatcher sisters are pretty great characters because they are so different and have actual real life issues. Sometimes it is hard to read the tough stuff but I think it adds a lot to the story. The main focus in this book is Jillian who has had cancer and is dealing with a lot of issues surrounding that but also just normal life stuff This is the second book in a series and I highly recommend reading book one. I really enjoy these books because they are set in a place that is familiar to me. The Thatcher sisters are pretty great characters because they are so different and have actual real life issues. Sometimes it is hard to read the tough stuff but I think it adds a lot to the story. The main focus in this book is Jillian who has had cancer and is dealing with a lot of issues surrounding that but also just normal life stuff. We get a good amount from the other sisters in this book too, especially Johanna. I am curious to see where the next book might take these girls. There was a lot of marital/relationship issues in this book and there were some times when I thought the story was moving pretty slow. The only thing that I really thought was overdone was the constant mention of Colorado. Yes, the book is set in Colorado Springs, (we know this at the first chapter) but there were some chapters where the word Colorado was in every paragraph. It was too much and I thought took away from the story a bit. Otherwise this was a decent contemporary read. I think I enjoyed book one more, but I am excited to read the next novel. Four Stars. "I received this book from the publisher for free. All opinions are my own and I was not required to write a positive review."
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  • Andi
    January 1, 1970
    Like the first book in the series, Things I Never Told You, this book grabbed at my heart. My heart broke and in Ms. Vogt's unique way was put back together again. Families are complicated and there is no other more complicated relationship than that of siblings. It's raw, real, and can change in a matter of minutes. I didn't grow up with sisters, I had a younger brother, and our relationship is complicated. I did, however raise three girls and I have a front row seat to how complicated and intr Like the first book in the series, Things I Never Told You, this book grabbed at my heart. My heart broke and in Ms. Vogt's unique way was put back together again. Families are complicated and there is no other more complicated relationship than that of siblings. It's raw, real, and can change in a matter of minutes. I didn't grow up with sisters, I had a younger brother, and our relationship is complicated. I did, however raise three girls and I have a front row seat to how complicated and intricate these relationships are. The push and pull of disappointments, struggles, and emotional baggage individually and with each of the sister's is real, raw, and palpable. Several times while reading I wanted to reach through the pages and smack them all. Which is what good fiction does to a reader. Making you care about each of the characters and the turmoil of a situation they are in. I enjoyed every part of this book even the parts that made me crazy. I have fallen in love with Johanna, Jillian and Peyton and their stories both individually and collectively. I also walked away from this story with hope. Hope that even in our struggles, disappointments, and pain God sees all of it and He's right there with us. Something we all need not forget. After reading book one in the series, Things I Never Told You, I was completely invested. I am now anxious for Johanna's story. Contemporary Women's Fiction is a genre that is known for it's emotional, relational ties and Ms. Vogt is making a name for herself within this genre. And I for one am anxious to see where her writing goes from here. Disclaimer:I received a copy of this book via the publisher in association with Beth Vogt's street team. I was not required to write a review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Suzie Waltner
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 StarsIn the second book in Beth Vogt’s Thatcher Family series, three sisters are having a very challenging year. Moments We Forget is centered around Jillian (the middle sister) but both Payton and Johanna have their moments to.As Jillian’s struggle with being the invisible one in her family carries over into her marriage and disappointment after disappointment assault her, she struggles to fight her way to some type of hope. Hope that her dreams will be realized, hope that she will heal fro 4.5 StarsIn the second book in Beth Vogt’s Thatcher Family series, three sisters are having a very challenging year. Moments We Forget is centered around Jillian (the middle sister) but both Payton and Johanna have their moments to.As Jillian’s struggle with being the invisible one in her family carries over into her marriage and disappointment after disappointment assault her, she struggles to fight her way to some type of hope. Hope that her dreams will be realized, hope that she will heal from her breast cancer treatment, hope that her best friend won’t forget about her completely. Yet in the darkness of the valley she’s walked through the previous year, she’s learning things about herself and her husband she would have probably never learned without this time of struggle.It’s sometimes heartbreaking how these three sisters who share a family and a huge loss each live in their own world when they have that built-in support system. Yet there are glimpses of those sisterly bonds being built stronger than before. Sure, there’s still bickering and outright disagreements but these three women are learning to respect each other a little bit more than they have before.Vogt gives readers a lot to digest in this one but she also gives them a wonderful ending that fits so well with the entire story, you end with a feeling of…well, hope.Disclosure statement:I receive complimentary books from publishers, publicists, and/or authors, including NetGalley. I am not required to write positive reviews. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.
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  • Carole Jarvis
    January 1, 1970
    Reviewed at The Power of Words: https://bit.ly/2DV4GlLMoments We Forget is a moving, character-driven story that quickly captured my interest and never let go. The Thatcher sisters – Johanna, Jillian, and Payton – couldn’t feel more real. I’m an only child who has always yearned for siblings, so I would take these sisters in a heartbeat, flaws and all. Women’s fiction is my favorite genre, and Beth Vogt shines in this area. The prose flows steadily, characters are well drawn and easily relatable Reviewed at The Power of Words: https://bit.ly/2DV4GlLMoments We Forget is a moving, character-driven story that quickly captured my interest and never let go. The Thatcher sisters – Johanna, Jillian, and Payton – couldn’t feel more real. I’m an only child who has always yearned for siblings, so I would take these sisters in a heartbeat, flaws and all. Women’s fiction is my favorite genre, and Beth Vogt shines in this area. The prose flows steadily, characters are well drawn and easily relatable, and emotions honest. I expect many sisters can identify with Johanna, Jillian, and Payton – who loved each other, yet couldn’t help but push each other’s buttons at times and struggled to get along. Moments We Forget is my first introduction to the series, so I’ve missed some background from Things I Never Told You, but this story can still stand alone. I loved the relevance of this story as the sisters struggle daily with life’s difficulties, such as the loss of a sibling and a cancer diagnosis. And rather than starting out as Christians, the series is more about an exploring of faith and all that it could mean personally. Transformation is a beautiful theme, as is the reality that love can be present in the midst of messy relationships. I came to know all three sisters well, but feel there is a lot more to learn about the often stiff and unbending Johanna.Highly recommended.I received a copy of this book through Celebrate Lit and Tyndale House. The opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.
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  • Tressa (Wishful Endings)
    January 1, 1970
    MOMENTS WE FORGET is a story about three sisters who haven't gotten along most of their lives who are trying to reconnect and find that there are some things that join them together. Recommended to Women's Fiction and Contemporary Romance readers.The beginning of this story threw me a little. I hadn't read the first book and I felt like I was missing some pieces. There also are quite a few different POVs and not a lot of intro into each one at first. However, it didn't take me long to get everyo MOMENTS WE FORGET is a story about three sisters who haven't gotten along most of their lives who are trying to reconnect and find that there are some things that join them together. Recommended to Women's Fiction and Contemporary Romance readers.The beginning of this story threw me a little. I hadn't read the first book and I felt like I was missing some pieces. There also are quite a few different POVs and not a lot of intro into each one at first. However, it didn't take me long to get everyone straight and get into this book.Each one of these sisters was easy to relate to in some way. They each have their strengths and their weaknesses and their struggles. Some of them feel like their life is going perfectly and then catastrophe strikes. Surprisingly (at least to them), they learn to lean on each other. There is romance, friendship, forgiveness, heartbreak (oh, the heartbreak - grab the tissues!), faith, and love woven through this story. These sisters aren't quite done and I'm hoping for a more resolved happily-ever-after in the next book.In the end, was it what I wished for? I really enjoyed this story. It was heartfelt, genuine, pulled on my emotions, and I couldn't help but fall in love with these sisters. I'm looking forward to more!Content: Some innuendo, couples living together.Source: I received a complimentary copy from the publisher, which did not require a positive review nor affect my review in any way.
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  • Susan L. Tuttle
    January 1, 1970
    I've been a fan of Vogt for quite some time, and honestly, I wasn't sure what to expect when she switched from contemporary romance to women's fiction. I picked the first book up in this series because I love her as an author and figured I'd give it a chance, and I'm SO glad I did. I immediately fell in love with the Thatcher sisters, so I was ready for this sequel which didn't disappoint. While it's certainly a deep read full of the ups and downs of family and real life, there's also moments of I've been a fan of Vogt for quite some time, and honestly, I wasn't sure what to expect when she switched from contemporary romance to women's fiction. I picked the first book up in this series because I love her as an author and figured I'd give it a chance, and I'm SO glad I did. I immediately fell in love with the Thatcher sisters, so I was ready for this sequel which didn't disappoint. While it's certainly a deep read full of the ups and downs of family and real life, there's also moments of levity and touches of romance. I truly did smile, laugh, and tear up at several different moments, and I finished this book looking forward to the final in the series. As a sister myself, Vogt has truly nailed this difficult dynamic and written a book full of heart that's enjoyable for all readers.I did receive an early copy of this book from the publisher but was under no obligation to write any review, nor do I receive anything for doing so. This review was written simply because I loved the book. All views are completely my own.
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  • Nicole Cook
    January 1, 1970
    Originally on Inkwell Inspirations: https://www.inkwellinspirations.com/2...Beth K. Vogt takes readers on an incredible journey in her latest novel Moments We Forget as she further explores the complicated relationships and family dynamics between the three Thatcher sisters - Johanna, Jillian, and Payton. This is the second book in the Thatcher Sisters series. I did not read the first book in the series (Things I Never Told You), but the author provides enough of the backstory so that the reader Originally on Inkwell Inspirations: https://www.inkwellinspirations.com/2...Beth K. Vogt takes readers on an incredible journey in her latest novel Moments We Forget as she further explores the complicated relationships and family dynamics between the three Thatcher sisters - Johanna, Jillian, and Payton. This is the second book in the Thatcher Sisters series. I did not read the first book in the series (Things I Never Told You), but the author provides enough of the backstory so that the readers are able to easily follow the storyline. However, there were some aspects of the storyline, such as the story behind the youngest sister’s (Payton’s twin) death years before, that were mentioned in this novel and appeared to be discussed more in depth in the previous novel. Therefore, I would recommend reading Things I Never Told You first if readers have the opportunity to do so. Readers will share in the Thatcher sisters’ heartbreak, loss, and struggles with their significant others as they follow middle sister Jillian’s recovery from breast cancer and her lingering chemo brain, older sister Johanna’s frustration with her job and long-distance relationship, and younger sister Payton’s difficulty to find her way in life years after her twin sister’s death. Beth K. Vogt paints a realistic picture of those struggling with their faith and trying to find their way to God when others in their lives do not share the same interests and question the importance of religion. Topics of adoption and infidelity were also discussed. In one part of the novel, Jillian discussed what her favorite part of the candlelight Christmas Eve service she attended was. She said that her favorite part was “when they darkened the sanctuary and we all sang ‘Silent Night’ and everyone lit each other’s candle, one by one” because it made her feel some of the peace that she was looking for. Beth K. Vogt was able to make the readers feel like they were right there at the Christmas Eve service. I could completely relate to that powerful feeling of peace when I attend Christmas Eve candlelight services at my own church and the congregation sings ‘Silent Night.’ Moments We Forget is recommended for readers of women’s fiction. Readers will enjoy this second installment in the Thatcher Sisters series and will look forward to the third book in the series. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Tyndale House Publishers and was not required to write a positive review. All opinions expressed are mine. “Yes. Believing in God, the real God - that He loves me, that He has a plan for my life - gives me hope.”“Life’s not perfect. And I’m not perfect. But for the first time, I’m beginning to be okay with that because I don’t have to have all the answers. I don’t have to fix everything.”
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  • Sharon Huether
    January 1, 1970
    Three sisters remained, Jillian,Johanna and Payton. the fourth Pepper had died. The sisters got together regularly for their book club. Jillian had beat cancer,but wasn't sure she could have children. Geoff didn't want to adopt.Johanna and Beckett were engaged for a long time. No wedding date was set.Payton missed her twin sister Pepper. Pepper was a Christian and had left a cross necklace for Payton.Payton wanted to know God as Pepper had. When she became a believer Zach asked her to marry him. Three sisters remained, Jillian,Johanna and Payton. the fourth Pepper had died. The sisters got together regularly for their book club. Jillian had beat cancer,but wasn't sure she could have children. Geoff didn't want to adopt.Johanna and Beckett were engaged for a long time. No wedding date was set.Payton missed her twin sister Pepper. Pepper was a Christian and had left a cross necklace for Payton.Payton wanted to know God as Pepper had. When she became a believer Zach asked her to marry him.At their wedding the sister's lives had changed.Jillian was ok with what the future held for her.Johanna had left Beckett, because of his infidelity .Payton was now married to Zach.I won this free book from Goodreads First reads.
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  • Tari
    January 1, 1970
    Beth Vogt is such a strong voice in women’s fiction. In this second book of the Thacher Sisters, Vogt takes you deeper with emotion and heart on every page. If you fell in love with Payton, Jillian, and Johanna in Things I Never Told You, you will not want to miss this book.
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  • Casey
    January 1, 1970
    Good women’s fiction resonates and resounds within the heart of the reader; Moments We Forget is just such fiction. Picking up where Things I Never Told You left off, this novel jumps into the middle of Jillian’s life and walks through the hard, hard recovery from a stealing disease. Weaving in threads of Payton and Johanna’s story as well, MWF becomes a layered story, delving deep into heart issues and relationships between three estranged—but growing back together again—sisters. Written with h Good women’s fiction resonates and resounds within the heart of the reader; Moments We Forget is just such fiction. Picking up where Things I Never Told You left off, this novel jumps into the middle of Jillian’s life and walks through the hard, hard recovery from a stealing disease. Weaving in threads of Payton and Johanna’s story as well, MWF becomes a layered story, delving deep into heart issues and relationships between three estranged—but growing back together again—sisters. Written with heart and pose, depth and skill, this novel is one that will wrap around your heart. One to savor and yet one to finish so you might get that much closer to an ending and resolution for these three sisters have been through so much. And I didn’t think I’d say this: but I’m actually quite looking forward to Johanna’s story. Highly recommended to readers of fiction that doesn’t stay on the surface, but goes deep.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Beth Vogt is the master at writing an emotional filled novel and Moments We Forget is no different. The characters are likeable and relatable going through true to life events. I loved Jillian right the beginning. Having many friends who fought through cancer, I was rooting for her. I could see their strength and bravery in her. Her story made me want to grab a box of tissues at times. I would give Moments We Forget one hundred stars if I could but will have to settle with five stars. I do want Beth Vogt is the master at writing an emotional filled novel and Moments We Forget is no different. The characters are likeable and relatable going through true to life events. I loved Jillian right the beginning. Having many friends who fought through cancer, I was rooting for her. I could see their strength and bravery in her. Her story made me want to grab a box of tissues at times. I would give Moments We Forget one hundred stars if I could but will have to settle with five stars. I do want to note that I was not aware this book was part of the Thatcher series. I have only read this one of the series. With that being said, in my opinion, it could be read as a stand alone. Moments We Forget is a great book! One of my favorites of the year. I highly recommend this book. It is most definitely not one to be missed.I received this book from the publisher. This review is 100% my own honest opinion.
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  • JoAnn
    January 1, 1970
    Moments We Forget is an absolutely awesome book and a great addition to the Thatcher Sisters series. I will be impatiently waiting for the next book. The book is well written with a great plot and well developed characters. I really enjoyed Jillian's story about her recovery from breast cancer. I highly recommend this book. I received an advance reader copy from the publisher and Netgalley. This is my unbiased review.
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  • Clara
    January 1, 1970
    I completely love this series. The raw, courageous and vulnerable writing. So I devoured this book every chance I got!In the previous book, we learned some of the scars that dictate the Thatcher family dynamics. In the second book, I was glad to get to know Jilly and Johanna much more and catch up with Payton, whose story continued (I don't want to say concluded because I really really hope we still get to catch up with her from a personal level) beautifully so <3In contemporary novels, I fee I completely love this series. The raw, courageous and vulnerable writing. So I devoured this book every chance I got!In the previous book, we learned some of the scars that dictate the Thatcher family dynamics. In the second book, I was glad to get to know Jilly and Johanna much more and catch up with Payton, whose story continued (I don't want to say concluded because I really really hope we still get to catch up with her from a personal level) beautifully so <3In contemporary novels, I feel like there's a fine line to cross between realistic challenges and too much, and I think Jillian had had her fair amount of struggle in the past year after radio and chemo. From page one in this book, I saw an organic flow in her pathway towards recovery, and, for those who read the first book, it was no surprise that Jilly's self-image would be addressed. But there's nothing she and her night and shining armor could face together, right?Except, Geoff fell from her white horse and completely lost said shiny armor - all without crossing that too fine line of "too much drama in a characters life". Jillian and Geoff's steadfast love shone in the first book and Beth K Vogt wisely gave the opportunity for it to shine again, only in a different angle. And this was satisfying, so much that I can't wait to follow up with their story in the third book.A book that will focus more on Johanna - the controlling, difficult sister. But it's impossible for her not to tug on your heart string, and you don't even have to wait much for that to happen in this book.The story of the Thatcher sisters is approachable and this is what I love the most about these books. We don't have to go through the same challenges, but questions of the heart don't always vary that much. And, so, alongside them, we can learn the freedom of sitting with the doubt without questioning who we are, or, better yet, Whose. As I said before, I really can't wait until the third book.* I received a complimentary copy of this book from Tyndale through Edelweiss. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Phyllis
    January 1, 1970
    Finding hope in a world of insecurityMy rating is 4.5 starsMoments We Forget is the deeply moving continuation of the story of the Thatcher sisters, picking up with Jillian's viewpoint. As the middle sister, she struggled with finding her worth - having never felt like she measured up. She wasn't as organized and in control as Jillian and wasn't athletic like the twins. In fact, she was short and overweight. . .Anyone who has also felt they were ""just"" will be able to relate well to Jillian. I Finding hope in a world of insecurityMy rating is 4.5 starsMoments We Forget is the deeply moving continuation of the story of the Thatcher sisters, picking up with Jillian's viewpoint. As the middle sister, she struggled with finding her worth - having never felt like she measured up. She wasn't as organized and in control as Jillian and wasn't athletic like the twins. In fact, she was short and overweight. . .Anyone who has also felt they were ""just"" will be able to relate well to Jillian. I was very touched by her struggles which were compounded by the effects the chemo and radiation wreaked on her body and her brain. As the circumstances of her life appeared to crash down around her, she discovered hope.I have to admit that after reading Things I Never Told You and liking Geoff so very much, I was a little nervous about this book. After all, what kind of life-altering revelation could he make? I won't give any spoilers and will let you stew as I did. I'll just say that I was surprised – and I do still like Geoff!As with Things I Never Told You, we are still given glimpses of the lives of Juliana and Peyton and I'm so glad. Peyton continues to struggle with her view of God and whether she even believes he exists. Her biggest struggle has become whether her choice to believe is because of her love for Zach. And Juliana - let me just say that she is becoming more human as her dreams are beginning to shatter around her. Not that I would wish these things on anyone, yet I can sense good things in store for her.I'm in the middle of three sisters and sometimes wonder what is wrong with my family when I read stories of the families who are so close they do everything together, even as adults. While my family isn't as dysfunctional as the Thatcher sisters (thank you, Lord!), it is refreshing to see a book that deals with the other side of families. The portrayal of each sister and the struggles they have finding into their place in the family are similar to those in my family and so I was able to relate so well.Don't even bother trying to read this before reading Things I Never Told You. I imagine it could stand alone yet feel you would miss out of so much by not getting the rest of the story. And yes, there is another book coming but don't wait to read these until it comes out. This is the type of story that stays with you so you won't be lost when you start reading the next one.I do hope the author will not only tell us Juliana's story but will also have a one for Harper, Jillian's best friend!Read my full review at at Among the ReadsI was given a copy of this book. I was not required to give a favorable review nor was any money received for this review. All comments and opinions are my own.
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  • Jessica Baker (A Baker's Perspective)
    January 1, 1970
    Let me start by saying how sorry I am that I did not read the first book in this series! Not because I felt lost in this one, because I didn’t at all. Vogt does a wonderful job of putting little back stories here and there to catch a new reader up. BUT I feel like had I read book one first, my emotions probably would have been even more heightened (and at times they were pretty high!). So my first recommendation to you is start at the beginning. I think it’ll be worth it.This book as so much emo Let me start by saying how sorry I am that I did not read the first book in this series! Not because I felt lost in this one, because I didn’t at all. Vogt does a wonderful job of putting little back stories here and there to catch a new reader up. BUT I feel like had I read book one first, my emotions probably would have been even more heightened (and at times they were pretty high!). So my first recommendation to you is start at the beginning. I think it’ll be worth it.This book as so much emotion in it. While I don’t have any sisters, I was still able to find a little connection with each sister, because essentially they all remind me of people in my life. And yes, I do argue with these people from time to time. That’s what people with differing personalities tend to do from time to time. The Thatcher sisters still loved each other, and would help each other out if needed. They just needed to reach a point where they were comfortable laying their burdens out. Galatians 6:2 tells us to “Bear ye one another’s burdens”, and this was one of the hard lessons these sisters had to learn.The part of the story line that intrigued me the most was Payton’s walk with the Lord. She was so raw and honest with her thought process. She truly wanted to make sure that she wasn’t starting a relationship with God for Pepper, or Zach. She needed to make sure she was doing it for herself. That statement is such an inspiration to me as a reader. It’s something I think our young people today need to hear. God doesn’t want you to seek Him to please other people. At the same time, Payton realizes that God is patient. And oh, is He ever patient! He didn’t want her rushing into a decision either, and so He gave her little seeds here and there, and allowed her the freedom and time to sort it all out on her own. I may have loved the drama, the relationships, the mix of emotions while I was reading this book, but this – this is what I loved the most.Vogt certainly has a way with writing relationships. The good, the bad, the ugly, and the redemption. Jillian’s own journey about having children in her future just about put me to tears. I can’t really expand on that anymore to avoid spoilers, but the way Vogt wrote that story line was a surprise to me. I did not at all expect what came to be between Jillian and her husband. I better stop talking before I give it away 🙂This book, no this series is a must read. I will definitely be going back to book one (shame on me for even missing it!), and look forward to the next release. Hopefully you will be too! I received a complimentary copy of this book. I was not required to write a favorable review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    Moments We Forget by Beth K. Vogt is an unforgettable story. It is so poignant and heart-wrenching I’m still emotional days after finishing. My heart absolutely goes out to Jillian and her sisters, Payton and Johanna. Life really does a number on all three of them in this book. Even though my heart is a little more tender after having read this story, I am leaving these pages with such a pervasive sense of hope. I am so encouraged by Jillian’s and Payton’s new-found ability to leave it all to Go Moments We Forget by Beth K. Vogt is an unforgettable story. It is so poignant and heart-wrenching I’m still emotional days after finishing. My heart absolutely goes out to Jillian and her sisters, Payton and Johanna. Life really does a number on all three of them in this book. Even though my heart is a little more tender after having read this story, I am leaving these pages with such a pervasive sense of hope. I am so encouraged by Jillian’s and Payton’s new-found ability to leave it all to God’s will. They don’t know what their future’s hold, but they are OK with that. God’s got capable hands and He will get them through anything that comes their way. I’m leaving this novel with the same sense — God’s got this, and He’ll take care of me and my walk with Him. What a lovely, hope-filled way to leave a story!Jillian is perfectly written. Her number one problem? Not the after-effects of cancer, not the side effects of chemo and dealing with chemo brain, not even a semi-disastrous kitchen remodel. Nope, these are not Jillian’s biggest problems. Her biggest issue is that she has always been “just Jillian.” Jillian is not like her perfect older sister, Johanna, who is always impressive and always has it together. She’s not like her amazingly athletic, talented, and beautiful twin sisters either. She’s “just Jillian,” and she hates it. As “just Jillian,” she is often dismissed and invisible. She is the girl who cannot catch a break, and she often has to watch as her dreams die. To the world, “just Jillian” is nothing. Honestly, the world sees her as a bit of a loser. Jillian almost caves and begins to believe that maybe she is just a “just” kind of girl. But then Jillian discovers the Truth — to God, Jillian is just the woman He needs.I’m not going to lie, I bawled my eyes out. I’ve been “just Nicole” my entire life. Someone has always been better than me. No matter how hard I played, my brother Joey was seen as the better soccer player; everyone went to his games, not mine. No matter how hard I worked, when I presented my family with my Master’s Thesis the first thing they saw was a typo I didn’t catch. And, when I introduced my family to the man I was going to marry, all they could do was cut me down in front of him — of course, it was all a good joke at my expense. To my family, I have always been “just Nicole.” Like Jillian, it bothered me so hard. It took me a long time and a lot of tears, but as Jillian learns in Moments We Forget, I too learned that I am just the woman God needs. When we “just” girls realize who we are in Christ, we can overcome all the soul-hurting comments and judgments of the world, of our families. And we can handle being overlooked or ignored by those we love because we know God sees us, and that is all that truly matters. This is such a hopeful, positive message. One I am going to strive to remember the next time someone in this world makes me feel like a “just.”Moments We Forget is a fantastic novel. I very much enjoyed every minute of this thought-provoking, heart-wrenching, hope-inducing story. I am sad my time with the Thatcher sisters is over … for now. Moments We Forget is another 2019 must-read — one I cannot recommend enough!I received a review copy of this novel in eBook form from the publisher, Tyndale, via NetGalley. In no way has this influenced my review. The opinions expressed in this review are my own.
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  • Becca-Rae Weidel
    January 1, 1970
    Last year I read and reviewed the first book in this series called Things I Never Told You. Since then I've been anxiously awaiting the next in the series to release. Many of my thoughts towards this book are similar in nature to the first. This book turns it's main focus to Jillian, the middle sister, but all three sisters are present throughout. It's told in first person through Jillian, and third person through Johanna. Families are complicated, and can have their ugly and beautiful moments e Last year I read and reviewed the first book in this series called Things I Never Told You. Since then I've been anxiously awaiting the next in the series to release. Many of my thoughts towards this book are similar in nature to the first. This book turns it's main focus to Jillian, the middle sister, but all three sisters are present throughout. It's told in first person through Jillian, and third person through Johanna. Families are complicated, and can have their ugly and beautiful moments even within a 10 minute span. There is a rawness that people that have that is often only released when they are with their family or those who are the closest to them. The Thatcher sisters have a whole lot of obstacles in their lives individually, and their relationships may suffer from frequent tension, but at the end of the day they realize that they are sisters and nothing will change that.What I loved most about this book was how personal Payton had made her journey to faith. She wasn't sure what she believed, but she knew she believed in God and was hungry to know more. What she didn't want, was to become a Christian for the wrong reasons. She didn't want to decide she was a Christian so she could wear her deceased sister's necklace, and she didn't want to do it so she could have a relationship with Zach. She recognized the enormity of the decision on a personal level and wanted it to be a direct relationship between her and her Heavenly Father alone before anyone else was included in the picture. I absolutely loved how this worked itself out throughout the novel.There is no denying that Jillian seems to be struck with obstacle after obstacle in her life. She has a whole heap of emotions that she struggles to work through to just to feel like she's keeping her head above water. I would have liked to see her faith journey start a bit earlier so that it could have been a larger part of her story in this one, but I have hope that a third book will be released that can show her walking through more of that. Being a middle child myself, I can relate to a lot of the "middle-child-itis" she deals with. I hope that her future is brighter for her.I thoroughly loved this story and highly recommend it. I would keep in mind that this is the second book in a series, and this is one that I wouldn't recommend reading out of order. There is too much backstory in the first book that is necessary to fully appreciate and understand this one. *I received a copy of this book through CelebrateLit and NetGalley. Thoughts and opinions expressed are mine alone.
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  • Connie Saunders
    January 1, 1970
    When I began reading this book it was apparent that there was a lot of tension in the relationships of the three sisters in Moments We Forget. Jillian is the middle Thatcher sister and she considers herself the peacemaker between her older and younger sister but she also feels like she is a little overlooked. She feels like she has been branded "just Jillian" and that she has worn this brand most of her life! Jillian is now fighting the after effects of her cancer diagnosis.The chemo and radiati When I began reading this book it was apparent that there was a lot of tension in the relationships of the three sisters in Moments We Forget. Jillian is the middle Thatcher sister and she considers herself the peacemaker between her older and younger sister but she also feels like she is a little overlooked. She feels like she has been branded "just Jillian" and that she has worn this brand most of her life! Jillian is now fighting the after effects of her cancer diagnosis.The chemo and radiation treatments have zapped her energy, messed with her memory and her ability to complete her daily tasks, and she is currently unable to have a baby. Jillian also senses a distance developing between her and her biggest champion, her husband Geoff. As I read this story, I realized that having a sister (or sisters) may not always be as perfect as some would have you believe. Family dynamics don't always make for a perfect sibling relationship and these Thatcher sisters are also missing the comfort that faith can offer. The Thatchers are non-believers during much of Moments We Forget but Beth K. Vogt does show two of the sisters reaching out to God. I was especially touched as Jillian contemplates her problems and her family's lack of belief in God. As she wondered about God loving someone as insignificant as her, Jillian realized that if she could find her way to a big, loving God who could fix all of her problems she would run straight to Him! Vogt allows readers to witness how God has a way of turning the coldest hearts warm and drawing the most reluctant people closer to Him. Moments We Forget is the second book of The Thatchers series and I didn't feel like I needed to have read the first book. I do, however, hope to read Things I Never Told You because I believe I would have an even deeper understanding of these three sisters. I look forward to learning more of their story!This is a contemporary fiction novel and it focuses on some of the issues that many of us have encountered: death. grief, infertility, adoption and unfaithfulness. It isn't, however, all doom and gloom because the author also reminds us of the importance of family, of moments to remember and moments to forget, and the ever-present hope that comes from believing and trusting in God! I received a complimentary digital copy of this book from the author and Celebrate Lit but I wasn't obligated to write a positive review.
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  • Meagan
    January 1, 1970
    After reading “Things I Never Told You,” I was eager to read the next installation, “Moments We Forget,” in the Thatcher Sisters series by Beth K. Vogt. “Moments We Forget” is a beautiful story that focuses on the middle sister Jillian. I thought it was very creative and poignant to talk about the aftermath of a cancer diagnosis and to show what people who have chemo go through such as “chemo brain” and difficulty getting pregnant. It was so powerful and touching to experience Jillian’s journey. After reading “Things I Never Told You,” I was eager to read the next installation, “Moments We Forget,” in the Thatcher Sisters series by Beth K. Vogt. “Moments We Forget” is a beautiful story that focuses on the middle sister Jillian. I thought it was very creative and poignant to talk about the aftermath of a cancer diagnosis and to show what people who have chemo go through such as “chemo brain” and difficulty getting pregnant. It was so powerful and touching to experience Jillian’s journey. Jillian goes through a lot of challenges in this novel, and it’s rewarding to see her character’s strength come through and how she grows.Familial relationships, especially with sisters, is a big focus of this book. It’s always interesting to look at the different roles that siblings have within the family unit, whether they are the oldest, middle, or youngest, and how those roles shape their personalities and their lives.All of the details from Geoff’s past were woven together into the story masterfully, and I liked seeing how his history impacted his marriage with Jillian. The evolution of the characters’ faith journeys was also a big part of the book, and I absolutely loved seeing more with Payton and Zach’s relationship. I also enjoyed how Payton’s and Jillian’s faith journeys are intertwined. Even though this story is mostly about Jillian, we also see more about Johanna and Beckett. I liked seeing more about life from Johanna’s point of view because I think she is one of those characters that we may instantly dislike because she seemed to enjoy bossing her sisters around. But I think there is more to Johanna and why she acts the way she does. Reading from her perspective reminded me of why it’s important to see situations from different angles and from different points of view. There is usually a reason why someone acts the way they do. I’m excited to read more about her story in the next book.I also really enjoyed the club scenes. These characters are dealing with a lot of hard things and a lot of hurt, so the scenes aren’t really supposed to be funny. But as I was reading, I did chuckle a few times because you have to give them credit for continuing to try even though their meetings never ended up as they planned. They were definitely determined!Thank you to the publisher and the author for an ARC. All opinions stated here are my own.
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  • MJSH
    January 1, 1970
    "And me? I would always be the designated driver of the emotional vehicle that carried our merry little trio."Brace yourself for an emotional impact when you pick up this book. This book, written in first person perspective from middle sister Jillian and third person from oldest sister Johanna and youngest sister Payton, will burrow deep into your heart with its raw, real, and heart-rendering discovery of self, love, sisterhood, and faith as the sisters battle the hard things of life like cancer "And me? I would always be the designated driver of the emotional vehicle that carried our merry little trio."Brace yourself for an emotional impact when you pick up this book. This book, written in first person perspective from middle sister Jillian and third person from oldest sister Johanna and youngest sister Payton, will burrow deep into your heart with its raw, real, and heart-rendering discovery of self, love, sisterhood, and faith as the sisters battle the hard things of life like cancer survival, insecurity of never being seen and never being enough, past family tragedies, betrayal, and loss of hopes and dreams. I didn't read the first book (Things I Never Told You) and I do feel that I missed some background history of Payton and her deceased twin sister Pepper but the author did an excellent job of weaving the past and Payton's story from book one into this storyline. I don't have sisters but felt the sisterly dynamic and the struggle of sisterhood all the way down to my bones due to the author's gift with words. Beth Vogt paints a beautifully broken world full of hurting people striving for hope in the Thatcher sisters and those looking for a stirring and insightful contemporary women's fiction will love this book.Jillian, the forever peacemaker in the family, is at the bottom of the pit, even after surviving breast cancer. As her life spirals out of control, her oldest sister Johanna, who has had her life in a neat and tidy square box all her life, faces personal challenges and work changes that send her life spinning. Payton, the youngest, is still trying to come to grips with her newfound faith and her budding feelings for Zach as her overloaded school and work schedule threaten to topple her. The three sisters are very different but compliment each other so well when they're actually in agreement. Payton and Jillian's walk toward faith is natural and encouraging.I can't wait to read the third book, which will likely feature Johanna as the first person narrator. She's the least likable of the three sisters but I'm sure that she'll have the biggest change of heart and spirit that will draw the sisters in a tighter bond than just genetics alone.I received a copy of the book from Tyndale House Publishers via Celebrate Lit Tours and was under no obligation to post a positive review. All comments and opinions are solely my own.
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