Brown Girl Ghosted
Violet Choudry may be part of the popular clique at school, but as one of a handful of brown girls in a small Illinois town, all she really wants to do is blend in. Unfortunately for her, she’s got a knack for seeing spirits. When the queen bee of the school ends up dead following a leaked sex tape, Violet's friends from the spirit world decide it’s the perfect time for Violet to test her skills and finally accept the legacy of spiritual fighters from whom she’s descended. Her mission? Find the killer. Or else she’s next.

Brown Girl Ghosted Details

TitleBrown Girl Ghosted
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 24th, 2020
PublisherHMH Books For Young Readers
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Fantasy, Horror, Thriller

Brown Girl Ghosted Review

  • Renata
    January 1, 1970
    This book was billed as "We Were Liars meets Riverdale" and I was like SIGN ME UP, but that is......not at all accurate?! I think something like Buffy the Vampire Slayer would be a better (if older) comp. But, fine, that's not the author's fault. What is the author's fault is the reallllllly weak character and worldbuilding. The premise--Violet Choudhury is called to be an aideo, an ancient order of warriors trained as guardians against demons & other supernatural baddies, but she rejects it This book was billed as "We Were Liars meets Riverdale" and I was like SIGN ME UP, but that is......not at all accurate?! I think something like Buffy the Vampire Slayer would be a better (if older) comp. But, fine, that's not the author's fault. What is the author's fault is the reallllllly weak character and worldbuilding. The premise--Violet Choudhury is called to be an aideo, an ancient order of warriors trained as guardians against demons & other supernatural baddies, but she rejects it because a) her mom died (or did she?) on aideo affairs and also b) she's one of very few kids of color in her small midwestern town so she doesn't want to do anything that would make her stand out...ok, sure, I can work with that premise! Honestly would LOVE to work with that premise, I'm always looking for more diverse urban fantasy-type books to read.But then it's just like...we learn SO little about Violet beyond the fact that she doesn't want to stand out in a crowd. And we learn so little about the aiedeo itself--like at first I assumed it was tied to Indian culture but then the main other aiedeo figure we see is a rando white dude named Lukas (who has a really weak enemies-to-romance going with Violet). also--I think this was just because of an error in the ARC formatting that abruptly inserted Lukas's POV into the middle of chapters, but it was off-putting.Also I searched for the term "aiedeo" to see if that was an actual tradition from India, and the ONLY matches I found for it are for this author's full name, Aideo Mintie Das. Honestly kind of a baller move, if confusing, since other terms used are from aspects of Indian culture/religion (BTW I know "Indian culture/religion" is like a really broad term) like "bhoot" (Sanskrit for "ghost") are used.Anyway then the PLOT involves her having to solve the rape and murder of the school queen bee, and Violet learns Valuable Lessons about slutshaming and not running away from her ghosthunting duties. It's just kind of a mess and also wasn't even very entertaining (which, say what you will about Riverdale, it's ALWAYS entertaining.)
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  • Sacha
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this arc, which I received in exchange for an honest review. Here is that review (updated 3/26/20): Not even one starI do not normally rate books that I DNF, especially when I do so this early on (I had to FORCE myself to get to 15%), but I would like for folks to consider this a warning not to waste their time. Also, I skimmed the rest to see if I should persist. NO. This novel needs so much editing. The flow of information is nearly impossible to Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this arc, which I received in exchange for an honest review. Here is that review (updated 3/26/20): Not even one starI do not normally rate books that I DNF, especially when I do so this early on (I had to FORCE myself to get to 15%), but I would like for folks to consider this a warning not to waste their time. Also, I skimmed the rest to see if I should persist. NO. This novel needs so much editing. The flow of information is nearly impossible to follow. The main character sounds like a 40-year-old trying to talk like a teenager. The word choice, the interactions between characters, and so on are ridiculous. My mom might as well have run into the room while I was reading and yelled, "That's like totally tubular!" in 2019. I laughed repeatedly and inappropriately several times during the first couple of chapters due to the bizarre choices demonstrated throughout. Like many other reviewers (I HAD to know if others were having the same extreme reactions), I thought the premise sounded super interesting and was excited to read this. However, it is a complete disaster, and that is apparent from the jump. I truly dislike writing negative reviews because I know how much work and heart go into producing a text. That noted, I'm having a hard time understanding how this is making it to publication. I hope to see much more polished, organized, and focused work from this author in the future. There is NO chance I'll be recommending this to my students or colleagues.
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  • Carolina
    January 1, 1970
    wtf did i just read skskajsjsjshsh
  • Lilyn G. | Sci-Fi & Scary |
    January 1, 1970
    1 star for the uterus to get it published. Everyone gets that from me.1 star for good topics.Full review to come later.Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from Netgalley for review consideration.
  • Kacey
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for the free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. My thoughts are not affected by the free copy.This is a really difficult one to talk about, because it does touch on a lot of things that are important and worth discussing. The main character brings up a lot of racial issues, sex issues, gender issues, nationality/heritage issues, and that's all really well done. But something about the writing style never quite clicked with me. The Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for the free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. My thoughts are not affected by the free copy.This is a really difficult one to talk about, because it does touch on a lot of things that are important and worth discussing. The main character brings up a lot of racial issues, sex issues, gender issues, nationality/heritage issues, and that's all really well done. But something about the writing style never quite clicked with me. The mystery was pretty lackluster, and the ending was just plain terrible. But I'll get to all that.Let's first tackle the overall style and plot. A lot of it is infodumped by way of the main character explaining things. She does it in an odd way, too, making it feel like she's interrupting the natural flow of dialogue to give more exposition on things. And it never seems to stop. Even when it gets closer to the climax she's still explaining stuff. How about showing us rather than telling us? The plot is also really strange. I do like this different take on ghosts-- bhoots, as they're called here-- and the more vicious nature of them. I like that Violet was in actual danger because of them. But with all the exposition and set-up, the actual plot doesn't really happen until almost halfway into the book. Since this is a murder mystery, starting the plot at the halfway mark doesn't leave much time for setting up clues, suspects and so forth before the reveal. All of that on its own would be difficult to do without adding in the Aeideo and this bigger battle Violet is going through. It reminded me of Charmed and how demons were influencing people to kill each other. That set-up really rubbed me the wrong way here. Like all of this was just a test for Violet to embrace her powers. It puts a completely different perspective on the murderer, the victim, and the search for the killer. Again, it is different having someone forced into investigating a murder, but I can't say I liked it. Then there's the conclusion and the ending, which are both terrible. I didn't like having the demon influence being a factor into the murder, and I definitely did not like the cliffhanger ending that is obviously a segway into a sequel. That is not a way to end a book, guys. It's a way to finish a chapter.All the pop culture references got on my nerves a little bit, too. Some of them are a little strange. What teenager would know who Hercule Poirot is? And since Violet is so extremely pop culture savvy, how is it she doesn't know about Kamila Khan, Miles Morales, John Stewart, America Chavez, Sam Wilson and so forth?But as I said, there are a lot of good things in this, too. There's a big examination of slut-shaming and the gender divide on sexual activity, there's a great and infuriating scene where authorities argue over whether or not a girl has been raped and what to do about the boys who raped her. There are some great bits about small town politics and how who you are and your sphere of influence can affect the justice system's treatment of you. Violet's struggle with her heritage is something I think a lot of people will relate with.So I'm torn. Obviously the ghost angle was a reason why I requested this, but I wish it didn't play as big a role as it did. I also wish the plot happened a little sooner and there was more focus on the mystery. I think there are some great things in here, and if there's more focus on that in future novels, then this will be a great series.
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  • Seanean
    January 1, 1970
    I gave up on this book at about 70% because I just couldn't force my way through it anymore. The author just kept changing the rules to suit the story and it was driving me nuts. Spirits can only affect the people who can see them. Wait! Spirits can affect the physical world. Nope! Spirits can go through everyone's personal belongings as if they were physically there, BUT the people don't notice because it's done in some alternate space? And, apparently because the author couldn't think of any I gave up on this book at about 70% because I just couldn't force my way through it anymore. The author just kept changing the rules to suit the story and it was driving me nuts. Spirits can only affect the people who can see them. Wait! Spirits can affect the physical world. Nope! Spirits can go through everyone's personal belongings as if they were physically there, BUT the people don't notice because it's done in some alternate space? And, apparently because the author couldn't think of any other way to do it, boys are just dumb and always set their phone passwords to 1234. All of them. Every single one. Even her crush. The perspective would also shift on a dime with one character having about 2% of the story with no warning of when it was his perspective vs. hers. Even the main character's time and location would shift with no warning. Part of this may be an ARC Kindle formatting issue, but there were quite a few times that I had to scroll back and reread to try and figure out what the heck was going on.This was just not well done. I strongly recommend avoiding this one.ARC provided by NetGalley
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  • McKayla Moors
    January 1, 1970
    Hey! I discuss my thoughts on this book over on booktube. Feel free to check it out!
  • Mary H
    January 1, 1970
    A little disappointed. I clicked with Brown Girl Ghosted right away. The voice is really strong, and I loved the concept. Mintie Das did a spectacular job balancing a story about seemingly normal high school girls with deep exploration into #metoo and racial relations in a small town with the supernatural twists. But while many parts made me sure this would be a 5 star read, many more seemed rushed and underdeveloped. I think this book could have benefitted from another round or two of A little disappointed. I clicked with Brown Girl Ghosted right away. The voice is really strong, and I loved the concept. Mintie Das did a spectacular job balancing a story about seemingly normal high school girls with deep exploration into #metoo and racial relations in a small town with the supernatural twists. But while many parts made me sure this would be a 5 star read, many more seemed rushed and underdeveloped. I think this book could have benefitted from another round or two of developmental edits and an additional 30-50 more pages. I'm loving the fact that shorter YA seems to be making a comeback, but it can't do so at the expense of the stories. I'm hoping for a second book because I think Violet deserves one.
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  • Sarah Evans
    January 1, 1970
    A teen thriller with emotional depth and authentic heart. Takes apart the mean girl and misfit girl of color stereotypes, all through an intriguing mystery with supernatural adventure elements. I seriously hope the author is planning a sequel - something I dont often say. Highly recommended for high school and up! A teen thriller with emotional depth and authentic heart. Takes apart the mean girl and misfit girl of color stereotypes, all through an intriguing mystery with supernatural adventure elements. I seriously hope the author is planning a sequel - something I don’t often say. Highly recommended for high school and up!
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  • Meredith Mara
    January 1, 1970
    A YA thriller that's Mean Girls meet Supernatural, and was exactly the kind of fictional reality break my brain needed.
  • Aoife
    January 1, 1970
    This story wasn't at all what I was expecting from the synopsis. I thought I was getting Teenage Ghost Whisperer, and instead it's a confused story about fighting spirits and stopping the end of the world. I was never 100% sure what was going on or why Violet was doing whatever she was doing, as her motivation seemed to swing wildly from scene to scene and the explanations just weren't making sense. There's a good story somewhere under here, but it's at least one round of edits away, sadly.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Brown Girl Ghosted is an interesting combination of storytelling elements all thrown together under a title that doesn't quite work. (Yes, the author clearly knows what "ghosted" means in slang terms. No, it doesn't work as well as it could.) The second half - when the mystery portion of the story begins - is much, much stronger than the beginning, which reads a bit like someone adult trying very hard to write for teens without entirely trusting that they'll enjoy a good book on its own merits. Brown Girl Ghosted is an interesting combination of storytelling elements all thrown together under a title that doesn't quite work. (Yes, the author clearly knows what "ghosted" means in slang terms. No, it doesn't work as well as it could.) The second half - when the mystery portion of the story begins - is much, much stronger than the beginning, which reads a bit like someone adult trying very hard to write for teens without entirely trusting that they'll enjoy a good book on its own merits. Lots of pop-culture-name-dropping, partying, and "oh, I'm a freak" lamenting don't a good teen novel make, so it's a relief when Das digs into the meat of the story - Violet's supernatural heritage and the mystery of who killed Naomi - becomes the focus. From about the 150-page mark, this becomes hard to put down.I love the overarching message here - that even if you're the "right" color, race, religion, socio-economic group, you can still feel like a freak and life like a performance. I can't wait to read what Das writes next, either, because once she really gets her feet under her, she's going to be an author the world should keep an eye on.
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  • Myron Brown
    January 1, 1970
    All Violet wants to do is blend in, at least much as a brown girl could in a small town. She used to be able to see ghosts but those days are long past until a tragedy causes the ghosts to return. She thought she was done with ghosts but those ghosts have other plans for her. Those "ghosts" are spirits of her warrior ancestors, "The Aiedeo," whose heritage she has forsaken. They want her to solve the high school's queen bee's murder. The Aiedeo mythos is the most interesting thing about this All Violet wants to do is blend in, at least much as a brown girl could in a small town. She used to be able to see ghosts but those days are long past until a tragedy causes the ghosts to return. She thought she was done with ghosts but those ghosts have other plans for her. Those "ghosts" are spirits of her warrior ancestors, "The Aiedeo," whose heritage she has forsaken. They want her to solve the high school's queen bee's murder. The Aiedeo mythos is the most interesting thing about this book. The murder doesn't occur until almost halfway into the book. Before that readers see Violet interacting with her classmates and none of it is convincing. Almost every line contains a pop culture reference, most of which is outdated. No teens talk like the teens in this book. Das tries too hard to be contemporary and hip, thus she winds up failing. The book feels more natural and the characters more relatable once it becomes a paranormal mystery. Readers may also want to try other paranormal mysteries like The Diviners series by Libba Bray or The Body Finder series by Kimberly Derting.Thank you NetGalley for providing the ARC for this book
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  • Samu
    January 1, 1970
    3,5 stars.Read for work. I had no preconceived ideas of what this story was about and that is always a good strategy as I enjoyed the not knowing. There is a lot going on here and this is perhaps not a book for the most sensitive reader (graphic depictions of violence in its many forms). Definitely a thought provoking book. I enjoyed it. And I really enjoyed Violet having a best friend who has her back always and also, the "only someone who belongs to a minority will understand that thing where 3,5 stars.Read for work. I had no preconceived ideas of what this story was about and that is always a good strategy as I enjoyed the not knowing. There is a lot going on here and this is perhaps not a book for the most sensitive reader (graphic depictions of violence in its many forms). Definitely a thought provoking book. I enjoyed it. And I really enjoyed Violet having a best friend who has her back always and also, the "only someone who belongs to a minority will understand that thing where the majority always does the same thing wrong and gets all embarrassed and you take back some tiny bit of your power through laughter and a shared burden". If that made no sense to you, don't worry. That bit is amazing in the book, I promise. You'll know it when you see it, if it's meant for you.
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  • Tatiana
    January 1, 1970
    Yikes. Okay, before I comment, I do have to say that I DNF this book. I got exactly halfway and I just couldnt continue on. I genuinely like the author as a person, but this book was just not good. Basically this is a story about Violet. Violet feels like an outcast in her small town because she is one of the only brown girls in her school. Her friends really suck. Like, they are all awful to each other, perpetuating the mean girl stereotype. The thing is, I didnt care about any of the Yikes. Okay, before I comment, I do have to say that I DNF this book. I got exactly halfway and I just couldn’t continue on. I genuinely like the author as a person, but this book was just not good. Basically this is a story about Violet. Violet feels like an outcast in her small town because she is one of the only brown girls in her school. Her “friends” really suck. Like, they are all awful to each other, perpetuating the mean girl stereotype. The thing is, I didn’t care about any of the characters and the plot was...nonexistent? The first half was so boring and by the time that I got more of the plot, I was too bored to care. Also, the way the characters spoke was extremely annoying. No teenagers talk like that. I teach 8th grade. They would cringe.
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  • Tara
    January 1, 1970
    Violet feels like an outsider in her small Midwestern town. She's one of only a few people of color, and she is keeping a major secret--she's part of a supernatural warrior tribe. When the Queen Bee of the school is murdered, Violet must use her abilities to help solve the murder.I really wanted to like this book. It had an interesting premise and I thought it would appeal to murder mystery fans. Unfortunately, the supernatural element seemed really forced and it didn't seem to truly work for Violet feels like an outsider in her small Midwestern town. She's one of only a few people of color, and she is keeping a major secret--she's part of a supernatural warrior tribe. When the Queen Bee of the school is murdered, Violet must use her abilities to help solve the murder.I really wanted to like this book. It had an interesting premise and I thought it would appeal to murder mystery fans. Unfortunately, the supernatural element seemed really forced and it didn't seem to truly work for the storyline. I'm not sure that many of my high schoolers will be able to overlook the supernatural parts to enjoy the mystery.I read an ARC from NetGalley.
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  • Jenny Ashby
    January 1, 1970
    I guess I was expecting this to be a realistic fiction story so imagine my surprise to find a paranormal fantasy! Surprise, and delight. Violet is a fun narrator through her troubles in high school, her participation on the cheer squad, and her dealings with her ghostly ancestors who either want her to join their crusade or kill her - who can say for sure? Some of the themes are pretty mature for middle school, especially all the circumstances of Naomi's death, but it raises some important I guess I was expecting this to be a realistic fiction story so imagine my surprise to find a paranormal fantasy! Surprise, and delight. Violet is a fun narrator through her troubles in high school, her participation on the cheer squad, and her dealings with her ghostly ancestors who either want her to join their crusade or kill her - who can say for sure? Some of the themes are pretty mature for middle school, especially all the circumstances of Naomi's death, but it raises some important points. Das slides several real life issues into her fun fantasy including some lessons about racist microaggressions and a commentary about how society treats rapists as opposed to their victims.
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    A great companion for "Undead Girl Gang" and "The Babysitter's Coven." And any novel where POC talk about the "no, where are you REALLY from?" game and being described as "exotic" as a negative has my heart.
  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    3.5do you like ahs coven? read this one
  • Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    Really good! I wonder if it was necessary to have the other POV character, though. Would be interested in a sequel!
  • Jenn
    January 1, 1970
    DNF. This was doing nothing for me and I wasn't into it at all.
  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    DNF
  • Bakugou Katsuki
    January 1, 1970
    this book a mystery but i did not find it as a very good mystery book. This is probably because i enjoy very mysterios books.
  • Deborah
    January 1, 1970
    Cute mystery and interesting plot. Felt slightly juvenile/surface level with some messages but was done well. Enjoyed the characters but donr remember much about it.
  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    For fans of Pretty Little Liars, Riverdale, and Teen Wolf
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