The Book of Lost Saints
An evocative multigenerational Cuban American family story of revolution, loss, violence, and family bondsMarisol vanished during the Cuban Revolution, her fate unknown and lost to time. Now, haunted by atrocities long-forgotten, her foul-mouthed spirit visits her nephew, Ramon, in modern-day New Jersey. Her hope: That her presence will prompt her descendant to unearth their painful family history.Ramon launches a haphazard investigation into the story of his ancestor, unaware of the forces driving him on his search. Along the way, he falls in love, discovers a new sense of his own identity, faces a run-in with a murderous gangster, and learns of each "lost saint" who helped Marisol during her imprisonment under Batista's reign.Uplifting and evocative, The Book of Lost Saints is a meditation on family, forgiveness, and the violent struggle to be free.

The Book of Lost Saints Details

TitleThe Book of Lost Saints
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 5th, 2019
PublisherImprint
ISBN-139781250185822
Rating
GenreFiction, Historical, Historical Fiction, Young Adult, Fantasy, Magical Realism, Contemporary

The Book of Lost Saints Review

  • Olivia (Stories For Coffee)
    January 1, 1970
    The Book of Lost Saints is a mesmerizing book that sucked me deep into the heart of a story that brought forth a world of emotions inside me that I’m still trying to process. Told in a 3rd person omnipresent point of view, this novel follows Ramón as he continually receives messages from a long lost tía who vanished without a trace after the Cuban revolution. As he gets glimpses of her rocky past in Cuba, he feels compelled to investigate to see what happened to her while also learning more The Book of Lost Saints is a mesmerizing book that sucked me deep into the heart of a story that brought forth a world of emotions inside me that I’m still trying to process. Told in a 3rd person omnipresent point of view, this novel follows Ramón as he continually receives messages from a long lost tía who vanished without a trace after the Cuban revolution. As he gets glimpses of her rocky past in Cuba, he feels compelled to investigate to see what happened to her while also learning more about his Cuban roots. At first, it was difficult to get sucked into the story considering it’s narrated by Marisol looking over Ramón, and as someone who doesn’t necessarily enjoy 3rd person, it took me a bit to get into it, but once I did, I was completely invested in the story full of Cuban culture, slang, and Spanish sayings that weren’t italicized, which others the language, in my opinion. It was so refreshing to see phrases that my family said in a book written into the narrative so effortlessly that it felt like I was coming home while reading a story. Not only were we able to explore Ramón’s life in New Jersey but we also got to see him explore Cuba for the first time which always hits me in the heart because I’ve never seen the island, so reading about the vivid descriptions and Ramón’s feelings as he explores an island he’s only heard about in stories really impacted me and made me long to see the island myself, one day. This story is about being Cuban, familial ties, exploring your culture, and also the trauma Cubans have faced that gets carried down generations. The Book of Lost Saints represented the pain and loss deep in my heart as a Cuban and also taught me new information about the Cuban revolution that I didn’t know about. This is such an important and validating books for Cuban readers and also for other readers who want a vivid, fantastical historical fiction. I cannot recommend it enough.
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  • Jocelyn
    January 1, 1970
    Revolution asks that its children put not only their own lives on the line, but the lives of all their friends and loved ones as well. It's a wide, sweeping trap, an ever-yawning crevice in the earth. 4.5 starsI don't think this book could feel more personal if I had written it myself. I am half convinced Older pried this story from the hearts of Cuban-Americans to lay bare for the rest of the world to see. It is a love letter, a haunting, and utterly unforgettable. Ramón and Marisol's journey Revolution asks that its children put not only their own lives on the line, but the lives of all their friends and loved ones as well. It's a wide, sweeping trap, an ever-yawning crevice in the earth. 4.5 starsI don't think this book could feel more personal if I had written it myself. I am half convinced Older pried this story from the hearts of Cuban-Americans to lay bare for the rest of the world to see. It is a love letter, a haunting, and utterly unforgettable. Ramón and Marisol's journey left me at once both broken and healed. I am nothing but raw emotion. If you want a story filled with love, loss, hardship, and horror, then you absolutely need The Book of Lost Saints.
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  • Sarah-Hope
    January 1, 1970
    The Book of Lost Saints is a Cuban family story with a heart firmly planted in the world of magical realism. Ramón, one of two central characters, is a hospital security guard by day and an exceptionally talented DJ by night. The other central character is Marisol, an aunt Ramón never met, but whose spirit is now haunting his dreams. Marisol disappeared in the aftermath of the Cuban revolution, and now she wants Ramón to uncover her story to put her spirit at peace. Doing this, however, is a The Book of Lost Saints is a Cuban family story with a heart firmly planted in the world of magical realism. Ramón, one of two central characters, is a hospital security guard by day and an exceptionally talented DJ by night. The other central character is Marisol, an aunt Ramón never met, but whose spirit is now haunting his dreams. Marisol disappeared in the aftermath of the Cuban revolution, and now she wants Ramón to uncover her story to put her spirit at peace. Doing this, however, is a singularly difficult task for Ramón, because it becomes clear that his mother, Nilda, played a key role in Marisol's fate.The entire book is told in Marisol's spirit's voice, which takes some getting used to at first, but works quite well. Marisol's spirit has forgotten much of her own story, so not only do we share Ramón's efforts to uncover the truth, we share Marisol's struggles to understand and accept the life she cannot remember.The dialogue is particularly well-written, making use of Cubanismos in ways that keep them accessible for those who don't speak Spanish, as well as for those who do.This book offers an interesting, critical perspective on pre- and post-revolutionary Cuba, which carries into the present, as Ramón travels to the island in search of more details of his aunt's story. The U.S. cast members include a variety of Cuban Americans whose attitudes about their former homeland vary widely—so even though Marisol is narrating, the reader always has access to multiple perspectives.The Book of Lost Saints should prove a satisfying read for a variety of readers: lovers of magical realism, fans of Latin American/Caribbean literature, and those who enjoy novels about families coming to terms with one another.I received a free electronic ARC of this book for review purposes. The opinions are my own.
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  • Eileen
    January 1, 1970
    4-4.5 starsWow, what an ending! This was no an easy book to read, partly because it was hard to figure out what was going on at the beginning, and partly because of the subject matter. This book covers the time surrounding the Cuban Revolution and moves towards the present where Ramon is being visited by the spirit and memories of his dead aunt Marisol as they both try to figure out what happened to her. This was a subject that I didn't know much about and like all war zones/dictatorships, it 4-4.5 starsWow, what an ending! This was no an easy book to read, partly because it was hard to figure out what was going on at the beginning, and partly because of the subject matter. This book covers the time surrounding the Cuban Revolution and moves towards the present where Ramon is being visited by the spirit and memories of his dead aunt Marisol as they both try to figure out what happened to her. This was a subject that I didn't know much about and like all war zones/dictatorships, it was a brutal, violent, and unfair time, and the struggles of the people continue to this day. The abuse and violence was particularly tough to read about, but I think it was also important to the story. There were times when I would get lost about the situation, but overall, I felt the author did an amazing job weaving together the past and the present. There were so many elements I loved about this book, and I only wish I could hear some of the music that Ramon put together, especially with the orchestra! This book took me awhile to get through because I wanted to read it slowly and let some of the events sit in my head. But I suspect if I had had the time, I could have sat down and read it in a couple of settings, with a different impact. As it was, I finished the last 60% in two sittings because once I hit that 50% mark, I wanted to know what happened! For anyone who enjoys historical fiction with a bit of mysticism and mystery, and doesn't mind some sex and violence, I would recommend this book. Thanks to #NetGalley, the author, and the publisher for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Didi Chanoch
    January 1, 1970
    There are some things which you are likely to encounter in a DJO book. There will be music. There will be complex family stuff (stuff: dynamics, relationships, magical legacies). There will probably be a medical professional. Politics will likely play a part. And a ghost. The Book of Lost Saints has all of these, and yet it is an entirely different work from Older's previous. It is a mix of magical realism, urban fantasy, historical fiction, multi-generational family drama. The horror here is There are some things which you are likely to encounter in a DJO book. There will be music. There will be complex family stuff (stuff: dynamics, relationships, magical legacies). There will probably be a medical professional. Politics will likely play a part. And a ghost. The Book of Lost Saints has all of these, and yet it is an entirely different work from Older's previous. It is a mix of magical realism, urban fantasy, historical fiction, multi-generational family drama. The horror here is not the supernatural kind Older has employed in the past. This time, it's the horror of very real human behavior and history. It may be his best work to date. This is a book that deals with the two ways a revolution can fail, both experienced, sequentially, in Cuba. The first being the revolution that succeeds and becomes a version of what it aimed to topple, and the second being the revolution that flat out fails. It deals with how families (one central family, but also some other tangential families) deal with those historical events. Those who take them on, those who avoid and deny. It's really good. You should read it.
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  • 2TReads
    January 1, 1970
    -So if you ever wonder what we, the disappeared, dream of in our darkest hours, know that it is you: those who remain- Marisol.Daniel Jose Older has delivered a story of a family, secrets, revolution, betrayal, survival, loss and love.Marisol vanished in the days following the Cuban revolution; now a part of her has returned to uncover what really happened to her. With a bond that transcends the physical, Marisol uses a loved one to search for the truth.History: shared, owned, hated or forgotten -So if you ever wonder what we, the disappeared, dream of in our darkest hours, know that it is you: those who remain- Marisol.Daniel Jose Older has delivered a story of a family, secrets, revolution, betrayal, survival, loss and love.Marisol vanished in the days following the Cuban revolution; now a part of her has returned to uncover what really happened to her. With a bond that transcends the physical, Marisol uses a loved one to search for the truth.History: shared, owned, hated or forgotten never truly leaves, and in The Book of Lost Saints, Older portrays just how strong history can be, how far forward it can reach and how bound we are by it.Memory and a shared history are the building blocks that bring this story to life; dreams and signs are tools of communication and the love of family crosses the sea and back to an ending that touched the heart.There is only one thing that I could not see past in this book, whether author did what he did. Because Cuba....if you know, you know.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    Slated for release on November 9th, 2019, The Book of Lost Saints by Daniel José Older is a haunting and intriguing book that readers are going to love.The story centers around Marisol, a spirit who is desperate to find out what happened to her in the past and how she died. She remembers fragment by fragment of her history and infuses those memories into the dreams of her nephew Ramón, a DJ. Ramón keeps a book of all his vivid dreams, but when he starts asking questions, his family evades him Slated for release on November 9th, 2019, The Book of Lost Saints by Daniel José Older is a haunting and intriguing book that readers are going to love.The story centers around Marisol, a spirit who is desperate to find out what happened to her in the past and how she died. She remembers fragment by fragment of her history and infuses those memories into the dreams of her nephew Ramón, a DJ. Ramón keeps a book of all his vivid dreams, but when he starts asking questions, his family evades him and refuses to answer anything. The story is told from Marisol’s perspective, so we see firsthand the horrifying memories she keeps gaining. It’s part mystery, part history, and ultimately a story about family and legacy.The first aspect of this book that I absolutely loved was that it prompted me to do a bit of research into the revolutions and unrest in Cuba under Torrado, then Castro."What do you do when you’ve already torn down the world to make a better one and the better one turns out to be just as rotten as the one you shattered?You shatter the world all over again, I suppose and keep breaking it until you get one you can name Freedom."I had a vague notion about the revolution, but knew little to nothing about the in your face brutality of Fidél Castro, which spurred another revolution.There was a significant gap in my knowledge of Cuban history outside of knowing a little about cult status of Che Guevera, a leader of one of the branches that finally overthrew Batista. So, thank you for prompting me to do a bit of research.I also loved the focus on the deep connections families can have and how quickly they can be shattered and rebuilt. I admire the Cubano’s fierce love and hope for their homeland, despite living on foreign soil. Finally, my favorite parts were Marisol’s memories – they were well-written so that it keeps you wanting more and had vivid description.One difficulty I had was that I haven’t spoken Spanish in decades. I could parse out a few words and phrases, but not all. It was funny because the ones I did google because they kept popping up ended up being curse words.I had the opportunity to meet Daniel José Older on two occasions at Book Con. He loves what he does and is such a genuinely nice person – he takes his time with his fans and I appreciate that!As an aside another one of my favorite quotes is:"The point is, son, the reason that Willsmeeth is such a good actor, the thing that makes him above all others, is that he can play any character he wants, and he is still true to himself"I just got home from Aladdin last night and this line is truer than ever. He’s the Genie, of course, but there is so much Will Smith in what he does and you can see his humor throughout. I think I could even pick out the lines he added himself. “I heard the princess is hot, where is she?” for instance.There were so many good quotes in this book and here are my top five:"The power of people knowing you have power means you don’t have to use it.""You’ve always been a warrior, and now you are learning that a true warrior is also very vulnerable on the outside, the pain has become so great that is is impossible to act tough anymore.""Wrap love around even the most broken parts of yourself, because they are what God has given you to remind you how strong you are.""They persist, but so do I, it seems.""The whole terrible system seemed like a setup sometimes: You crack slightly in the face of a world not built for you, and they load you up with medications till you can’t feel anything, then they act surprised when your body and mind rebel and the rebellion is an explosion outward instead of another fake suicide attempt. And then you’re done: locked away, disappeared, force-fed more meds and trapped in a smiley-faced spiral of How Are You Feeling Today and Let’s Talk About What Happened That Day, and it never fucking ends."As a disclaimer, I received this digital ARC from Edelweiss for purposes of review and all opinions are my own.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to partner NetGalley for the digital ARC of Daniel José Older’s The Book of Lost Saints in exchange for an honest review. The book releases Tuesday, November 5.“They came in boats and airplanes, armed with false documents and holy terror and a grinding wariness of what they would find. . . . They came and left behind family members clutching photographs, and promises to send money and frequent letters and powdered milk or vacuum cleaners or whatever it was impossible to find that year. . Thanks to partner NetGalley for the digital ARC of Daniel José Older’s The Book of Lost Saints in exchange for an honest review. The book releases Tuesday, November 5.“They came in boats and airplanes, armed with false documents and holy terror and a grinding wariness of what they would find. . . . They came and left behind family members clutching photographs, and promises to send money and frequent letters and powdered milk or vacuum cleaners or whatever it was impossible to find that year. . . . Each brought along a cord that stretched all the way back to the island and when they slept, each prayed the cord would send along news from home until slowly, each one came to call this place home and the cords wavered beneath the weight of that present tense” (loc. 302).Daniel José Older’s The Book of Lost Saints is a strange, brilliant, gorgeous novel filled with magic and ghosts and love. I love it so, so much and recommend that you pre-order it quickly!The book’s narrator is Marisol. A ghost. She is one of three Cuban sisters, two of whom were lost during the Cuban Revolution. Marisol, the youngest, has returned in spirit form to seek vengeance and to discover the truth of her disappearance before her spirit also disappears. She haunts her nephew, Ramón, son of Nilda, planting her memories in his dreams in hopes both of being remembered and of spurring him on to investigate the truth of what happened to her.Older’s novel is gritty and real, and Marisol is the perfect narrator for such a book. She doesn’t shy away from sex or nudity or violence. Instead, she embraces all that is life, hungry for vitality and eager to anchor herself to the world in all its beauty and ugliness. She is also inherently curious, eager to take in everything about the people around her, about the home she lost, about the world as it is now.As we—alongside Ramón—learn Marisol’s story, we begin to see the shape of her life. She and her eldest sister Isabel are drawn in to the Revolution and to the repercussions of the new regime. Ramón, born in the United States, has never been to Cuba but nevertheless deals with the fallout that has followed his community even as they tried to leave war behind. This is a rich, rich story, full of romance and love, violence and revolution, loyalty and spite. There are friendships and betrayals, old ties and new alliances. It’s a master work of discovery as we watch Marisol learn the truth of her own life and Ramón understand the history that haunts his family and, therefore, himself. Daniel José Older’s beautiful writing, brilliant imagination, and keen sense of history have produced a brilliant novel in The Book of Lost Saints.
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    The Book of Lost Saints is ghost story of sorts. One that spans generations and a revolution and a bifurcation of cultures. The story is narrated by Marisol and the first few chapters definitely take a little to get used to as I figured out that I was seeing the world through the eyes of a spirit. The once-removed view is important because it enables the reader to experience the past and the present through this single eye, but the problem is that Marisol doesn’t remember some key details of her The Book of Lost Saints is ghost story of sorts. One that spans generations and a revolution and a bifurcation of cultures. The story is narrated by Marisol and the first few chapters definitely take a little to get used to as I figured out that I was seeing the world through the eyes of a spirit. The once-removed view is important because it enables the reader to experience the past and the present through this single eye, but the problem is that Marisol doesn’t remember some key details of her life on the island. It takes Ramon’s investigations and her own discoveries to trigger the past.I loved Older’s writing. From the mixture of English and Spanish languages to the repetition of key words and phrases, the writing is lyrical and mesmerizing. There are dark or tough passages to read, but there is also so much love. The love of family, but a hard series of choices that has split and broken people in the midst of governmental eruption.I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys stories of the American tapestry.For my full review:https://paulspicks.blog/2019/10/29/th...For all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog
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  • Susie Dumond
    January 1, 1970
    Ramon is a hospital security guard by day and a DJ by night in post-9/11 New Jersey. He never met his aunt Marisol, as she disappeared during the Cuban Revolution before he was born. But once her spirit starts following him around and rediscovering her own story through his dreams, he must uncover what happened to her in order to set her free.Told through the eyes of Marisol's spirit, this is a haunting, lyrical tale of family history lost and found. I love the narrative choice of using Ramon is a hospital security guard by day and a DJ by night in post-9/11 New Jersey. He never met his aunt Marisol, as she disappeared during the Cuban Revolution before he was born. But once her spirit starts following him around and rediscovering her own story through his dreams, he must uncover what happened to her in order to set her free.Told through the eyes of Marisol's spirit, this is a haunting, lyrical tale of family history lost and found. I love the narrative choice of using Marisol's perspective; it makes the flipping back and forth between timelines feel really fresh and engaging. I'm not sure why this book is categorized as YA. There's a lot of dark, violent, and sexual content, but it definitely has a purpose in the story. Overall, it's a profound tale told in an inventive way. I was happy to get lost in Marisol's history.Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • K
    January 1, 1970
    This book took a few chapters to take root and set fire to my brain but when it did, hoo boy that flame was bright. This isn't a ghost story, it's a spirit story. Some people look up their family on ancestry web sites or do the DNA tests just for a lark, but for the rest of us, the story isn't in some database or lab results. Family history is complicated, doubly so with immigration, exponentially so because of a revolution. The Book of Lost Saints unfolded in an intricately beautiful manner This book took a few chapters to take root and set fire to my brain but when it did, hoo boy that flame was bright. This isn't a ghost story, it's a spirit story. Some people look up their family on ancestry web sites or do the DNA tests just for a lark, but for the rest of us, the story isn't in some database or lab results. Family history is complicated, doubly so with immigration, exponentially so because of a revolution. The Book of Lost Saints unfolded in an intricately beautiful manner that it was harder to put down with each story Marisol reveals to Ramon. Read this book while drinking a cafecito and listening to a playlist of old school Cuban songs (thanks, Napster) and late 90s dance club classics. (I received a free electronic ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.)
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  • Lianne
    January 1, 1970
    “Something touches me. Moves me. It’s jolting, a flicker of sharp light inside all my weighty depths. I look up from the empty chair and see the sky. The sky is flecked with dots of white.” This passage from The Book of Lost Saints is indicative of Daniel José Older’s evocative writing, which is reminiscent of Gabriel García Márquez andIsabel Allende’s magical realism. This novel is told from the point of view of Marisol, a mysterious wraith-like character who can weave through the past and the “Something touches me. Moves me. It’s jolting, a flicker of sharp light inside all my weighty depths. I look up from the empty chair and see the sky. The sky is flecked with dots of white.” This passage from The Book of Lost Saints is indicative of Daniel José Older’s evocative writing, which is reminiscent of  Gabriel García Márquez and Isabel Allende’s magical realism. This novel is told from the point of view of Marisol, a mysterious wraith-like character who can weave through the past and the present and the consciousness of the other characters. The complex plot explores familial connections, the Cuban Revolution, and intense interactions with passionate prose. Filled with Spanish and honest sexuality, Older includes the power of music and mysticism to immerse the reader in Marisol’s quest for the truth of her life and death. I highly recommend this book for adults.
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  • Kathleen Gray
    January 1, 1970
    Know in advance that the spirit of Marisol is narrating this book and that there's a fair amount of magical realism and then surrender to the pleasures of an unusual quest. Ramon, who works at a hospital and as a dj, is haunted by Marisol, his aunt who died during the Cuban revolution. They never met so he's not sure why this is happening and now he's compelled to discover the truth about her, his family (especially his mother), and, to be a little dramatic, his place in the world. His Know in advance that the spirit of Marisol is narrating this book and that there's a fair amount of magical realism and then surrender to the pleasures of an unusual quest. Ramon, who works at a hospital and as a dj, is haunted by Marisol, his aunt who died during the Cuban revolution. They never met so he's not sure why this is happening and now he's compelled to discover the truth about her, his family (especially his mother), and, to be a little dramatic, his place in the world. His exploration of his heritage ultimately takes him to Cuba, which is the best part of the book. This can be a bit challenging at first but stick with it and you'll be rewarded. No spoilers. Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC. A very good read.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    The Book of Lost Saints is the beautifully told story of a family and a revolution that alters the lives of generations. Ramon is a young man, a DJ, he’s in love and oh yeah, the aunt he has never met, narrates her life in his dreams. The narrative voice is Aunt Marisol who is looking for answers as to what happened to her. Marisol has been part of a family secret, one his mother (Nilda) will not speak about. Marisol uses her nephew’s curiosity to motivate him in her search for her final The Book of Lost Saints is the beautifully told story of a family and a revolution that alters the lives of generations. Ramon is a young man, a DJ, he’s in love and oh yeah, the aunt he has never met, narrates her life in his dreams. The narrative voice is Aunt Marisol who is looking for answers as to what happened to her. Marisol has been part of a family secret, one his mother (Nilda) will not speak about. Marisol uses her nephew’s curiosity to motivate him in her search for her final outcome. Older uses beautiful prose to tell the story of the struggles of fighting for what you believe and the cost to the ones you love. I received an ARC for an honest review. Thank you BEA/Macmillan USA/Imprint Reads
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  • A-L
    January 1, 1970
    I am not Cuban but I have worked on human rights issues in Cuba for 20 years. I've never read a book that describes the country, its people, its history and present, including the exile community, so well. I saw the ruins of the prison on Isla de los Pinos/la Juventud once and this book brought them to life. This is the Cuba that brings me joy, that infuriates me, that breaks my heart and gives me hope. This is the Cuba of impossible decisions. These are the exiles who drive me crazy and who I I am not Cuban but I have worked on human rights issues in Cuba for 20 years. I've never read a book that describes the country, its people, its history and present, including the exile community, so well. I saw the ruins of the prison on Isla de los Pinos/la Juventud once and this book brought them to life. This is the Cuba that brings me joy, that infuriates me, that breaks my heart and gives me hope. This is the Cuba of impossible decisions. These are the exiles who drive me crazy and who I love. This should be essential reading for anyone who wants to understand Cuba, the real story of the Revolution, and why the exiles and those still in Cuba are the way they are.
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  • Diane Payne
    January 1, 1970
    I wish I wasn't such a curmudgeon about spirits and ghosts, but I understand why the author chose this mode to tell the story about our main character, who returns to discover how she died. Readers learn a lot about life under Castro in Cuba and about Marisol, the spirit, and her family connections. Older is an excellent writer, which is why I read the entire novel on a long flight. I enjoyed the elements of mysticism flowing through the questioning of what happened to Marisol and the political I wish I wasn't such a curmudgeon about spirits and ghosts, but I understand why the author chose this mode to tell the story about our main character, who returns to discover how she died. Readers learn a lot about life under Castro in Cuba and about Marisol, the spirit, and her family connections. Older is an excellent writer, which is why I read the entire novel on a long flight. I enjoyed the elements of mysticism flowing through the questioning of what happened to Marisol and the political history of how Marisol became involved with the movement. Much to appreciate and savor in this novel.
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  • Jan
    January 1, 1970
    Ramon's family says that the revolution in their homeland of Cuba is over and not to be spoken of since they are Americans now. The spirit of his aunt Marisol despises this attitude and wants everyone to know that she was murdered during that revolution. The author makes it all personal regardless of the reader's background. It is intense and moving with an urgency peculiar to those coming from a war zone. It needs to be read by the many.
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  • Shari Suarez
    January 1, 1970
    Ramon, a security guard by day and a talented DJ by night is being haunted by an aunt he's never met. Marisol disappeared during the Cuban Revolution but her soul can't rest until she figures out what happened to her. Ramon travels to Cuba and back to New Jersey to find out the truth about his aunt.This book was mesmerizing and really brings home the trauma that the Cuban people have endured since the Revolution. A beautiful piece of magical realism in a haunting setting.
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  • Sherrie
    January 1, 1970
    This book, The Book of Lost Saints, covers many topics, although it was quite tough to follow in the beginning, it leads you to; the Cuban Revolution, ghosts, spirits looking for answers, Ramon > his Aunt Marisol and lots of curiosity. Read when you have time to concentrate and can take it all in. It's quite a curious fantasy. Thank you #netgalley #thebookoflostsaints #imprintbooks
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  • Nica Borders
    January 1, 1970
    Please read this book. It is a beautiful song of revolution, forgiveness, love, and the mostly whole children of trauma victims. I don't want to say that much, to be honest. Or maybe I can't. This is a book that wakens only emotions in me and I don't have words for them. I'm sad it's over. It made me feel like I was home in a strange world.
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  • Brigitte
    January 1, 1970
    This story! It is a story of family and history. I learned so much about the revolution and history of Cuba reading this book. The characters were so rich, brave and strong! Loved this book! Thank you Daniel Jose Older for the book talk in Portland that made me want to buy this book. Can’t wait to read the young adult books by this amazing author.
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  • MCZ Reads
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t think I was in the right mindset to read this book, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t. The Book of Lost Saints is a beautiful perspective. I’m also a fan of the movement to stop othering non-English languages by not writing them in italics. I appreciate the experimental and non-traditional approach to this story and encourage others to check it out.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I am completely and totally gutted. What a gift this book is. What a story and a family and a mystery. Marisol is a haunting figure, literally and figuratively, and not even she knows how her story will end. Really, really well done.
  • Morgan M. Page
    January 1, 1970
    Hands down the best novel I've read all year. Daniel José Older's The Book of Lost Saints reinvents the diasporic family saga, pivoting its perspective not only to the displaced but to the very souls of those already lost to the living.
  • Galen Strickland
    January 1, 1970
    Full review to follow. Another that I'm not likely to be able to do justice, but I will make the attempt.A contender for my favorite novel of the year - http://www.templetongate.net/book-of-...
  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    I do not like magical realism, so I decided to shelve this for a while and read something I like.
  • Samantha Whittaker
    January 1, 1970
    Daniel Jose Older does it again this time in a heart pounding family saga full of politics secrets betrayals and ultimately love
  • Julia Marie
    January 1, 1970
    i started reading an e-arc and then realized i needed to just get a final copy so here i am, waiting for my last minute pre-order.
  • Linz
    January 1, 1970
    Review forthcoming
  • Erika
    January 1, 1970
    3 1/2*'S
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