Fry Bread
Told in lively and powerful verse by debut author Kevin Noble Maillard, Fry Bread is an evocative depiction of a modern Native American family, vibrantly illustrated by Pura Belpre Award winner Juana Martinez-Neal.Fry bread is food.It is warm and delicious, piled high on a plate.Fry bread is time.It brings families together for meals and new memories.Fry bread is nation.It is shared by many, from coast to coast and beyond.Fry bread is us.It is a celebration of old and new, traditional and modern, similarity and difference.

Fry Bread Details

TitleFry Bread
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 22nd, 2019
PublisherRoaring Brook Press
ISBN-139781626727465
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Food and Drink, Food, Family, Cultural, History

Fry Bread Review

  • Donalyn
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful book. Don't miss the back matter with additional information from the author about Native American culture, his family, and the historical context for many of the images in the book.
  • Abigail
    January 1, 1970
    Native American journalist Kevin Noble Maillard, a member of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, makes his children's book debut in this lovely picture-book tribute to fry bread, a staple of many native peoples' diet. Using simple but poetic text, he explores the shapes, colors, sounds and flavors of fry bread. More importantly, he explores its role in the Native American family, and its importance as a symbol of Native American resilience. His text is paired with charming artwork from Caldecott Ho Native American journalist Kevin Noble Maillard, a member of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, makes his children's book debut in this lovely picture-book tribute to fry bread, a staple of many native peoples' diet. Using simple but poetic text, he explores the shapes, colors, sounds and flavors of fry bread. More importantly, he explores its role in the Native American family, and its importance as a symbol of Native American resilience. His text is paired with charming artwork from Caldecott Honoree Juana Martinez-Neal (she was honored for Alma and How She Got Her Name ), and accompanied by an extensive afterword giving more information...I have been looking forward to Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story since I first learned it was coming out, and am grateful to have been given the opportunity to read it a little ahead of its release date, later this month (October 2019). Unlike the other reviewers so far, this wasn't a five-star title for me, although I did find it excellent overall. I loved the ideas of this book, I loved the artwork, and I loved the detailed seven-page afterword, with its history of fry bread, and its information about some of the culturally significant objects used in the illustrations. I also loved the endpapers, which give an alphabet listing of all (I assume?) Native nations and peoples in the United States. All that said, the text itself, although serviceable, didn't particularly impress me, and while this didn't ruin the book for me (witness the four-star rating), it did prevent me from feeling emotionally involved in it, in that way I had hoped to be. Reactions vary, and I appear to be in the minority here, so I'd still strongly recommend this one, both to anyone looking for picture-books about food and family in general, or about Native American cultures specifically.
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  • Paul Hankins
    January 1, 1970
    "Five Stars for Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story"From the start, I want to tell you that I could get this review completely wrong. But, I note that a number of friends are giving the book five stars and moving on. Their endorsement with the full five stars says that they loved the book. Found it to be amazing. . . I would love to know the what and the why of those five-star ratings. Let me try to share my what and my why of five stars for Fry Bread. The reason I could get th "Five Stars for Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story"From the start, I want to tell you that I could get this review completely wrong. But, I note that a number of friends are giving the book five stars and moving on. Their endorsement with the full five stars says that they loved the book. Found it to be amazing. . . I would love to know the what and the why of those five-star ratings. Let me try to share my what and my why of five stars for Fry Bread. The reason I could get this wrong is because of my markers. So, I will put those out for you here: White. Male. Cisgender. Straight. All of these create a bit of a disconnect coming into books of any genre or format that center upon diversity and representation. So, while I might get elements of this review wrong, I want to get as much "write" as I can for this book. First of all, I think we do right by this book when we reference the book for title and subtitle together. How easy it would be to ask if a friend has seen Fry Bread? With a little more effort, we can center the book and its representation by asking, "Have you seen Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story?"With a little more effort, we reference the full title and add author Kevin Noble Maillaird (Seminole Nation, Mekuskey Band) and illustrator, Juana Martinez Neal (Caldecott Honor: ALMA AND HOW SHE GOT HER NAME).The dust jacket to case reveal presents Martinez Neal's fuller-faced characters. We see an older matriarch holding a small baby who is nibbling what we might assume is fry bread suggested by the title. The woman holds a bowl finished fry bread suggesting a sort of continuous communion between generations, one offering to the next the gift of tradition by way of shared foods. The woman's glance and the toddler's return look of wonder suggests connection between the two that happens over the bowl. The case reveals multi-colored hands reaching forward toward finished fry bread which serves to continue with the idea of a shared experience in the tradition of creating and baking fry bread. The end papers which have been celebrated in the social media spaces reveal the many names of the First Nations from, of, and before what we would know of America. Those First Nations that are still recognized today are front-and-center over the spread of the end papers. Turned into thoughtfully, this moment can be one of entering into a liminal space of past and present to the story that will be shared in the book. As with a number of picture books right now, Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story begins with the title page as the woman presented on the cover now moves toward a group of children with finished fry bread to share. Noble Maillard's text begins with a sense of rhythm like that of the heart of the art of making and baking fry bread. The "er" sounds at the end of the list of ingredients is a mentor text in how half and slant rhyme work to create an effect without the words getting in the way of the sentiment of this page: "Fry Bread is Food." The reader is reminded that this is something of sustenance that will carry the story. How important may this be to younger readers to be situated in a story that centers food as tradition passed down from generation to generation? And this is achieved in a short list of ingredients coupled with images of the gathering of these by the hands that were introduced on the case of the book. In the next spread, flour clouds the images of the hands coming together to mix the dough. "Fry Break is Shape" presents in three distinct similes that suggest pancakes and balls and "Nana's" soft pillow. The natural tendency of the person is to categorize and it is the basic stuff of definition to classify before setting differentiae. Here, younger readers are able to conceptualize that fry bread is probably like something they have seen before and has a shape and feel that is familiar. Noble Maillard continues with expert word choice in "Fry Bread is Sound" with verb choices that include, "clang," "blazes," "sizzle," and "pop" which presents the food product of something that would come of real heat and present warm in the hands. The back matter of the book points to the idea that a patriarch is handling the skillet and his wrist is adorned with tribal patterns of lightning bolts and trees. The multicolored and gender-diverse children in this spread are following the suggestion of the sensory in the handling of dough, the covering of ears, and the closed-eye taking in of the scents in the kitchen coming from the stove. From the early work that I have done to try to understand of First Nations-centered story is to watch who is presented with eyes closed and in a suggested dream state. Here, it is the white child who is taking in the smells with eyes closed. In the next spread, fry bread becomes the backdrop of the illustration and comes forward, too, in the hands of those who will consume the bread now. "Fry Bread is Color" continues with the flow of Fry Bread is ________ which serves as a mentor text now for vetting out what a subject is and what it means. The formula becomes, X is _______ and how we see it might be ________ and this means ________.This book is a marvelous example of listing as a means of vetting out the subject of a story or a full-length book. With FRY BREAD: A NATIVE AMERICAN FAMILY STORY presenting in this manner, we might suggest that this would be a good formula for approaching subjects for how they are seen, depicted and what this might mean. "Fry Bread is the Flavor" sees the bread held in the hands now of the patriarch as it makes it way from stove to table. Now, its versatility as a bread, a staple, can be seen for the number of ways it might be used with other ingredients. A bounty of tomatoes and cheese and honey and sorghum and cherry compote suggest flavors that might be enhanced by their being atop warm fry bread. "Fry Bread is Time" presents a character from the book not seen prior to this spread. This seems to be the mother of the family and she is introduced to us with tattoos that run up her arm and onto her shoulders. Her hair is braided and she cradles a small child and the baby from the cover of the book. The character from from the cover of the book is now revealed to be another older child and not a matriarch which suggests different levels of roles and responsibilities within this group of characters enjoying fry bread. We readers are invited to a type of gathering. Noble Mallaird intimates the fry bread is common fare for "supper or dinner" or "powwows and festivals." The reader is able to see this traditional bread as suitable for daily and celebratory use and eating. FRY BREAD: A NATIVE AMERICAN FAMILY STORY takes a turn now from the kitchen to the idea of fry bread as an art wherein our group of children now observe and take part in traditional art forms centered on fry bread. Basket weaving and doll making are featured here. For this reader, it is as though author and illustrator wanted to assure that the readers were part of the making, baking and eating (being fed) before advancing into the back part and back matter of the book. "Fry Bread is History" present elders (a woman and a man) who are depicted as though they are presenting a history. The motherly elder now cradles the baby while the fatherly elder leans upon a walking stick, eyes upon the suggested drawings that are being created by the woman's words. The children listen attentively to a story woven: "The long walk, the stolen land/Strangers in our own world/With unknown food/We made new recipes/from what we had."There is concern and wonder depicted upon the faces of the five young people taking in the tale and it struck me that this is what we might look like when we are first made aware of a history we were not brought to by way of our instruction. That the elders present this story is an important piece of this books multigenerational approach. The author presents Fry Bread is a Place and continues with "Fry Bread is a Nation" wherein the end papers now present as a sort of wall to which the mother and father characters point the children. That the end papers are now integrated into the book as feature artwork centers the importance of the "hundreds and hundreds of tribes" that might be shared and celebrated in the children's literature we select, shelve, and share. Toward the very end of the book, all characters come together in "Fry Bread is Us." Suggestions of those not with us in the composite are seen in a character holding a black and white picture of another character we do not meet. We have down-cast closed eyes here in two of our First Nations characters, one of the mother and the other our senior elder, but these depictions seem to be more in the savoring of a moment than their not being a part of that moment in each and every way sensory. "Fry Bread is You" invites the reader to commune at least by way of being a part of the book. The back matter of the book celebrated by reviews includes the author's recipe for fry bread along with more information underneath the titles of the spreads throughout the book. FRY BREAD: A NATIVE AMERICAN FAMILY STORY is an essential book as inclusion within larger units focusing on Native American History and Culture. What's more, a setting that includes a Foods or a Family and Consumer Sciences course could craft and bake its own fry bread as a means of looking into and communing with a culture and tradition. Family. History. Heritage. Traditions. Moments. Stories. This books pulls all of this together and makes suggestion that we, too, can be a part. Inclusion is the heart of this book as much as inclusion and integration of ingredients are necessary to make bread. Reading and the sharing of stories is how we break that bread and Fry Bread brings us to a table where we can begin to listen and to share from our collective experiences. I am so happy that the publishers wanted to send me a finished copy of this book for review. Even if I missed something in the midst of reading and reviewing, I bring this book to you now so that we can share together what we see. Author and illustrator come together to create a book I know we will see during award season this year.
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  • Jillian Heise
    January 1, 1970
    I am utterly enamored with this upcoming picture book from debut author Kevin Noble Maillard (Enrolled Seminole Nation Okla.) & a favorite illustrator, Juana Martinez Neal!! 🧡 Beautifully written & lovingly told in both words and illustrations. 🧡 Plus SO MUCH back matter to dive into that will provide perspective and historical context that is valuable for every classroom and library. A must-read, must-share.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful book! The celebration of fry bread as food, as history, as community and as tradition in the story of American Indians is embedded and extolled throughout this special book. I especially love the recipe and the back matter author, Kevin Maillard shares as it connect his writing and explains the deeper meaning and connection to Native people.Juana Martinez-Neal does an exquisite job of illustrating this book. Her thoughtful attention to detail bridges customs from past to pr Beautiful book! The celebration of fry bread as food, as history, as community and as tradition in the story of American Indians is embedded and extolled throughout this special book. I especially love the recipe and the back matter author, Kevin Maillard shares as it connect his writing and explains the deeper meaning and connection to Native people.Juana Martinez-Neal does an exquisite job of illustrating this book. Her thoughtful attention to detail bridges customs from past to present in a thoughtful and beautiful way.
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  • DaNae
    January 1, 1970
    A celebration of culture.
  • Wendy Gardiner
    January 1, 1970
    Don't miss the outstanding backmatter
  • Lauren Kell
    January 1, 1970
    This was an absolutely beautiful book about family and community that focuses around fry bread, a Native American food with origins in colonial-induced deprivations in the last 150 years. This book was so warm and cozy and inviting. Maillard presented fry bread as something that is both common across tribes as well as unique to each tribe. The inclusion of every federally and state-recognized tribe in the US, as well as some groups that haven't managed to be officially recognized, in the end pap This was an absolutely beautiful book about family and community that focuses around fry bread, a Native American food with origins in colonial-induced deprivations in the last 150 years. This book was so warm and cozy and inviting. Maillard presented fry bread as something that is both common across tribes as well as unique to each tribe. The inclusion of every federally and state-recognized tribe in the US, as well as some groups that haven't managed to be officially recognized, in the end papers as well as in the story itself was so beautiful and really emphasizes the breadth of diversity that still lives on among Native Americans today. They are not a monolith nor are they extinct and Fry Bread does an amazing job of celebrating both of those facts. Definitely don't miss the author's note at the end, which provides some personal context from Maillard about his relationship to fry bread as well as some historical and contemporary context for some of the images and ideas present in the book. This was such a well-crafted book that I simply cannot recommend it highly enough.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I think I would use this book in kindergarten to line up with the social studies standard comparing family traditions. This book could be used among others to share different family traditions. To integrate writing students could write about an important family tradition they have, or a tradition they would like to make up so that this is inclusive for students with diverse family backgrounds. Students could practice writing and following recipes (maybe a friendship snack mix?). There is also a I think I would use this book in kindergarten to line up with the social studies standard comparing family traditions. This book could be used among others to share different family traditions. To integrate writing students could write about an important family tradition they have, or a tradition they would like to make up so that this is inclusive for students with diverse family backgrounds. Students could practice writing and following recipes (maybe a friendship snack mix?). There is also a sensory approach to this story which would be interesting to explore with students through reading and writing activities.
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  • Lorie Barber
    January 1, 1970
    I can only give 5? I spent over an hour with this exquisite picture book. It feels more like two books in one, actually, as the back matter is so extensive and matches each page. From the jacket to the casing to each page, the art is spectacular. It’s clear that this book is one where the illustrator and author collaborated more than normal, and it shows.I cannot wait to share this book with my students, who are starting to gain an informed understanding that Indigenous People in this coun I can only give 5? I spent over an hour with this exquisite picture book. It feels more like two books in one, actually, as the back matter is so extensive and matches each page. From the jacket to the casing to each page, the art is spectacular. It’s clear that this book is one where the illustrator and author collaborated more than normal, and it shows.I cannot wait to share this book with my students, who are starting to gain an informed understanding that Indigenous People in this country are so much more than a single story or a supremacist stereotype.
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  • C.E. G
    January 1, 1970
    There's a lot of detail in the art and telling and design of this book that was just so smart! I loved:*The end pages of the book are decorated with a list of both recognized and unrecognized tribes.*Instead of acknowledgments/thanks at the end of the book, the names of the people he's thanking are tucked into the art within the story.*Racially diverse indigenous family, showing a range of hair textures and skin colors.*The final pages were really thoughtful and inf There's a lot of detail in the art and telling and design of this book that was just so smart! I loved:*The end pages of the book are decorated with a list of both recognized and unrecognized tribes.*Instead of acknowledgments/thanks at the end of the book, the names of the people he's thanking are tucked into the art within the story.*Racially diverse indigenous family, showing a range of hair textures and skin colors.*The final pages were really thoughtful and informative. A standout picture book.
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  • Lisa Momblanco
    January 1, 1970
    We loved this new book about fry bread from the Native American perspective. We had many good class discussions about Native Americans and their history in the US. We loved thinking about how fry bread united people from many Native American tribes across the country and across time. We related it to traditions in our own families. The pictures in this book were a nice match to the great wording in the books. My students were able to pick out the similes and strong word choice.
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  • Dierric Rogers
    January 1, 1970
    Fry bread is food...fry bread is time...fry bread is art...fry bread is everything. This Native American story of family, friends, and neighbors coming together to continue the tradition of making fry bread is also the story of history - the smell, the sound, the voices. This is what makes fry bread a part of Native American culture, bringing us together as one whole. Beautiful pencil illustrations that brings the story to life.
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  • Laura Harrison
    January 1, 1970
    Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story by Kevin Noble Maillard and illustrated by Juana Martinez-Neal is one of my favorite books of 2019. It should be getting more attention. The book is about a modern Native American family. This is the author's first picture book. He is an enrolled citizen of the Seminole Nation. The illustrations are the best that Juana Martinez-Neal has ever created. It is a stunning picture book and a true Caldecott 2020 contender.
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  • Ami Pendley
    January 1, 1970
    Dr. Debbie Reese called this book exquisite and that’s exactly the right word. Everything is perfect: the endpapers with the names of tribes and nations including those who have been denied federal recognition, the gorgeous case cover, the back matter, the beautiful illustrations, and the story. Absolutely exquisite.
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  • Dylan Teut
    January 1, 1970
    If I was asked what I loved the most about FRY BREAD, would it be @noblemaillard's crafty language? Would it be @juanamartinez's best illustrations yet? Would it be the fascinating back matter? Would it be the power of all of the above? Yes. Absolutely incredible. A treasure. (And I want to go make some fry bread, now.....)
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  • Kyle
    January 1, 1970
    So many wonderful things about this book from the illustrations to the words. The art, acrylics, colored pencils, and graphite on hand-textured paper is beautiful and greatly enhanced the words bringing them very much alive. The words day so much about fry bread, culture, family, traditions and love. Great book.
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  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    This is an incredible book. It not only shows community and love, but has endpages that list the tribal nations of what is now the U.S. The back matter includes a recipe for fry bread, as well as in-depth information about each of the pages in the story. I think every elementary school and public library should have a copy.
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  • Art
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn't love this book any more. It is gorgeous and entertaining and educational -- all at once. For anyone who wants to know more about native people and our close and complex relationship with frybread, grab this book.
  • E.
    January 1, 1970
    Heard about this book on NPR the other day so I ordered it, as we don't have any contemporary Native American stories in our son's library. The book just arrived, and I haven't read it to him yet, but I look forward to doing so. And then also following the recipe!
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Super fantastic. What a great story and way to learn about a different culture. I like the explanation notes and references. The illustrations are wonderful. This reminds me of the Mooncake book. Love the picture under the cover.
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This is just beautiful!
  • Krysta
    January 1, 1970
    Each spread focuses on a different theme like family, history, etc. The descriptions are general, so the back matter provides detailed information on what fry bread is, its history, etc.
  • Sam
    January 1, 1970
    This is fabulous. Must add to any library collection. Great read for a storytime. Makes you hungry though so...good luck. Extensive endnotes for further study if used as part of a school project.
  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    I see you.
  • Bethany Olson
    January 1, 1970
    Such a fun, repetitive-styled story! Really great, informational back matter + a recipe for fry bread!
  • Kayla
    January 1, 1970
    This was a great book! It was very informative. I had never heard of fry bread. I also learned a lot about Native Americans. The illustrations in this book were great as well.
  • Adria Goetz
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so beautiful and warm and will reeeeally make you crave fry bread.
  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful Native american history.
  • Kristina Jean Lareau
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeous illustrations and verse tell the story about fry bread and its place in Native American culture. With lots of notes and information, I cannot recommend this book highly enough!
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